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Traffic signal

Started by Tom89t, January 14, 2012, 01:01:45 AM

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roadfro

Quote from: JMAN_WiS&S on January 08, 2024, 02:01:22 AM
Quote from: US 89 on December 18, 2023, 09:42:07 AM
I've seen this occasionally in Georgia as well. Here's an example at US 27 and US 82 near Cuthbert.

That intersection also features what appears to be a case of traffic calming on a highway. US 27 is divided with two lanes each direction throughout southwestern Georgia, but on both approaches to the US 82 intersection, 27 is striped to lose one of its two lanes before promptly regaining it on the other side - even when the road cross section that is built would clearly support carrying both lanes through. I have never seen this anywhere else. Doesn't bother me too much since 27 is not a highly traveled road, but if that's used anywhere with more traffic I imagine it getting frustrating.

Something I immediately noticed, 82 westbound has a left and right near-side signal with double reds for each. I wonder if there is a low driver complacency rate at this intersection. Usually, these types of intersections get prioritized for alternative intersections, mainly roundabouts if nothing else can be done to mitigate the red-running issue. 27 in both directions also gets a speed zone, 7 signal ahead signs, 3 sets of dual flashers including one overhead, and painted rumble strips. It seems the local agency here is trying everything in their power to increase awareness here without spending tons of money to reconstruct the intersection. I am a bit surprised to see that roadway lighting has not been implemented here on the approaches as an attempted solution.

I'd almost argue that there are too many signal ahead signs... You expect to see the actual signal by the time you get to the second set.

Yeah, they probably should install some overhead lighting as a mitigation. Around me, it's rare to encounter a permanent signal setup that does not have any overhead lighting at the intersection, even in rural areas.
Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.


PColumbus73

Quote from: roadfro on January 09, 2024, 11:03:08 AM
Quote from: JMAN_WiS&S on January 08, 2024, 02:01:22 AM
Quote from: US 89 on December 18, 2023, 09:42:07 AM
I've seen this occasionally in Georgia as well. Here's an example at US 27 and US 82 near Cuthbert.

That intersection also features what appears to be a case of traffic calming on a highway. US 27 is divided with two lanes each direction throughout southwestern Georgia, but on both approaches to the US 82 intersection, 27 is striped to lose one of its two lanes before promptly regaining it on the other side - even when the road cross section that is built would clearly support carrying both lanes through. I have never seen this anywhere else. Doesn't bother me too much since 27 is not a highly traveled road, but if that's used anywhere with more traffic I imagine it getting frustrating.

Something I immediately noticed, 82 westbound has a left and right near-side signal with double reds for each. I wonder if there is a low driver complacency rate at this intersection. Usually, these types of intersections get prioritized for alternative intersections, mainly roundabouts if nothing else can be done to mitigate the red-running issue. 27 in both directions also gets a speed zone, 7 signal ahead signs, 3 sets of dual flashers including one overhead, and painted rumble strips. It seems the local agency here is trying everything in their power to increase awareness here without spending tons of money to reconstruct the intersection. I am a bit surprised to see that roadway lighting has not been implemented here on the approaches as an attempted solution.

I'd almost argue that there are too many signal ahead signs... You expect to see the actual signal by the time you get to the second set.

Yeah, they probably should install some overhead lighting as a mitigation. Around me, it's rare to encounter a permanent signal setup that does not have any overhead lighting at the intersection, even in rural areas.

May even need to re-evaluate the intersection geometry. It looks like US 27 comes around the curve at 65 MPH before dropping down to 45 MPH, and US 82 crests a hill right before the signal.

Could it be that US 27 enables people to go too fast? What if they reduced the speed limit to 55 and 'undivided' US 27 and make it two-lanes through the bypass?

mrsman

Here is an interesting signal for a bus queue lane:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.6548042,-75.6163846,3a,75y,244.77h,94.07t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sEFganywu3slmYpyze0W8Cg!2e0!7i16384!8i8192?entry=ttu

The signal seems normal, but the operation is interesting.  At this split between US 13 and US 40 in Delaware, the signal will make it easier for buses in the right lane to continue onto US 13, which splits off to the left.  What is odd is that the queueing signal is way ahead of the normal signal, that controls the pedestrian crossing and allows for access from the fire station.

roadman65

Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

jeffandnicole

Quote from: mrsman on January 31, 2024, 08:31:27 AM
Here is an interesting signal for a bus queue lane:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.6548042,-75.6163846,3a,75y,244.77h,94.07t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sEFganywu3slmYpyze0W8Cg!2e0!7i16384!8i8192?entry=ttu

The signal seems normal, but the operation is interesting.  At this split between US 13 and US 40 in Delaware, the signal will make it easier for buses in the right lane to continue onto US 13, which splits off to the left.  What is odd is that the queueing signal is way ahead of the normal signal, that controls the pedestrian crossing and allows for access from the fire station.

I've seen that there for many years. No clue if it actually works. Seems like it doesn't have any normal controls such as those you mentioned.

roadman65

https://maps.app.goo.gl/TURqgUyg5FNnPAzF6
Does any other state besides NJ and MD use these "RED" light up signal warning signs?
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

hotdogPi

Clinched

Traveled, plus
US 13, 44, 50
MA 22, 40, 107, 109, 117, 119, 126, 141, 159
NH 27, 111A(E); CA 133; NY 366; GA 42, 140; FL A1A, 7; CT 32; VT 2A, 5A; PA 3, 51, 60, QC 162, 165, 263; 🇬🇧A100, A3211, A3213, A3215, A4222; 🇫🇷95 D316

roadfro

Quote from: roadman65 on February 04, 2024, 04:17:01 PM
https://maps.app.goo.gl/TURqgUyg5FNnPAzF6
Does any other state besides NJ and MD use these "RED" light up signal warning signs?

There used to be at least one in Nevada on westbound Sahara Ave on the railroad bridge approaching I-15 in Las Vegas, but it was replaced at least 15 years ago in favor of Nevada's current standard "Prepare to Stop When Flashing" warning sign with yellow beacons.
Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

CJResotko


plain

Newark born, Richmond bred

US 89

Quote from: roadman65 on February 04, 2024, 04:17:01 PM
https://maps.app.goo.gl/TURqgUyg5FNnPAzF6
Does any other state besides NJ and MD use these "RED" light up signal warning signs?

I recall seeing a number of these on US 60 in southern Missouri.

kphoger

Quote from: US 89 on February 07, 2024, 08:28:40 AM

Quote from: roadman65 on February 04, 2024, 04:17:01 PM
https://maps.app.goo.gl/TURqgUyg5FNnPAzF6
Does any other state besides NJ and MD use these "RED" light up signal warning signs?

I recall seeing a number of these on US 60 in southern Missouri.

Ah, yes, you're correct!  I remember seeing them near Rogersville:  https://maps.app.goo.gl/U2k7ksXSwVVVaiuf7
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. DickIf you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

SignBridge

We have a few in Long Island's Nassau County, NY too.

jakeroot

#5238
Made a video about a rare signal in Japan. Most intersections in Japan use lagging green arrows. Traffic starts with the yield phase, and the protected phase is at the end. Because the signals are all shared, there's no way to have individual operations, so both sides have the same right-arrow green time. This is not always ideal, but it works well most of the time.

Anyways, this intersection in the video (Google Maps: Yogi Intersection in Naha, Okinawa) has a leading phase for one approach, and then a lagging phase at the end for both approaches. There is no yellow phase for the end of the advanced right turn, though there is at the end. This phasing seems to have been introduced because there is no designated right turn lane, so this helps clear out traffic better than just having a green arrow at the end.

https://youtu.be/rBr-BONo9ek?si=1N2IGB1xcAUr5hYv

It operates the same as this intersection in Tucson, Arizona, that I also recorded many years ago:

https://youtu.be/1WWBn_6o4oY?si=-cBjOelwheDCir5f

SignBridge

I've seen that in California also, both lead and lag left arrow in the same signal. It was back in 2010 on S.R. 82 (El Camino Real) in Millbrae, near San Fran. Int'l. Airport.

thenetwork

Quote from: SignBridge on February 13, 2024, 09:01:43 PM
I've seen that in California also, both lead and lag left arrow in the same signal. It was back in 2010 on S.R. 82 (El Camino Real) in Millbrae, near San Fran. Int'l. Airport.

There are two lead & lag arrow intersections in my area.  One in Grand Junction (which also involves a railroad crossing @ the intersection) and one in Montrose, CO.

jakeroot

Quote from: thenetwork on February 13, 2024, 09:11:51 PM
Quote from: SignBridge on February 13, 2024, 09:01:43 PM
I've seen that in California also, both lead and lag left arrow in the same signal. It was back in 2010 on S.R. 82 (El Camino Real) in Millbrae, near San Fran. Int'l. Airport.

There are two lead & lag arrow intersections in my area.  One in Grand Junction (which also involves a railroad crossing @ the intersection) and one in Montrose, CO.

For these, just to clarify, they all operate with lead and lag phasing in the same phase? Or switch between the two depending on, say, time of day?

thenetwork

#5242
Quote from: jakeroot on February 14, 2024, 12:35:29 AM
Quote from: thenetwork on February 13, 2024, 09:11:51 PM
Quote from: SignBridge on February 13, 2024, 09:01:43 PM
I've seen that in California also, both lead and lag left arrow in the same signal. It was back in 2010 on S.R. 82 (El Camino Real) in Millbrae, near San Fran. Int'l. Airport.

There are two lead & lag arrow intersections in my area.  One in Grand Junction (which also involves a railroad crossing @ the intersection) and one in Montrose, CO.

For these, just to clarify, they all operate with lead and lag phasing in the same phase? Or switch between the two depending on, say, time of day?

Yes, after cross-street traffic completes, the leading left green arrows begins the main highway phase, then full green  .  In the case of Montrose (US-50 @ US-550), eastbound US-50 traffic gets an additional lagging left-turn arrow phase.

In the case of the Grand Junction case (WB I-70B @ 31-½ Road), the westbound traffic starts with a leading left arrow phase (green balls for other WB traffic), then full green for EB I-70B traffic.  At the end of the cycle, WB gets another lagging left arrow phase before 31-½ traffic gets their green.

Both situations assume there are left turn/cross-street traffic calls at the traffic sensors at both opportunities 24/7 and there are no trains affecting either intersection.

SignBridge

California is same phase also.

fwydriver405

I know of an intersection in Portland, Maine that does this, though not in the traditional sense as some of these other examples - this is for the West ME Route 22 / Congress Street approach:

- Starts off with a leading protected left turn to Fore River Pkwy + Through traffic continuing west on ME Route 22 / Congress Street.
- Shared permissive left turn - both thru directions of ME Route 22 / Congress proceed
- "Lagging" protected left turn onto Fore River Pkwy from West ME Route 22 / Congress Street. The right turns from Fore River Parkway and I-295 Exit 5 B are also active at this time - I think this left turn might simply be an overlap of the Fore River Pkwy right (or could be reversed).
- West ME Route 22 / Congress Street left turn, and I-295 Exit 5 B change to red, and the left turn from Fore River Pkwy gets its left green arrow.

For some reason, I'm not sure why the circular red is louvred on both the doghouse and 3-section signal, but not the other indications.

roadman65

#5245
https://maps.app.goo.gl/zZch2L9t2SxLMg649
Traffic signals set up like a Fire Signal with flashing yellow on bottom.

I'm guessing the City of Easton did a study to find that the signals at this circle are no longer warranted but instead of flashing them as normal they removed the green lens and set up like an emergency signal.

Looks like it operates for pedestrians as the crosswalk heads are still active. 
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

SilverMustang2011

Quote from: roadman65 on February 25, 2024, 07:35:05 PM
https://maps.app.goo.gl/zZch2L9t2SxLMg649
Traffic signals set up like a Fire Signal with flashing yellow on bottom.

I'm guessing the City of Easton did a study to find that the signals at this circle are no longer warranted but instead of flashing them as normal they removed the green lens and set up like an emergency signal.

Looks like it operates for pedestrians as the crosswalk heads are still active.

Looks like the signals have been like that since at least 2009 per street view, so while it predates something like a HAWK beacon I'm surprised they haven't considered replacing the old signals with one yet.

freebrickproductions

Quote from: roadman65 on February 25, 2024, 07:35:05 PM
Looks like it operates for pedestrians as the crosswalk heads are still active. 

Even better, the previous 9 inch pedestrian signals there (which had been upgraded to LED with the traffic lights) were replaced with the current 16 inch pedestrian signals sometime after 2013:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Easton,+PA/@40.6914801,-75.2090304,3a,90y,291.09h,76.39t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1s00MtHhvPyUC0oH7gR0TWgg!2e0!5s20130801T000000!7i13312!8i6656!4m7!3m6!1s0x89c46b821870585f:0x37203227748fc82b!8m2!3d40.688432!4d-75.2207323!10e5!16zL20vMF83ejI?entry=ttu
It's all fun & games until someone summons Cthulhu and brings about the end of the world.

I also collect traffic lights, road signs, fans, and railroad crossing equipment.

(They/Them)

roadman65

Quote from: SilverMustang2011 on February 25, 2024, 08:29:05 PM
Quote from: roadman65 on February 25, 2024, 07:35:05 PM
https://maps.app.goo.gl/zZch2L9t2SxLMg649
Traffic signals set up like a Fire Signal with flashing yellow on bottom.

I'm guessing the City of Easton did a study to find that the signals at this circle are no longer warranted but instead of flashing them as normal they removed the green lens and set up like an emergency signal.

Looks like it operates for pedestrians as the crosswalk heads are still active.

Looks like the signals have been like that since at least 2009 per street view, so while it predates something like a HAWK beacon I'm surprised they haven't considered replacing the old signals with one yet.

I'm surprised too. It's already acting like one only flashing yellow during normal operations.
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

roadman65

#5249
https://maps.app.goo.gl/SjeXwFKNB2rXzarF8
This right turn signal in Augusta, GA looks like a ramp meter onto a freeway. Two section with no green though.
https://maps.app.goo.gl/TFnA2S36AAgdqgvB7
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe



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