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Author Topic: US 6 over Loveland Pass  (Read 2659 times)

Max Rockatansky

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US 6 over Loveland Pass
« on: May 07, 2020, 12:08:18 AM »

Back during 2016 on my way back to Denver I took a scenic detour over US Route 6 by way of Loveland Pass.  Loveland Pass is named for William Loveland who plotted a wagon road through Clear Creek Canyon circa 1863-64.  During the early US Route era Loveland Pass part of Colorado State Route 91 which became part of the extended US 6 during 1937.  While US 6 was rerouted from Fremont Pass by way of Vail Pass during 1940 the route over Loveland Pass has remained.  Loveland Pass remains a heavily used freight route due to truck restrictions in the Eisenhower Tunnel of I-70.  The descent on US 6 from Loveland Pass into Clear Creek Canyon and I-70 includes 6.7% down hill grades.  At 11,990 feet above sea level US 6 over Loveland Pass is second only to US 34 on the Trail Ridge Road for highest US Route.

https://www.gribblenation.org/2020/05/2016-summer-mountain-trip-part-29-us.html
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kphoger

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Re: US 6 over Loveland Pass
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2020, 11:43:56 AM »

Last time I was that way, we had just had a radiator blow and be replaced, ruining half out vacation.  So, even though I stopped at the top of Vail Pass and found no signs of trouble, I still wasn't about to deviate from the Interstate to go farther uphill than necessary.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: US 6 over Loveland Pass
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2020, 11:54:01 AM »

Last time I was that way, we had just had a radiator blow and be replaced, ruining half out vacation.  So, even though I stopped at the top of Vail Pass and found no signs of trouble, I still wasn't about to deviate from the Interstate to go farther uphill than necessary.

I ended up taking every major two lane Pass from Wolf Creek Pass north to Beartooth Pass that year, it really was an epic level trip.  I bailed on Mount Evans on the last day because I was wiped out from so much hiking and driving but that was the only thing on my list that I didnít get in.
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kphoger

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Re: US 6 over Loveland Pass
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2020, 11:55:55 AM »

I spoke incorrectly.  The radiator didn't blow and get replaced on that trip.  It ran dry and overheated our engine, then the mechanic in GJ had it in the shop for a couple of days, thoroughly examining everything, only to find I had bought the wrong type of radiator cap.  It wasn't until next year that the rad blew.
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Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
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Quote from: Philip K. Dick
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US 89

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Re: US 6 over Loveland Pass
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2020, 12:12:48 PM »

At 11,990 feet above sea level US 6 over Loveland Pass is second only to US 34 on the Trail Ridge Road for highest US Route.

I’ve seen it claimed more than once online that Loveland is the highest point on the US highway system, but 34 definitely is just a bit higher. US 6 does maintain the distinction of highest elevation on a US highway open year-round.

Max Rockatansky

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Re: US 6 over Loveland Pass
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2020, 12:24:50 PM »

At 11,990 feet above sea level US 6 over Loveland Pass is second only to US 34 on the Trail Ridge Road for highest US Route.

Iíve seen it claimed more than once online that Loveland is the highest point on the US highway system, but 34 definitely is just a bit higher. US 6 does maintain the distinction of highest elevation on a US highway open year-round.

I think a lot of that comes from how little US 34 is actually signed.  IIRC the State of Colorado actually maintains Trail Ridge and not the Park Service. 
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ca_enright

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Re: US 6 over Loveland Pass
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2020, 10:16:54 AM »

At 11,990 feet above sea level US 6 over Loveland Pass is second only to US 34 on the Trail Ridge Road for highest US Route.

Iíve seen it claimed more than once online that Loveland is the highest point on the US highway system, but 34 definitely is just a bit higher. US 6 does maintain the distinction of highest elevation on a US highway open year-round.

I think a lot of that comes from how little US 34 is actually signed.  IIRC the State of Colorado actually maintains Trail Ridge and not the Park Service. 

I'm pretty sure NPS maintains Trail Ridge Road, not CDOT R4.  The NPS has the info line for road conditions, and they suggest on their website to consult COTRIP for anything outside of the park.  Similar to Tioga Pass in Yosemite; even though it's theoretically part of CA-120, it's maintained by NPS in the park.
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oscar

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Re: US 6 over Loveland Pass
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2020, 10:44:06 AM »

I'm pretty sure NPS maintains Trail Ridge Road, not CDOT R4.  The NPS has the info line for road conditions, and they suggest on their website to consult COTRIP for anything outside of the park.  Similar to Tioga Pass in Yosemite; even though it's theoretically part of CA-120, it's maintained by NPS in the park.

I think CDOT and/or AASHTO consider Trail Ridge Road in the park to be part of US 34. Opposite for the supposed US routes in Yellowstone NP.

CA 120 isn't even theoretically within Yosemite NP. State law is explicit that route 120 ends at the park's western boundary, and resumes at the eastern boundary. Signs within the park point you to the different CA 120 segments, but don't mean the route exists within park boundaries. And AIUI the Tioga Pass road was never part of the state highway system -- it started off as a private mine road, donated to the National Park Service.
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