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National Boards => General Highway Talk => Topic started by: Alex on July 29, 2009, 01:24:27 PM

Title: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Alex on July 29, 2009, 01:24:27 PM
Was thinking about this when looking at my rand earlier. We are all familiar with the standard street name suffixes like Street, Road, Boulevard, Parkway, Freeway, Expressway, Avenue, etc., but occasionally (and perhaps regionally) we will find a different suffix. There was a post the other day that referred to the Norwood Lateral, and on my recent trip to California, I traveled the Sausalito Lateral. How often is that one used? In Kansas they use the suffix Trafficway, and I was reminded in a recent post of OKC's Tinker Diagonal and found a Turner Diagonal in the Kansas City area just now. Then there are the instances where there is no suffix, such as Richmond's "Boulevard". What others are out there?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mightyace on July 29, 2009, 01:38:50 PM
During my time working for the Roadway Express trucking company in the late 80s, one of my coworkers was working on a program to parse addresses.  Therefore, he was looking at suffixes and found a number of oddball things.

However the one that sticks in my mind is "Swing."  Yes, some road somewhere was named "Grapevine Swing!"  :spin:

I know that "Trail" is occasionally used.  US 11-15 between the north end of the Selinsgrove, PA bypass to somewhere south of the PA 61 bridge to Sunbury is "Susquehanna Trail."  Not surprisingly, the remaining part of a previous alignment of US 11-15 is called "Old Trail."

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=selinsgrove,+pa&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=50.557552,114.169922&ie=UTF8&ll=40.834155,-76.833014&spn=0.0119,0.027874&t=h&z=16 (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=selinsgrove,+pa&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=50.557552,114.169922&ie=UTF8&ll=40.834155,-76.833014&spn=0.0119,0.027874&t=h&z=16)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: agentsteel53 on July 29, 2009, 01:45:37 PM
A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Chris on July 29, 2009, 01:47:46 PM
Oh, they can never think of any good street names in the Netherlands, so they end up picking a suffix, and then open the encyclopedia.

For instance, in my city, the suffix in some neighborhood is "veld" (field). They just simply add all kind of animal types before the suffix, so you'll get street names like "bunny field", "beaver field", "mammoth field", "fox field", "squirrel field" etc.   :paranoid: :-P

Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: agentsteel53 on July 29, 2009, 01:52:02 PM
"bunny field", "beaver field", "mammoth field", "fox field", "squirrel field" etc.  

are these all commonly found creatures in the Netherlands?  :ded:
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheStranger on July 29, 2009, 02:35:21 PM
A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Sacramento's El Camino Avenue has to go in that category as well.  :pan:

In Alberta, "Trail" is rather common too (i.e. Calgary Trail up in Edmonton for part of Highway 2; Deerfoot Trail over in Calgary).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Chris on July 29, 2009, 02:38:00 PM
"bunny field", "beaver field", "mammoth field", "fox field", "squirrel field" etc.  

are these all commonly found creatures in the Netherlands?  :ded:

Yeah, I see mammoths walking by my apartment all the time  :-D
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: cu2010 on July 29, 2009, 02:44:22 PM
I've seen "Run", "Pass", and "Crossing" near Victor, NY. In all three cases, the names involved animals of some sort (I don't recall the exact names of the roads).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: J N Winkler on July 29, 2009, 02:48:52 PM
Some others:

*  Close (very common in Britain and has a specialized meaning in some British cities like Edinburgh)

*  Court

*  Place (typically used in the US to refer to roads which are not squares)

*  Alley

Regarding Spanish-derived street names, there are abbreviations in Spanish which are rarely if ever used in the US, even in natively Spanish-speaking jurisdictions like Puerto Rico.  Americans also don't follow Spanish capitalization, which calls for the generic element of the street name to appear in lowercase only.

In Madrid, calle O'Donnell (named after a nineteenth-century Spanish general and premier of Irish descent) is a major arterial, and appears on signs as "c/ O'Donnell."  On autopista signs in Puerto Rico, it would appear as "Calle O'Donnell."  "Paseo" is sometimes abbreviated "Pº" (using the special superscript "o" available in Spanish).

I don't know if Puerto Rico follows peninsular Spanish address ordering, in which the house number follows the street name (e.g., "Paseo de la Castellana, 67").  I think Mexico does.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: agentsteel53 on July 29, 2009, 02:53:39 PM
I've never seen one.  Can you stick one in an envelope and send it to me?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: corco on July 29, 2009, 06:16:20 PM
Like the Mukilteo Speedway?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Ian on July 29, 2009, 06:36:07 PM
"Lane" is commonly used. I live on a lane.

-One close to me ends in "Hill". Consort Hill is the name.

-Short streets that end in a circle commonly end in "circle".

-The New York "Thruway" and the New England "Turnpike"

-Has anyone said "turnpike"? Turnpikes seem to be common in the northeast.

-"By-Pass" is the name of a lot of roads that by-pass towns.

-In California, there is the El Camino "Real".

Thats all I know.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: agentsteel53 on July 29, 2009, 06:44:21 PM
in "El Camino Real", the designator is "Camino", which means road.  It translates to "the royal road".
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SSOWorld on July 29, 2009, 06:53:45 PM
even just using "Way" as a suffix.

"Whitney Way"
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Duke87 on July 29, 2009, 07:16:43 PM
There are at least a half dozen streets that end in "Trail" in my town.

Mohawk Trail, Cross Country Trail, Quails Trail, West Trail (no, there isn't an East Trail), Settler's Trail, Fishing Trail, Short Trail, Woody Trail, Mountain Trail... maybe one or two more, but I think that's all of them.

Other, more unique oddballs in town:

- Huckleberry Hollow
- Trumbull Gate
- Pilgrim Walk
- Trinity Pass


And how about Grand Concourse in The Bronx?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Alps on July 29, 2009, 08:07:42 PM
In NY near Albany you have Lower and Upper Letter S.  There are a few Plazas in this area and at least one Crossing (and a Cross or two).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: UptownRoadGeek on July 29, 2009, 08:19:52 PM
Rue, Alley & Exchange

Ex:  Rue _______,
      _______ Exchange,
      _______ Alley.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Bryant5493 on July 29, 2009, 08:31:08 PM
Ramsey Clos. SW (Atlanta, Ga.)


Be well,

Bryant
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: WillWeaverRVA on July 29, 2009, 08:37:56 PM
"Crescent" is common here, though it is especially prevalent in Virginia Beach.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SSOWorld on July 29, 2009, 11:08:20 PM
street names without suffixes

Broadway - very common

The Bowery
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Urban Prairie Schooner on July 29, 2009, 11:33:52 PM
Esplanade (as in Brookhollow Esplanade, in Elmwood LA)
Trail (Woodland Trail, etc.)

A word on suffixes and street naming procedure: Uncommon suffixes are always oddball when you are creating a street name database to be used in GIS and other applications. In theory any reasonable word can act as a suffix. In the city where I live, there is a list of approved suffixes to which you are limited when naming a new street, to keep the street name records consistent. Otherwise your street name suffixes would be all over the place and it would be a complete bear to update the suffix generator in the street database to include them all. There are some other cities that I know of which do the same.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mapman on July 30, 2009, 12:06:50 AM
In Santa Cruz, CA, where I grew up, they use the suffix "Curve" on one street, Bethany Curve.  Most of the streets in that part of town are semi-circular (a couple are even full circles).

In parts of the San Francisco Bay Area, "Common" is a common suffix, mostly in new high-density neighborhoods.

I've also seen two suffixes used for the same street.  Sacramento, CA has 65th Street Expressway.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Scott5114 on July 30, 2009, 01:24:15 AM
I've also seen two suffixes used for the same street.  Sacramento, CA has 65th Street Expressway.

Oklahoma City has 36th St Expy.

Kansas City, KS has 18th St Expy and 7th St Trfwy. 18th St Expy is a freeway built on the alignment of 18th Street.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Sykotyk on July 30, 2009, 02:58:31 AM
http://www.usps.com/ncsc/lookups/abbr_suffix.txt (http://www.usps.com/ncsc/lookups/abbr_suffix.txt)

I'd think the Post Office would be the authority on this topic.

Sykotyk
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Chris on July 30, 2009, 03:47:44 AM
street names without suffixes

Broadway - very common


Broadway comes from the Dutch word "breedeweg" (which means Broadway). In Dutch, "breedeweg" is not spelled with a space, so Broadway would technically have been "Broad Way". So "way" is still it's prefix, but written as one word due to the historic influence of the Dutch language.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Scott5114 on July 30, 2009, 06:36:02 AM
http://www.usps.com/ncsc/lookups/abbr_suffix.txt (http://www.usps.com/ncsc/lookups/abbr_suffix.txt)

I'd think the Post Office would be the authority on this topic.

What the heck is a "Stravenue"?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: usends on July 30, 2009, 11:01:29 AM
What the heck is a "Stravenue"?

It's a portmanteau of "Street" and "Avenue".
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: yanksfan6129 on July 30, 2009, 01:27:48 PM
Central Park West
Central Park South
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Bryant5493 on July 30, 2009, 01:32:54 PM
Boulevard

Parkway Drive


Both of these roads are in northeast Atlanta.


Be well,

Bryant
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mightyace on July 30, 2009, 02:40:00 PM
The main drag in Sevierville and Pigeon Forge is simply known as Parkway.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: luokou on July 30, 2009, 03:28:12 PM
Los Alamitos Park is a roundabout in Long Beach where CA 1 (Pacific Coast Hwy), CA 19 (Lakewood Blvd) and Los Coyotes Diagonal intersect.

Up in Portland and my hometown, terraces were pretty common (e.g. SW Maverick Ter), and several streets have no suffix (i.e. SW Greenway, NE Alameda, Broadway)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: J N Winkler on July 30, 2009, 07:16:57 PM
I have never understood "Chausseestrasse" in several German cities (the most famous example being in Berlin).  Chaussée means "road" in French and exists in German as a loanword, so the literal translation of this street name is something like "Road Street."
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Hellfighter on July 30, 2009, 08:28:08 PM
In Detroit, we have Avenues, Drives, and Roads
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: deathtopumpkins on July 31, 2009, 01:37:53 AM
In Elizabeth City, NC, US-17 Business is "North/South Road St." Street signs even abbreviate it as "N./S. Rd. St."
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Coelacanth on July 31, 2009, 04:17:56 PM
street names without suffixes

Broadway - very common


Broadway comes from the Dutch word "breedeweg" (which means Broadway). In Dutch, "breedeweg" is not spelled with a space, so Broadway would technically have been "Broad Way". So "way" is still it's prefix, but written as one word due to the historic influence of the Dutch language.
I think you meant to say that "way" is still its suffix.

Anyway, the point I wanted to make is that I live on Broadway Avenue.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mightyace on July 31, 2009, 05:16:56 PM
A little bit south of the end of the US 202-322 West Chester bypass is the intersection with Street Road.

I have my own picture of it, but until I can scan it, see:

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=chadds+ford+pa&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=50.557552,114.169922&ie=UTF8&ll=39.91994,-75.577011&spn=0.024126,0.055747&z=15&layer=c&cbll=39.919858,-75.576943&panoid=Hk6Ln4cu44nji9bYGHTpgw&cbp=12,339.09,,0,-26.9 (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=chadds+ford+pa&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=50.557552,114.169922&ie=UTF8&ll=39.91994,-75.577011&spn=0.024126,0.055747&z=15&layer=c&cbll=39.919858,-75.576943&panoid=Hk6Ln4cu44nji9bYGHTpgw&cbp=12,339.09,,0,-26.9)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Bickendan on August 02, 2009, 07:07:22 PM

*  Court
Used in Portland for streets that share the same name only a block apart (SE Grant St, SE Grant Pl). Courts do not affect the address grid (Grant St would be 2200 S, Grant Pl would be 2250 S).

Quote
*  Place (typically used in the US to refer to roads which are not squares)
Used in Portland in the same manner as Courts, but only for avenues instead of streets. Much more common, too.
(SE 32nd Ave, SE 32nd Pl; 3200 E, 3250 E)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: hm insulators on August 03, 2009, 03:19:42 PM
The Phoenix area has a "Broadway Road." It runs from south Phoenix eastward through Tempe and Mesa.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Scott5114 on August 03, 2009, 07:23:19 PM

*  Court
Used in Portland for streets that share the same name only a block apart (SE Grant St, SE Grant Pl). Courts do not affect the address grid (Grant St would be 2200 S, Grant Pl would be 2250 S).

Quote
*  Place (typically used in the US to refer to roads which are not squares)
Used in Portland in the same manner as Courts, but only for avenues instead of streets. Much more common, too.
(SE 32nd Ave, SE 32nd Pl; 3200 E, 3250 E)

In OKC "Terrace" normally fulfills this function.

J.K. Rowling included a couple streets with uncommon suffixes (in the U.S., anyway; maybe they're more common in the UK) in her books: A street nearby Privet Drive is called "Wisteria Walk", and Professor Snape lives on a street named "Spinners End".
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Pete from Boston on April 30, 2016, 11:31:03 AM
I just found one that made me do a double take and then go look it up to make sure I wasn't wrong: "Close," as in the street "Fellsdale Close" in upper-crusty Winchester, Massachusetts.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: 74/171FAN on April 30, 2016, 12:08:15 PM
Apex, NC has the Apex Peakway (a partially- completed loop road) (https://www.apexnc.org/199/Apex-Peakway) based off Apex being "The Peak of Good Living" from its motto as it was the peak of the Eastern Seaboard Railway.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: US 81 on April 30, 2016, 12:14:40 PM
I thought I had one that had not been mentioned: "______ Cut Off."  I lived on one growing up; before computerization, 'Cut Off' was a suffix per the Post Office.

But I went to look them up for citation, they have now become "____ Cut Off Road," as in Roberts Cut Off Road in Ft. Worth, Sprinkle Cut Off Road in Austin, Goat Creek Cut Off Road in Kerrville, etc

Somehow I feel cheated....
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: bmorrill on April 30, 2016, 12:42:44 PM
We've got a street here named Hardeman Pass, and many years ago Culwell Street (near the stockyards) was called Culwell Cattle Trail.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kurumi on April 30, 2016, 12:52:59 PM
Hey, it's the Walking Thread :-)

A few previous and later threads:
Very unusual street suffixes: http://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=16661.0
Unconventional street suffix abbreviations on signs: http://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=13995.0
Unique Public Roadway Types: http://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=8383.0

New Haven's Ella T. Grasso Blvd. was formerly named "Boulevard". West Hartford still has a plain Boulevard waiting for an honorific name. In Hartford, east of Boulevard across Prospect Street, is West Boulevard.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Big John on April 30, 2016, 01:18:14 PM
street names without suffixes

Broadway - very common

The Bowery
In Atlanta, there is a Boulevard.  No suffix as it is its own suffix.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: jwolfer on April 30, 2016, 01:58:20 PM
Atlantic Beach FL has Barefoot Trace.. Like Natchez Trace I guess...a few miles away in Ponte Vedra Beach there is a Possum Trot
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Bruce on April 30, 2016, 03:54:07 PM
Even in a grid you can get some weird things... "32nd Upper Avenue S (https://www.google.com/maps/@47.5912245,-122.2915931,3a,75y,118.19h,87.17t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sjAqiHvz52zOZvJh1WOYGuw!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DjAqiHvz52zOZvJh1WOYGuw%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D71.775078%26pitch%3D0!7i13312!8i6656)" is located up a small hill from 32nd Avenue on the Mount Baker Ridge in Seattle. It also has a nice view of the I-90 floating bridges.

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1678/26668863611_a889bceaee_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/GCCU2i)
32nd Upper Avenue South, Mount Baker (https://flic.kr/p/GCCU2i) by SounderBruce (https://www.flickr.com/photos/sounderbruce/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Pete from Boston on April 30, 2016, 07:29:58 PM

I thought I had one that had not been mentioned: "______ Cut Off."  I lived on one growing up; before computerization, 'Cut Off' was a suffix per the Post Office.

But I went to look them up for citation, they have now become "____ Cut Off Road," as in Roberts Cut Off Road in Ft. Worth, Sprinkle Cut Off Road in Austin, Goat Creek Cut Off Road in Kerrville, etc

Somehow I feel cheated....

US 20 in Worcester, Mass., is called Southwest Cutoff.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: hbelkins on April 30, 2016, 07:41:31 PM
I thought I had one that had not been mentioned: "______ Cut Off."  I lived on one growing up; before computerization, 'Cut Off' was a suffix per the Post Office.

But I went to look them up for citation, they have now become "____ Cut Off Road," as in Roberts Cut Off Road in Ft. Worth, Sprinkle Cut Off Road in Austin, Goat Creek Cut Off Road in Kerrville, etc

Somehow I feel cheated....

We have a road locally called the Cutoff Road, which is a shortcut between KY 52 and KY 11 about five miles north of town. It's never officially been called that, however. For years its post office designation was HC (or HCR) 36, and now it's Highway 498.

And there's the infamous Wiener Cutoff Road in Arkansas, a photo of the sign for said road having become a popular Facebook meme.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: GCrites80s on April 30, 2016, 09:02:37 PM
Washington D.C. has "Unit" which is used on streets that lie on borders between the NE/NW/SW/SE parts of town. There's even one called "G Unit".
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on May 01, 2016, 12:53:02 AM
Edina, MN has a "Chowen Curve", which is a western continuation of Chowen Avenue where that road turns back onto its north-south trajectory.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Eth on May 01, 2016, 08:05:09 AM
Washington D.C. has "Unit" which is used on streets that lie on borders between the NE/NW/SW/SE parts of town. There's even one called "G Unit".

That's actually a block number, not a suffix (example) (https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8898048,-77.0019791,3a,75y,141.26h,78.27t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sWnjdAIiRxhPIDI9uHvLjUg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656). "Unit" is DC's weird way of referring to the block with addresses 0-99.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: froggie on May 01, 2016, 08:25:33 AM
One not mentioned in either this thread or the three other threads we've had on the subject (links posted earlier by Kurumi) is "Flat".  We have a few "Flats" in my area, including Jaffin Flat here in Greensboro and also Couture Flat in Lyndon.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: dgolub on May 01, 2016, 09:55:07 AM
Central Park West
Central Park South

I guess you haven't been up to my neighborhood, 'cause there's also Central Park North.  Then, in Brooklyn there's Prospect Park West and Prospect Park Southwest.  The Bronx has Van Cortlandt Park South and Bronx Park East.  There are probably others that I'm not thinking of.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: dgolub on May 01, 2016, 09:56:52 AM
Suffolk County out on Long Island has a whole batch of streets with names ending in "path" such as Straight Path (CR 2), Joshua's Path (NY 111), Old Willets Path (CR 108), Bicycle Path (yes, that's a street, not a bike path), Doctor's Path, Stephen Hands Path, etc.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: RG407 on May 01, 2016, 10:53:08 PM
There is a neighborhood near where I live in Longwood, Florida with tons of unusual suffixes.  The main road in the subdivision is Tollgate Trail, which isn't an unusual suffix, but look at some of the side streets....

Meadow Creek Cove
Heather Hill
Tollgate Branch
Western Fork
Eastern Fork
Fox Ridge Run
Sweetbriar Branch
Post 'n Rail Road  (not an unusual suffix at all, but the main name is pretty odd)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kkt on May 01, 2016, 10:54:49 PM
street names without suffixes

Broadway - very common

The Bowery
In Atlanta, there is a Boulevard.  No suffix as it is its own suffix.

Bellingham, Washington has one of those too.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: CNGL-Leudimin on May 02, 2016, 06:13:40 AM
Motorway. I was surprised to see it as a valid suffix in the US.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Rothman on May 02, 2016, 08:26:08 AM
Just thought about this this morning.

Although officially called "Skull Fork," (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Skull+Fork,+Weeksbury,+KY+41667/@37.2973374,-82.7258368,14.75z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x88453b3cb5a8f853:0xeb5d2bcfa5bb1ed7) locals call it "going up Skull." (Floyd County, KY)

My father said heading up there was the first time he saw a trailer straddling a creek.  Didn't take a genius to figure out why.

Muddy Gut also came to mind (every couple of years some network goes down in there to do some story on the misery of being poor in Appalachia), but I guess its official name is "Muddy Gut Branch (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Muddy+Gut+Branch,+Weeksbury,+KY+41667/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x88453c62c2212e6f:0xd15bea16dd957c62?sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjLqMvzsbvMAhVGFj4KHYh1AwAQ8gEIGzAA)."
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: dgolub on May 02, 2016, 08:48:25 AM
J.K. Rowling included a couple streets with uncommon suffixes (in the U.S., anyway; maybe they're more common in the UK) in her books: A street nearby Privet Drive is called "Wisteria Walk", and Professor Snape lives on a street named "Spinners End".

That exists in the real world in Long Beach, NY.  They have one for each month: January Walk, February Walk, and so on through December Walk.  The catch is that those streets are all pedestrian only, hence the names.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Buffaboy on May 02, 2016, 10:28:42 PM
How uncommon are streets with a suffix of "Common (https://www.google.com/maps/@42.7425953,-78.8584648,18z)?"
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: 1995hoo on May 02, 2016, 10:34:27 PM
Washington D.C. has "Unit" which is used on streets that lie on borders between the NE/NW/SW/SE parts of town. There's even one called "G Unit".

That's not the street name, it's the block number. It's the "unit block" of whatever street, avenue, etc. It goes along with the 100 block, 200 block, etc. The unit block theoretically has addresses from 1 to 99. The next block is the 100 block and has numbers from 100 to 199 and so on up.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SignGeek101 on May 02, 2016, 10:35:38 PM
How about the suffix 'Mall', on a road that doesn't border (or is private) a shopping mall?

Graham Mall is the example I can think of here. It does have to do with a transit 'mall', so I guess that doesn't count. Maybe?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: 1995hoo on May 02, 2016, 10:55:12 PM
How about the suffix 'Mall', on a road that doesn't border (or is private) a shopping mall?

Graham Mall is the example I can think of here. It does have to do with a transit 'mall', so I guess that doesn't count. Maybe?

Pall Mall and The Mall in London are probably the classic examples, although the Brits don't pronounce "mall" in the same way North Americans do.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Rothman on May 03, 2016, 07:46:22 AM
Although there are shops along it, there's also Nicollet Mall in Minneapolis.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SD Mapman on May 03, 2016, 11:20:33 AM
There's a bunch of "Corso"s in Nebraska City. Not sure if those exist anywhere else.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.673089,-95.8590047,3a,16.4y,211.93h,88.75t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9sBaZWl0UBzbBq1i9w3wuA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656 (https://www.google.com/maps/@40.673089,-95.8590047,3a,16.4y,211.93h,88.75t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9sBaZWl0UBzbBq1i9w3wuA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: froggie on May 03, 2016, 11:33:34 AM
A few more suffixes not mentioned yet, all of them in the Ghent neighborhood of Norfolk, VA:

Gardens (there are two of them)
Mews
Arch
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: bzakharin on May 03, 2016, 12:11:31 PM
J.K. Rowling included a couple streets with uncommon suffixes (in the U.S., anyway; maybe they're more common in the UK) in her books: A street nearby Privet Drive is called "Wisteria Walk", and Professor Snape lives on a street named "Spinners End".

That exists in the real world in Long Beach, NY.  They have one for each month: January Walk, February Walk, and so on through December Walk.  The catch is that those streets are all pedestrian only, hence the names.
Philadelphia has walks meant for pedestrians including streets that are otherwise "streets" or "avenues", but have pedestrian-only segments signed as "walks". The Locust Walk is the main pedestrian thoroughfare of the University of Pennsylvania. Street Blades that identify walks are rare, but here's one at a pedestrian only intersection: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9499166,-75.1955628,3a,75y,187.78h,88.4t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sm1WO3Hg9OzNoHdnPN8GUxg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!5m1!1e1?hl=en-US and here's one at an intersection with a regular street: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9501969,-75.1994767,3a,75y,10.19h,89.62t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sTiEJ5whQMo68bmwnG0YXpQ!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo1.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DTiEJ5whQMo68bmwnG0YXpQ%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D108.44843%26pitch%3D0!7i13312!8i6656!5m1!1e1?hl=en-US
The exception is numbered streets. Those don't become walks, even the pedestrian segments.

How about the suffix 'Mall', on a road that doesn't border (or is private) a shopping mall?

Graham Mall is the example I can think of here. It does have to do with a transit 'mall', so I guess that doesn't count. Maybe?

Pall Mall and The Mall in London are probably the classic examples, although the Brits don't pronounce "mall" in the same way North Americans do.

In Philly, Independence Mall (East) is famous, partly because KYW, the local news radio station used to introduce itself every hour "From Independence Mall" for 35 years, though the studios moved to another location in 2014. It's co-signed as 5th street.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadman65 on May 03, 2016, 12:31:39 PM
What about Central Park West, North, and South in NYC?  Using a direction as the suffix.  However, go Downtown and see "Bowery" without its suffix.

Lately Wichita, KS is dropping suffixes from their city streets and eliminating them along the interstates and the freeway parts of K96 and US 54. 

Then there is Park Row near City Hall and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Oh yes, for The Bronx there is a Concourse for the major boulevard that runs up and down the center ridge of the NYC borough.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mapman1071 on May 03, 2016, 07:17:04 PM
What about Central Park West, North, and South in NYC?  Using a direction as the suffix.  However, go Downtown and see "Bowery" without its suffix.

Lately Wichita, KS is dropping suffixes from their city streets and eliminating them along the interstates and the freeway parts of K96 and US 54. 

Then there is Park Row near City Hall and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Oh yes, for The Bronx there is a Concourse for the major boulevard that runs up and down the center ridge of the NYC borough.

Bowery is the name the street, No Suffix
Grand Concourse is the short form of the Grand Boulevard and Concourse.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadman65 on May 03, 2016, 07:39:27 PM
What about Central Park West, North, and South in NYC?  Using a direction as the suffix.  However, go Downtown and see "Bowery" without its suffix.

Lately Wichita, KS is dropping suffixes from their city streets and eliminating them along the interstates and the freeway parts of K96 and US 54. 

Then there is Park Row near City Hall and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Oh yes, for The Bronx there is a Concourse for the major boulevard that runs up and down the center ridge of the NYC borough.

Bowery is the name the street, No Suffix
Grand Concourse is the short form of the Grand Boulevard and Concourse.


And how common is it to have a street name with a suffix?

Also Concourse is still unusual as you do not hear it often a major artery or any side street with that particular suffix.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: oscar on May 03, 2016, 08:30:27 PM
Behchokǫ̀ in Canada's Northwest Territories (along NT 3, between Yellowknife and Fort Providence) has most if not all of its roads suffixed with "Tili", a suffix I've seen nowhere else. I don't know whether "tili" means street, road, or some other road type in the native Dogrib language.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: lepidopteran on May 03, 2016, 11:09:16 PM
Regarding "Mews", there appear to be a lot of these in England.  The only time I ever saw one in the USA was in New York City; there's a "Washington Mews" off Washington Square Park.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: lepidopteran on May 03, 2016, 11:28:33 PM
Someone mentioned "Street Rd." in suburban Philadelphia.  There's also an "Avenue Rd." in Toronto.

Then there's "Highway", for roads that are not necessarily freeways.
Brooklyn has King's Hwy.
Alexandria, VA has the (potentially controversial) Jefferson Davis Hwy.
MD has highways named Ritchie (MD-2), Crain (MD-3), Defense (MD-450), etc.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: oscar on May 03, 2016, 11:35:54 PM
Alexandria, VA has the (potentially controversial) Jefferson Davis Hwy.

It is US 1 through parts of Alexandria, and Arlington too, as well as other places outside northern Virginia. Whatever one might think of the name, the route designation qualifies it as a "highway" even with the urban setting and all the traffic lights.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: briantroutman on May 04, 2016, 12:42:51 AM
Williamsport, PA has Via Bella (not Via Bella Street as mislabeled on Google and Apple Maps). It’s essentially a frontage road providing downtown access to and from I-180. In this case, I suppose Via would be the suffix or “generic odonym”.

Regarding "Mews", there appear to be a lot of these in England.

A mews is a row of horse stables (or garages, in more modern times) with townhouses above them. In England, these mews probably are true to their name. In the US, it seems to be a term gratuitously used by suburban olde towne fake downtown developments.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadman65 on May 04, 2016, 02:59:13 AM
I never saw Trafficway before I visited Kansas City, MO.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: froggie on May 04, 2016, 07:21:40 AM
Quote from: briantroutman
A mews is a row of horse stables (or garages, in more modern times) with townhouses above them. In England, these mews probably are true to their name. In the US, it seems to be a term gratuitously used by suburban olde towne fake downtown developments.

The example I cited is in one of the older neighborhoods of Norfolk, VA.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: empirestate on May 04, 2016, 08:03:52 AM
How about the suffix 'Mall', on a road that doesn't border (or is private) a shopping mall?

Graham Mall is the example I can think of here. It does have to do with a transit 'mall', so I guess that doesn't count. Maybe?

Pall Mall and The Mall in London are probably the classic examples, although the Brits don't pronounce "mall" in the same way North Americans do.

They probably also wonder why Americans can't recognize your basic mall unless it's enclosed and has shops along it. :-D

The street I grew up on had a mall down its center, which was basically where kids went to play outside. "Going to the mall" didn't have the meaning for me that it now has for most American kids until much later.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: GaryV on May 04, 2016, 06:15:12 PM
Then there's "Highway", for roads that are not necessarily freeways.
Lenawee County, MI, has dead end dirt roads that are called "Highways".
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: opspe on June 15, 2016, 05:10:57 PM
Got a few bumps here.

There's a few double-suffixed streets in Portland, such as SW Market Street Drive: https://goo.gl/maps/neu6PS557Hp (https://goo.gl/maps/neu6PS557Hp).  There's also SW Ford Street Drive, SW Mill Street Terrace, and SW Broadway Drive (as opposed to plain old SW Broadway).  Another interesting one is NE Alameda, which officially has no street suffix because it's more or less the Spanish equivalent of "Broadway".

In Vancouver, there are several Diversions: Kitsilano Diversion, Victoria Diversion, Boyd Diversion: https://goo.gl/maps/cNvyUdm5FEo (https://goo.gl/maps/cNvyUdm5FEo)    There are also a few Connectors: Cassiar Connector, Aurora Connector (which they actually abbreviated): https://goo.gl/maps/fsJH3TCXMny (https://goo.gl/maps/fsJH3TCXMny)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: rarnold on June 15, 2016, 05:35:33 PM
Some areas of Idaho use "grade" as a suffix for roads. Santa Fe also uses avienda, calle, and camino as well as trail.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: JustDrive on July 09, 2016, 01:26:29 AM
A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Alameda Street in Los Angeles translates to "Parkway Street"
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TEG24601 on July 09, 2016, 10:28:43 AM
A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Alameda Street in Los Angeles translates to "Parkway Street"


Sounds like the few places I've seen Broadway Street, Broadway Avenue, and Broadway Boulevard... when Broadway is already suffixed... way.  Thankfully Seattle really confuses people with a Broadway and a Broad Street.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: bzakharin on July 18, 2016, 12:06:58 PM
A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Alameda Street in Los Angeles translates to "Parkway Street"


Sounds like the few places I've seen Broadway Street, Broadway Avenue, and Broadway Boulevard... when Broadway is already suffixed... way.  Thankfully Seattle really confuses people with a Broadway and a Broad Street.
Ha! New York has three Broadways and four Broad Streets. Manhattan has both, two blocks apart from each other. The Bronx and Queens have both as well. The continuation of Brooklyn's Broadway into Manhattan (under a different name) comes within two blocks of Manhattan's Broadway. Interestingly, the Broad Streets last only a few blocks, while the Broadways are major arteries.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TR69 on July 18, 2016, 07:59:20 PM
Louisville has Evergreen Wynde.

Louisville also has Third Street Road and Seventh Street Road.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Rothman on July 19, 2016, 10:05:29 AM
A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Alameda Street in Los Angeles translates to "Parkway Street"


Sounds like the few places I've seen Broadway Street, Broadway Avenue, and Broadway Boulevard... when Broadway is already suffixed... way.  Thankfully Seattle really confuses people with a Broadway and a Broad Street.
Ha! New York has three Broadways and four Broad Streets. Manhattan has both, two blocks apart from each other. The Bronx and Queens have both as well. The continuation of Brooklyn's Broadway into Manhattan (under a different name) comes within two blocks of Manhattan's Broadway. Interestingly, the Broad Streets last only a few blocks, while the Broadways are major arteries.

Meh.  I wouldn't consider the Williamsburg Bridge Brooklyn's Broadway (https://goo.gl/maps/wAZXtdeBrn72).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: ModernDayWarrior on July 19, 2016, 02:18:55 PM
There are several streets in Missouri with the prefix "Trafficway," particularly in Kansas City. It often gets abbreviated to "Trfwy" and I remember being really confused by it when I was younger.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on July 19, 2016, 02:23:00 PM
There are several streets in Missouri with the prefix "Trafficway," particularly in Kansas City. It often gets abbreviated to "Trfwy" and I remember being really confused by it when I was younger.

As stated in the original post.

Was thinking about this when looking at my rand earlier. We are all familiar with the standard street name suffixes like Street, Road, Boulevard, Parkway, Freeway, Expressway, Avenue, etc., but occasionally (and perhaps regionally) we will find a different suffix. There was a post the other day that referred to the Norwood Lateral, and on my recent trip to California, I traveled the Sausalito Lateral. How often is that one used? In Kansas they use the suffix Trafficway, and I was reminded in a recent post of OKC's Tinker Diagonal and found a Turner Diagonal in the Kansas City area just now. Then there are the instances where there is no suffix, such as Richmond's "Boulevard". What others are out there?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: epzik8 on July 28, 2016, 06:14:02 PM
Columbia, Maryland is extremely infamous for this. A family who's friends with mine (specifically, that father and my father have been friends for ages) lived on a street suffixed "Hill" in Columbia. The area has suburban streets and cul-de-sacs with such suffixes as "Ride", "Sky", "Row", "Run", "Spring", "Star", "Calm", "Clover" and "Screen". It even extends into neighboring Ellicott City and Clarksville. The planners seemed to be extremely fond of "Hill" and "Row". My dad's sister, brother-in-law and my cousins, who lived more on the line between Columbia and Clarksville, were fortunate enough to live on a "Court".
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: jay8g on August 01, 2016, 10:47:45 AM
Apparently, there is an actual street (https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6264188,-122.3579041,3a,16.8y,200.98h,81.7t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sjuH46kNHsEdWavkDwWx9Ag!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1?hl=en) in Seattle with the suffix "driveway" (Drwy on the signs).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: bzakharin on August 01, 2016, 01:05:50 PM
There are a bunch off signed Driveways (Dwy on signs) off of Wood Avenue in Iselin, NJ (e.g. https://www.google.com/maps/@40.5611186,-74.3264692,3a,75y,79.18h,86.94t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sDGUuniB8MLpezEDZPr_y1w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!5m1!1e1). At one point, that's all they were, Driveways to buildings they were named after, but some of the buildings changed hands and the Driveway names were not updated. So, "Hilton Driveway" takes you to "Hotel Woodbridge" now.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: chays on September 01, 2016, 02:04:52 PM
Lawton, OK, has the Quanah Parker Trailway.

https://goo.gl/maps/HR3oCisJb9J2
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Avalanchez71 on September 01, 2016, 04:38:01 PM
Course
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: jlwm on September 02, 2016, 02:45:05 AM
Houston has Buffalo Speedway (abbreviated Spdwy or Spwy on street signs).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: cpzilliacus on September 02, 2016, 04:31:45 PM
Apparently, there is an actual street (https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6264188,-122.3579041,3a,16.8y,200.98h,81.7t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sjuH46kNHsEdWavkDwWx9Ag!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1?hl=en) in Seattle with the suffix "driveway" (Drwy on the signs).

The municipality of North Chevy Chase, Maryland has a few "driveways," including Kenilworth Driveway (https://www.google.com/maps/@39.0017471,-77.0728588,3a,26.1y,158.05h,85.01t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1szH4ZXyolTGpsjJ0v6DC3rA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1).

Not so far away, in the Chevy Chase area of the District of Columbia, is this circle (https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9756402,-77.0667178,3a,15y,202.72h,89.05t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZAHrfVE7wrsj_hVm7qC0XQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1) (there are several others in D.C.).

Baltimore City has The Alameda (https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3450454,-76.5996794,3a,15y,99.25h,92.35t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sAMKCY10QZVONa60XSqxZCw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656) and its own Broadway (https://www.google.com/maps/@39.29516,-76.5941935,3a,75y,94.62h,90.18t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZca8XQoeAJuP5Ibp8AuWAA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Kacie Jane on September 02, 2016, 06:34:13 PM
Ha! New York has three Broadways and four Broad Streets. Manhattan has both, two blocks apart from each other. The Bronx and Queens have both as well. The continuation of Brooklyn's Broadway into Manhattan (under a different name) comes within two blocks of Manhattan's Broadway. Interestingly, the Broad Streets last only a few blocks, while the Broadways are major arteries.

Meh.  I wouldn't consider the Williamsburg Bridge Brooklyn's Broadway (https://goo.gl/maps/wAZXtdeBrn72).

Correct.  The continuation of Brooklyn's Broadway is actually Grand Street, not Kenmare/Delancey.  And Grand Street not only intersects Manhattan's Broadway, but makes it most of the way across the island to the Holland Tunnel.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: cpzilliacus on September 08, 2016, 12:15:21 AM
J.K. Rowling included a couple streets with uncommon suffixes (in the U.S., anyway; maybe they're more common in the UK) in her books: A street nearby Privet Drive is called "Wisteria Walk", and Professor Snape lives on a street named "Spinners End".

That exists in the real world in Long Beach, NY.  They have one for each month: January Walk, February Walk, and so on through December Walk.  The catch is that those streets are all pedestrian only, hence the names.

Baltimore City, Maryland  has a Leith Walk (https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3656805,-76.5908086,3a,75y,136.47h,78.27t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1swKnF0cq8CgkOb2eLauP7og!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1) which  is open to bikes and motorized traffic as well as pedestrians.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Aerobird on January 28, 2017, 06:14:57 PM
Belatedly...I kept expecting to see this (first) one as I went through the thread, but if it was there, I missed it, therefore-

In Tallahassee, Florida, there's a group of roads in the north part of town that are suffixed "Ride": "North Ride", "Vinnedge Ride", "Ruadh Ride" and "South Ride". While not spectacularly so two of the three are rather hilly, so I suspect the first was named to reflect that and the others followed the pattern.

Further south in town there's the Indianhead neighborhood, which, when it was being built in the late 1940s-early 1950s, had the developers decide to name the streets with names from the Seminole language (http://www.olary.com/nene.html), working with the state librarian to do so, and therefore now the roads through the area are all suffixed "Nene" - which translates to "trail".

Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Otto Yamamoto on January 28, 2017, 09:04:12 PM
street names without suffixes

Broadway - very common

The Bowery
'The Bowery' is the area, the street is simply 'Bowery'

XT1254

Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mapman1071 on January 29, 2017, 01:47:47 AM
The Phoenix area has a "Broadway Road." It runs from south Phoenix eastward through Tempe and Mesa.

Broadway Road Aliment runs from Maricopa/La Paz county line east to Maricopa/Pinal county Line (Continues east in to Pinal County as Broadway Avenue)

Also Tucson has Broadway Blvd
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: epzik8 on January 29, 2017, 09:44:47 AM
Anything in the area of Columbia, Maryland.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: jmd41280 on January 29, 2017, 11:54:51 AM
PJ McArdle Roadway (https://www.google.com/maps/place/P.+J.+McArdle+Roadway,+Pittsburgh,+PA/@40.4290846,-79.9992295,3a,66.8y,17.26h,87.64t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1swzQsdSCNQ73hE4sLa0QAbA!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x8834f14efc86af39:0xe421e320915a4abb) in Pittsburgh, PA, the main route from the South Side and Liberty Bridge up to the top of Mt. Washington.

Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Quillz on January 29, 2017, 12:56:05 PM
Moorpark, CA has both an "Elk Run" and "Elk Run Loop."
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 29, 2017, 05:55:39 PM
Des Moines is pretty much entirely conventional, with exception to this one, Sterling Trace:

(https://i.imgur.com/qUA87Xf.jpg) (https://i.imgur.com/qUA87Xf.jpg)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: 7/8 on April 17, 2017, 02:30:16 PM
I found Viewmont Close in Kitchener, ON.
(http://i.imgur.com/2JWsiTZ.jpg)

It's also interesting since it's shaped like an upside-down "T", with two cul-de-sacs on each end, which means there's an intersection within itself.
(http://i.imgur.com/yc22Vso.png)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: 7/8 on August 14, 2017, 08:59:18 AM
I'm resurrecting this old thread for another example I found: Westchester Bourne on the 401 near London, ON. I tried looking up bourne, but all I see is Jason Bourne :pan:

(http://i.imgur.com/kC1fOAQ.jpg)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: MN34 on August 14, 2017, 06:47:39 PM
There's a "Yates Bay", "Moorland Chase", and "Nantwick Ridge" near me.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Pink Jazz on August 15, 2017, 12:11:56 AM
Where I used to lived in New Mexico, "Loop" was fairly common.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: inkyatari on August 15, 2017, 11:06:44 AM
I have one nearby called "Morris Blacktop," although I'm not convinced that's the road's real name.

EDIT:  Yep, it's not.  It's actually N 30th Road, although businesses along the road call it Morris Blacktop.
Title: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: national highway 1 on September 30, 2017, 08:04:04 AM
‘Parade’ is a common suffix here in Australia, e.g. Anzac Pde, Marine Pde, Railway Pde etc.  https://goo.gl/maps/WLYyK4SXhSB2 (https://goo.gl/maps/WLYyK4SXhSB2)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: 21stCenturyRoad on September 30, 2017, 08:34:25 AM
Tucker’s grade near Punta Gorda, FL
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: paulthemapguy on September 30, 2017, 04:56:10 PM
Oswego, IL has a "Partridge Square"

https://goo.gl/maps/CaPiPfd2hBH2

I find "Terraces" to be fairly uncommon.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: US 89 on September 30, 2017, 09:16:33 PM
I don't think anyone has mentioned the Pinellas Bayway near St Petersburg FL.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: 1995hoo on October 01, 2017, 09:00:41 AM
There's a street here in Kingstowne called Lavenham Landing, made doubly strange because it's not near water.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadman65 on October 27, 2017, 09:41:05 PM
In Kenilworth, NJ there is a Via Vitale.  I guess the Vitale is the name and it has no suffix, but one IMO is uncommon.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: US 89 on October 27, 2017, 09:48:49 PM
In Kenilworth, NJ there is a Via Vitale.  I guess the Vitale is the name and it has no suffix, but one IMO is uncommon.

Via is Latin for road, so that basically acts as the suffix here. (Hence, viatology :pan:). It’s no different than Spanish road names in the southwest like El Camino Real (the royal road).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Avalanchez71 on November 10, 2017, 09:16:14 PM
Cay
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: sandwalk on November 10, 2017, 10:10:17 PM
A small stretch of US 250 in Sandusky, Ohio is called Sycamore Line.
https://goo.gl/maps/T1zuh4LQuRq

Terry Arcade in Norwalk, Ohio
https://goo.gl/maps/BCQsSbz4irE2

East, West, & South Roadway around Public Square in Cleveland
https://goo.gl/maps/oWn6cGzxAvT2
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: CNGL-Leudimin on November 11, 2017, 04:17:41 PM
Too bad what would be North Roadway is part of Rockwell Ave instead...
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: chays on December 19, 2018, 11:52:21 AM
Here's one that I haven't seen before: Private.

Not "Private" as in private road.  I found a road in Ottawa called Thad Johnson Private.

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.3272665,-75.6514691,18.25z
GSV: https://goo.gl/maps/jvKDdRnvPBE2

Here's the Wikipedia page about Thad Johnson.  There's even a line near the end about the road named after him: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Thad_Johnson
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: bcroadguy on December 21, 2018, 05:54:32 AM
Port Coquitlam, BC has a street called Riverwood Gate

https://www.google.com/maps/@49.2627288,-122.7561539,3a,15.5y,217.25h,108.89t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sCLKJq7GYE48qs24-j5_CdA!2e0!7i16384!8i8192
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: sandwalk on December 23, 2018, 08:44:47 AM
Clifton 'Prado' in Lakewood, Ohio:
https://goo.gl/maps/JLC4ZDGb8tm
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SSR_317 on December 24, 2018, 12:40:03 PM
As far as I can tell, no one in this thread has mentioned Indianapolis' fondness for double suffixed streets, such as Fall Creek Parkway, North Drive or Kessler Boulevard, West Drive.

Also, in regard to the suffix Trace, Wayne Trace in Fort Wayne, IN (and in nearby areas of NE Indiana & W Ohio) is a prominent urban street and rural road.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Kulerage on January 15, 2019, 08:52:19 PM
In Cary, I've found an Arlington Ridge (https://www.google.com/maps/@35.7905607,-78.8351783,3a,41.5y,108.3h,85.29t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sivel5FDvjv1c6UHgs0ULMg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656), and Village Greenway (https://www.google.com/maps/@35.7808469,-78.7631112,3a,15y,338.31h,93.88t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sairHT211dqLzX0QHR2wkrw!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DairHT211dqLzX0QHR2wkrw%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D163.72672%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i13312!8i6656). Greenway isn't uncommon, but usually refers to recreational trails instead of roads.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: DandyDan on January 15, 2019, 10:37:02 PM
The Omaha area has a number of streets which end in Plaza. If you live in an apartment there, it's likely you live on a Plaza, although none of them are officially maintained by the city.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: apeman33 on January 16, 2019, 01:14:02 AM
Garden City, Kansas, has four frontage roads designated as "Plaza" that would probably be known as terraces in other places.

Kansas Plaza actually has two sections off Kansas Ave., one from Third to Center and the other from Fleming St. to Campus Dr.

Fulton Plaza is just off Fulton St. It's only a block long.

There are two Taylor plazas off Taylor Ave. These aren't disconnected parts of the same road like Kansas Avenue. These are on either side of Taylor Ave. Taylor Plaza East runs from Alma St. to Campbell St. Taylor Plaza West runs from Olive to Campbell (it's the shorter of the two).

Interestingly, there is a Fulton Terrace but it's a parking lot for an office park and I think it's only named as such so that the offices back farther from the street can have their own addresses (instead an office being "1520 Fulton St. Suite J," it's "1538 Fulton Terrace.")

So the plazas are actually terraces and the terrace is actually a plaza.

Meanwhile, over in Dodge City, there are streets called Cannery Row and Elbow Bend.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on January 16, 2019, 01:05:25 PM
Garden City, Kansas, has four frontage roads designated as "Plaza" that would probably be known as terraces in other places.

Kansas Plaza actually has two sections off Kansas Ave., one from Third to Center and the other from Fleming St. to Campus Dr.

Fulton Plaza is just off Fulton St. It's only a block long.

There are two Taylor plazas off Taylor Ave. These aren't disconnected parts of the same road like Kansas Avenue. These are on either side of Taylor Ave. Taylor Plaza East runs from Alma St. to Campbell St. Taylor Plaza West runs from Olive to Campbell (it's the shorter of the two).

Interestingly, there is a Fulton Terrace but it's a parking lot for an office park and I think it's only named as such so that the offices back farther from the street can have their own addresses (instead an office being "1520 Fulton St. Suite J," it's "1538 Fulton Terrace.")

So the plazas are actually terraces and the terrace is actually a plaza.

To me, a Terrace is just like a Street, because that's how Kansas City does it.

To me, a Plaza could be a cul-de-sac, a multi-dwelling complex, a business park, or something like that.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: MantyMadTown on January 16, 2019, 07:08:27 PM
In Madison, we have a few streets named Crest, over by the Hilldale Mall.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: empirestate on January 17, 2019, 11:47:42 AM
To me, a Terrace is just like a Street, because that's how Kansas City does it.

To me, a Plaza could be a cul-de-sac, a multi-dwelling complex, a business park, or something like that.

To me, a Terrace would be something built into or off of the side of a slope, elevated (presumably artificially) on its downslope side. In other words, like a terrace. :-)

A Plaza would be something rather wide and open, with some kind of suggested (if not actual) public function. In other words, like a plaza. :-)

Here's an example of what I think of as a "Plaza": https://goo.gl/maps/dRcSExPRhBp
Here's a "Terrace": https://goo.gl/maps/nTaPVMLNaF42
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: apeman33 on January 18, 2019, 12:52:19 PM
I was thinking of "Terrace" in the way some cities may call a street "XYZ Terrace" since it either is a spur of or runs parallel to an "XYZ Street." In each of Garden City's cases of "Plaza," the street's function is like that of a frontage road.

Fulton Terrace, on the other hand, functions the way kphoger described one of his definitions of a plaza: it's a business park. Every front door faces the parking lot but are addressed as though they face a street.

The one building on Fulton Terrace is L shaped and the addresses are based on the way a theoretical street in front of them would run. The offices in the north-south leg of the L have addresses of the 200 North block of Fulton Terrace but the east-west leg's offices are addressed as the 1500 East block.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Evan_Th on January 18, 2019, 05:36:41 PM
A couple years ago, I stayed in a hotel just off "Great Highway" in San Francisco.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on January 18, 2019, 05:58:29 PM
A couple years ago, I stayed in a hotel just off "Great Highway" in San Francisco.

"Highway" is not an uncommon generic.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Kacie Jane on March 21, 2019, 10:27:37 AM
The Scotiabank Saddledome in Calgary has a few Trails in the surrounding Stampede fairgrounds, but more unique is that the arena's street address is on Saddledome Rise SE.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadman65 on March 28, 2019, 10:28:54 PM
Real in California which I believe is been talked about in El Camino Real.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: CNGL-Leudimin on March 29, 2019, 08:56:18 AM
"Real" is not a street suffix prefix in Spanish. "Camino" is, and as such it is the "suffix" in El Camino Real.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: JustDrive on March 30, 2019, 03:18:11 AM
There’s a residential area in Ventura, CA named after U.S. presidents where there’s an “Arthur Rondo” and a “Garfield Rondo.”
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on March 30, 2019, 07:11:04 PM
Real in California which I believe is been talked about in El Camino Real.

"Real" is not a street suffix prefix in Spanish. "Camino" is, and as such it is the "suffix" in El Camino Real.

To be specific...

El = The
Camino = Road
Real = Royal

In Spanish, the adjective most often comes after the noun—unlike in English, in which the adjective almost always comes first—and the same sort of difference exists with street names.

For example, the route I often take when coming into a particular town in Mexico is as follows:
Calle 16 de Septiembre
Calle Ramos Arizpe
Calle Eugenio Aguirre Benavides
Calle Orilla de Agua

It should be obvious by those street names that they don't all have different "suffixes".  Rather, "calle" means "street".

This is why I don't like referring to it as a "suffix" at all.  Instead, I refer to it as the "generic" and the main part of the street name as the "specific".  Then it doesn't matter which comes first.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: MNHighwayMan on March 30, 2019, 07:16:44 PM
This is why I don't like referring to it as a "suffix" at all.  Instead, I refer to it as the "generic" and the main part of the street name as the "specific".  Then it doesn't matter which comes first.

Affix, then.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: 1 on March 30, 2019, 08:26:47 PM
Calle 16 de Septiembre

What is the point of streets named after days of the year? I know they are everywhere, but I don't know why they exist.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadman65 on March 30, 2019, 09:55:37 PM
Well Camino is uncommon in US usage despite it means road.  Calle is Street so a Main Street would be Calle Main.  In Miami 8th Street is called Calle Ocho and along US 41 it has three names on the street sign.  US 41 runs along 8th and is called the Tamiami Trail in addition to 8th Street, but its in Little Havana there so, its in Spanish too.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: MantyMadTown on March 30, 2019, 11:11:35 PM
Well Camino is uncommon in US usage despite it means road.  Calle is Street so a Main Street would be Calle Main.  In Miami 8th Street is called Calle Ocho and along US 41 it has three names on the street sign.  US 41 runs along 8th and is called the Tamiami Trail in addition to 8th Street, but its in Little Havana there so, its in Spanish too.

Isn't Calle Ocho part of the long name for Pitbull's song I Know You Want Me? I didn't know Calle Ocho was a street.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: oscar on March 30, 2019, 11:15:02 PM
Well Camino is uncommon in US usage despite it means road.

Fairly common in California, and perhaps other states that were once part of Mexico.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Scott5114 on March 31, 2019, 02:33:57 AM
Calle 16 de Septiembre

What is the point of streets named after days of the year? I know they are everywhere, but I don't know why they exist.

Imagine New York building a "September 11th Memorial Highway" and you'll be on the right track.

Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: MantyMadTown on March 31, 2019, 03:55:30 AM
Calle 16 de Septiembre

What is the point of streets named after days of the year? I know they are everywhere, but I don't know why they exist.

Imagine New York building a "September 11th Memorial Highway" and you'll be on the right track.

If New York designated a "September 11th Memorial Highway", where would it be?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Verlanka on March 31, 2019, 06:47:02 AM
Calle 16 de Septiembre

What is the point of streets named after days of the year? I know they are everywhere, but I don't know why they exist.

Imagine New York building a "September 11th Memorial Highway" and you'll be on the right track.

If New York designated a "September 11th Memorial Highway", where would it be?
Probably in Manhattan, beginning near the WTC.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on March 31, 2019, 03:26:29 PM

Calle 16 de Septiembre

What is the point of streets named after days of the year? I know they are everywhere, but I don't know why they exist.

The dates are significant.

16 de Septiembre, for example, is Independence Day in Mexico.  So, instead of the street being called Ca. Independencia, it's called Ca. 16 de Septiembre instead.

Another street nearby is named in commemoration of the Battle of Puebla:  instead of being called Ca. Batalla de Puebla, it's called Ca. 5 de Mayo instead.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: skluth on March 31, 2019, 07:14:46 PM
Well Camino is uncommon in US usage despite it means road.

Fairly common in California, and perhaps other states that were once part of Mexico.

I live in California and agree. My home is just off Camino Real in Palm Springs. Nearby (all within a mile or so) are Camino Descanso, Camino Carmelita, Camino Encano, Barranca, Camino Alturas, and Camino Bueno Vista. You get the idea.

Other Spanish street names close by include Calle Palo Fierro, Calle Bravo, Via Carisma, Via Lazo, Avenida Granada, and Avenida Palmera. I could go on but again, you get the idea. There is even an Calle El Segundo which means Second Street.

Keeping to the thread topic, another nearby street is named simply Oro Prado which translates to Gold Meadow. I don't think there's been a Meadow suffix mentioned much less in Spanish.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadman65 on March 31, 2019, 10:31:32 PM
Charlotte County, FL has a Tucker's Grade.  Now all roads are graded but do many use that term "Grade?"
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: oscar on March 31, 2019, 10:57:18 PM
Other Spanish street names close by include Calle Palo Fierro, Calle Bravo, Via Carisma, Via Lazo, Avenida Granada, and Avenida Palmera. I could go on but again, you get the idea. There is even an Calle El Segundo which means Second Street.

And, to follow up on a few examples upthread, "Alameda" means "tree-lined avenue". It can be used as a complete street name, or "The Alameda" (which really should be "La Alameda", to keep it all in Spanish), or as part of a longer name such as "Alameda Padre Serra" (Father Serra Avenue, even though he is now a saint) in Santa Barbara.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on April 01, 2019, 01:56:00 PM
There is even an Calle El Segundo which means Second Street.

Actually, it means "El Segundo Street," as El Segundo is the name of a city, which in turn was named after a Standard Oil refinery, which in turn was named after its being the second such refinery in that part of the country.

"Second Street" would instead be either "Calle Segundo" or just "Calle Dos".
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Scott5114 on April 13, 2019, 03:09:43 AM
Other Spanish street names close by include Calle Palo Fierro, Calle Bravo, Via Carisma, Via Lazo, Avenida Granada, and Avenida Palmera. I could go on but again, you get the idea. There is even an Calle El Segundo which means Second Street.

And, to follow up on a few examples upthread, "Alameda" means "tree-lined avenue". It can be used as a complete street name, or "The Alameda" (which really should be "La Alameda", to keep it all in Spanish), or as part of a longer name such as "Alameda Padre Serra" (Father Serra Avenue, even though he is now a saint) in Santa Barbara.

Or, if you're in Norman, we have "Alameda Street"...tree-lined avenue street. Whoops.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: sandwalk on April 13, 2019, 05:58:47 PM
Or, if you're in Norman, we have "Alameda Street"...tree-lined avenue street. Whoops.

We have Alameda Avenue in Denver.  :D
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: US 89 on April 16, 2019, 05:07:54 PM
IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this (https://goo.gl/maps/xspe57iy3f52).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on April 16, 2019, 07:05:23 PM
IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this (https://goo.gl/maps/xspe57iy3f52).

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries (https://goo.gl/maps/2tXWJz2XANQ2) as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website (https://isaf.gob.mx/) of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mrsman on May 30, 2019, 04:41:36 PM

Calle 16 de Septiembre

What is the point of streets named after days of the year? I know they are everywhere, but I don't know why they exist.

The dates are significant.

16 de Septiembre, for example, is Independence Day in Mexico.  So, instead of the street being called Ca. Independencia, it's called Ca. 16 de Septiembre instead.

Another street nearby is named in commemoration of the Battle of Puebla:  instead of being called Ca. Batalla de Puebla, it's called Ca. 5 de Mayo instead.

Surprisingly there are only a handful of 4th of July Roads out there, and they are all in very small towns.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mrsman on May 30, 2019, 04:48:44 PM
IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this (https://goo.gl/maps/xspe57iy3f52).

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries (https://goo.gl/maps/2tXWJz2XANQ2) as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website (https://isaf.gob.mx/) of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".

Even in the US we have that problem in some places:

There is Street Road in the Philadelphia area.

Broadway in NYC (and L.A. and Denver and many other towns) does not need any other suffix.  Yet there is Broadway Ave in Pittsburgh and Broadway Street in Myrtle Beach.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: plain on May 30, 2019, 10:15:26 PM
Tarleton Bivouac in James City County, VA

Image from GSV(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190531/8d0023185788ec8790d386265edbc440.jpg)

SM-S820L

Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on November 27, 2019, 12:09:08 PM
Close and Terrence
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on November 27, 2019, 02:02:56 PM
Close and Terrence

Terrence??  Where?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on November 27, 2019, 02:10:15 PM
Close and Terrence

Terrence??  Where?
I meant Terrace   :pan:
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on November 27, 2019, 02:35:06 PM
Terrace is a completely normal generic to me.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: ipeters61 on November 27, 2019, 02:56:26 PM
IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this (https://goo.gl/maps/xspe57iy3f52).

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries (https://goo.gl/maps/2tXWJz2XANQ2) as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website (https://isaf.gob.mx/) of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".

Even in the US we have that problem in some places:

There is Street Road in the Philadelphia area.

Broadway in NYC (and L.A. and Denver and many other towns) does not need any other suffix.  Yet there is Broadway Ave in Pittsburgh and Broadway Street in Myrtle Beach.
I read on Wikipedia that actually Street Road's name is one of those archaic holdovers to when "Street" referred to the fact that the road was paved, predating when "street" was synonymous with "road."
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on November 27, 2019, 04:40:01 PM
IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this (https://goo.gl/maps/xspe57iy3f52).

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries (https://goo.gl/maps/2tXWJz2XANQ2) as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website (https://isaf.gob.mx/) of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".

Even in the US we have that problem in some places:

There is Street Road in the Philadelphia area.

Broadway in NYC (and L.A. and Denver and many other towns) does not need any other suffix.  Yet there is Broadway Ave in Pittsburgh and Broadway Street in Myrtle Beach.
I read on Wikipedia that actually Street Road's name is one of those archaic holdovers to when "Street" referred to the fact that the road was paved, predating when "street" was synonymous with "road."
That would explain why there are like 10 different Street Roads in the Philly area.

There is a Charles Street Avenue in Baltimore:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Charles+St+Ave,+Towson,+MD+21204/@39.4015545,-76.6224599,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x89c80fc88ac0ae91:0xd5efda72018a3888!8m2!3d39.4015504!4d-76.6202712

EDIT: There is also one in Waltham, MA, along with a Prospect Street Avenue!
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Charles+St+Ave,+Waltham,+MA+02453/@42.3732802,-71.2488671,18.08z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89e38325a83d9637:0x9c1bf389c1de30b!8m2!3d42.3734013!4d-71.2488381
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on November 27, 2019, 04:43:58 PM
Tarleton Bivouac in James City County, VA

Image from GSV(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190531/8d0023185788ec8790d386265edbc440.jpg)

SM-S820L
Nah, it looks to me that the road originally had a suffix, but it somehow got rubbed off over time. It also seems to me that there is a chance that Google Maps might have actually made a mistake, though I can neither confirm nor disprove this without consulting official sources, which I'm not sure how you can find this stuff out.

(Link to Google Maps: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Tarleton+Bivouac,+Roberts,+VA+23185/@37.2137484,-76.618731,15.33z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89b07d61493aea45:0x1fc2a3ce40d32f54!8m2!3d37.2106014!4d-76.6129841)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: plain on November 27, 2019, 05:16:56 PM
Tarleton Bivouac in James City County, VA

Image from GSV(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190531/8d0023185788ec8790d386265edbc440.jpg)

SM-S820L
Nah, it looks to me that the road originally had a suffix, but it somehow got rubbed off over time. It also seems to me that there is a chance that Google Maps might have actually made a mistake, though I can neither confirm nor disprove this without consulting official sources, which I'm not sure how you can find this stuff out.

(Link to Google Maps: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Tarleton+Bivouac,+Roberts,+VA+23185/@37.2137484,-76.618731,15.33z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89b07d61493aea45:0x1fc2a3ce40d32f54!8m2!3d37.2106014!4d-76.6129841)


It's always been just Tarleton Bivouac (I have several friends on this loop). The blades were just made that way for some reason.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Techknow on November 27, 2019, 10:55:06 PM
In Gilroy, CA, there is a road parallel to US 101 called "No Name Uno". There's even an hospital on the road with its address on an entrance sign that can be seen from the freeway!

The story behind it is here: https://gilroydispatch.com/2007/06/07/former-worker-says-he-coined-no-name-uno/

Someone in this thread already mentioned Bethany Curve in Santa Cruz, CA. There's also "Arroyo Seco", a residential street that is next to a canyon with the same name.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on November 28, 2019, 10:37:40 AM
In Gilroy, CA, there is a road parallel to US 101 called "No Name Uno". There's even an hospital on the road with its address on an entrance sign that can be seen from the freeway!

The story behind it is here: https://gilroydispatch.com/2007/06/07/former-worker-says-he-coined-no-name-uno/

Someone in this thread already mentioned Bethany Curve in Santa Cruz, CA. There's also "Arroyo Seco", a residential street that is next to a canyon with the same name.
Not a road, but one of the Florida Keys is named "No Name Key". https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Name_Key
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on November 28, 2019, 10:43:33 AM
Van Nostrand Rise, Bridgewater, NJ:
https://maps.google.com/69nyiv61gAoYvT34A

Dogwood Hill, Warren, NJ:
https://maps.google.com/PVND2Gwh8VEDHnGFA
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: bing101 on November 28, 2019, 02:32:03 PM

Sacramento, CA has Capitol Mall as a name of a Downtown Street and this has to be one of a rare cases where mall gets used as a street suffix name.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capitol_Mall (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capitol_Mall)

Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: midwesternroadguy on December 04, 2019, 05:34:07 AM
In suburban Dakota County, MN the street naming grid includes suffixes such as “Path”.  Diamond “Path” is a 4-5 lane thoroughfare with no historical basis for the name.  Seriously?

Nearby Woodbury, MN has suffixes as “Cove”.  Doesn’t cove refer to a body of water typically?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on December 04, 2019, 07:26:38 AM
In suburban Dakota County, MN the street naming grid includes suffixes such as “Path”.  Diamond “Path” is a 4-5 lane thoroughfare with no historical basis for the name.  Seriously?

Nearby Woodbury, MN has suffixes as “Cove”.  Doesn’t cove refer to a body of water typically?

"Path" is not so uncommon. There are six to seven Deer Paths in the area where I grew up.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on December 04, 2019, 12:38:20 PM

In suburban Dakota County, MN the street naming grid includes suffixes such as “Path”.  Diamond “Path” is a 4-5 lane thoroughfare with no historical basis for the name.  Seriously?

Nearby Woodbury, MN has suffixes as “Cove”.  Doesn’t cove refer to a body of water typically?

"Path" is not so uncommon. There are six to seven Deer Paths in the area where I grew up.

"Cove" is also not so uncommon but highly location-dependent.  It's used extensively in Memphis as a generic for culs-de-sac, for example.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on December 04, 2019, 12:42:28 PM
And "Close" seems to be common in Great Britain.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadman65 on December 04, 2019, 01:01:08 PM
Kenilworth, NJ has Via Vitale.
New York City has Grand Concourse and Bowery with no suffix at all.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Mrt90 on December 04, 2019, 01:27:34 PM

Sacramento, CA has Capitol Mall as a name of a Downtown Street and this has to be one of a rare cases where mall gets used as a street suffux name.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capitol_Mall



Henry Mall, Madison, Wisconsin.


https://www.google.com/maps/@43.074922,-89.4101612,3a,75y,208.76h,95.54t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1szh9JFyqS2vbFbvl82EIa0Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: kphoger on December 04, 2019, 02:01:54 PM
In the interests of being anal about everything, I should point out that the thread title is misleading.

Street names are made up of the following parts:
[Directional Prefix] [Specific] [Generic] [Directional Suffix]

Only the Specific is a required element, and everything else is optional.

An example of a street name using all four elements here in Wichita:
E 21st St N
Directional prefix = E / East
Specific = 21st is the specific
Generic = St / Street
Directional suffix = N / North

Close, Mall, Cove, Rise, etc are all examples of a generic, not of a suffix.  In the case of Via Vitale, it could be argued that the entire street name is just a specific, or it could be argued that the specific and generic have simply swapped places.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: roadfro on December 08, 2019, 02:44:50 PM
In the interests of being anal about everything, I should point out that the thread title is misleading.

Street names are made up of the following parts:
[Directional Prefix] [Specific] [Generic] [Directional Suffix]

Only the Specific is a required element, and everything else is optional.

An example of a street name using all four elements here in Wichita:
E 21st St N
Directional prefix = E / East
Specific = 21st is the specific
Generic = St / Street
Directional suffix = N / North

Close, Mall, Cove, Rise, etc are all examples of a generic, not of a suffix.  In the case of Via Vitale, it could be argued that the entire street name is just a specific, or it could be argued that the specific and generic have simply swapped places.

I've never heard the term "Generic" in regards to terms like "Street", "Road", etc. — I've always heard them referred to as a suffix. I'd also note that the USPS maintains a list of Street Suffix Abbreviations (https://pe.usps.com/text/pub28/28apc_002.htm)

Given that, I think of the following as street naming structure (noting that many jurisdictions use only one directional affix):
[Directional prefix] [Street Name] [Suffix] [Directional suffix] 

Noting it is also common for the Suffix to become a Prefix instead, when the Street Name and Suffix are in a non-English language and it would be phased this way in the original language (such as Via Vitale).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: US 89 on December 08, 2019, 02:59:42 PM
Given that, I think of the following as street naming structure (noting that many jurisdictions use only one directional affix):
[Directional prefix] [Street Name] [Suffix] [Directional suffix] 

You can also switch around the suffix and directional suffix, as is done in several towns that use a variation on the Mormon street grid naming style ("1st South St", for example).
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: mapman1071 on December 08, 2019, 05:16:56 PM
Kenilworth, NJ has Via Vitale.
New York City has Grand Concourse and Bowery with no suffix at all.
Grand Concourse is a shortened name, the full street name is Grand Boulevard and Concourse
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: bzakharin on December 08, 2019, 05:24:56 PM
Only the Specific is a required element, and everything else is optional.
This might be true, but is itself an unusual situation. One could even argue the Broadway is both a "specific" and a "generic", it's just written as one word. And is Boulevard by itself a specific or a generic?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: empirestate on December 09, 2019, 12:03:24 PM
New York City has Grand Concourse […] with no suffix at all.

Certainly it does: concourse. In fact, by its full name it has two suffixes: Grand Boulevard and Concourse.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on March 06, 2020, 12:40:57 AM
Twin Cities area: Hopkins Crossroad
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: stevashe on March 10, 2020, 05:11:29 PM
In the interests of being anal about everything, I should point out that the thread title is misleading.

Street names are made up of the following parts:
[Directional Prefix] [Specific] [Generic] [Directional Suffix]

Seattle's street inventory uses:
[Pre Directional][Street Name][Suffix][Post Directional]

I think this is one case where the terms used are just inconsistent.  :-P
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: cpzilliacus on March 11, 2020, 02:03:00 PM
Or, if you're in Norman, we have "Alameda Street"...tree-lined avenue street. Whoops.

We have Alameda Avenue in Denver.  :D

Baltimore, Maryland has The Alameda (the southernmost 0.94 miles of The Alameda is part of MD-542 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland_Route_542)).

Recent Baltimore Sun article: Why is it The Alameda and not Alameda Street? Here’s how the Baltimore road got its name (https://www.baltimoresun.com/ask/bs-ask-the-alameda-20200303-amnlb5zffzgtvehoavm2uaqbki-story.html?fbclid=IwAR0uM91IC367Z0iHjniOlQEBBQ_im4MyJKW1nHUOHFUQ25rk1inP14I6IEc)

Quote
Why is it “the” Alameda, and not Alameda Street or Alameda Boulevard?

Quote
It’s all in the name.

Quote
The meaning of the Spanish word “Alameda” — and a hint at how the name likely was chosen for the tree-lined road from Harford Road to the county line — was published The Sun in 1931 in an excerpt from Mayor Ferdinand C. Latrobe’s memoir that explained the origin of Mount Royal Avenue.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: cpzilliacus on March 11, 2020, 02:11:46 PM
Quote from: briantroutman
A mews is a row of horse stables (or garages, in more modern times) with townhouses above them. In England, these mews probably are true to their name. In the US, it seems to be a term gratuitously used by suburban olde towne fake downtown developments.

The example I cited is in one of the older neighborhoods of Norfolk, VA.

One of my favorite street names anywhere is in the Ghent area of the City of Norfolk, Botetourt Gardens (https://www.google.com/maps/@36.8622732,-76.2917947,3a,37.5y,295.1h,80.97t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sftNV4ChaYnlY8QFEXHgwXg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656).  The "Gardens" part is somewhat unusual, and the Botetourt is presumably named for Botetourt County, Virginia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botetourt_County,_Virginia) (the county seat of Botetourt County (Fincastle) is over 250 miles from the Botetourt Gardens street).

Added bonus - the pronunciation of Botetourt is something of a shibboleth, as most people not from the Commonwealth get it wrong.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: J3ebrules on March 11, 2020, 03:14:20 PM
Someone at the very beginning of this thread mentioned “Turnpike” in the northeast, but was referring to the large well-known roads that still have tolls. I know New Jersey has a bunch of “Pikes” that were turnpikes in the 18th or 19th century, but are now just regular county, state, or even US routes. Case in point, near me, there are NJ 70, US 30, and NJ 168 - respectively, the Marlton Pike, White Horse Pike, and Black Horse Pike. When I lived in Delaware County, PA, we had Baltimore Pike, West Chester Pike, and not far off in Delaware, the Philadelphia Pike.

All perfectly normal toll-free roads now, but once were turnpikes in the toll-collecting sense.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: Rothman on March 11, 2020, 05:49:29 PM
Someone at the very beginning of this thread mentioned “Turnpike” in the northeast, but was referring to the large well-known roads that still have tolls. I know New Jersey has a bunch of “Pikes” that were turnpikes in the 18th or 19th century, but are now just regular county, state, or even US routes. Case in point, near me, there are NJ 70, US 30, and NJ 168 - respectively, the Marlton Pike, White Horse Pike, and Black Horse Pike. When I lived in Delaware County, PA, we had Baltimore Pike, West Chester Pike, and not far off in Delaware, the Philadelphia Pike.

All perfectly normal toll-free roads now, but once were turnpikes in the toll-collecting sense.
All from the era before we figured out privatizing roads doesn't work.

Whoops.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: TheGrassGuy on March 12, 2020, 08:04:02 AM
Someone at the very beginning of this thread mentioned “Turnpike” in the northeast, but was referring to the large well-known roads that still have tolls. I know New Jersey has a bunch of “Pikes” that were turnpikes in the 18th or 19th century, but are now just regular county, state, or even US routes. Case in point, near me, there are NJ 70, US 30, and NJ 168 - respectively, the Marlton Pike, White Horse Pike, and Black Horse Pike. When I lived in Delaware County, PA, we had Baltimore Pike, West Chester Pike, and not far off in Delaware, the Philadelphia Pike.

All perfectly normal toll-free roads now, but once were turnpikes in the toll-collecting sense.

Not just NJ. In NY we also have "Glasco Tpk", "Malden Tpk", "Schoharie Tpk", etc.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SeriesE on March 12, 2020, 03:09:39 PM
There are many streets in residential neighborhoods in southern Orange County, CA that doesn’t have suffixes.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: J3ebrules on March 13, 2020, 12:25:24 AM
There are many streets in residential neighborhoods in southern Orange County, CA that doesn’t have suffixes.

Is that like a “Broadway” situation - the address would be like, “501 Juniper”?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SeriesE on March 14, 2020, 10:58:41 PM
There are many streets in residential neighborhoods in southern Orange County, CA that doesn’t have suffixes.

Is that like a “Broadway” situation - the address would be like, “501 Juniper”?
Yes. Here are some examples:
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.645886,-117.6483402,16.58z

https://www.google.com/maps/@33.7173949,-117.7472042,16.9z
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: J3ebrules on March 15, 2020, 02:30:52 AM
^^ that’s really interesting, especially since now and again there are suffixes like “Way” and “Parkway”. A lot of the names in the first example were Spanish, too... wonder if there’s any correlation with Spanish influence and that naming convention, or if that came way later... I’d love to know the rationale.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: cpzilliacus on March 15, 2020, 09:22:14 AM
Someone at the very beginning of this thread mentioned “Turnpike” in the northeast, but was referring to the large well-known roads that still have tolls. I know New Jersey has a bunch of “Pikes” that were turnpikes in the 18th or 19th century, but are now just regular county, state, or even US routes. Case in point, near me, there are NJ 70, US 30, and NJ 168 - respectively, the Marlton Pike, White Horse Pike, and Black Horse Pike. When I lived in Delaware County, PA, we had Baltimore Pike, West Chester Pike, and not far off in Delaware, the Philadelphia Pike.

All perfectly normal toll-free roads now, but once were turnpikes in the toll-collecting sense.

Not just NJ. In NY we also have "Glasco Tpk", "Malden Tpk", "Schoharie Tpk", etc.

The Maryland and Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C. have quite a few "pikes" and "turnpikes" that are not toll roads any longer.

In Maryland:

Marlboro Pike now county-maintained, formerly MD-4
U.S. 29 Columbia Pike
MD-355 Rockville Pike
U.S. 40 Baltimore National Pike

In Virginia:

VA-236 Little River Turnpike
VA-7 Leesburg Pike
VA-244 Columbia Pike (not the same road as the part of U.S. 29 in Maryland)
VA-193 Georgetown Pike
Parts of U.S. 29 in Northern Virginia were once the Warrenton Alexandria Turnpike

Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: empirestate on March 16, 2020, 03:12:00 AM
Twin Cities area: Hopkins Crossroad

In the interests of being anal about everything, I should point out that the thread title is misleading.

Street names are made up of the following parts:
[Directional Prefix] [Specific] [Generic] [Directional Suffix]

Seattle's street inventory uses:
[Pre Directional][Street Name][Suffix][Post Directional]

Apropos of all this, I was just thinking the other day as I passed Haights Cross Road: would it not be correct to parse this as a one-word specific ("Haights") and a two-word generic ("Cross Road")? After all, it is the cross road named for Haight; it isn't the road that goes to Haights Cross.

(The more pertinent part of that question is, how often, in this day and age, will the nuance of that parsing be pretty much blown over in every system that matters?)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SeriesE on March 17, 2020, 05:23:08 PM
^^ that’s really interesting, especially since now and again there are suffixes like “Way” and “Parkway”. A lot of the names in the first example were Spanish, too... wonder if there’s any correlation with Spanish influence and that naming convention, or if that came way later... I’d love to know the rationale.
Same here, I would like to know why.

My hypothesis is since those cities don’t show the street suffix on road signs, developers never bothered thinking of adding one when naming those streets.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: bulldog1979 on March 17, 2020, 07:08:30 PM
Twin Cities area: Hopkins Crossroad

In the interests of being anal about everything, I should point out that the thread title is misleading.

Street names are made up of the following parts:
[Directional Prefix] [Specific] [Generic] [Directional Suffix]

Seattle's street inventory uses:
[Pre Directional][Street Name][Suffix][Post Directional]

Apropos of all this, I was just thinking the other day as I passed Haights Cross Road: would it not be correct to parse this as a one-word specific ("Haights") and a two-word generic ("Cross Road")? After all, it is the cross road named for Haight; it isn't the road that goes to Haights Cross.

(The more pertinent part of that question is, how often, in this day and age, will the nuance of that parsing be pretty much blown over in every system that matters?)

Similar to this is when a road is named for a place containing a cardinal direction, yet the USPS addressing rules treat it like a directional. For example: "East Jordan Road", which runs to East Jordan, Michigan. The USPS rules abbreviate that as "E JORDAN RD", which to me implies that it's the eastern end of a "Jordan Road". North of my hometown, we have "South Basin Drive" and a "North Basin Drive" on opposing sides of the Dead River Basin. Abbreviating the first word implies, to me, that they are opposite ends of the same "Basin Drive" instead of separate roads. (It's also wonky when "North Road" becomes "N RD", although that's rare.)
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: US 89 on March 18, 2020, 01:11:29 AM
Twin Cities area: Hopkins Crossroad

In the interests of being anal about everything, I should point out that the thread title is misleading.

Street names are made up of the following parts:
[Directional Prefix] [Specific] [Generic] [Directional Suffix]

Seattle's street inventory uses:
[Pre Directional][Street Name][Suffix][Post Directional]

Apropos of all this, I was just thinking the other day as I passed Haights Cross Road: would it not be correct to parse this as a one-word specific ("Haights") and a two-word generic ("Cross Road")? After all, it is the cross road named for Haight; it isn't the road that goes to Haights Cross.

(The more pertinent part of that question is, how often, in this day and age, will the nuance of that parsing be pretty much blown over in every system that matters?)

Similar to this is when a road is named for a place containing a cardinal direction, yet the USPS addressing rules treat it like a directional. For example: "East Jordan Road", which runs to East Jordan, Michigan. The USPS rules abbreviate that as "E JORDAN RD", which to me implies that it's the eastern end of a "Jordan Road". North of my hometown, we have "South Basin Drive" and a "North Basin Drive" on opposing sides of the Dead River Basin. Abbreviating the first word implies, to me, that they are opposite ends of the same "Basin Drive" instead of separate roads. (It's also wonky when "North Road" becomes "N RD", although that's rare.)

How do those streets show up on signage, though? You could make the same argument about "North Temple" and "South Temple" in Salt Lake City, which are two parallel streets named because they run on the blocks north and south of the Mormon temple downtown. I have no issue with abbreviating those as "N Temple" and "S Temple" because they are in fact signed as such.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: empirestate on March 18, 2020, 11:35:32 AM
Similar to this is when a road is named for a place containing a cardinal direction, yet the USPS addressing rules treat it like a directional. For example: "East Jordan Road", which runs to East Jordan, Michigan. The USPS rules abbreviate that as "E JORDAN RD", which to me implies that it's the eastern end of a "Jordan Road". North of my hometown, we have "South Basin Drive" and a "North Basin Drive" on opposing sides of the Dead River Basin. Abbreviating the first word implies, to me, that they are opposite ends of the same "Basin Drive" instead of separate roads. (It's also wonky when "North Road" becomes "N RD", although that's rare.)

The same applied to me when I used to live on East End Avenue; automated systems often treated as though it were the eastern component of End Avenue.

How do those streets show up on signage, though? You could make the same argument about "North Temple" and "South Temple" in Salt Lake City, which are two parallel streets named because they run on the blocks north and south of the Mormon temple downtown. I have no issue with abbreviating those as "N Temple" and "S Temple" because they are in fact signed as such.

Would it be different if there were two temples? So, instead of having a northern street that passes the temple and a southern street that passes the temple, you'd have a street that passes the northern temple and a street that passes the southern temple?
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SeriesE on March 21, 2020, 04:31:13 AM
Twin Cities area: Hopkins Crossroad

In the interests of being anal about everything, I should point out that the thread title is misleading.

Street names are made up of the following parts:
[Directional Prefix] [Specific] [Generic] [Directional Suffix]

Seattle's street inventory uses:
[Pre Directional][Street Name][Suffix][Post Directional]

Apropos of all this, I was just thinking the other day as I passed Haights Cross Road: would it not be correct to parse this as a one-word specific ("Haights") and a two-word generic ("Cross Road")? After all, it is the cross road named for Haight; it isn't the road that goes to Haights Cross.

(The more pertinent part of that question is, how often, in this day and age, will the nuance of that parsing be pretty much blown over in every system that matters?)

Similar to this is when a road is named for a place containing a cardinal direction, yet the USPS addressing rules treat it like a directional. For example: "East Jordan Road", which runs to East Jordan, Michigan. The USPS rules abbreviate that as "E JORDAN RD", which to me implies that it's the eastern end of a "Jordan Road". North of my hometown, we have "South Basin Drive" and a "North Basin Drive" on opposing sides of the Dead River Basin. Abbreviating the first word implies, to me, that they are opposite ends of the same "Basin Drive" instead of separate roads. (It's also wonky when "North Road" becomes "N RD", although that's rare.)

I used the USPS tool and it’s smart enough to only abbreviate the first cardinal direction if there are multiple. Like East “South” Street, West “West Covina” Parkway
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: ipeters61 on March 21, 2020, 06:07:59 PM
There's a neighborhood in Delaware where the buildings all have their own "street" for their address, so something like 12 Fox Hall is a valid Dover address.  I just validated on the USPS website that the actual address is "12 Fox Hall, Dover, DE 19904."
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: SSR_317 on March 28, 2020, 01:44:00 PM
Twin Cities area: Hopkins Crossroad

In the interests of being anal about everything, I should point out that the thread title is misleading.

Street names are made up of the following parts:
[Directional Prefix] [Specific] [Generic] [Directional Suffix]

Seattle's street inventory uses:
[Pre Directional][Street Name][Suffix][Post Directional]

Apropos of all this, I was just thinking the other day as I passed Haights Cross Road: would it not be correct to parse this as a one-word specific ("Haights") and a two-word generic ("Cross Road")? After all, it is the cross road named for Haight; it isn't the road that goes to Haights Cross.

(The more pertinent part of that question is, how often, in this day and age, will the nuance of that parsing be pretty much blown over in every system that matters?)

Similar to this is when a road is named for a place containing a cardinal direction, yet the USPS addressing rules treat it like a directional. For example: "East Jordan Road", which runs to East Jordan, Michigan. The USPS rules abbreviate that as "E JORDAN RD", which to me implies that it's the eastern end of a "Jordan Road". North of my hometown, we have "South Basin Drive" and a "North Basin Drive" on opposing sides of the Dead River Basin. Abbreviating the first word implies, to me, that they are opposite ends of the same "Basin Drive" instead of separate roads. (It's also wonky when "North Road" becomes "N RD", although that's rare.)
Hey, Google Maps often truncates the name of Court Street to "CT ST" (see downtown Indy for an example). I also hate when they (and others) abbreviate the name of a cardinal direction that is not used as such (S. Park instead of South Park) or as a directional for an address.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: CNGL-Leudimin on March 29, 2020, 05:55:19 AM
Similarly, Mr. Google abbreviates all instances of Oriente and Poniente to "Ote." and "Pte.". This works for Mexico, but I know a town here in Spain which have streets with those names, and they show up in Google Maps as "Calle Ote." and "Calle Pte." respectively, which looks quite weird. Street signs fully spell out "Calle Oriente" and "Calle Poniente", as it should be.
Title: Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
Post by: CtrlAltDel on March 29, 2020, 12:36:10 PM
Similarly, Mr. Google abbreviates all instances of Oriente and Poniente to "Ote." and "Pte."

Just out of idle curiosity, is there a difference in meaning between poniente and occidental?