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Max Rockatansky:
From what I recall the fact US 80 was never moved to AZ 86 and AZ 84 was part of the rationale of why the City of San Diego once got pushing about extending US 90 to California.  Interestingly what is now AZ 89A was originally planned as AZ 89 and what become US 89 between Wickenburg-Ash Fork was planned as US 280.  The highway through Oak Creek Canyon wasnít finished until 1938 and was ultimately renumbered to AZ 79 when US 89 was extended to Wickenburg in the final version of the US Route System.  I suspect Arizona wanted US 89 in Oak Creek Canyon from the get go but got pushback from the AASHO given how long it would take to construct.  Ironically the corridor of Oak Creek Canyon was ultimately destined to become US 89A. 

https://www.gribblenation.org/2020/04/paper-highways-us-route-280-and-us.html?m=1

Zonie:

--- Quote from: roadman65 on August 10, 2022, 09:21:23 AM ---I was noticing that I-17 on and old map by Enco, was not built over US 89 like you would think.  It appears US 89 had a more convoluted alignment between Phoenix and Flagstaff serving Prescott and then having an Alternate route to head back to I-17 of today.

US89 doubled back east along US 66 instead.


Also AZ 85 north of Gila Bend was also part of US 80 as I-8 replaced AZ 84 to Casa Grande. Though itís odd AZ 84 was not US 80 ALT or another X80 designation at the time I-8 was not part of history as I am sure it was used by cross country motorists as a de facto bypass of Phoenix back then.

--- End quote ---

If you look at historical maps of Arizona, AZ 84 was the de facto bypass.  US 80/89 between Phoenix and Tucson wasn't fully paved until well into WWII. 

Great Lakes Roads:
//www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5kffZsjueE
Here's a video on the I-10 widening project from Loop 202 to south of SR 387.

Improvements call for:


* Adding an HOV lane from the 202 interchange to Riggs Rd interchange
* Adding a third lane in each direction within the median from AZ SR 347 (Queen Creek Rd) to south of AZ SR 387
* Rebuilding the Wild Horse Pass Blvd/Sundust Rd and the AZ SR 347 (Queen Creek Rd) interchanges to Diverging Diamond Interchange
* At the SR 587/Casa Blanca Rd interchange, the interchange itself will be rebuilt into a roundabout with a realignment of Casa Blanca to go over I-10
* A new diamond interchange at Seed Farm Rd
* Bridge removal at Dirk Lay Rd
* Bridge replacements and widenings along the corridor where needed

KeithE4Phx:

--- Quote from: Zonie on August 12, 2022, 02:23:36 PM ---
--- Quote from: roadman65 on August 10, 2022, 09:21:23 AM ---Also AZ 85 north of Gila Bend was also part of US 80 as I-8 replaced AZ 84 to Casa Grande. Though itís odd AZ 84 was not US 80 ALT or another X80 designation at the time I-8 was not part of history as I am sure it was used by cross country motorists as a de facto bypass of Phoenix back then.
--- End quote ---

If you look at historical maps of Arizona, AZ 84 was the de facto bypass.  US 80/89 between Phoenix and Tucson wasn't fully paved until well into WWII.
--- End quote ---

Per this 1938 map, the only stretch of US 80/89 that wasn't paved was from south of Florence to AZ 77 north of Tucson. 

There was also no direct route between Phoenix and Tucson until I-10 was opened in around 1970.  One couldn't travel between them without going through Mesa.  Both AZ 84 and 87 were paved by 1938.

https://www.arizonaroads.com/maps/1938-4.jpg

Sonic99:

--- Quote from: Great Lakes Roads on August 16, 2022, 10:31:07 AM ---//www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5kffZsjueE
Here's a video on the I-10 widening project from Loop 202 to south of SR 387.

Improvements call for:


* Adding an HOV lane from the 202 interchange to Riggs Rd interchange
* Adding a third lane in each direction within the median from AZ SR 347 (Queen Creek Rd) to south of AZ SR 387
* Rebuilding the Wild Horse Pass Blvd/Sundust Rd and the AZ SR 347 (Queen Creek Rd) interchanges to Diverging Diamond Interchange
* At the SR 587/Casa Blanca Rd interchange, the interchange itself will be rebuilt into a roundabout with a realignment of Casa Blanca to go over I-10
* A new diamond interchange at Seed Farm Rd
* Bridge removal at Dirk Lay Rd
* Bridge replacements and widenings along the corridor where needed
--- End quote ---

And that confirms that the GRIC's reasoning for shutting down Wild Horse Pass Motorsports Park (home to 3 of the few remaining club road racing tracks left in the state, along with the only track in the state capable of hosting NHRA Nationals events) was all bunk. They said in their announcement it was "due to the I-10 widening" and that's why they were closing. But in that video, it's clearly shown that the only RoW needed is at the far corner of the northern end of the property, not even close to any of the tracks. As a motorsports fan, it's painful to see how much we've lost around Phoenix in the last 15 years. Manzanita in 2007, Speedworld and PIR's road course in 2012, ET Motorsports Park in 2021, and now WHPMP in 2023. One drag strip left in the state, and that's past Tucson. One dirt track in the state with Canyon Raceway (with rumors that the State has its eyes on killing it in the near future), and one road course at Arizona Motorsports Park that is so tightly regulated by the local gov'ts that it can't do much more than small club events with heavy sound restrictions.

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