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Regional Boards => Mountain West => Topic started by: andy3175 on May 10, 2015, 11:54:29 PM

Title: Tucson Freeways
Post by: andy3175 on May 10, 2015, 11:54:29 PM
Starting a thread on Tucson highways and freeways, of which there are only 2 Interstate-grade freeways (I-10 and I-19). This article discusses the plans for Aviation Parkway (AZ 210) and the Sonoran Corridor in SE Tucson, but it also mentions the potential need for a crosstown freeway traveling from east to west across Tucson. Opinions in the article naturally extend in favor and opposition to considering such a route, which would be a $3B endeavor according to the article.

http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com/story/28939827/traffic-troubles-does-tucson-need-a-crosstown-freeway

Quote
As Tucson's population grows, what plans are in place for crosstown roads to cut down your commute? We've debated potential ideas for decades, and though past proposals for crosstown freeways, parkways, or even outer loops have failed, questions remain. As the city of Tucson expands east, how will our road system change with it? ...

Clearly the thought isn't new, so why don't we have an east to west route yet?

We saw a proposal for a crosstown parkway in 1984, as well as ideas for a loop around the city in the late 1980s and early 1990s. In these cases, it came down to a lack of money and designs were defeated at the ballot box.

According to the Arizona Department of Transportation and Regional Transportation Authority, it would cost more than $3 billion to build an actual crosstown freeway now. ...

tate Route 210, also known as Aviation Parkway, will eventually change for commuters. Currently, it spans from Golf Links Road west of South Swan Road on the east side to the eastern edge of downtown Tucson at East Broadway Boulevard.

ADOT is starting Phase 2 of a traffic study which includes expansion of the parkway. The parkway could eventually go all the way to I-10 on the west side, while the eastern extension has yet to be planned. ADOT officials say this would really make a difference for drivers.

"This would relieve a lot of traffic on I-10 that is heading to downtown Tucson," Krugel said. "Because they would have another option to get downtown by taking State Route 210, which would be a free-flowing highway."

They have money set aside now for the right of way fees, but no design or construction fees are designated, which means any kind of change here is still years away.

Plans are also in place for The Sonoran Corridor. Once built, this road will connect I-19 at Pima Mine Road to I-10 at Rita Road, easing congestion around Raytheon's facilities. It should cut about 20 minutes out of the southeast side commute, according to Pima County officials. ...

The Sonoran Corridor will also connect traffic from about 18 roads in the area with about 304,025 cars traveling on them, according to Raytheon and Pima Association of Governments.

"We're attempting to find ways to make sure we minimize congestion at the crossings, which is where the two come together," Pima County Director of Strategic Planning John Moffatt said. "As well as divert traffic and also make it easier to get to work."

Designs for this corridor are slightly further along and they should have it built in the next five to 10 years. The expected cost exceeds $600 million. The county will initially build this as a surface street, but Moffatt tells me they are ultimately looking at a four-lane highway design.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: nexus73 on May 11, 2015, 12:57:57 AM
Funny to think that I see so many local/regional tax increases pass in California where congestion is Obvious with a capital O but a growing place like Tucson can't be bothered with building the needed infrastructure as well as paying the piper.  It looks like all that can be done is to let things get so bad that the people scream for ice cream, then they'll be ready to pay.  Those "pay me now or pay me later" commercials must not have resonated with the people who live in the only walled city in the US of A. 

Rick
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: dfwmapper on May 11, 2015, 03:33:41 AM
Funny to think that I see so many local/regional tax increases pass in California where congestion is Obvious with a capital O but a growing place like Tucson can't be bothered with building the needed infrastructure as well as paying the piper.  It looks like all that can be done is to let things get so bad that the people scream for ice cream, then they'll be ready to pay.  Those "pay me now or pay me later" commercials must not have resonated with the people who live in the only walled city in the US of A. 

Rick
Pima County did pass a 1/2 cent sales tax increase in 2006 to pay for transportation. It has funded hundreds of projects including widening of many roads, building of new interchanges on I-10, eliminating at-grade rail crossings, improving bus service, and the streetcar line that opened last year. But please, continue telling us about how they refuse to pay.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: nexus73 on May 11, 2015, 10:39:56 AM
Funny to think that I see so many local/regional tax increases pass in California where congestion is Obvious with a capital O but a growing place like Tucson can't be bothered with building the needed infrastructure as well as paying the piper.  It looks like all that can be done is to let things get so bad that the people scream for ice cream, then they'll be ready to pay.  Those "pay me now or pay me later" commercials must not have resonated with the people who live in the only walled city in the US of A. 

Rick
Pima County did pass a 1/2 cent sales tax increase in 2006 to pay for transportation. It has funded hundreds of projects including widening of many roads, building of new interchanges on I-10, eliminating at-grade rail crossings, improving bus service, and the streetcar line that opened last year. But please, continue telling us about how they refuse to pay.

"We saw a proposal for a crosstown parkway in 1984, as well as ideas for a loop around the city in the late 1980s and early 1990s. In these cases, it came down to a lack of money and designs were defeated at the ballot box."

Satisfied?

Rick
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Henry on May 11, 2015, 12:54:09 PM
Due to the fact that the I-710 proposal was shot down decades ago and Tucson's anti-freeway sentiment, I find it hard to believe that any freeway proposals have come about since then.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Sonic99 on May 13, 2015, 02:46:24 AM
Tucson is very "anti-Phoenix", and they see freeways and loop systems is trying to turn Tucson into Phoenix. It's more of an arrogance problem, enhanced by the rivalry between ASU and Tucson Community College (aka U of A). I lived there for a time in the late 90's and have met people since then from Tucson, and they really despise Phoenix and anything associated with it.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: nexus73 on May 13, 2015, 10:23:48 AM
Tucson is very "anti-Phoenix", and they see freeways and loop systems is trying to turn Tucson into Phoenix. It's more of an arrogance problem, enhanced by the rivalry between ASU and Tucson Community College (aka U of A). I lived there for a time in the late 90's and have met people since then from Tucson, and they really despise Phoenix and anything associated with it.

Thanks for explaining the rivalry aspects Sonic.  Another one in the west exists in Idaho.  You're either a Boise person or a rest of the state person is what I have heard.  Tucson Community College...LOL!

Rick
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Henry on May 13, 2015, 10:31:14 AM
Tucson is very "anti-Phoenix", and they see freeways and loop systems is trying to turn Tucson into Phoenix. It's more of an arrogance problem, enhanced by the rivalry between ASU and Tucson Community College (aka U of A). I lived there for a time in the late 90's and have met people since then from Tucson, and they really despise Phoenix and anything associated with it.

Thanks for explaining the rivalry aspects Sonic.  Another one in the west exists in Idaho.  You're either a Boise person or a rest of the state person is what I have heard.  Tucson Community College...LOL!

Rick
I had to laugh at that Tucson Community College statement! I'm told that Seattle and Spokane don't like each other either. And then there are the examples from the bigger states, such as Los Angeles-San Francisco and Dallas-Houston, which are there for more obvious reasons.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on May 13, 2015, 04:27:45 PM
One thing that I wonder is that once logo signs are installed on the Tucson area freeways, I wonder if there will be heavy opposition.  There hasn't been much opposition for them in Phoenix (most people that I spoke to in person support them), but I have this feeling that many Tucson area residents (and possibly the City of Tucson government) will be in opposition to them since they might think it clutters up their freeways.  After all, Tucson often tries to do everything the opposite of Phoenix.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: NE2 on May 13, 2015, 06:13:54 PM
Tucson will demand the Parclo B4 if they get logo signs.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: swbrotha100 on May 13, 2015, 11:18:51 PM
Tucson takes way too long just to widen existing roads. Forget about a new freeway or parkway. I would love to see the mentality change there, but I'll believe it when I see it.

There is one good thing going on there. Many of the interchanges on I-10 NW of Prince Road are due to be redone. Most will be new bridges over the freeway and parallel railroad tracks.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: corco on May 13, 2015, 11:52:23 PM
I lived in Tucson for two years (2010-2012) and commuted from Oracle and Hardy down to the university (roughly 6th and Euclid) during rush-hour three days a week. While the lack of a freeway was odd and people would whine about no freeway, traffic really wasn't that bad once you got used to it and figured out what streets to be on (1st to Orange Grove was much faster than taking Speedway to Oracle) and lane to be in and when. It might be worse going east, but coming from Oro Valley, I never saw any particular need for more road- it seemed like adding a freeway connection would be more for the sake of saying that there was a freeway than for any real reason. Having lived in places with congested freeways, I actually felt like having timed traffic lights was better and more efficient than sitting on a gridlocked freeway.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: mrsman on May 22, 2015, 01:04:41 PM
I lived in Tucson for two years (2010-2012) and commuted from Oracle and Hardy down to the university (roughly 6th and Euclid) during rush-hour three days a week. While the lack of a freeway was odd and people would whine about no freeway, traffic really wasn't that bad once you got used to it and figured out what streets to be on (1st to Orange Grove was much faster than taking Speedway to Oracle) and lane to be in and when. It might be worse going east, but coming from Oro Valley, I never saw any particular need for more road- it seemed like adding a freeway connection would be more for the sake of saying that there was a freeway than for any real reason. Having lived in places with congested freeways, I actually felt like having timed traffic lights was better and more efficient than sitting on a gridlocked freeway.

Yes, it does. Because instead of having everyone take the freeway, traffic is spread around many more arterials.  For a city that is Tucson's size, it works very well.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on May 31, 2015, 02:44:30 PM
I lived in Tucson for two years (2010-2012) and commuted from Oracle and Hardy down to the university (roughly 6th and Euclid) during rush-hour three days a week. While the lack of a freeway was odd and people would whine about no freeway, traffic really wasn't that bad once you got used to it and figured out what streets to be on (1st to Orange Grove was much faster than taking Speedway to Oracle) and lane to be in and when. It might be worse going east, but coming from Oro Valley, I never saw any particular need for more road- it seemed like adding a freeway connection would be more for the sake of saying that there was a freeway than for any real reason. Having lived in places with congested freeways, I actually felt like having timed traffic lights was better and more efficient than sitting on a gridlocked freeway.

Much of Tucson does have an efficient "gridiron" pattern, similar to Chicago and other cities, where streets are straight, run either N-S or E-W and major intersections were often placed exactly a mile apart.   As for additional freeway in the Tucson metro area, wonder why ROW was not identified and preserved along Houghton Road on the far east side, for eventual upgrading to a piece of an beltway? 
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: 707 on June 09, 2015, 07:09:39 AM
Seems ADOT didn't give up on the idea of Freeway upgrades for years.

http://azhighwaydata.com/resolutions/?syear=1927&eyear=2014&crc=3&rtnum=910&submit1=Submit

Apparently, Grant Road, Kolb Road and Valencia Road were part of a little known unsigned State Route 910 Loop. I say "were" considering all Route Logs published by ADOT in modern times don't show a SR 910 anywhere. Plus, the lack of maintenance on Grant Road speaks for itself.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: mapman1071 on June 11, 2015, 12:41:47 AM
There is a Unofficial Proposal for I-11 to create a bypass of Tucson.
Starting At I-8 West of Casa Grande, running West of I-10 South along a Kinney Road Alinement to Valencia Road then East on a Valencia Road to I-10 (With a Branch to Tucson International Airport) 
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: SignGeek101 on June 11, 2015, 12:58:43 AM
Are those button copy signs on I-19 still there? Seems like ADOT has postponed any sign projects on that route. It'll be interesting to see what they install when a sign inevitably falls over or becomes unreadable.

Anyone know the status on that?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on June 19, 2015, 04:40:55 AM
Yes they were.  Traveled in that area - just south of the newer I-10 / I-19 interchange around the end of March.  Kilometer signage as well - very faded.   Wish it was not as hard as heck to post some pics on this site, would be neat to share.   Btw there is still button copy on the Black Canyon freeway inside Phoenix city limits, also.   A lot better than this modern crap, "clearview" that is.   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: swbrotha100 on June 22, 2015, 06:41:34 PM
According to this link, it looks like the current western end of SR 210 (Aviation Highway) would be extended with an at-grade intersection with Broadway Blvd:

http://downtownlinks.info/app/uploads/2014/04/BroadwayIntersection-ThroughMovements_8_2013.pdf

At least there are still plans for a true freeway segment at its east end, if/when it gets connected to I-10 in southeast Tucson.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: SignGeek101 on June 22, 2015, 07:18:38 PM
Wish it was not as hard as heck to post some pics on this site, would be neat to share.

Here:

Post the link of the image. To do that, (on Chrome), right click on the image, and left click 'open image in new tab'. Then go to that tab, copy the link, and paste it in your post.

Example:

http://i1291.photobucket.com/albums/b551/slik_sh00ter/I5South_zpsxmpxxnpt.png

Then, highlight the link, and click the "Image" button in the menu you see when you are typing a post. It is found below the 'bold' button and above the smilies.

Your link will have the image tags pasted around it. The first one at the beginning of the link, and the last one at the end.

(http://i1291.photobucket.com/albums/b551/slik_sh00ter/I5South_zpsxmpxxnpt.png)

If the picture is on your computer, upload it to a photo sharing site such as imgur or photobucket. Then follow the instructions above.

There should be a thread on how to share pictures on here...
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: andy3175 on July 14, 2015, 12:16:29 AM
There should be a thread on how to share pictures on here...

Yes, please see https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=9821.0 for a brief explanation on how to do it.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on July 30, 2015, 09:36:16 PM
I wonder, will ADOT eventually expand its travel times program to the Tucson area?  Starting this week in the Phoenix area, the travel times are now shown at all times (including weekends) except during overnight hours.  I don't think Tucson is too small of a city, since NMDOT in Albuquerque (a similarly sized metro area) posts travel times on the DMS installed there.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: corco on July 30, 2015, 11:14:55 PM
http://www.city-data.com/forum/tucson/2418087-will-adot-bring-its-travel-times.html
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: jakeroot on August 01, 2015, 03:04:38 PM
I wonder, will ADOT eventually expand its travel times program to the Tucson area?

Hmm. Probably. Why not?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on August 01, 2015, 04:21:23 PM
I wonder, will ADOT eventually expand its travel times program to the Tucson area?

Hmm. Probably. Why not?

Well, almost everybody knows that most Tucson residents are opposed to building new freeways.  Since there has to be an extensive ITS network available in order to display travel times, I wouldn't surprised if Tucson residents are also opposed to their taxpayer money being spent on improving the ITS network on Tucson area freeways.  After all, Tucson is the anti-Phoenix.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: jakeroot on August 01, 2015, 06:53:43 PM
...I wouldn't surprised if Tucson residents are also opposed to their taxpayer money being spent on improving the ITS network on Tucson area freeways.  After all, Tucson is the anti-Phoenix.

A small signs on the side of the road will not cause people to light pitchforks. Seriously, the cost is minimal, and no one knows what ITS stands for. Your creating a false sense of reality.

(https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5471/18836997815_6b80f3854c_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on August 01, 2015, 09:39:01 PM

A small signs on the side of the road will not cause people to light pitchforks. Seriously, the cost is minimal, and no one knows what ITS stands for. Your creating a false sense of reality.


There is more than just the costs of the signs themselves.  To measure travel times, there needs to be a network of in-road sensors and/or cameras, which adds to the costs.  Most Tucson exits have at least CCTV cameras, however, I am not sure if they have in-road sensors.

BTW ADOT actually displays its travel times on its overhead dynamic message signs, rather than static signs with small LED panels like the one you posted.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Rothman on August 01, 2015, 09:57:44 PM
It's not the amount of the cost of running/implementing ITS that is the problem.  If Arizona is like a lot of other states, they're seeing funding for operations constrained, especially since the three-year rule for using CM/AQ funds for ITS operations is now fizzling out.

At least in NY, ITS and other operations have sort of become orphan children that are really only grudgingly being taken care of out of funds for capital projects since that is becoming the way to fund them.

So, if AZ is in a similar situation, I can see opposition internally causing ITS systems to resist expansion.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: corco on August 01, 2015, 11:00:46 PM
Honestly, it's technology that is clearly intended to be obsolete within 15-20 years (when everybody's phone and/or car will be able to provide them with this same information), so even if costs are low there's not too much sense in making it a priority.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Buffaboy on October 31, 2015, 03:13:06 PM
Somehow I found myself looking at Tucson on Google Maps, and WOW, even for cities that a big and don't have many highways cutting through them, Tucson appears very disconnected! I'd have to imagine though that people there aren't clamoring for beltways because of the eminent domain that would come with it and because all of the services they need are where they live presently.

I think about it now however, and this is kind of how Buffalo works. As someone said, traffic is spread around the arterials more than the highways. At the same time, at least we have a semi beltway, arterials and wide roads.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: swbrotha100 on October 31, 2015, 07:25:18 PM
Somehow I found myself looking at Tucson on Google Maps, and WOW, even for cities that a big and don't have many highways cutting through them, Tucson appears very disconnected! I'd have to imagine though that people there aren't clamoring for beltways because of the eminent domain that would come with it and because all of the services they need are where they live presently.

I think about it now however, and this is kind of how Buffalo works. As someone said, traffic is spread around the arterials more than the highways. At the same time, at least we have a semi beltway, arterials and wide roads.

The Tucson area relies mostly on its grid system of major roads to move people around. The best people in the area can hope for (at least for now) is to widen some of the major roads to 4-lane or 6-lane divided arterials. The county (Pima County) has been doing the bulk of that work in recent years.

Here's a link to the RTA, responsible for most of the big road projects in the Tucson/Pima County area recently:

http://www.rtamobility.com/

A grade-separated intersection recently was finished in Tucson: Kino Pkwy going over 22nd St.

https://www.tucsonaz.gov/tdot/announcement/kino-parkway-and-22nd-street

Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: The Ghostbuster on November 03, 2015, 04:40:41 PM
I read on wikipedia about possible extensions of the Aviation Highway (State Highway 210) being extended on both ends. The western extension had very strong opposition towards it. Are any extension plans for Aviation Highway now dead, or merely postponed?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: swbrotha100 on November 03, 2015, 06:19:31 PM
I read on wikipedia about possible extensions of the Aviation Highway (State Highway 210) being extended on both ends. The western extension had very strong opposition towards it. Are any extension plans for Aviation Highway now dead, or merely postponed?

Aviation Highway/AZ 210 may happen, but slowly. Some links are below for each potential project.

City of Tucson project (I-10 to Broadway Blvd)
http://downtownlinks.info/

ADOT project (Golf Links/Alvernon to I-10)
http://azdot.gov/projects/south-central/i-10-and-sr-210-feasibility-study
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: andy3175 on December 06, 2015, 01:50:50 AM
Now we know that the Sonoran Corridor is proposed as Arizona State Route 410 and is a Congressional High Priority Corridor:

http://www.yourwestvalley.com/nation_world/article_690c7cac-9adf-11e5-b5d8-a7c091752953.html

Quote
The Sonoran Corridor will run along the planned State Route 410 in Pima County, connecting I-19 and I-10 by passing south of Tucson International Airport.

At 16 miles, the Sonoran Corridor is expected to shorten the average truck driving time by 20 minutes for shipments moving between Mexico and points to the east and provide an estimated $30,000 in total truck cost savings per day. It will enhance connections with other major interstate highways along with established routes and ports of entry to Mexico, Arizona’s major partner for trade and commerce. These daily time savings add up to tremendous overall savings along these major trade corridors. The Sonoran Corridor will be located within a planned aerospace, defense and technology business and research park.

http://tucson.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/county-report-sonoran-corridor-would-have-b-impact/article_8e4a9e31-2799-52f6-87bc-f902f9cd4fa8.html

Link to Sonoran Corridor Study: http://tucson.com/sonoran-corridor-report/pdf_bab037ce-7d61-58cd-9a4e-cbc6537d1ff8.html

Quote
The Pima County-commissioned report by Phoenix-based Applied Economics estimates a Sonoran Corridor bypass connecting the two interstates south of Tucson International Airport would eventually create a $32.2 billion annual impact to the regional economy. ...

County leaders have proposed construction of a 26-mile connection between I-10 and I-19 as a bypass primarily for northbound I-19 and westbound I-10 drivers, especially commercial vehicles.

The Sonoran Corridor would run roughly from Rita Road on the southeast side to about Pima Mine Road south of Tucson through areas with little existing development.

Huckelberry said bond funding would make up only a small fraction of the total cost of the corridor, which is estimated at more than $600 million. ...

The county’s analysis says the possible business expansion associated with the Sonoran Corridor project among three main employment segments would directly and indirectly support as many 189,000 jobs.

As many as 104,000 people could work directly for tenant companies in the bypass corridor at build-out. Those workers would earn an estimated $5.2 billion, or $50,000 per worker, annually.

Huckelberry said the large figures show the possible impacts many years down the road, assuming the highway project gets completed and businesses relocate to the area.

That’s a lot of assumptions, says Avra Valley resident Albert Lannon.

“It’s based on assumptions, projections and what ifs,” Lannon said. “I think it’s pure speculation.”

He’s been a vocal opponent of the $816 million bond package before voters in November and has opposed plans for interstate expansions, including the proposed Interstate 11 plan through Avra Valley. ...

Real estate investor Don Diamond‘s company — Diamond Ventures — has for many years owned a 3,000-acre section of undeveloped land southeast of the airport.

The company has a master-planned community proposal for the land called Swan Southlands.

Lannon said the proposed highway route would benefit the company.

“Dropping it south looks like a gift to Don Diamond,” he said, noting the highway would run west from Rita Road then drop sharply south before turning west north of Pima Mine Road.

Huckelberry said the proposed alignment was not chosen to benefit any private landowners.

“It’s a location that we’ve worked with the San Xavier district (of the Tohono O’odham Nation) to minimize the impacts,” Huckleberry said.

A straight east-west connection starting at Rita Road would end up running through areas of archaeological significance to the tribe. A similar east-west alignment farther south would run through areas in the southeast known for widespread flooding.

Another article talked about a November 2015 ballot measure to fund multiple projects in Pima County, including the Sonoran Corridor/AZ 410. The following article talks about the need for a freeway connection to Tucson Intl Airport, Raytheon, the Port of Tucson, and University of Arizona Tech Park

http://tucson.com/news/opinion/steve-kozachik-give-voters-nd-crack-at-sonoran-corridor/article_ba304a36-10ab-5a04-bcd3-205e650756cc.html

Quote
On Nov. 3, the voters said “no” to a package of 99 proposed Pima County bond projects. Some of them were “nice to haves” and others were key to our long-term economic development. The Sonoran Corridor falls into the latter category.

The Sonoran Corridor is the connection of I-10 and I-19, out by Raytheon and the Tucson International Airport. The county bond was our $30 million match to the full $600 million price tag that our federal delegation has included in the Federal Transportation package. The project is more than simply a convenience for the traveling public.

The completion of the corridor will be the catalyst for several very important economic generators. And it will preserve some of those that we already have in place. ...

The voters said “no” to all seven bond questions, valued at more than $800 million. The Sonoran Corridor was included in the $200 million road package. Many, including me, thought that if any of the questions were going to pass, roads would be the one. Unfortunately, we were wrong.

I believe the long-term impact of our turning down the corridor is too important to not pull out as a separate item, and this time do the educational work we failed to do in round one. In fairness, the way the bond package was presented, the voters never had the option to say “yes” to this critical project.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: swbrotha100 on December 06, 2015, 02:17:02 PM
Arizona SR 410...interesting that the Tucson area and Pima County seem to always propose numbers that make some sense. Some of the state route numbers in the Phoenix area (not including the loops) seem to be pretty random.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: The Ghostbuster on December 07, 2015, 03:17:32 PM
Does the "no" vote mean SR 410 will not be constructed?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: 707 on January 06, 2016, 12:11:44 AM
Does the "no" vote mean SR 410 will not be constructed?

I'm thinking you're right... Damn it.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: jakeroot on January 06, 2016, 01:16:51 AM
Does the "no" vote mean SR 410 will not be constructed?

I'm thinking you're right... Damn it.

Why are you online, 707? You should be out getting minted.  ;-)
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on January 10, 2016, 08:14:21 PM
It looks like Tucson does in fact now have travel times on two signs.  One of them on is on I-10 eastbound, which shows travel times to I-19/Valencia and I-10/Alvernon, while the other is on I-19 southbound displaying travel time to Valencia.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: 707 on January 12, 2016, 01:31:29 AM
For a while, it seems there was a SR 110 in planning around 1998 which would have supplanted Grant Road and Kolb Road from I-10 exits 256 to 270. I have no idea if this would have been a freeway, but here it is nonetheless:

http://www.azdot.gov/docs/planning/98hwylogreport.pdf?sfvrsn=4

Other likely proposed freeways are mentioned as follows:

SR 489
SR 589
SR 810
SR 910
SR 982
SR 983
SR 989

From what I've gathered, only SR 989 ever existed and never was a freeway. It was a short state maintained "spur" which consisted of less than three miles of Tangerine Road west of SR 77 (old US 89/US 80), because of a large bridge over a wash the county wanted the state to maintain. I don't believe it was ever signed either.

I think almost everyone here knows about the never-was-built I-710. Though to some degree, it shows its original proposal with the new 22nd Street interchange they built on Kino Parkway. Not sure if anyone else knows, but for a while, they were planning on bulldozing through downtown to build an SR 210 freeway from Broadway to I-10. Instead, they've settled on the "Downtown Links" proposal after much protesting and compromising with Tucson locals.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: coatimundi on January 21, 2016, 03:40:51 PM
I lived in Tucson for several years in the 2000's and would periodically see mentions of pipe-dream freeway proposals in the local paper. "Pipe-dream" because new construction of anything, let alone roads, is very difficult in Tucson because of the resistance to encroachment on environmentally sensitive areas. I recall, years ago, they had a map of freeway proposals, including one that ran along Sahuarita Road to create a mini loop from I-19 to I-10. The Interstate 11 proposals (http://tucson.com/business/local/tucson-may-see-another-interstate/article_826cbc8a-059d-5e30-b25e-613adc5e6a7d.html) also fueled the idea of putting a freeway down Sandario Road. That latter one was obviously just someone looking at that line on a map and saying "That looks like a good spot." It's unreasonable if you anything about the area and the people that live off of that road, especially in Picture Rocks.
Personally though, I always found it extremely easy to get around in Tucson even without freeways. The lights are timed really well, the roads are generally pretty clear (except for the bottlenecks close to Downtown, but those are slowly being improved upon) outside of rush hours, and it rarely took more than about 20 minutes to get anywhere. I found it a lot easier there than driving where we moved to (Bloomington, Indiana) or where we live now (Monterey, California). The only reason to use the freeways was if you lived in one of the suburban areas that were on the freeways, like Vail, Sahuarita or Marana. I would take Aviation sometimes to reach a band rehearsal space by the power plant when I lived Downtown, but would almost never find myself on I-10 except to leave town.
Tucson will never see another freeway. I would be very surprised if even the Downtown Links/Aviation extension finishes within the next 10 years. We still go down at least once per year to visit family, and I've seen the slow, limited progress. But improvements on other arterials, particularly Grant, has been promising. You also have to realize that, with a crosstown freeway, you're most logical direction is from west - around I-10 - to east, but where would it go in the east? Tanque Verde? Tucson is walled in by land that will never be developed, so growth is not going to occur directly east of town.
Just some thoughts.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: JKRhodes on January 31, 2016, 07:49:47 AM
Sabino Canyon Road is being extended south of Tanque Verde Rd to tie in with Kolb Road north of Speedway:

https://www.tucsonaz.gov/projects/kolb-road-connection-sabino-canyon-road

I stayed in Tucson for four months last year and found this corner of town to be a mess. Traffic on Eastbound Tanque Verde waiting to turn north onto Sabino Canyon frequently backs up all the way to Grant Road, resulting in another queue on Grant Road stacking up almost all the way to Wilmot Road during rush hour.

This will be a very nice, welcome fix when Eastbound Grant no longer has to share Tanque Verde with Northbound Kolb to get to Sabino Canyon.

I'm also interested to see what studies have been done on extending Camp Lowell to Sabino Canyon. Especially now that River is tied into Alvernon; it appears the remainder of River Road likely won't be improved.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: coatimundi on February 02, 2016, 11:44:38 AM
When we went back this past October, I went out to Sabino Canyon for a quick hike and rolled by this project site. I never get out to this area when we're in town, just because I have no reason to be out there. They've been talking about this since the RTA proposal vote, and it kept coming back up throughout the years in articles. I expected some progress, but it looked exactly the same as it did ten years ago. Since it's new ROW and creates a new wash crossing, the environmental impact is potentially a lot higher, so I understand them being careful with it, but I'm surprised the rich people who live up Sabino Canyon Road haven't thrown their weight around more on this and gotten it prioritized.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: coatimundi on February 02, 2016, 11:52:05 AM
I'm also interested to see what studies have been done on extending Camp Lowell to Sabino Canyon. Especially now that River is tied into Alvernon; it appears the remainder of River Road likely won't be improved.

Both the River Road improvements and the Camp Lowell extension are unfeasible because of who lives along them. They went through a good amount of hassle to get Camp Lowell to Swan in the first place (article (http://tucsoncitizen.com/morgue2/2000/08/22/229120-controversial-fort-lowell-extension-opens-today/)).
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: swbrotha100 on February 03, 2016, 07:53:52 PM
Sabino Canyon Road is being extended south of Tanque Verde Rd to tie in with Kolb Road north of Speedway:

https://www.tucsonaz.gov/projects/kolb-road-connection-sabino-canyon-road

I stayed in Tucson for four months last year and found this corner of town to be a mess. Traffic on Eastbound Tanque Verde waiting to turn north onto Sabino Canyon frequently backs up all the way to Grant Road, resulting in another queue on Grant Road stacking up almost all the way to Wilmot Road during rush hour.

This will be a very nice, welcome fix when Eastbound Grant no longer has to share Tanque Verde with Northbound Kolb to get to Sabino Canyon.

I'm also interested to see what studies have been done on extending Camp Lowell to Sabino Canyon. Especially now that River is tied into Alvernon; it appears the remainder of River Road likely won't be improved.


The Grant/Tanque Verde/Kolb intersection was proposed many years ago to be rebuilt as a grade-separated interchange. Of course, this being Tucson, it never happened. If there was ever a place that needed a leading left signal (or an extended left turn signal in one direction), it would be for traffic going from eastbound Grant to eastbound Tanque Verde.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: JKRhodes on February 03, 2016, 09:06:31 PM


Both the River Road improvements and the Camp Lowell extension are unfeasible because of who lives along them. They went through a good amount of hassle to get Camp Lowell to Swan in the first place (article (http://tucsoncitizen.com/morgue2/2000/08/22/229120-controversial-fort-lowell-extension-opens-today/)).
[/quote]

Coatimundi- Thank you for sharing the article. It answers a longstanding question I had about why Fort Lowell turns into Camp Lowell while the "other fort lowell" continues on a different alignment.

Somehow I'm not surprised in the least by that... Rich people, expensive ROW, political pull... and looking more closely at the map it appears a "whatever lowell" extension would require bridges over both the pantano wash and the rillito river. Not to mention cutting through the middle of a neighborhood and possibly a golf course, making an extension very tricky.

Swbrotha-- I remember that proposal! IIRC, they were going to be called "Bantam intersections" and there were a few proposed locations in addition to Kolb and Tanque Verde. At least we still get to look at the dinosaur eating the stoplight today while we wait at it for a cycle or two. :)
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on February 03, 2016, 09:09:39 PM
FYI, logo signs should be going up on I-10 starting sometime next month.  The first phase will include most exits from Tangerine Road in Marana to 22nd Street in Downtown Tucson, followed by 6th Avenue near Downtown Tucson to Wilmont Road in southeastern Tucson in April. 

Interestingly, the Tangerine exit in Marana actually has a text sign without any logos with the word "CAMPING" in the center, along with a small sign at the ramp with the "Camping" tent symbol on it.  I wonder if the campground at that exit (A Bar A RV Park) doesn't sign up for a logo sign, will those existing general service signs be retained?  It is actually surprising logo signs were never installed in that part of Marana, since that exit is still way out in the boonies.  If they do sign up for a logo sign, they could simply convert the existing text sign into a logo sign by covering the word "CAMPING" in the center of the sign with blueout, and rivet on a logo and a plaque with the word at the top of the sign.

No current timeline for I-19, since the engineering study hasn't been completed yet.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on March 30, 2016, 03:11:57 PM
So, has anyone been to the Tucson area recently?  I wonder if the logo signs have gone up, since the first phase of installation (I-10 west of I-19) was supposed to begin this month.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: NE2 on March 30, 2016, 07:57:25 PM
HOLY CRAP PARCLO B4 LOGO SIGNS
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: swbrotha100 on March 31, 2016, 09:25:15 PM


Both the River Road improvements and the Camp Lowell extension are unfeasible because of who lives along them. They went through a good amount of hassle to get Camp Lowell to Swan in the first place (article (http://tucsoncitizen.com/morgue2/2000/08/22/229120-controversial-fort-lowell-extension-opens-today/)).

Coatimundi- Thank you for sharing the article. It answers a longstanding question I had about why Fort Lowell turns into Camp Lowell while the "other fort lowell" continues on a different alignment.

Somehow I'm not surprised in the least by that... Rich people, expensive ROW, political pull... and looking more closely at the map it appears a "whatever lowell" extension would require bridges over both the pantano wash and the rillito river. Not to mention cutting through the middle of a neighborhood and possibly a golf course, making an extension very tricky.

Swbrotha-- I remember that proposal! IIRC, they were going to be called "Bantam intersections" and there were a few proposed locations in addition to Kolb and Tanque Verde. At least we still get to look at the dinosaur eating the stoplight today while we wait at it for a cycle or two. :)
[/quote]

I lived in Tucson for awhile years ago. I still visit once in a while. I've been frustrated for years in how anything transportation related drags on for years and years. Take for example, 22nd St, between I-10 and Kino Pkwy:

https://www.tucsonaz.gov/projects/22nd-street-i-10-kino-parkway-widening

"On hold" for eternity? Who knows.

I feel that the ADOT projects in Tucson and the Pima County projects get done at a somewhat faster pace than City of Tucson projects.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: coatimundi on April 02, 2016, 04:08:51 PM
I lived in Tucson for awhile years ago. I still visit once in a while. I've been frustrated for years in how anything transportation related drags on for years and years. Take for example, 22nd St, between I-10 and Kino Pkwy:

https://www.tucsonaz.gov/projects/22nd-street-i-10-kino-parkway-widening

"On hold" for eternity? Who knows.

When the RTA bill was proposed, the east-west arterial expansions were pitched sort of as a bundle and for whatever reason, in my mind, I recall them going Grant Road, Broadway, 22nd, in that order. I don't know why I have that in my mind, but that's the way projects have gone nonetheless. 22nd Street doesn't have priority, partly because traffic flows pretty well along it, there are a number of alternate routes and - getting back to classism - the wealthier people live north of 22nd and don't use it.
The Kino overpass project was at least completed, and I believe it was completed on schedule.
I think the thing with the 22nd Street widening, especially the section west of Kino, is that it brings up the old bitterness within the near south side, mostly Latino, communities, regarding projects that require demolition. No one in Tucson forgets anything, ever, regardless of how long ago it was. Unless it turned into a good thing, like the streetcar project (people complained so much during that construction), and then it's never spoken of again.

Edit:
And I'll be back at the end of the month. We're driving from Phoenix and will probably go all the way to the Kino exit, so I'll be sure to scope out the logo signs. Maybe even get the wife to drive so I can snap some pictures.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on April 02, 2016, 05:35:35 PM

And I'll be back at the end of the month. We're driving from Phoenix and will probably go all the way to the Kino exit, so I'll be sure to scope out the logo signs. Maybe even get the wife to drive so I can snap some pictures.

The first scheduled phase of installation is on I-10 from Tangerine Road to I-19 , so I would think they would be there.  However, I wonder if GCSLS will update their website by then.

Note that the Tangerine exit actually has Camping general service signs (text signs on the freeway mainline, and small signs with the tent symbol on the ramps), but no logos.  I wonder if these will be replaced by logo signs assuming the campground at that exit decides to get a logo sign.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: 707 on April 13, 2016, 02:50:46 AM
It seems the SR 210 eventual connection to I-10 is not off the table, but more awaiting future attention when other big projects are out of the way. But when it happens, Tucson will see its first new freeway since the early 1960s. It seems one of the three proposals turn Alvernon Way into the SR 210 freeway with a few interchanges before meeting up with I-10 at a flyover interchange as per ADOT files. The other two proposals show the SR 210 freeway skirting the south perimeter of Davis Monthan AFB, then displacing Swan to I-10. The last one does a similar action, but ends up taking a winding snake like path to Wilmot Road, then displacing Wilmot to I-10. I don't know if the rest of 210 between Alvernon and Broadway will be turned into a freeway.

https://www.azdot.gov/projects/south-central/i-10-and-sr-210-feasibility-study/documents

And the unusual interchange RTA built at Kino Parkway and 22nd Street between 2011 and 2015 seems to bring out a glimpse of Kino Parkway's "What Could Have Been" past as the unbuilt I-710. It isn't freeway standard though. There is a large lack of shoulders and high curbs, as well as Bicycle Paths that cross the exit/entrance ramps. No word either on if more interchanges will be built on Kino or if the interchange with SR 210 will become a flyover. I find it odd the RTA even built one interchange on the parkway.

Also, I think we're all familiar with Interstate 11. There's a good possibility of it being a separate freeway until reaching Avra Valley, before interchanging with I-10.

Then lastly, there's the Sonoran Corridor proposal which doesn't seem to go away or get built. Residents in Sahuarita are apparently asking the state to build it across El Toro Road. There's also talk about it being funded by federal dollars.

http://tucson.com/news/business/county-report-sonoran-corridor-would-have-b-impact/article_8e4a9e31-2799-52f6-87bc-f902f9cd4fa8.html

http://www.gvnews.com/news/town-asks-for-el-toro-rd-sahuarita-be-part-of/article_8c430bf0-f5d4-11e5-bea1-af26a76f70bc.html
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on May 16, 2016, 10:41:28 AM
So, does anyone have any updates on the Tucson area logo signs?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: NE2 on May 16, 2016, 10:42:47 AM
So, does anyone have any updates on the Tucson area logo signs?
No.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: coatimundi on May 16, 2016, 01:08:27 PM
So, does anyone have any updates on the Tucson area logo signs?

Actually, yes!
I only drove eastbound I-10, but they were definitely at the Grant Road exit but not at the Speedway exit in that direction. They looked very new. Del Taco and Waffle House were on there. I seem to remember them being at Ruthrauf as well. One for Jack in the Box and, I think, the Arco.
I know you had brought up the "CAMPING" sign at Cortaro - I remember that sign and always thought it was weird that it was in all caps - and I did not see a logo sign for the campground on the eastbound side though there was a logo sign at Cortaro.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on May 16, 2016, 01:53:59 PM

Actually, yes!
I only drove eastbound I-10, but they were definitely at the Grant Road exit but not at the Speedway exit in that direction. They looked very new. Del Taco and Waffle House were on there. I seem to remember them being at Ruthrauf as well. One for Jack in the Box and, I think, the Arco.
I know you had brought up the "CAMPING" sign at Cortaro - I remember that sign and always thought it was weird that it was in all caps - and I did not see a logo sign for the campground on the eastbound side though there was a logo sign at Cortaro.

Good to know.  Were these signs in Clearview or FHWA?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: coatimundi on May 17, 2016, 11:43:34 AM
Sorry, I don't recall. There's not a lot of text on them, obviously. I would lean towards Clearview, but I don't want to steer you wrong if it wasn't. I only say that because I recall them looking different than the typical logo signs.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on May 17, 2016, 01:06:36 PM
Sorry, I don't recall. There's not a lot of text on them, obviously. I would lean towards Clearview, but I don't want to steer you wrong if it wasn't. I only say that because I recall them looking different than the typical logo signs.

Phoenix is almost all Clearview, all with large exit tabs (even those with only one service type).
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on November 03, 2016, 02:53:56 PM
According to AZ511.gov It looks like ADOT in Tucson has extended the hours it displays travel times on its DMS to display them most of the day, which Phoenix has done since July 2015.

In addition, it also appears that ADOT has expanded the number of DMS in Tucson displaying travel times from two to five.  New locations include one on I-10 eastbound west of Ajo displaying travel time to Valencia, one on I-10 westbound east of Valencia displaying travel times to I-19 and Miracle Mile, and one on I-19 northbound near Valencia displaying travel times to I-10 and Miracle Mile.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on February 05, 2018, 09:34:35 PM
I was in Tucson over the weekend. The freeway construction areas of significance are at I-19/Ajo Way and I-10/Ina Road. It was nice to see that the SB I-19 on ramp from Ajo was built to be a braided ramp for the future, whenever ADOT reconstructs the SB exit to Irvington Rd. On I-10, all traffic is now going under the future Ina overpass, using the future EB lanes.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Interstate 69 Fan on February 07, 2018, 03:27:55 PM
Section of AZ 210 remains unused  :-/ https://www.google.com/maps/place/451-401+E+Stevens+Ave,+Tucson,+AZ+85705/@32.2230655,-110.9651842,3a,44.2y,187.15h,82.52t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sPo1lZTdEK29pMMmHT-Yuiw!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x86d670e28e960207:0xc4c96818eebc960c?hl=en-US (https://www.google.com/maps/place/451-401+E+Stevens+Ave,+Tucson,+AZ+85705/@32.2230655,-110.9651842,3a,44.2y,187.15h,82.52t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sPo1lZTdEK29pMMmHT-Yuiw!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x86d670e28e960207:0xc4c96818eebc960c?hl=en-US)
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: jakeroot on February 07, 2018, 06:25:42 PM
Section of AZ 210 remains unused  :-/ https://www.google.com/maps/place/451-401+E+Stevens+Ave,+Tucson,+AZ+85705/@32.2230655,-110.9651842,3a,44.2y,187.15h,82.52t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sPo1lZTdEK29pMMmHT-Yuiw!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x86d670e28e960207:0xc4c96818eebc960c?hl=en-US (https://www.google.com/maps/place/451-401+E+Stevens+Ave,+Tucson,+AZ+85705/@32.2230655,-110.9651842,3a,44.2y,187.15h,82.52t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sPo1lZTdEK29pMMmHT-Yuiw!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x86d670e28e960207:0xc4c96818eebc960c?hl=en-US)

By that, do you mean unbuilt?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on February 10, 2018, 10:43:53 PM
I was in Tucson over the weekend. The freeway construction areas of significance are at I-19/Ajo Way and I-10/Ina Road. It was nice to see that the SB I-19 on ramp from Ajo was built to be a braided ramp for the future, whenever ADOT reconstructs the SB exit to Irvington Rd. On I-10, all traffic is now going under the future Ina overpass, using the future EB lanes.

The 10 corridor on the east side seems ancient compared to downtown, the 19 interchange, and the west side.  When are they going to widen and improve it?  Did drive through there yesterday and noticed the perpetual work at the Craycroft and Wilmot overpasses does not provide for at least an additional through lane in each direction.  Believe four lanes in each direction with full shoulder on both sides is what's needed there.   What's up with that??   Seems shortsighted. 
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on February 11, 2018, 06:28:09 PM
I was in Tucson over the weekend. The freeway construction areas of significance are at I-19/Ajo Way and I-10/Ina Road. It was nice to see that the SB I-19 on ramp from Ajo was built to be a braided ramp for the future, whenever ADOT reconstructs the SB exit to Irvington Rd. On I-10, all traffic is now going under the future Ina overpass, using the future EB lanes.

The 10 corridor on the east side seems ancient compared to downtown, the 19 interchange, and the west side.  When are they going to widen and improve it?  Did drive through there yesterday and noticed the perpetual work at the Craycroft and Wilmot overpasses does not provide for at least an additional through lane in each direction.  Believe four lanes in each direction with full shoulder on both sides is what's needed there.   What's up with that??   Seems shortsighted.

The only plans I see in terms of I-10 east of the I-19 interchange are planned widenings to tie into a new I-10/AZ 210 interchange somewhere around Alvernon Way or a little east of there. There is info in the plans regarding the AZ 210 extension.

http://azdot.gov/planning/transportation-studies/i-10-and-sr-210-feasibility-study/overview
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: JKRhodes on March 04, 2018, 09:29:57 PM
This study comes up with some pretty grand improvements for I-10 between I-19 and SR 83. Much of it seems like a pipe dream at this point:

https://webcms.pima.gov/UserFiles/Servers/Server_6/File/Government/Transportation/Transportation%20Planning/Future%20Roadway%20Plans%20and%20Reports/I-10_SR%20210%20Feasibility%20Report%20(no%20appendix).pdf

Houghton will be getting a new interchange, though not to the specs recommended in this study. The study called for an urban diamond with three thru lanes in each direction and two left turn lanes. The new interchange will be a DDI, according to some other news sources.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on May 03, 2018, 08:37:23 PM
Looks like the I-19/Ajo Way SPUI is now open (since March). Still work to be done to make Ajo Way 6 lanes in the immediate area.

I wish the city of Tucson would consider widening Speedway Blvd to 6 lanes between Stone Ave and Euclid Ave. The other east-west streets (Grant Rd, Broadway Blvd, 22nd St) all have widenings planned.

Downtown Links (connecting AZ 210/Aviation Highway to I-10 via St Mary's Rd) looks like it will be back to the drawing board. The bids were too expensive to move forward with construction anytime soon.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: ztonyg on May 17, 2018, 07:34:12 PM
Looks like the I-19/Ajo Way SPUI is now open (since March). Still work to be done to make Ajo Way 6 lanes in the immediate area.

I wish the city of Tucson would consider widening Speedway Blvd to 6 lanes between Stone Ave and Euclid Ave. The other east-west streets (Grant Rd, Broadway Blvd, 22nd St) all have widenings planned.

Downtown Links (connecting AZ 210/Aviation Highway to I-10 via St Mary's Rd) looks like it will be back to the drawing board. The bids were too expensive to move forward with construction anytime soon.

Widening Speedway from Stone to Euclid would require the demolition of dozens of homes and other businesses.

Judging from the glacial pace that widening Grant is going, even if they proposed to widen Speedway today it wouldn't be until the 2030s or 2040s when any work would even begin.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on June 02, 2018, 12:21:16 PM
Have been to the Grant Road reconstruction as part of a new job (geotechnical) in the last month.  The project limits (Phase II) are from just east of Park to just west of Stone.   New curbing, and sidewalks are being installed currently.  Subgrade work on the eastern end is nearing completion, with asphalt base course close to be installed.   The work is continuing in a general fashion from west to east.  The intersections (1st Ave, Stone) will feature "michigan lefts" where traffic desiring to turn left off Grant will need to continue along and then U turn to return back to the desired turn.  This is visible a bit further west at Grant / Oracle, which am going to assume was part of Phase I.   Seems crazy, but maybe the desire is to shorten light cycles at major intersections.   And to avoid the need to widen up intersections in order to achieve double left turn lanes.  From what have learned this current phase started sometime in 2016, so it has been at least two years of disruption in that area.   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on June 30, 2018, 12:28:51 AM
Pima County commissioners recently nixed $887 million (to be derived from a proposed sales tax) to pay to repair deteriorated county roadways.  Most of which are in the poorer areas in the south side of Tucson.   The proposed sales tax, was aimed at fixed existing roadways, not building any new ones apparently.   Some similarity to the '85 Maricopa County sales tax issue seems evident here, although it is certainly far smaller in scope.   Many of the south side arterials (Ajo, Irvington, Alvernon, etc. are beat up and feature large cracks from oxidized asphalt pavement cracking and splitting.   Very few improvements on many of these roads appear to have been made, and to an observer, one could be in the late sixties in terms of roadway elements - pavement, curbing, and traffic signals and masts.   
The media immediately blamed the two sitting Republicans, who apparently voted no.   An re-attempt may be made, by revisiting the issue at the ballot box in November.  If enough signatures can be acquired.   Don't know how much one can do with that number $887 million, perhaps a diamond mill and overlay on all the worst arterials, along with minimal ADA improvements at intersections.   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Pink Jazz on August 31, 2018, 10:48:55 PM
GCSLS finally updated the map on their website, and it looks like I-19 in Tucson now has logo signs installed at two exits (Valencia and Irvington), although the latter only has them in the northbound direction.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: 707 on September 07, 2018, 05:20:07 AM
Fun fact: I-10 from SR 77 (then SR 84) to 6th Avenue in Tucson was one of the earliest planned freeways in Arizona and was originally constructed on the city's dime before the state took over. It appears at least $100,000 went into relocating the Santa Cruz River away from the route back as reported by the Arizona Daily Star in 1951. That and according to an official ADOT document, I-10 between 6th Avenue, Alvernon Way and Benson Highway was the first section of freeway in Arizona to be built using Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956/Interstate funds from the beginning of the project. Construction started in 1957 and was finished in the early 60s. Between 1958 and 1962, the segment from Present Day SR 77 and 6th Avenue was rebuilt to minimal Interstate standards and was first signed as I-10 shortly after work finished.

VS988
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on September 07, 2018, 10:40:16 PM
That would certainly explain why 10 east of downtown appears so old.   Really need to rebuild this eastern Tucson section (MP 262 - 282) before spending anything on I-11 silliness south of Phoenix.
SR - 77 (Miracle Mile) west of I-10 appears to still have much of its' early sixties (or earlier) curbing and lightposts.   The entire downtown section of I-10 was rebuilt in the early 00's, completely, adding a lane in each direction and improving exits and collector (frontage) roads.     
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: 707 on September 08, 2018, 12:29:30 PM
I took a gander at some old aerials. It appears I-10 between Valencia and Benson wasnt finished until sometime between 1968 and 1970. 1967 photos show it still under construction. I got my years wrong. Thinking about it though, Im starting to doubt if the ADOT document was entirely right. 1957 to 1968 is an awful long time to spend building a freeway segment that short, especially for those times. On a side note, I've found from this research experience that conflicting resources make it hard to nail down the full history of early I-10 with each one saying a different thing. In the sense of "the kettle was blue" or "it was definitively positively red" at the same time. This discovery proves the THPF document on Miracle Mile was partially wrong. While SR 84A by 1962 was I-10, the eastern segment obviously wasn't finished yet.

VS988
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on September 08, 2018, 03:35:07 PM
The Benson Highway was "twinned" at that time.  The EB lanes are the original two lane roadbed, and the WB lanes are the late sixties construction.   This is apparent from MP 282 to 288 approximately. 
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: 707 on September 08, 2018, 06:56:16 PM
I wonder if they twinned it originally planning on making I-10 or if it was just planned as a temporary measure the whole time?

VS988

Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on September 21, 2018, 03:45:09 PM
Then, as now, it passes through ranch land.   The preexisting Route 80 already had a four lane section (old Marsh Station Road exit 289).  So they apparently just double barrelled the pre-existing two lane, and tied into the four lane section. 
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: 707 on September 21, 2018, 04:13:21 PM
Then, as now, it passes through ranch land.   The preexisting Route 80 already had a four lane section (old Marsh Station Road exit 289).  So they apparently just double barrelled the pre-existing two lane, and tied into the four lane section.
So Marsh Station Road was once four lane? Or are you referring to the section south of it that became I-10? Also my question was more along the lines of wondering if Benson Highway between Park and Valencia, which you said was four laned around the time of the Interstate highways being established was ever supposed to be I-10 or was just made to four lanes to tempirarily better handle traffic volumes while I-10 was being built?

By the way, I came across this scanned postcard of the Triple T Truck Stop at the I-10/Craycroft interchange. It was taken in the years before US 80 was removed and shows the only photo I've ever seen of a 1963 spec US 80 reassurance marker. Interesting to see the now long gone I-10/US 80 concurrency.
http://nostalgia.esmartkid.com/azroute80pc055.jpg
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on September 21, 2018, 04:34:50 PM
To clarify, meant that the US 80 Alignment at the Marsh Station road was a short pre-existing four lane section that was incorporated into the I-10 alignment.   It used to dip rather sharply into a creek/wash (Cienega?) going under both the old RR tracks and the old Exit 289 overpass.   This entire section, along with the RR straightening, was upgraded and done by FNF Construction 5 - 8 years ago.   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on September 21, 2018, 04:46:10 PM
Believe I-10 was simply placed atop the Benson Highway east of Valencia Road.   So perhaps a good part of it's roadbed was used for either the EB or WB lanes between Valencia and the Sonoita Highway exit.   Some old concrete bridge rails are visible, on 10, on both sides, in the wide median section between Houghton Road and Exit 279 (forgot name of road).  This leads to confusion as to which carriage way was the original two lane highway in that area.   Personally believe it was the WB lanes, in that area, as the EB lanes are straighter.   Between Exits 279 and 281, the original Benson highway is actually to the N, and acts as a two way frontage.   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: splashflash on March 14, 2019, 10:58:51 PM

Then lastly, there's the Sonoran Corridor proposal which doesn't seem to go away or get built. Residents in Sahuarita are apparently asking the state to build it across El Toro Road. There's also talk about it being funded by federal dollars.

http://tucson.com/news/business/county-report-sonoran-corridor-would-have-b-impact/article_8e4a9e31-2799-52f6-87bc-f902f9cd4fa8.html

http://www.gvnews.com/news/town-asks-for-el-toro-rd-sahuarita-be-part-of/article_8c430bf0-f5d4-11e5-bea1-af26a76f70bc.html

An open house was recently held discussing three options between I10 and I19, down from ten.  https://news.azpm.org/p/news-articles/2019/3/7/147457-proposed-sonoran-corridor-freeway-down-to-3-alternatives/
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on March 16, 2019, 10:08:18 AM
   Interesting.  All three proposals have a very defined "L" shape to them.   Wonder why that is, versus a more "straight" shot.   
   Personally, would choose 8A. 
 
a.  Growth and development will continue to happen, whether one likes it or not. 
b.  Raw land should be cheaper farther out.  Development will come. 
c.  Connecting to I-10 at  Houghton Road should bury, once and for all, any talk or movement
     towards a DDI at that interchange.  There should be high speed directional interchanges at both
     I-10 and I-19.
d.  The facility should have an even numbered 3DI number.  I-219 is the one would choose.   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: sparker on March 16, 2019, 03:34:36 PM

Then lastly, there's the Sonoran Corridor proposal which doesn't seem to go away or get built. Residents in Sahuarita are apparently asking the state to build it across El Toro Road. There's also talk about it being funded by federal dollars.

http://tucson.com/news/business/county-report-sonoran-corridor-would-have-b-impact/article_8e4a9e31-2799-52f6-87bc-f902f9cd4fa8.html

http://www.gvnews.com/news/town-asks-for-el-toro-rd-sahuarita-be-part-of/article_8c430bf0-f5d4-11e5-bea1-af26a76f70bc.html

An open house was recently held discussing three options between I10 and I19, down from ten.  https://news.azpm.org/p/news-articles/2019/3/7/147457-proposed-sonoran-corridor-freeway-down-to-3-alternatives/

Back in 2016 the "Sonoran" corridor between I-10 and I-19 was afforded a place as HPC #83 in the FHWA compendium of such corridors; like all the others, it's eligible for federal funding -- but without any guarantee -- and still subject to the fiscal whims of Congress.  Nevertheless, it does have a level of national attention -- which needs to be followed through at the state and/or local level to actually be developed. 
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Henry on March 20, 2019, 09:58:01 AM
   Interesting.  All three proposals have a very defined "L" shape to them.   Wonder why that is, versus a more "straight" shot.   
   Personally, would choose 8A. 
 
a.  Growth and development will continue to happen, whether one likes it or not. 
b.  Raw land should be cheaper farther out.  Development will come. 
c.  Connecting to I-10 at  Houghton Road should bury, once and for all, any talk or movement
     towards a DDI at that interchange.  There should be high speed directional interchanges at both
     I-10 and I-19.
d.  The facility should have an even numbered 3DI number.  I-219 is the one would choose.   
Agreed on all counts, although, given AZ's aversion to 3di's, I would see it as SR 219 or 410.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on March 20, 2019, 03:44:54 PM
   Interesting.  All three proposals have a very defined "L" shape to them.   Wonder why that is, versus a more "straight" shot.   
   Personally, would choose 8A. 
 
a.  Growth and development will continue to happen, whether one likes it or not. 
b.  Raw land should be cheaper farther out.  Development will come. 
c.  Connecting to I-10 at  Houghton Road should bury, once and for all, any talk or movement
     towards a DDI at that interchange.  There should be high speed directional interchanges at both
     I-10 and I-19.
d.  The facility should have an even numbered 3DI number.  I-219 is the one would choose.   
Agreed on all counts, although, given AZ's aversion to 3di's, I would see it as SR 219 or 410.

Pima County had an older map of the proposed Sonoran Corridor labeled as I-510. More recent references to the corridor use SR 410 as the number in planning.

https://webcms.pima.gov/UserFiles/Servers/Server_6/File/Government/Newsroom/Work%20Newsroom/1308%20August/130813%20Pima%20County%20supports%20study%20of%20interstate%20highway%20link.pdf
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on March 22, 2019, 11:31:38 PM

Then lastly, there's the Sonoran Corridor proposal which doesn't seem to go away or get built. Residents in Sahuarita are apparently asking the state to build it across El Toro Road. There's also talk about it being funded by federal dollars.

http://tucson.com/news/business/county-report-sonoran-corridor-would-have-b-impact/article_8e4a9e31-2799-52f6-87bc-f902f9cd4fa8.html

http://www.gvnews.com/news/town-asks-for-el-toro-rd-sahuarita-be-part-of/article_8c430bf0-f5d4-11e5-bea1-af26a76f70bc.html

An open house was recently held discussing three options between I10 and I19, down from ten.  https://news.azpm.org/p/news-articles/2019/3/7/147457-proposed-sonoran-corridor-freeway-down-to-3-alternatives/

Any links to the other seven?  Why were they dropped from consideration?   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: splashflash on March 23, 2019, 01:48:27 AM

Then lastly, there's the Sonoran Corridor proposal which doesn't seem to go away or get built. Residents in Sahuarita are apparently asking the state to build it across El Toro Road. There's also talk about it being funded by federal dollars.

http://tucson.com/news/business/county-report-sonoran-corridor-would-have-b-impact/article_8e4a9e31-2799-52f6-87bc-f902f9cd4fa8.html

http://www.gvnews.com/news/town-asks-for-el-toro-rd-sahuarita-be-part-of/article_8c430bf0-f5d4-11e5-bea1-af26a76f70bc.html

An open house was recently held discussing three options between I10 and I19, down from ten.  https://news.azpm.org/p/news-articles/2019/3/7/147457-proposed-sonoran-corridor-freeway-down-to-3-alternatives/

Any links to the other seven?  Why were they dropped from consideration?

https://www.azdot.gov/planning/transportation-studies/sonoran-corridor-tier-1-environmental-impact-statement/documents

Check out 3.8.2 of the corridor selection report.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on July 12, 2019, 01:19:18 PM
In the Tucson area, the new I-10/Ina Rd interchange is complete. Next up to be redone is the I-10/Ruthrauff Rd interchange, which should begin later this summer or by the fall. I-19 is being widened between Irvington Rd and Ajo Way.

The only other active construction of significance is on surface streets. Just my personal belief, the Valencia Rd and Kolb Rd intersection could have been a nice grade-separated interchange, but that is not the case. When finished, there will be a combination of "Michigan lefts" and at-grade ramps onto the mainline roads.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Kniwt on December 02, 2019, 06:50:19 PM
The Arizona Daily Star reports today that ADOT has plans for a $1.2 billion project to massively widen I-10 (double to triple current capacity) east of the I-19 split and build a freeway connection between I-10 and AZ 210.
https://tucson.com/news/local/road-runner-long-term-billion-project-would-connect-i-/article_95b134b1-1e63-51cd-a800-61841d9a5fa2.html

Quote
The project would add up to two lanes in each direction from the I-10, I-19 interchange to Alvernon Way and up to four lanes in each direction on I-10 from Alvernon Way to Kolb Road. These improvements include addressing the corridor’s interchanges and bridges.

Alvernon Way would be designated State Route 210, known as Barraza-Aviation Parkway, along with an interchange that provides direct access from Palo Verde Road to Interstate 10 and an alternate route downtown, according to an environmental assessment from the Arizona Department of Transportation.

... Residents could expect the final touches on the project around 20 years from now.

ADOT project page: https://azdot.gov/planning/transportation-studies/interstate-10-and-state-route-210-study

(https://i.imgur.com/YLHV9Vj.jpg)
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Sonic99 on December 02, 2019, 07:50:22 PM
20 years??? Holy crap.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on December 04, 2019, 08:28:51 AM
Believe it when it actually seems to be happening.  That corridor (10 east of downtown) is absolutely antiquated.   They have done some bridge deck replacements (Craycroft and Wilmot) but haven't even added bearing seats on the back walls for additional lanes?  What the heck??   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Plutonic Panda on December 10, 2019, 05:32:00 PM
20 years is insane but perhaps they eventually expedite it. 7-12 years would be better to muster and understandable given the amount of projects Arizona needs to tackle. They should have widened this to at least six lanes a few years ago it seems.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on December 14, 2019, 05:53:04 PM
Am guessing this corridor in Tucson has been "back burnered" either on purpose or through oversight.   Given the scope and quality of work elsewhere (Phoenix) can't think of any other reason.   Really can not understand why Wilmot and craycroft overpasses did not have widening done during the re decks.
Alvernon Road overpasses were replaced and widened - with a box beam design - guessing a long time ago - to the inside - but inside lanes have not been utilized.     
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: dfwmapper on December 16, 2019, 06:28:55 PM
ADOT doesn't have much money in the budget for expansion, and traffic volumes east of Kino don't particularly warrant expansion right now (AADT west of Kino is over 100k, but east is under 80k, and 100k is usually the point where going to 6 lanes is needed). Pima County's 1/2 cent tax for transportation is primarily going towards surface street improvements (more lanes, bike lanes, and sidewalks), transit, and railroad grade separations, with little if any going towards freeways, other than replacing the interchanges on the west side to eliminate the railroad grade crossings.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on October 10, 2020, 07:38:21 AM
Bumping this to mention a couple projects currently going on in Tucson.

I-10/Ruthrauff Rd interchange is being redone. Ruthrauff will go over I-10 and the parallel railroad tracks when this project is finished. Similar to other interchanges (Ina Rd, Prince Rd).

Downtown Links, after many, many, many years of planning and delays, is finally under construction. It will connect I-10/St Mary's Rd with AZ 210 and Broadway. Was once planned to be a freeway, but will be just another surface road skirting the northern part of downtown Tucson.

SM-G975U

Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Plutonic Panda on May 22, 2021, 08:14:17 PM
Houghton Road/I-10 Interchange Update

Quote
The concrete work on the bridge comes as the Arizona Department of Transportation reaches the halfway point of a $24.4 million project to rebuild the interchange.

While drivers have experienced several temporary ramp and lane shifts during the project, the concrete pour will allow drivers to see the bridge's final driving surface come into view.

This summer, traffic on Houghton Road will move from the existing two-lane bridge to the new six-lane structure. Motorists will cross I-10 in a temporary lane configuration for several months while crews demolish the old bridge and complete building new ramps on the east side of the interchange.

Read more here: https://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/crews-pour-concrete-deck-on-houghton-road-i-10-structure/52215
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: machias on May 22, 2021, 10:28:52 PM
Houghton Road/I-10 Interchange Update

Quote
The concrete work on the bridge comes as the Arizona Department of Transportation reaches the halfway point of a $24.4 million project to rebuild the interchange.

While drivers have experienced several temporary ramp and lane shifts during the project, the concrete pour will allow drivers to see the bridge's final driving surface come into view.

This summer, traffic on Houghton Road will move from the existing two-lane bridge to the new six-lane structure. Motorists will cross I-10 in a temporary lane configuration for several months while crews demolish the old bridge and complete building new ramps on the east side of the interchange.

Read more here: https://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/crews-pour-concrete-deck-on-houghton-road-i-10-structure/52215

I've been watching this project on and off and it's nice to see it progressing.

As an aside, I see several maps that show Houghton Rd as SR 983, but I've never seen a sign indicating it as this. Is this an "unsigned" official route?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DRMan on May 24, 2021, 12:20:04 PM
Houghton Road/I-10 Interchange Update

Quote
The concrete work on the bridge comes as the Arizona Department of Transportation reaches the halfway point of a $24.4 million project to rebuild the interchange.

While drivers have experienced several temporary ramp and lane shifts during the project, the concrete pour will allow drivers to see the bridge's final driving surface come into view.

This summer, traffic on Houghton Road will move from the existing two-lane bridge to the new six-lane structure. Motorists will cross I-10 in a temporary lane configuration for several months while crews demolish the old bridge and complete building new ramps on the east side of the interchange.

Read more here: https://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/crews-pour-concrete-deck-on-houghton-road-i-10-structure/52215

I've been watching this project on and off and it's nice to see it progressing.

As an aside, I see several maps that show Houghton Rd as SR 983, but I've never seen a sign indicating it as this. Is this an "unsigned" official route?
There are a number of roads around Tucson like that, for example Tangerine Rd (SR-989) and Valencia Rd (SR-910). Annoyingly, Apple Maps treats them as if they are actually signed, but there are no signs in the field.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on May 24, 2021, 03:29:05 PM
Houghton Road/I-10 Interchange Update

Quote
The concrete work on the bridge comes as the Arizona Department of Transportation reaches the halfway point of a $24.4 million project to rebuild the interchange.

While drivers have experienced several temporary ramp and lane shifts during the project, the concrete pour will allow drivers to see the bridge's final driving surface come into view.

This summer, traffic on Houghton Road will move from the existing two-lane bridge to the new six-lane structure. Motorists will cross I-10 in a temporary lane configuration for several months while crews demolish the old bridge and complete building new ramps on the east side of the interchange.

Read more here: https://www.constructionequipmentguide.com/crews-pour-concrete-deck-on-houghton-road-i-10-structure/52215

I've been watching this project on and off and it's nice to see it progressing.

As an aside, I see several maps that show Houghton Rd as SR 983, but I've never seen a sign indicating it as this. Is this an "unsigned" official route?
There are a number of roads around Tucson like that, for example Tangerine Rd (SR-989) and Valencia Rd (SR-910). Annoyingly, Apple Maps treats them as if they are actually signed, but there are no signs in the field.
Tangerine (SR 989) is the only one of those that was acknowledged in the field. Not any 989 shield, but a mileage sign. Don't know if it's still there or not.

https://www.arizonaroads.com/arizona/az989.html



SM-G975U

Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: KeithE4Phx on May 24, 2021, 03:44:32 PM
The sign for Milepost 35 was there as of June 2018, when this Google Street View photo was taken.  I'm not sure if ADOT maintains only the bridge or the entire road between the bridge and AZ 77.  In any case, it is not signed as AZ 989 anywhere.

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.42672,-110.9516145,3a,75y,259.15h,88.38t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s5n9BWqdReVRBFPtyTEotbw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on May 24, 2021, 05:14:30 PM
The sign for Milepost 35 was there as of June 2018, when this Google Street View photo was taken.  I'm not sure if ADOT maintains only the bridge or the entire road between the bridge and AZ 77.  In any case, it is not signed as AZ 989 anywhere.

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.42672,-110.9516145,3a,75y,259.15h,88.38t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s5n9BWqdReVRBFPtyTEotbw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
As of today (5/24/21) there's a mile marker 35 in both directions.(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20210524/835f5e65819ffa77f4b3fc04120a1ef0.jpg)

SM-G975U

Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: ztonyg on May 25, 2021, 01:34:51 AM
A key tell with AZ 989 is that the traffic signal at Innovation Park Dr. is an ADOT standard signal as opposed to the white painted Oro Valley signals.

Compare the signal at 1st Ave (Oro Valley) with the ones at Innovation Park Dr. and Oracle Rd. (ADOT).
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DRMan on May 25, 2021, 09:24:19 AM
A key tell with AZ 989 is that the traffic signal at Innovation Park Dr. is an ADOT standard signal as opposed to the white painted Oro Valley signals.

Compare the signal at 1st Ave (Oro Valley) with the ones at Innovation Park Dr. and Oracle Rd. (ADOT).
Another indication is that when Oro Valley recently resealed their part of Tangerine, they stopped just west of La Canada Dr. Mile marker 34 is just east of La Canada, so that matches up pretty well. It's interesting that there's an OV signal at Rancho Vistoso/First and Tangerine because the road is ADOT-owned.

https://apps.azdot.gov/WebTeam/ROW/Plans/SR_989/SR_989_Index.pdf
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on July 22, 2021, 05:35:22 PM
As of last week, Ruthrauff Rd is open to traffic over I-10. The ramp connections are still closed till later this year.

https://azdot.gov/adot-news/ruthrauff-road-opens-over-i-10-project-nears-completion
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: machias on September 26, 2021, 12:22:55 AM
The Houghton Rd interchange with I-10 is now functioning as a DDI, albeit with the temporary lights and a lot of cones.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: kernals12 on November 06, 2021, 05:07:00 PM
ADOT has picked a route for the Sonoran Corridor to connect I-10 and I-19
https://azdot.gov/adot-news/adot-selects-final-sonoran-corridor-route-pima-county

Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on November 07, 2021, 08:46:53 PM
They picked one of the "L" shaped corridors.  Two giant Dog Legs.   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: KeithE4Phx on November 07, 2021, 09:46:34 PM
ADOT has picked a route for the Sonoran Corridor to connect I-10 and I-19
https://azdot.gov/adot-news/adot-selects-final-sonoran-corridor-route-pima-county

I'll be shocked if The City of Tucson and/or the Pima County Board of Supervisors ever approves this.  Tucson is almost violently anti-freeway, and has been at least since the I-710 debacle of the mid-'70s.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Plutonic Panda on November 07, 2021, 09:49:41 PM
ADOT has picked a route for the Sonoran Corridor to connect I-10 and I-19
https://azdot.gov/adot-news/adot-selects-final-sonoran-corridor-route-pima-county

I'll be shocked if The City of Tucson and/or the Pima County Board of Supervisors ever approves this.  Tucson is almost violently anti-freeway, and has been at least since the I-710 debacle of the mid-'70s.
I bet they change their tune. This is pretty far south I don’t see why Tucson would have a problem and would likely welcome it. More growth and tax dollars.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: kernals12 on November 07, 2021, 10:22:02 PM
ADOT has picked a route for the Sonoran Corridor to connect I-10 and I-19
https://azdot.gov/adot-news/adot-selects-final-sonoran-corridor-route-pima-county

I'll be shocked if The City of Tucson and/or the Pima County Board of Supervisors ever approves this.  Tucson is almost violently anti-freeway, and has been at least since the I-710 debacle of the mid-'70s.

They are building Downtown Links
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DRMan on November 08, 2021, 11:09:30 AM
But Downtown Links isn't a freeway.

The Sonoran Corridor would be a nice connection between the airport, the Port of Tucson (rail), and the freeway system. It makes a lot of sense, and it is well away from the main population areas. But I'm not sure it will ever happen in my lifetime, given this area's history with freeways.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: kernals12 on November 08, 2021, 12:39:14 PM
But Downtown Links isn't a freeway.

The Sonoran Corridor would be a nice connection between the airport, the Port of Tucson (rail), and the freeway system. It makes a lot of sense, and it is well away from the main population areas. But I'm not sure it will ever happen in my lifetime, given this area's history with freeways.

It's a wide urban boulevard being sliced through downtown requiring major eminent domain. And it may not be a freeway now, but I think they could elevate some of the lanes in the future.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Plutonic Panda on November 08, 2021, 02:25:55 PM
Pardon me but what road is this?
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DRMan on November 08, 2021, 02:41:15 PM
Pardon me but what road is this?

I'm pretty new to the Tucson area, but my understanding is that Downtown Links is a project that will connect I-10 to SR 210, as well as improve drainage and grade crossings with the Union Pacific tracks. It's been the works since the 1980s, when ADOT proposed a freeway extension to SR 210 that would have directly connected it to I-10. The city of Tucson took the project over in 1989.

The project that's under construction is a 30 mph, 4-lane urban street.

More information here: downtownlinks.info (http://downtownlinks.info)
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: DJStephens on November 12, 2021, 09:18:18 PM
ADOT has picked a route for the Sonoran Corridor to connect I-10 and I-19
https://azdot.gov/adot-news/adot-selects-final-sonoran-corridor-route-pima-county

I'll be shocked if The City of Tucson and/or the Pima County Board of Supervisors ever approves this.  Tucson is almost violently anti-freeway, and has been at least since the I-710 debacle of the mid-'70s.

Am guessing? the dog legs are to swing it closer to the Airport.   Not sure if I would refer to 710 as a "debacle" it was a spur that should have been built.  The Kino Pkwy grade separation at 22nd St partially fulfilled the long dead spur.   The complex arrangement at I-10 where Irvington goes under  and Kino goes over, is a funky arrangement.  Have to wonder how 710 would have connected to 10 there.   
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on November 13, 2021, 05:05:23 PM
ADOT has picked a route for the Sonoran Corridor to connect I-10 and I-19
https://azdot.gov/adot-news/adot-selects-final-sonoran-corridor-route-pima-county

I'll be shocked if The City of Tucson and/or the Pima County Board of Supervisors ever approves this.  Tucson is almost violently anti-freeway, and has been at least since the I-710 debacle of the mid-'70s.

Am guessing? the dog legs are to swing it closer to the Airport.   Not sure if I would refer to 710 as a "debacle" it was a spur that should have been built.  The Kino Pkwy grade separation at 22nd St partially fulfilled the long dead spur.   The complex arrangement at I-10 where Irvington goes under  and Kino goes over, is a funky arrangement.  Have to wonder how 710 would have connected to 10 there.

I think you meant Ajo Way where it meets Kino Pkwy and I-10.

Speaking of which, there's some plans to improve I-10 east of I-19, including extending SR 210 to reach I-10 around Alvernon Way. Some plans of improvements are below:

https://azdot.gov/sites/default/files/media/2021/05/H7825plot_I-10_WestEnd.pdf

https://azdot.gov/planning/transportation-studies/interstate-10-and-state-route-210-study
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: JKRhodes on January 23, 2022, 11:09:36 AM
DDI project at Houghton and I-10 is reported complete according to this article:

https://www.thetrucker.com/trucking-news/the-nation/arizona-completes-rebuild-of-i-10-houghton-road-interchange

On our last trip through the area in November, the on-ramps and bridge were completed. Finishing touches were being made and traffic was coned down to two lanes over the new bridge with temporary signals in operation.
Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: JKRhodes on January 28, 2022, 12:15:10 AM
But Downtown Links isn't a freeway.

The Sonoran Corridor would be a nice connection between the airport, the Port of Tucson (rail), and the freeway system. It makes a lot of sense, and it is well away from the main population areas. But I'm not sure it will ever happen in my lifetime, given this area's history with freeways.

It's a wide urban boulevard being sliced through downtown requiring major eminent domain. And it may not be a freeway now, but I think they could elevate some of the lanes in the future.

Links is certainly a shell of  the 210/I-10 connection once envisioned by ADOT, and the design looks like a complete charlie foxtrot as far as traffic signal spacing and sight lines are concerned. In due time the handful of crappy buildings the city has managed to save by shoehorning in the surface street may eventually lose their "historic value" and be torn down to make way for a beefier connection to the interstate. Frankly it's been needed since ever since Tucson put in the trolley and put Congress and Broadway downtown on road diets a while back.

Frankly any hope of a freeway in the city proper north of Golf Links road is probably a lost cause A loop freeway along houghton/ina/skyline would either involve tearing down a bunch of rich people's homes, or routing along the washes. Fat chance of either.

Suburbs, however, are a different story. I'll have to dig up the link but there's plans for 4-5 lanes each direction on I-10 between the eastern 210 link (It's supposed to tie in near the current Craycroft TI) and AZ 83. I can see Sahuarita, Vail, Corona De Tucson and other future growth corridors on the south and east end of the metro being very supportive of freeways as they tend to lean a little more right, politically.


Title: Re: Tucson Freeways
Post by: JKRhodes on February 08, 2022, 06:51:53 PM
Drove through Tucson last Saturday and took the Houghton road exit specifically to check on the progress. Based on what I saw exiting west to go north, the  new DDI interchange is 100% complete and operational.