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Thanks to everyone for the feedback on what errors you encountered at https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=33904.0
Corrected several already and appreciate your patience as we work through the rest.

Author Topic: 1932 Kansas City Star article about highways & bridges being built at that time.  (Read 1778 times)

Route66Fan

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Article was found on Newspapers.com.

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Route66Fan

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A few things that I've noticed, on the included map, is that Spring Branch Rd. is now Truman Rd, Sugar Creek Rd. is now Kentucky Rd. Also, I found the part of the article, under the subheading "How the Roads get their Numbers", to be pretty interesting!

motorola edge plus

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fhmiii

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This plan is actually featured in the "Truman" biopic about the President's rise from farm boy to President.
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Road Hog

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This plan is actually featured in the "Truman" biopic about the President's rise from farm boy to President.
Truman's mug is prominent in the story. I assume he was a "county judge" in an anachronistically executive sense like "county judges" in Texas and Arkansas are today.
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fhmiii

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This plan is actually featured in the "Truman" biopic about the President's rise from farm boy to President.
Truman's mug is prominent in the story. I assume he was a "county judge" in an anachronistically executive sense like "county judges" in Texas and Arkansas are today.

Yes, at the time Jackson county legislators were called "judges."  They're now called "legislators."
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bwana39

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This plan is actually featured in the "Truman" biopic about the President's rise from farm boy to President.
Truman's mug is prominent in the story. I assume he was a "county judge" in an anachronistically executive sense like "county judges" in Texas and Arkansas are today.

Yes, at the time Jackson county legislators were called "judges."  They're now called "legislators."

County judges in many  counties in Texas have limited judicial duties. Depending on the particular county, they may have all of the following in the "County Court at Law"



(1)  "Criminal law cases and proceedings" includes cases and proceedings for allegations of conduct punishable in part by confinement in the county jail not to exceed one year.

(2)  "Family law cases and proceedings" includes cases and proceedings under Titles 1, 2, 4, and 5, Family Code.

(3)  "Juvenile law cases and proceedings" includes all cases and proceedings brought under Title 3, Family Code.

(4)  "Mental health cases and proceedings" includes all cases and proceedings brought under Chapter 462, Health and Safety Code, or Subtitle C or D, Title 7, Health and Safety Code.

as well as
(1)  civil cases in which the matter in controversy exceeds $500 but does not exceed $250,000, excluding interest, statutory or punitive damages and penalties, and attorney's fees and costs, as alleged on the face of the petition; and

(2)  appeals of final rulings and decisions of the division of workers' compensation of the Texas Department of Insurance regarding workers' compensation claims, regardless of the amount in controversy

(3) Probate and estate matters

Many counties have a separate County Court at Law presided over by its own elected judge(s). 

Probate and Mental Health Commitments were, historically, almost ALWAYS heard by the county judge in Texas except for the LARGEST counties. Much of the rest of the possible duties of the County Court at Law were handled either by the District Court or by the Justice Courts.  The County Judge does have to be certified (similar to the JP's) but not an attorney.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2023, 05:45:41 PM by bwana39 »
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Let's build what we need as economically as possible.

 


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