Non-Road Boards > Off-Topic

Walmart lawsuit

(1/7) > >>

LM117:
A jury awarded a woman $2.1M after being falsely accused of shoplifting. Apparently, Walmart makes bank on making false accusations and then going for a settlement. WTF?

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/walmart-shoplifted-jury-awards-21-million-81463335

SectorZ:
Apparently they believe that there is a secondary preponderance of evidence for shoplifting cases civilly after criminal acquittal.

The stuff they try just blows my mind.

The concept of using collection companies to collect what are effectively claimed third party damages, without actually going to court first, may be one of the lowest ways to conduct business. Saw this same stuff in the insurance world as well.

Max Rockatansky:
Most states have a Civil Recovery Statute that allows retailers to pursue some form of debt collection related to theft/shoplifting.  The standard rate most retailers attempt to recover is $200 dollars.  The theory is that it covers all the costs associated with the time Loss Prevention puts into a shoplift apprehension.  Usually itís no big deal unless someone makes a dumb ass ďbad stopĒ like what happened here.  Itís likely the Civil Demand people at Walmart werenít talking to the stored and was unaware this was a bad stop where someone was falsely accused of shoplifting.  Typically the Civil Demand is issued via an automated process that reads case reports and suspect mailing addresses.

Typically the rate of actual payment for Civil Demand is about 40%, most people know it would never see a Civil Court.  Thatís one of the primary reasons I tend to think the practice of Civil Demand is antiquated.  Even the military world our Civil Demand recovery rate is just in the 50-60% range.

hbelkins:
If someone who isn't a sworn law enforcement officer attempts to detain you at a retail outlet, are you under any obligation to heed their demands?

Even if it's a uniformed "security guard" with a badge of some sort pinned to their polyester blue shirt with multiple pockets and flaps, are you under any obligation to stop for them? (And yes, I know that many stores employ off-duty sworn officers, and that's a different set of circumstances than hiring Paul Blart.)

zachary_amaryllis:

--- Quote from: hbelkins on December 01, 2021, 11:16:12 AM ---If someone who isn't a sworn law enforcement officer attempts to detain you at a retail outlet, are you under any obligation to heed their demands?

Even if it's a uniformed "security guard" with a badge of some sort pinned to their polyester blue shirt with multiple pockets and flaps, are you under any obligation to stop for them? (And yes, I know that many stores employ off-duty sworn officers, and that's a different set of circumstances than hiring Paul Blart.)

--- End quote ---

so i don't shoplift.

having said that, i've been stopped on the way out of walmart because i was suspected of it. apparently i fit a profile. i told the guy to call the police, and i'd wait for the police to sort it out. the guy was mildly threatening to me 'all you have to do is empty your pockets, man'. after much back-and-forth, he decided it wasn't worth the trouble.

i respect the police, a rarity among those of us who've done time. i have little respect for 'fake' police.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version