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Regional Boards => Canada => Topic started by: Stojko on February 04, 2010, 06:56:42 PM

Title: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stojko on February 04, 2010, 06:56:42 PM
Any Quebecois on the forum? I'm planning on driving through Quebec and Ontario next year and it would be interesting to learn more about the highways/autoroutes, specifically in the Montreal area. Are the driving generalizations true? Is signage along A-20 and A-40 (Metropolitan) as bad/non-existent as people say? What's the best route through Montreal?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on February 04, 2010, 10:16:10 PM
I'm one Quebecois, hard to said which one is the best route trough Montreal A-20 still have traffic lights on Dorion and Perrot Island but there plans to remove them. A-40 (Metropolitain), the elevated part is very substandard and the structures are aged, especially the Turcot interchange )A-20/Decarie A-15/A-720). As for signage, yes it's as bad/non-existant or even very old.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SP Cook on February 05, 2010, 07:08:03 AM
I am definitely not a Quebecois, but I have driven across Quebec several times.

The following are broad generalizations:

- This is not a bilingual place.  New Brunswick and the part of Ontario that is near Quebec is, but in Quebec the only bilingualism is in thing run by the federal government (post office, airports, etc).  Things run by the provence are French only.  You will need enough French to dope out road signs.  Cardinal directions and such.  Not hard, but it takes paying attention.  And it is all in metric, which is more irritating to me than the French.  Learning ones numbers, for value meal purposes, is good if you are going north of Quebec City.

- This is not France.  A lot of Americans are kind of the "ugly American" type assume that.  Actually this is still North America, and a lot less different from the USA and English Canada, but for the language, than you might think.  Great steaks and Italian food in Montreal.

- The people are very friendly, but, IMHO, are more friendly if they know you are an American (and thus not expected to know French) than an Ontarian.  They expect Ontarians to speak a little French.  The language really is not a barrier until you get north of Quebec City, or away from the A routes.

- Roads are as described in Montreal and Quebec City.  Kinda poor by US standards.    In the more rural areas, it is similar to a US Interstate, but slightly different standards.  Metric signage.  No mention of other destinations outside Quebec, other than those in the USA (political thing).  More of those euro-style pictograph signs for things like gasoline, hotel, etc.  "Hotel de ville" on exit signs, which you see a lot, means "City Hall", not a hotel.  I think they note that because its like saying "police station" in the USA.

- I try to avoid those "all *ians drive like whatever" generalizations.  I did not perceive much difference in Montreal or Quebec than any other place.  In the rural areas, the locals seemed to (rightly, IMHO) view the underposted SLs as jokes.



Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stojko on February 05, 2010, 12:44:31 PM
I'm from Newfoundland, and I know enough french to get around and have a basic conversation at least. Thanks for the info.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on February 05, 2010, 01:08:42 PM
I'll be heading to Newfoundland this summer... stay tuned and it'd be neat to meet up.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Chris on February 22, 2010, 05:39:22 AM
Freewaybrent made a nice video of A-73 in Quebec.

Watch it in HD:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiPQgoTt84s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiPQgoTt84s)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on February 24, 2010, 11:36:48 AM
This is not a bilingual place.  New Brunswick and the part of Ontario that is near Quebec is, but in Quebec the only bilingualism is in thing run by the federal government (post office, airports, etc).  Things run by the province are French only.

Things may have changed significantly since I visited in 1998, but at that time there was a fair amount of bilingual signing in Montréal.

Quote
You will need enough French to dope out road signs.  Cardinal directions and such.  Not hard, but it takes paying attention.  And it is all in metric, which is more irritating to me than the French.  Learning ones numbers, for value meal purposes, is good if you are going north of Quebec City.

There is also an insistence on translating business names into French which results in, e.g., KFC becoming PFK (KFC trades as KFC in France, if memory serves).  Québec does try to use symbol signs whenever possible, and on MTQ infrastructure you shouldn't run across any yellow diamond warning signs which have text messages in French only.  However, local authorities in Québec often place text-message warning signs in French only without MTQ approval ("LENTEMENT" = slow is a common legend) on local roads.  Moreover, MTQ construction signs still use French-only text messages, so you need to know "TRAVAUX," "ROUTE BARRÉE," and some other legends.

Design details for traffic signs in Québec can be downloaded from the MTQ Signalisation site:

http://www.mtqsignalisation.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/

The signs themselves can be downloaded in EPS, DXF or AI formats (all vector), while the sign designs (labelled "devis") can be downloaded in PDF format with the sign illustrations rendered as rasters within the PDF files.

Quote
The people are very friendly, but, IMHO, are more friendly if they know you are an American (and thus not expected to know French) than an Ontarian.  They expect Ontarians to speak a little French.  The language really is not a barrier until you get north of Quebec City, or away from the A routes.

My perspective may be colored somewhat by being deaf and having to communicate in writing, but personally I never felt comfortable about using English anywhere in Québec outside Montréal.

Quote
Roads are as described in Montreal and Quebec City.  Kinda poor by US standards.    In the more rural areas, it is similar to a US Interstate, but slightly different standards.  Metric signage.  No mention of other destinations outside Quebec, other than those in the USA (political thing).  More of those euro-style pictograph signs for things like gasoline, hotel, etc.  "Hotel de ville" on exit signs, which you see a lot, means "City Hall", not a hotel.  I think they note that because its like saying "police station" in the USA.

Not really--it is more like "Civic center" on US freeway guide signs.  Hôtel in French is a fairly tricky word since in some contexts it can mean "House" in the occasional British sense of an office building, while in others it can refer to a lodging establishment.  There are separate pictograms for the Sûreté du Québec (the provincial police force, equivalent in most respects to a state police agency in the US) and for local police.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: agentsteel53 on February 24, 2010, 12:41:20 PM
I was just in Quebec and I did not see a single English sign.  Everything was in French.  There were a couple that were text-only in the yellow diamond (mainly on old alignments and town roads) but for the most part it was pictorial and therefore easy to understand.

I did note a US-201 trailblazer on Autoroute 73 heading south of Quebec City, about 120 miles away, which has to be the most distant indicator for a US route in existence!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Truvelo on February 24, 2010, 12:44:04 PM
Ah yes, and for a second I thought it also contained an I-73 shield.

Picture here (http://maps.google.co.uk/?ie=UTF8&ll=46.71824,-71.278825&spn=0,359.99404&t=k&z=18&layer=c&cbll=46.718425,-71.280077&panoid=Q355KDr0bYM2QLadko5Axg&cbp=12,197.19,,1,-5.69)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on February 24, 2010, 01:21:38 PM
I was just in Quebec and I did not see a single English sign.  Everything was in French.

Not even "St James St/Rue St-Jacques" on an autoroute guide sign?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: agentsteel53 on February 24, 2010, 01:37:29 PM
Not even "St James St/Rue St-Jacques" on an autoroute guide sign?

I do not recall that one.  Now that I think about it, there were a few autoroute guide signs that were bilingual.  I will have to look through my photos.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on February 24, 2010, 07:11:46 PM
The Autoroute bilingual signs are mostly around Montreal because that's as far north as US tourists tend to venture.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SP Cook on February 25, 2010, 07:33:26 AM
There is also an insistence on translating business names into French which results in, e.g., KFC becoming PFK (KFC trades as KFC in France, if memory serves). 

This is, indeed, unique in the world.  KFC is KFC everywhere in the world, regardless of what "Kentucky Fried Chicken" might letter out to in the local language, even in places that do not use Latin letters (it will translate or transliterate Kentucky Fried Chicken into the local language).  It is KFC in France and in Canada's only bilingual provence (New Brunswick). 

Except in Quebec.  As I understand it, Quebec has this law called "Bill 101" which provides, among other things, that all commercial signage must have French "markedly prominent" compared to any other language.  A name, however, does not have to be translated, even if it could be (if your name is James you do not become Jacques when you cross the border), so "McDonald's" is "McDonald's", "Wal-Mart" is "Wal-Mart" and "Tim Horton" is "Tim Horton".  But in the case of KFC, it was ruled that "Kentucky" was the brand name and "Fried Chicken" was the product so they had to translate, and they chose to keep the French initials when they went to this strategy of using the initials.

BTW, in Canada, and in every other country of the world except the USA, KFC has regular French Fries, rather than the (awful, IMHO) potato logs served here.



Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on February 25, 2010, 09:01:22 AM
There is also an insistence on translating business names into French which results in, e.g., KFC becoming PFK (KFC trades as KFC in France, if memory serves). 

This is, indeed, unique in the world.  KFC is KFC everywhere in the world, regardless of what "Kentucky Fried Chicken" might letter out to in the local language, even in places that do not use Latin letters (it will translate or transliterate Kentucky Fried Chicken into the local language).  It is KFC in France and in Canada's only bilingual provence (New Brunswick). 

Except in Quebec.  As I understand it, Quebec has this law called "Bill 101" which provides, among other things, that all commercial signage must have French "markedly prominent" compared to any other language.  A name, however, does not have to be translated, even if it could be (if your name is James you do not become Jacques when you cross the border), so "McDonald's" is "McDonald's", "Wal-Mart" is "Wal-Mart" and "Tim Horton" is "Tim Horton".  But in the case of KFC, it was ruled that "Kentucky" was the brand name and "Fried Chicken" was the product so they had to translate, and they chose to keep the French initials when they went to this strategy of using the initials.
When I drove through southern Ontario a few weekends ago, I recall seeing at least one PFK.  That part of the province is pretty far from Quebec, and not particularly strong on bilingual signage.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Hellfighter on March 03, 2010, 03:29:58 PM
What is the timetable for the western portion of A-50 between Grenville and Route 317?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on March 03, 2010, 06:07:53 PM
What is the timetable for the western portion of A-50 between Grenville and Route 317?

from what I read on this French blog with interesting construction pics, a gap of A-50 between Greenville and a local road named Kilmar road, is scheduled to open for this year
http://richard3.wordpress.com/2009/11/22/a-50-en-roulant-vers-la-montee-boucher/
http://richard3.wordpress.com/2009/11/20/a-50-pendant-quon-est-a-pointe-au-chene/
http://richard3.wordpress.com/2009/10/28/a-50-au-chemin-avoca/
http://richard3.wordpress.com/2009/09/26/a-50-quoi-de-nouveau-au-chemin-kilmar/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Franks on March 03, 2010, 08:26:54 PM
Moi aussi je suis ce blogue trés intéressant... merci Stéphane ^^ ... en plus l'A50 me concerne , c'est dans ma région , les laurentides!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: agentsteel53 on March 03, 2010, 08:44:33 PM
Moi aussi je suis ce blogue trés intéressant... merci Stéphane ^^ ... en plus l'A50 me concerne , c'est dans ma région , les laurentides!

please translate for the rest of us  :sombrero: or else I will have to attempt to.

my hovercraft is full of eels
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Franks on March 03, 2010, 09:04:40 PM
Sorry I forgot  :) ... but I was talking to Stéphane... I said : I'm following this blog too, he's really interresting. And the A50 concerns myself cause it's in my region : the laurantians.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Hellfighter on March 04, 2010, 12:20:59 AM
It might never happen, but what if Quebec extends A-70 past A-40, over the St Laurence River (Big Bridge!), and connects to A-20/A-85?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Bickendan on March 04, 2010, 12:27:06 AM
Moi aussi je suis ce blogue trés intéressant... merci Stéphane ^^ ... en plus l'A50 me concerne , c'est dans ma région , les laurentides!

please translate for the rest of us  :sombrero: or else I will have to attempt to.

my hovercraft is full of eels
No no, it's 'weevils', not 'eels'. Of course, you could learn French...

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Scott5114 on March 04, 2010, 02:32:38 PM
See, and I got "My Aussie gets suits and sees blokes that are three times as interesting. Mercy, Stephen, A-50 is concerning, because Dan Garnell is in my region!"
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Hellfighter on March 04, 2010, 03:57:08 PM
Here's another idea, finish A-30 west of A-55...
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Franks on March 08, 2010, 10:31:32 PM
Here's another idea, finish A-30 west of A-55...

Absolutely, this was planned since 30 years ! ... but I think that for now they're choosing what are their priorities... So one day yes, but not now !
For true, the A30 was supposed to be constructed as far as Bécancour ( east of A55 )
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: un1 on March 09, 2010, 03:47:05 PM
Absolutely, this was planned since 30 years ! ... but I think that for now they're choosing what are their priorities... So one day yes, but not now !
For true, the A30 was supposed to be constructed as far as Bécancour ( east of A55 )

Can I see the plans for this? I don't see how there is enough demand for two freeways to run between Montreal and Trois-Rivières.

Also, what is the progress of A-85's extension to NB?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Franks on March 09, 2010, 04:22:40 PM
Sorry, I don't have anything for the eastern extension of the A30 between Sorel and Trois-Rivières, but I'm sure that the ministry of transportation have some old plans in the Backstore  :) ... For true, there's some indication of a future extention, just take a look in google maps : Rue Yvon-Trudeau, Bécancour, Qc. ... and look at the Route 132 just south of this you'll see...

And for the A85, the extention is well advanced now. But it's a over 100km new highway so, the whole highway will only be opened around 2015, with some gradual little openning stretches before 2015.

Take a look here, it's only in French, but it's the MTQ's website and there's also some up-to-date pictures :

http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/page/portal/grands_projets/trouver_grand_projet/reamenagement_r185 (http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/page/portal/grands_projets/trouver_grand_projet/reamenagement_r185)

This is a plan of the new highway on a PDF with explainations about each parts. Some Stretches are now open, without the purple and red ones.
http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/page/portal/Librairie/Images/Fr/regions/bas/reamenagement_route_185_en_autoroute/ream_carte_185_10.02.01.pdf (http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/page/portal/Librairie/Images/Fr/regions/bas/reamenagement_route_185_en_autoroute/ream_carte_185_10.02.01.pdf)

Franks.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Hellfighter on March 10, 2010, 02:16:14 PM
According to Transport Quebec (http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/page/portal/grands_projets/trouver_grand_projet/reamenagement_r185), A-85 should be fully completed by the end of next year. What I would like to know is if they will ever consider building a bridge for Route 138 over the Saugauney River?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: un1 on March 10, 2010, 03:02:51 PM
Thanks Franks and Hellfighter, just too bad it wont be ready for my trip to NB next year.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Franks on March 14, 2010, 11:32:57 PM
According to Transport Quebec (http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/page/portal/grands_projets/trouver_grand_projet/reamenagement_r185), A-85 should be fully completed by the end of next year. What I would like to know is if they will ever consider building a bridge for Route 138 over the Saugauney River?

I don't think so, and anyways they did some interviews and they clearly said that the A85 will fully opened in 2015, and anyways here in Quebec , highways projects are always late ! And for the Saguenay river they did some plans and videos about it, but I don't think it is serious for now. it's a over 1 billion of $ for what ? around 100 000 peoples. I don't say that this is couldnt be good, for the Région côte-Nord it should be, but in general, our government is never spending too much money for a low-populated region, you just can see how they're doing with Super-2 highways around here about that.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on August 20, 2011, 02:31:00 PM
A new gap of A-50 between Grenville and Pointe-au-Chêne had opened yesterday. Here a French article about it
http://www.cyberpresse.ca/le-droit/actualites/gatineau-outaouais/201108/19/01-4427461-un-nouveau-troncon-de-la-50-ouvert-en-grande-pompe.php
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: mhallack on September 07, 2011, 06:49:44 PM
This thread brings back soooo many memories of driving to Quebec from Maine (via Route 201) Last time we were there was 2004, but due to money and now having to get passports, it will be a long time before we can get back to Quebec. All our memories of traveling there has been awesome. People there are really cool, food is great and even though my french is near non-existant, I was able to get us around fairly easy.

Funny story while in Quebec. We were on A40 going for the day to Montreal. We got pulled over by the provincial police for going 124km in a 100km zone (even though most people were driving faster than us) I tried to play dumb American by saying I didn't understand metric speeds. He politely pointed out to me that on my speedometer it has mileage in MPH and KMH (damn!!) So I did get a ticket. When we got home I translated the ticket via Babelfish, paid it and sent it off. (Ticket was entirely in french) A few months later I get a letter from the police there stating that THEY had overfined me and included a check for the difference of $15 Canadian!! I did cash the check, but should have kept it!!

BTW: The policeman was VERY polite,and I even helped him with a few english words, which he appreciated!!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on September 08, 2011, 09:09:26 PM
I got pulled over for the exact same speed, while being passed too.

Some local (municipal) authorities have bilingual tickets, but not the Sûreté du Québec.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on September 14, 2011, 09:59:10 PM
What I would like to know is if they will ever consider building a bridge for Route 138 over the Saugauney River?

And for the Saguenay river they did some plans and videos about it, but I don't think it is serious for now. it's a over 1 billion of $ for what ? around 100 000 peoples. I don't say that this is couldnt be good, for the Région côte-Nord it should be, but in general, our government is never spending too much money for a low-populated region, you just can see how they're doing with Super-2 highways around here about that.

I did the Saguenay river crossing earlier this month, on my way back from Labrador.  Convenient and free ferry service, with two vessels both covering the ferry route, very short wait and crossing times.  I'm not sure a bridge would be useful, unless ice or weather closes the ferry during part of the year.  Otherwise, the best reason for a bridge would be just dollars-and-cents, if the cost of building and maintaining a bridge would be less than the operating costs of the ferries.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 14, 2011, 07:03:34 PM
Does anybody know, when is the A-35 extension supposed to open?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on October 14, 2011, 07:45:03 PM
End 2013 to Saint-Sébastien, just north of Venise-en-Québec, then full completion in 2017.

http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/page/portal/grands_projets_en/trouver_grand_projet/parachevement_a35
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on November 11, 2011, 02:39:13 PM
I was looking at Google Maps today along A-15 north of pont Champlain, and I noticed that there is a set of traffic signals just north of pont Iles-des-Soeurs that seem to regulate where busses enter traffic during the reversible lane hours.  Do they really stop freeway traffic to let busses in the reversible lane?

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Montreal,+QC,+Canada&hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.471495,-73.555009&spn=0.001612,0.004128&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=58.467737,135.263672&vpsrc=6&hnear=Montreal,+Communaut%C3%A9-Urbaine-de-Montr%C3%A9al,+Quebec,+Canada&t=k&z=19&layer=c&cbll=45.471503,-73.555124&panoid=NFN7QCc8HcVIhz4uorjJUA&cbp=12,281.88,,0,2.57
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on November 11, 2011, 10:54:54 PM
I've honestly never seen those operate. But I tend to avoid this area during rush hour.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on November 20, 2011, 01:21:04 AM
I was looking at Google Maps today along A-15 north of pont Champlain, and I noticed that there is a set of traffic signals just north of pont Iles-des-Soeurs that seem to regulate where busses enter traffic during the reversible lane hours.  Do they really stop freeway traffic to let busses in the reversible lane?

Yes they do, from 3:30 PM to 7:30 PM and on A-15 north only.

Last summer, heavy jams formed from Pelletier boulevard on A-10 and Rome boulevard on A-15, Mercier bridge closure forced vehicles heading towards Montréal to use Champlain. This added an awful 45-60 min to the bridge crossing time, when entering the island on a PM rush hour.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on November 27, 2011, 07:20:35 PM
I have recently begun collecting old road maps from Québec.  My latest purchase is a 1964 atlas where the Autoroute network is just starting to blossom.  This is my second map from that era and I am noticing that Québec had a fairly extensive dual highway network constructed in advance of the Autoroute network.  For example, almost all of what was then Hwy 9 (now R-116 and A-20) was four laned between the South Shore of Montreal and Quebec City, however everything west of Saint-Hyacinthe followed what is today's Route 116.  Also, I noticed that what has become today's Metropolitaine began from then Hwy 2 following what is now A-520 to get to what is now A-40.  Does anybody know, was Metropolitaine first an at-grade divided highway that was later upgraded to an expressway standard during the Autoroute era?  It would seem that way.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on December 04, 2011, 12:20:02 AM
Also, I noticed that what has become today's Metropolitaine began from then Hwy 2 following what is now A-520 to get to what is now A-40.  Does anybody know, was Metropolitaine first an at-grade divided highway that was later upgraded to an expressway standard during the Autoroute era?  It would seem that way.

Yes, indeed. Autoroute Côte-de-Liesse and autoroute Métropolitaine follow old rural roads. You can even observe some remnants of it (http://g.co/maps/49z9q).

From west to east, boulevard Métropolitain replaced:
-Chemin de la Côte-de-Liesse (route 2/late A-20 to Chemin Sainte-Croix)
-Chemin Vervais (Ste-Croix to rue Saint-Hubert)
-a road parallel to Chemin de la Côte-Saint-Michel/late rue Jarry Est (St-Hubert to Longue-Pointe limits/late boulevard Langelier)
-Chemin de la Côte-Saint-Léonard (Longue-Pointe limits to Island Boulevard/late boulevard Henri-Bourassa)

These roads were twinned in the 50's, with a large median to allow the construction of a freeway. The highway then bore number 2B. Traffic used the service roads. The first limited-access section to open was the elevated section, in 1959, between actual A-520 and Pie-IX boulevard. Interchanges were gradually built connecting the service roads. A-520 had its express lanes opened in 1966, A-40 between Pie-IX and boulevard du Roi-René in 1969 and Roi-René to Henri-Bourassa in 1971. (Meanwhile, the Transcanadienne towards Vaudreuil opened in 1963, service roads alternating with freeway lanes)

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/1-1.png)
Boulevard Métropolitain (A-40), approaching boulevard Henri-Bourassa, looking east.
Picture by Gabor Szilasi (1970), Archives Nationales du Québec.
Late Google Street View (http://g.co/maps/nnx2f).

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/2-2.png)
Boulevard Métropolitain (A-40), east of boulevard du Roi-René, looking east.
Picture by Henri Rémillard (1970), Archives Nationales du Québec
Late Google Street View (http://g.co/maps/ut5k2).

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/3-1.png)
Boulevard Métropolitain (A-40), east of boulevard du Roi-René, looking west.
Picture by Henri Rémillard (1970), Archives Nationales du Québec
Late Google Street View (http://g.co/maps/x4bzm).

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/4.png)
End of Boulevard Métropolitain/Beginning of Autoroute de la Rive-Nord (now Félix-Leclerc) (A-40), near boulevard Henri-Bourassa, looking east.
Picture by Henri Rémillard (1970), Archives Nationales du Québec.
Late Google Street View (http://g.co/maps/8udmu).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on December 16, 2011, 09:38:16 AM
(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/15/A15_index_front.jpg)
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/15/index.html (http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/15/index.html)

Not as cool as the historical photos that precede this post, however, this links to a photolog of Autoroute 15 through Montreal.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on January 26, 2012, 04:55:06 PM

Great Youtube clip of the Ville Marie Autoroute through Downtown Montreal.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: xcellntbuy on January 26, 2012, 05:13:23 PM
It looks like many of the tiles on the walls of the tunnel are in need of replacement.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on January 26, 2012, 10:13:27 PM
It looks like many of the tiles on the walls of the tunnel are in need of replacement.

I think that is minor, compared to the structural problems...
http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Concrete+structure+collapses+Ville+Marie+tunnel/5871834/story.html
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: xcellntbuy on January 26, 2012, 10:42:06 PM
You are indeed very correct!  The Can$4 billion price tag is an enormous cost for repairs. :-o
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on January 26, 2012, 11:18:27 PM
They got tired of replacing tiles a long while ago...

Also, notice the LED-copy speed limit and exit gore signs. (ie. Exit 7 @ 2:08)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on January 29, 2012, 02:44:21 PM
You are indeed very correct!  The Can$4 billion price tag is an enormous cost for repairs. :-o

The 4G$ program cited in the article is to inspect and maintain every structure under MTQ jurisdiction. Not just Ville-Marie tunnel.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on February 25, 2012, 12:27:12 PM
The first "real" storm of this unsnowy winter revealed to be fatal for driver in a spectacular accident.

Quote from: CBC News

(http://img.src.ca/2012/02/25/635x357/120225_g575f_accident-autoroute-40_sn635.jpg)

Highway 40 eastbound remains closed in Montreal's Anjou sector after a fatal accident late Friday night, during the first major snowfall to hit Quebec in weeks. A 49-year-old man was killed in his car after it was struck by debris from a transport truck collision near the Roi-René exit. The transport truck crashed into several safety barrels on the side of the road before it hit a large metal road sign structure hanging overhead, which fell on the car. A second transport truck was also struck by the debris, but the driver escaped uninjured. Authorities shut the eastbound lanes to finish their investigation on Saturday. Eastbound drivers have to exit at Ray-Lawson, police said.Only one westbound lane will be open, until inspectors finish their investigation.

The accident is one of two deadly road collisions reported during Quebec's first major snowfall this month.

Read the full article here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2012/02/25/snow-storm-quebec.html
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on February 25, 2012, 12:31:58 PM
Is that here?:
(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/40/A40_dv_82_east.jpg)

Bad luck for the driver of the car.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on February 25, 2012, 05:25:15 PM
Right there.

The first semi is said to have hit those "trashcans" full of sand, then the BGS gantry, at relatively high speed.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on June 11, 2012, 03:42:24 PM
L'autoroute Ville-Marie:

A couple of pictures of Montreal's Downtown Autoroute taken in early May:

(http://asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/720/A720_dv_2-8_east_May12.jpg)

(http://asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/720/A720_dv_3-9_east_May12.jpg)

(http://asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/720/A720_dv_5-9_west_May12.jpg)

(http://asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/720/A720_cl_6-1_west_May12.jpg)

(http://asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/720/A720_cl_7_east_May12.jpg)

(http://asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/720/A720_cl_9_west_t_May12.jpg)

http://asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/720/index.html (http://asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/720/index.html)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 02, 2012, 11:37:06 PM
Found that while walking around town with a friend.
I don't think there's much of them remaining. Not young, too.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/100_1480.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on July 02, 2012, 11:40:14 PM
Found that while walking around town with a friend.
I don't think there's much of them remaining. Not young, too.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/100_1480.jpg)
I have never seen one of those. That also qualifies as Best Of. Location?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 03, 2012, 12:40:44 AM
Rue Charlevoix and Rue Mullins, in Pointe-Saint-Charles neighborhood.
http://goo.gl/maps/QgAM

Dates back from the toll era, probably early 70's, but can be younger because seems unaltered by the sun, even though the sign faces northwest.

The preceding trailblazer (located at Charlevoix/Grand-Trunk) is a plain «A-15 sud» sign, the following (Charlevoix/Knox) is a «[ahead] Pont Champlain» MGS.

This one stood out.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: agentsteel53 on July 03, 2012, 10:11:34 AM
I don't think it is unaltered.  I believe the original color was much closer to blue.  but that is just conjecture.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on July 03, 2012, 10:46:59 AM
Definitely a great find, webfil!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on December 26, 2012, 04:21:41 PM
If you look at Google Maps' aerial photo:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=quebec+city&hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=46.814827,-71.217434&spn=0.003693,0.00912&sll=37.6,-95.665&sspn=34.785432,74.707031&hnear=Quebec+City,+Communaut%C3%A9-Urbaine-de-Qu%C3%A9bec,+Quebec,+Canada&t=k&z=17

you'll notice that there's a stub ramp on the right and a bulldozer chewing into the ramp on the left. I'm trying to find out what those ramp stubs were for - were they the original ramps to head south on QC 175, or were they stubs for something else? A historical map or aerial image from the 1970s or 1980s would be perfect, or just your own knowledge. Wikipedia refers to "removal of stubs," but that could just as easily be the mainline stub.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ARMOURERERIC on December 26, 2012, 04:34:20 PM
I recall reading on another site, maybe Steve Andersons, Roads of Montreal, that those ramps were to serve a tunneled highway route underneath the surface route served by the ramps that are to remain, something about a tunnel route to underneath that would ultimately provide access to the estern shore of the island.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on December 26, 2012, 04:34:59 PM
If you look at Google Maps' aerial photo:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=quebec+city&hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=46.814827,-71.217434&spn=0.003693,0.00912&sll=37.6,-95.665&sspn=34.785432,74.707031&hnear=Quebec+City,+Communaut%C3%A9-Urbaine-de-Qu%C3%A9bec,+Quebec,+Canada&t=k&z=17

you'll notice that there's a stub ramp on the right and a bulldozer chewing into the ramp on the left. I'm trying to find out what those ramp stubs were for - were they the original ramps to head south on QC 175, or were they stubs for something else? A historical map or aerial image from the 1970s or 1980s would be perfect, or just your own knowledge. Wikipedia refers to "removal of stubs," but that could just as easily be the mainline stub.

That stub in question was for a once planned tunnel to link Dufferin-Momontrency autoroute (A-440) with Champlain blvd.

Here some pictures of that tunnel http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=132909 and some proposed plans on this French blog http://www.quebecurbain.qc.ca/2011/12/09/le-tunnel-dufferin-une-caverne-mysterieuse-sous-nos-pieds/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: NE2 on December 26, 2012, 06:14:45 PM
Hmmm.
https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll=46.813921,-71.217552&spn=0.006696,0.016512&t=k&z=17&layer=c&cbll=46.813921,-71.217552&panoid=agm7kBg9HhHPxcSsw8LThQ&cbp=12,163.13,,0,-22.28
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on December 26, 2012, 10:39:01 PM

Here some pictures of that tunnel http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=132909
This thread was worth it for that link alone.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on May 15, 2013, 10:27:52 PM
Here a video of A-15 from St.Adele to Montreal
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on May 21, 2013, 09:25:57 AM
Stéphane Dumas pointed out cool pictures on another website. They are night shots of A-40 and A-73 in Charlesbourg (Québec City).

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showpost.php?p=6134666&postcount=1669
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on June 12, 2013, 08:25:27 PM
Here are a few photos from logging road 0212, between R-167 (the junction is located @ kilometre 85 of route 167) and Opitciwan Atikamekw (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atikamekw) community.

The road is co-maintained by Ministère des Ressources naturelles and logging companies, as it gives access to an isolated community ― logging roads are usually maintained by the companies only. They go through impressive clearcuts, which are not visible from highways (can't see/can't hurt...). Warning signage found along these roads is rudimentary, although directionnal MGSs can be found at major intersections, pointing either towards Opitciwan or Saint-Félicien. Since the road is not subject to provincial standards, important warnings (keep left, announce your position, CB channel 9, etc.) are notified to drivers with white-on-blue text signs, as opposed to ideogrammatical signage usually found in the province. Speed limit is 60 km/h between km 0 and 104, then 70 km/h up to km 161. It drops to 50 km/h approaching the core of the community and then to 30 km/h in the village (i cannot find my "Maximum 30 Petokemari" bilingual sign photo).

Interesting tidbit : stop signs in Opitciwan are unilingual french, which is usually not the case in most Aboriginal communities in Québec where bilingual, nay trilingual signs are found.

If you plan on travelling logging roads in Québec, let me advise to always carry proper UHF radiocommunication equipment. Not announcing your position on logging roads, even at daytime, is putting your life in danger, with the risk of facing a truck unaware of your existence. There is little to no traffic on these roads and no wireless network nor emergency phone is available, so planning such communication equipment is a strict minimum.

Please excuse the poor quality of some shots. Vibrations due to road condition and rain made photography quite hard. I decided to share anyways, I think this is of some interest.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/Opitciwan%20road/100_1784_zpsea695413.jpg)
French-Atikamekw bilingual sign. Pronounce /o.bit.ˈtʃu.wɑn/ or /o.bɛd.ˈdʒi.wɑn/. Yeah, like this.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/Opitciwan%20road/100_1785_zpsc474d89d.jpg)
Junction 0212 and 0203 @ kilometre 4, near Abitibi-Bowater logging camp. Note the complete absence of shields, even though some Wikipedia articles make usage of such a shield (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Quebec_R_405.png) ― never saw that. Nonetheless, I saw some 2-digits provincial-route-alike green shields bearing numbers I can't match with any maps, past or present ; I know logging road numbering is quite changing, and are solely for adminstrative purpose, for the account of either the Ministère or logging companies. Do not expect to see these (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Quebec_R_405.png).

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/Opitciwan%20road/100_1794_zpsb5b81168.jpg)
Looking east @ kilometre 4.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/Opitciwan%20road/100_1798_zpsead455d0.jpg)
Looking west @ approx. kilometre 34.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/Opitciwan%20road/100_1799_zpsdc6b4d3b.jpg)
Nice descending curve. Looking west @ approx. kilometre 35.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/Opitciwan%20road/100_1800_zps4a3cdae0.jpg)
One of eight 1-lane bridge along 0212. This one is located @ approx. kilometre 50, over unnamed river. Drivers are required to announce their position at least 1 kilometre before crossing bridges. The sign you see right-hand is standard for "Yield to Oncoming Traffic" in Québec.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/Opitciwan%20road/100_1811_zps3bf21760.jpg)
Traces of human settlement. Junction 0212 and 1046 @ kilometre 92. From here in a 4-kilometre radius, 0212 dips into Hudson Bay watershed and Baie-James municipality. The remainder is located in unorganized territory or in city of La Tuque, on Saint-Laurent watershed.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/9025694413_3a746d4604_o_zpsb8eaa9e5.jpg)
Dirt road. Route 0212, approaching Ruisseau Mathieu @ approx. kilometre 147.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/Opitciwan%20road/100_1867_zps53773389.jpg)
No limits. Route 1046 over Seskatciwan Sipi (Toussaint River), 6.5 kilometres north of Opitciwan.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/9027924322_68852859a1_o_zps23c5aeb9.jpg)
Some rough backroad I enjoyed driving in traditional Atikamekw homeland.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on June 12, 2013, 08:35:29 PM
That's awesome.  Thanks for uploading the photos!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: agentsteel53 on June 12, 2013, 08:57:18 PM
awesome photos!

I have some photos of R shields, as well as Reserves Fauniques Quebec shields, which are a darker shade of green than the provincials.  they were all taken on roads leading up to the James Bay Road.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: aridawn on June 12, 2013, 10:11:22 PM
\any pics or news on the Rte-138 extension to connect the huge gape to Newfoundland and Labrador?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on June 13, 2013, 12:49:06 AM
That's awesome.
awesome photos!
Thanks. Atikamekw people is awesome too, but that awesomeness is sadly harder to record via photography.

I have some photos of R shields, as well as Reserves Fauniques Quebec shields, which are a darker shade of green than the provincials.  they were all taken on roads leading up to the James Bay Road.

I'd be willing to see that.

I know SÉPAQ (the provincial authority responsible for parks, wildlife reserves and tourist resorts) has a brown, provincial-route-alike shield of its own, from which I saw examples in Papineau-Labelle reserve and Mont-Tremblant park.

any pics or news on the Rte-138 extension to connect the huge gape to Newfoundland and Labrador?
July 2011 picture : http://goo.gl/maps/NNqY5
Bridge has still not been built yet.

Schedule :

I would not be surprised if Chevery, Aylmer Sound, Tête-à-la-Baleine and Mutton Bay/La Tabatière/Red Bay would be the first communities to be linked together. Chevery has an all-season airport with an asphalt runaway and facilities, which is not the case for the other mentionned settlements.

Topic about R-138 end, with pictures of "winter" R-138, Route Blanche. (http://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=7954)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on June 13, 2013, 09:19:27 PM
Do you have a map of your travels?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on June 14, 2013, 01:30:06 PM
Detailed logging roads map :
http://www.quebec511.gouv.qc.ca/images/fr/carte_routiere/PDF/web08_Mauricie_nord.pdf
Itinerary (711 km) :
http://goo.gl/maps/IHeC2

We first planned to go there via Parent (via R-117 and R-311, 675 km) and were offered to be guided from Manawan (via R-131, 584 km). I'm looking forward to return to Opitciwan and use one of these two options.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on June 24, 2013, 10:19:27 AM
New photo of Autoroute 5 nearing completion.  There appears to be two contracts for the extension of A-5.  The southern contract appears to nearly be complete, while there is a lot of work remaining for the northern contract:

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/5/A5_extn_future.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on June 26, 2013, 01:56:52 PM
I am deducting this is the Farm Point interchange.

Any updates on the Wakefield bypass extension towards Alcove? I know it is scheduled to open in 2 or 3 years; has the construction began yet?

EDIT : Construction workers' general strike might have affected ongoing construction, thus giving the impression of stagnation.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on June 26, 2013, 03:43:41 PM
Nothing starting north of Wakefield that I could see, unless there was some advanced clearing or something.  I stopped my trek north at Hwy 366, as I wanted to spend some time at Hwy 417 in Arnprior.

I had wondered why there was no construction ongoing when I visited the site on a Wednesday.  The grève would explain that.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on August 11, 2013, 09:45:25 PM
I have some photos of R shields, as well as Reserves Fauniques Quebec shields, which are a darker shade of green than the provincials.  they were all taken on roads leading up to the James Bay Road.

I'd be willing to see that.

I know SÉPAQ (the provincial authority responsible for parks, wildlife reserves and tourist resorts) has a brown, provincial-route-alike shield of its own, from which I saw examples in Papineau-Labelle reserve and Mont-Tremblant park.

Here is one example of that said Réserve faunique (wildlife reserve) dark green shield. It was shot at the junction of Papineau-Labelle routes 2 and 3, north of Montpellier, QC. All of the dark green signs (shields and lodge trailblazers) were not there last year.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/100_1964_zps478100b2.jpg)

Route 3 is a trunk route in the reserve.  We've also been on route 2, although I was not in position to take any picture. As we had to stop to register the catches of the day at the gamekeeper's booth, I took the opportunity to take out my camera.

Here is a shot of route 3 looking north at "Accueil Mulet" (Mulet Gate).
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/2ouest_zps80389492.jpg)

Here is a shot at the same spot, looking south. As you can see, the dark green colour amalgamates with the surroundings
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/3sud_zps446e0f61.jpg)

The location is here (http://goo.gl/maps/RwJTO), which is a mere 50 kilometres north of A-50.

Bonus!  :love:
Here is half of yesterday's catches before being smoked with maple embers.
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/100_1945_zps6d8f5a83.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Interstatefan78 on August 12, 2013, 01:49:39 PM
Freewaybrent made a nice video of A-73 in Quebec.

Watch it in HD:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiPQgoTt84s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiPQgoTt84s)

Saw his video and from one of Freewaybrent's annotation A-73 is suppose to go to Maine and it's supposed to go to Saguenay 200km north of Quebec since Saguenay is a tourist attraction for Americans living in ME,NH,VT
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on August 14, 2013, 10:47:28 PM
Freewaybrent made a nice video of A-73 in Quebec.

Watch it in HD:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiPQgoTt84s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiPQgoTt84s)

Saw his video and from one of Freewaybrent's annotation A-73 is suppose to go to Maine and it's supposed to go to Saguenay 200km north of Quebec since Saguenay is a tourist attraction for Americans living in ME,NH,VT
QC 175 heads north to Saguenay and that's how it's going to stay for the indeterminate future. No reason to make it a full autoroute, it works fine as a divided highway with sparse intersections. (Not that an Autoroute couldn't have at-grade connections, so if they haven't made it A-73 now, they never will.) They also aren't extending it any farther than their latest project unless Maine brings a freeway up the US 201 corridor. In other words, A-73 is never growing beyond its current length.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on August 15, 2013, 01:35:20 AM
In other words, A-73 is never growing beyond its current length.

There is a 18-kilometre section currently under construction from Beauceville to Saint-Georges.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on August 15, 2013, 11:43:06 PM
In other words, A-73 is never growing beyond its current length.

There is a 18-kilometre section currently under construction from Beauceville to Saint-Georges.
Yes, I accounted for that in my rundown.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on September 21, 2013, 06:55:47 PM
A couple of new photos from A-30 west of Montreal:

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/30/A30_dv_4-9_west_Jun13.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/30/A30_dv_10_east_Jun13.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/30/A30_cl_9_east_WB_Jun13.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/30/A30_cl_9_east_May12.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/30/A30_cl_11_east_t_Jun13.jpg)

More and larger:
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/30/Page1.html
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ghYHZ on September 22, 2013, 07:47:05 PM
A couple of new photos from A-30 west of Montreal:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

More and larger:
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/30/Page1.html

Another great set of photos......thanks for posting!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on September 27, 2013, 07:08:10 PM
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/route38_zpsc7fe84dc.jpg)
Viau bridge, 1948, as seen from Pont-Viau (now Laval). Source : Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec.

Contrary to the popular belief, Viau (or Ahuntsic) bridge was, in 1847, the first bridge built to provide access to Montréal island; Victoria Bridge was open in 1859, 10 years after Lachapelle and Delisle-et-Lemoyne (long lost wooden bridge west of actual Papineau-Leblanc) bridges inauguration.

The first Viau bridge consisted in an impressive layout of wooden archs and covered spans.
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/effc24b1-397b-462c-a2e7-f410452f3e74_zps5859310c.jpg)
Circa 1860, looking towards Sault-au-Récollet (now Montréal). Source : Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec.

The actual steel and concrete structure over Prairies river dates from 1930. The deck was wholly rebuilt in 2010-2012, and enlarged to 5 lanes. It carries route 335 and has seen 29 000 vehicles per day in 2010, a significant decrease from the 36 000 passages in 2008. The Orange line of the Montréal metro has been extended to the other shore inbetween; suburban bus routes now end at Laval stations and parking is available for commuters.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/route38-1_zps8f0f90ec.png)
Actual view of the bridge, from (deducted) same point of view as 1948. Source : Google Street View.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on September 27, 2013, 08:08:44 PM
The first Viau bridge consisted in an impressive layout of wooden archs and covered spans.
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/effc24b1-397b-462c-a2e7-f410452f3e74_zps5859310c.jpg)
Circa 1860, looking towards Sault-au-Récollet (now Montréal). Source : Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec.
They need to build more of these.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: NE2 on September 27, 2013, 08:17:48 PM
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/route38-1_zps8f0f90ec.png)
No goats?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on September 27, 2013, 08:18:43 PM
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/route38-1_zps8f0f90ec.png)
No goats?
It's not the ACTUAL Prairies, mind you, just Blvd. des Prairies.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on September 27, 2013, 10:41:37 PM
No goats?
No unleashed goats. (http://goo.gl/maps/HUlMg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on October 05, 2013, 08:46:14 AM
The extension of PQ-138 to Kegaska is opened!:)
http://www.radio-canada.ca/regions/est-quebec/2013/09/26/011-cote-nord-pont-natashquan.shtml
http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Canada/Montreal/Audio/ID/2409043379/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 05, 2013, 03:47:40 PM
The extension of PQ-138 to Kegaska is opened!:)
http://www.radio-canada.ca/regions/est-quebec/2013/09/26/011-cote-nord-pont-natashquan.shtml
http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Canada/Montreal/Audio/ID/2409043379/

Inauguration without any government delegate? Not even a deputy minister? The local M.P.? I think that means : «no, we will not put a single cent for a further extension»...

Congrats anyway to the Innu people, who are part of Construction Atik.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 24, 2013, 07:43:31 PM
Here are some 1970 pictures of A-25 Hochelaga interchange (now exit 4) (http://goo.gl/maps/S0UBC) in Montréal.

That interchange was built to accomodate movements between A-25 and A-20, although A-20 never reached that point ― Ville-Marie autoroute was never extended west of Papineau street. It has been assigned A-720 spur number, Trans-Canada Highway was finally rerouted onto A-40/Métropolitaine. A 2.9-kilometres expressway extends west of Hochelaga interchange since the mid-90's; the lanes now pointing southwest used to veer and connect directly to Hochelaga street in a fashion shown on the map below. The construction of Souligny Avenue expressway and surface streets reconfiguration were brought up as a solution to divert the flow of trucks from the local street network when transiting between Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine bridge-tunnel and the Port of Montréal, on Notre-Dame street.

A-25 now carries 133,000 vehicles per day between Hochelaga interchange and the Tunnel, while Souligny Avenue expressway carries 44,000 vpd (2010 studies).

Black and white pictures are from Henri Rémillard, 1970, via BAnQ. August 2011 pictures are taken directly from Google Streetview and match closely the same point of view.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/a25-7_zps67ea5f5f.png)
Source : 31-H-12-200-0102 topo map, Gouvernement du Québec, 1978 via Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ)

Corner of Tellier and Currateau streets. Looking northwest. Note the R-2 shield in the background.
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/8bfa2922-5e9e-4feb-bcc9-c8f93c10066f_zps12d2baca.jpg)
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/c973c7b7-f803-4d92-b1ec-df65dcd85502_zpsbf7aa3f8.jpg)

Rue Hochelaga, over A-25 SB exit 4. The overpass has been demolished and completely rebuilt with additionnal lanes in 2010.
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/a5cd1e9d-8c63-4b71-aec0-53afa92879fa_zpsbdde3a2e.jpg)
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/c1a7fbd9-1a48-4a01-8bb8-9ae6c9d33a42_zps5bfad168.jpg)

Rue de Boucherville, over A-25. Looking northwest. Not that quiet anymore.
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/8c9a7b2d-2bd9-4497-9530-acd03eafebd0_zps79ca7df2.jpg)(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/2eff99f5-7373-4de7-842c-01439e61a389_zps40eec018.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on December 04, 2013, 09:17:51 PM
Some new pics of the Autoroute 5 extension north of Ottawa/Gatineau, taken last June:

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/5/A5_dv_23_north_Jun13.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/5/A5_cl_25_north_Jun13.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/5/A5_cl_25-5_north_Jun13.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/5/A5_structure_29_north_Jun13.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/5/A5_dv_30-5_south_Jun13.jpg)

More and larger:
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/5/index.html (http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/5/index.html)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on December 11, 2013, 05:22:33 PM
No photo yet (I shall remedy that tomorrow night next week), but Boulevard Champlain in Quebec City is now actually signed as route 136, at least on the new BGSes on A-73 SB.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on December 11, 2013, 08:33:50 PM
No photo yet (I shall remedy that tomorrow night), but Boulevard Champlain in Quebec City is now actually signed as route 136, at least on the new BGSes on A-73 SB.
:wow:
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on December 11, 2013, 09:43:33 PM
A few more months and we'll get a second R-136, this one in Montréal designating obsolete A-720, Notre-Dame, Dickson and Souligny between A-15 and A-25.

Also, Dubuc Bridge (R-175, between R-372 and R-172) has been closed due to a fire on a scaffold under the deck. The bridge linking downtown Saguenay (Chicoutimi) to the northern suburbs is in an uncertain state regarding the steel properties.

Pedestrian can either walk the Sainte-Anne bridge (which seemed to be quite popular today) and ride free bus shuttles or use the 42-km detour via the Chute-à-Caron bridge linking Arvida to Shipshaw. I doubt that the former will be very popular tomorrow, with lows in the -10°F/-25°C, high around 0°F/-20°C.

The closest bridge, the Aluminum Bridge, is ironically closed for major maintenance. Dubuc bridge is the first automobile bridge upstream Saguenay river. It has more trafic than any leg of A-70.

CBC has more info on that (and a video of the blaze) : http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/saguenay-s-dubuc-bridge-to-remain-closed-thursday-morning-1.2460007
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on December 11, 2013, 09:55:34 PM

Also, Dubuc Bridge (R-175, between R-372 and R-172) has been closed due to a fire on a scaffold under the deck. The bridge linking downtown Saguenay (Chicoutimi) to the northern suburbs is in an uncertain state regarding the steel properties.

Pedestrian can either walk the Sainte-Anne bridge (which seemed to be quite popular today) and ride free bus shuttles or use the 42-km detour via the Chute-à-Caron bridge linking Arvida to Shipshaw. I doubt that the former will be very popular tomorrow, with lows in the -10°F/-25°C, high around 0°F/-20°C.

The closest bridge, the Aluminum Bridge, is ironically closed for major maintenance. Dubuc bridge is the first automobile bridge upstream Saguenay river. It has more trafic than any leg of A-70.

CBC has more info on that (and a video of the blaze) : http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/saguenay-s-dubuc-bridge-to-remain-closed-thursday-morning-1.2460007
*Aluminium Bridge, no? ;)

I wonder if Pont Ste-Anne could be repaved and reopened to vehicles to help compensate? It could either be one lane each way, or just the one paved lane that is currently there going in peak direction, or two lanes both going in peak direction.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on December 12, 2013, 03:37:51 PM
*Aluminium Bridge, no? ;)
Whatevs... It's made of It, it is nearing 65 years old and it needed major repairs. There is no "I" in such art work :P

I wonder if Pont Ste-Anne could be repaved and reopened to vehicles to help compensate? It could either be one lane each way, or just the one paved lane that is currently there going in peak direction, or two lanes both going in peak direction.

It is paved, only not plowed. I don't know if the structure could bear any vehicular trafic, though. I think it is quite in good shape, as it was closed to cars in 1972 ― its lifespan was less than 39 years! For now, Bagotville soldiers are installing tents on all the bridge's length to ensure pedestrians are protected from the raw and intense cold temperatures, wind and humidity.

Saguenay city put up a "crisis cell" to adjust the services according to the needs. Add that to the aditionnal Société de Transport du Saguenay buses (they rented a couple of them from transport companies and transit authorities all over Eastern Québec), you get a >100k$ bill per day the bridge is closed, according to the mayor.

Test results for Dubuc bridge will be made public on Sunday. We'll see then what's the plan.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Duke87 on December 12, 2013, 09:05:19 PM
Wait, so what's happening with A-720 exactly? Is it being modified in any way or are they just changing the designation so they can say "look! We don't have an Autoroute going through downtown Montreal, I swear!"?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: NE2 on December 12, 2013, 09:14:10 PM
Wait, so what's happening with A-720 exactly? Is it being modified in any way or are they just changing the designation so they can say "look! We don't have an Autoroute going through downtown Montreal, I swear!"?
Maybe they wanted a continuous number for the whole corridor and MTQ refused to make it 720. Or 136 will begin where A-720 ends and something got lost in translation.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on December 13, 2013, 09:38:23 AM
A bit of both, I think.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on December 20, 2013, 10:36:09 AM
Dubuc Bridge was reopen this morning, with one lane per direction, restricted to vehicles under 4,500 kg (10,000 lbs).

Temporary services are still up (tents on Sainte-Anne Bridge, free bus shuttles, etc.). Access to the bridge from the north is quite harsh, as larger vehicles have to go through a weight station before hitting the bridge, and smaller vehicles have to use local street in order to bypass that station.

MTQ is currently installing reinforcement plates to solidify parts that were hit by fire. Here are workers showing the plates and the nuts to the transportation minister. Pictures are from Radio-Canada.
(http://img.src.ca/2013/12/19/1250x703/131219_7j0jd_travailleur-proco-pont_sn1250.jpg)
(http://img.src.ca/2013/12/19/1250x703/131219_fi174_plaque-pont-dubuc_sn1250.jpg)

EDIT : The bridge will be completely reopen to all trafic tomorrow.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on January 14, 2014, 02:26:30 PM
Here is a video shot of the newly opened A-73 Saint-Georges bypass. The 4-lane divided freeway, consisting of a partial Saint-George bypass, extends northward from R-204 up to the new 74e Rue, a 4-lane divided expressway (some grade separation, some at-grade crossings) linking A-73 to R-173.

Video : http://www.beauce.tv/regarder.php?vId=4351 The video covers 74e Rue first, then A-73 south.
Map : http://goo.gl/maps/pA6IB
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on January 15, 2014, 09:51:46 PM
Here is a video shot of the newly opened A-73 Saint-Georges bypass. The 4-lane divided freeway, consisting of a partial Saint-George bypass, extends northward from R-204 up to the new 74e Rue, a 4-lane divided expressway (some grade separation, some at-grade crossings) linking A-73 to R-173.

Video : http://www.beauce.tv/regarder.php?vId=4351 The video covers 74e Rue first, then A-73 south.
Map : http://goo.gl/maps/pA6IB
Once A-73 is complete to here, all I can see is one more 3 to 5 km segment to complete the bypass around St-Georges. QC has no reason to go any farther until Maine does something to connect, which there just isn't a need for. The proposed trans-Maine corridor might actually be the genesis of the remaining freeway.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on January 16, 2014, 04:24:21 PM
Judging by that roundabout at the end (with no stub), it doesn't look like MTQ has any plans to extend A-73 anywhere once this segment is connected to the main one to the north.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on January 16, 2014, 08:01:41 PM
Judging by that roundabout at the end (with no stub), it doesn't look like MTQ has any plans to extend A-73 anywhere once this segment is connected to the main one to the north.
Until I see an aerial photo, I can't tell if the roundabout was designed with a potential flyover in mind, or if it's too small for that. I suspect the latter, though.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Duke87 on January 16, 2014, 09:30:13 PM
What I don't get is, why permanently end A-73 at QC 204? Wouldn't it make more sense to complete the bypass and end it at QC 173 south of town?

Of course, this is Quebec. They'd be perfectly willing to continue the Autoroute through the roundabout without building a flyover, so the lack of provision for one means nothing.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on January 17, 2014, 03:40:23 PM
What I don't get is, why permanently end A-73 at QC 204? Wouldn't it make more sense to complete the bypass and end it at QC 173 south of town?
It's Quebec.

Quote
Of course, this is Quebec. They'd be perfectly willing to continue the Autoroute through the roundabout without building a flyover, so the lack of provision for one means nothing.
They've done stranger things, like that disconnected segment of A-30 that's co-signed with QC 132 and is a two lane surface street.  At least the two-lane section of A-55 is mostly a super-2.

Or A-19.

Or A-30's end in Sorel.

I think I'm gonna stop now before I list nearly every autoroute.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on January 20, 2014, 11:43:07 AM
I don't if Quebec would build a roundabout on alignment at the end of an expressway segment if there were long term plans to extend the expressway.  If Quebec is guilty of anything, its staging road construction too far in advance, not the other way around.  A lot of the idiosyncrasies of Quebec's Autoroute network came out planning an overly elaborate network, not by having little foresight.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on January 20, 2014, 02:46:21 PM
They've done stranger things, like that disconnected segment of A-30 that's co-signed with QC 132 and is a two lane surface street.

Not sure what you are referring to.

I don't if Quebec would build a roundabout on alignment at the end of an expressway segment if there were long term plans to extend the expressway.  If Quebec is guilty of anything, its staging road construction too far in advance, not the other way around.  A lot of the idiosyncrasies of Quebec's Autoroute network came out planning an overly elaborate network, not by having little foresight.

I totally agree! The A-route system was elaborated at a time where planners thought the province's population would reach 10 million people around 2000 ― which never came true ― and that everybody would be able and willing to own a car. Moreover, in many regions where the 1960s network is a tight mesh, population evolution is negative today. Nicolet-Yamaska, a rural region with a key location being halfway between Québec and Montréal, for example, was supposed to be penetrated by A-20, A-30, A-51, A-55, only one of which was fully completed over the past 50 years, has a negative demographic evolution.

No, MTQ will not spend a zillion dollar so that <500 motorists per day can get to the border [that's pretty much the same  border traffic as NY-374 at Herdman/Chateaugay, R-219 at Hemmingford/Mooers, R-161/ME-27 at Woburn/Coburn Gore or R-147/VT-147 at Stanhope/Norton, nobody's crying for a freeway there].

That A-route to the border, as AsphaltPlanet said, is nothing more than the pipedream of some ecstatic engineers that saw the thing bigger that it would ever be. If you've ever driven that lonely stretch of road that is R-173 between Saint-Georges and the border, you will agree with me that a freeway is nothing but needed, even in the far future. What would be the value, anyways, of a dead-end freeway to Maine?

That border connection serve for local purpose, as shown on every O-D survey I could find. A-73 south of A-20 is not used on a regular basis to connect to the United States (O-D studies show 2 direct regular trips on a daily average of 18000 vehicles at Saint-Isidore), as the Armstrong border facilities seem to accomodate mainly local and inter-regional trafic.

(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/AADTarmstrong_zps931d4f6c.png)

Here is a graph of the traffic evolution near the border, at permanent counting site in Armstrong, QC (I'll admit that the number in Saint-Côme seems a bit low to me, perhaps is it local traffic bound to the border, study does not say). That evolution sure does provide a good argument for the absence of eventuality for a freeway, adding to that the newly enlarged R-173 in Saint-Georges (the road is now 4+ lanes from 74e Rue up to 182e Rue ― never saw congestion in Saint-Georges).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on January 20, 2014, 03:23:51 PM
Personally I would have finished the Saint-Georges bypass (perhaps as a super 2) for a permanent end at QC 173 about three miles south of the roundabout.  That would also eliminate a turn for through traffic.

They've done stranger things, like that disconnected segment of A-30 that's co-signed with QC 132 and is a two lane surface street.

Not sure what you are referring to.
http://cmap.m-plex.com/hb/hwymap.php?sys=canqca&rg=all&gr=p&r=qc.a030bec&showint=0&dl=0
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on January 20, 2014, 09:25:30 PM
Personally I would have finished the Saint-Georges bypass (perhaps as a super 2) for a permanent end at QC 173 about three miles south of the roundabout.  That would also eliminate a turn for through traffic.
Through traffic is about as much as a quiet residential street. It can manage a turn...

They've done stranger things, like that disconnected segment of A-30 that's co-signed with QC 132 and is a two lane surface street.

Not sure what you are referring to.
http://cmap.m-plex.com/hb/hwymap.php?sys=canqca&rg=all&gr=p&r=qc.a030bec&showint=0&dl=0

Then again, no big deal. That one is quite far from any «surface street» I know of. The ROW is 100% access-controlled on the 19 kilometres A-30 is signed, but no interchanges were built; thanks to the gasoduct ROW that follow A-30 ROW, you can clearly see the location of planned buttonhooks ― luckily, some unuseful service road once bound to link ramps to crossroads were dismantled or converted to bike paths. The heaviest-travelled section has no traffic control of any kind (not co-signed with 132), whereas there is  significant drop on the other sections signed as A-30 up to Gentilly, indicating local movements. Then again, rates do not justify a full freeway, and have been stable over the last 12 years (0% change).

A-30 was supposed to serve as a throughfare for metallurgical complexes (and other heavy industries) along Saint Lawrence south shore, hence its name ― Autoroute de l'Acier, Steel Freeway. Valleyfield, Contrecœur, Sorel and Bécancour plants never went as big as they thought they would, partly because of the abrupt downfall of metal prices following the Oil Crisis, closure or deprecation of extraction in North Shore mines, and thank god the '76 moratorium stopped the project of a caducous third east-west freeway alongside Saint Lawrence.

Otherwise, Québec would have a more overbuilt than network of freeways, surely in worst shape than it is right now.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on January 20, 2014, 10:21:40 PM
Personally I would have finished the Saint-Georges bypass (perhaps as a super 2) for a permanent end at QC 173 about three miles south of the roundabout.  That would also eliminate a turn for through traffic.
Through traffic is about as much as a quiet residential street. It can manage a turn...
Still going WAY out of the way.  QC 173 to QC 204 to A-73 is more than double the mileage of finishing the bypass.  I've never liked having to go out of my way because roads are laid out in an odd way.

Quote
Then again, no big deal. That one is quite far from any «surface street» I know of. The ROW is 100% access-controlled on the 19 kilometres A-30 is signed, but no interchanges were built; thanks to the gasoduct ROW that follow A-30 ROW, you can clearly see the location of planned buttonhooks ― luckily, some unuseful service road once bound to link ramps to crossroads were dismantled or converted to bike paths. The heaviest-travelled section has no traffic control of any kind (not co-signed with 132), whereas there is  significant drop on the other sections signed as A-30 up to Gentilly, indicating local movements. Then again, rates do not justify a full freeway, and have been stable over the last 12 years (0% change).

A-30 was supposed to serve as a throughfare for metallurgical complexes (and other heavy industries) along Saint Lawrence south shore, hence its name ― Autoroute de l'Acier, Steel Freeway. Valleyfield, Contrecœur, Sorel and Bécancour plants never went as big as they thought they would, partly because of the abrupt downfall of metal prices following the Oil Crisis, closure or deprecation of extraction in North Shore mines, and thank god the '76 moratorium stopped the project of a caducous third east-west freeway alongside Saint Lawrence.

Otherwise, Québec would have a more overbuilt than network of freeways, surely in worst shape than it is right now.
To me, two lanes, all at-grades = surface street (probably a bit of upstate NY influence; we have very few non-freeways with access control, and all of them are divided extensions of freeways, and I can count on one finger the number of super 2s we have); IMO, having a route multiplex with another and then end randomly between two towns screams "decommission the overlap" (or having a route end in an overlap, period).  A-30, A-55, A-19, and however many others have non-freeway segments remind me of I-180 is Wyoming and Breezewood.  I don't like freeways with disconnected segments either.  I guess Quebec didn't want to play the "re-designate all the route numbers every couple years" game the US played with the interstate system and got stuck.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on May 15, 2014, 02:52:36 PM
An imponderable that occurs to me as I sit going through a stack of signing plans for Greater Montréal:  why "boul." instead of "blvd." as the standard abbreviation for boulevard?  "Bd." seems to be preferred in Parisian French.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on May 15, 2014, 07:57:35 PM
I wouldn't be surprised if the reasoning is something along the lines of "we must use boul because the English-speaking places use blvd" given Quebec's language politics.  France is much less insecure about its language since they're in Europe's polyglot of languages rather than surrounded by English hegemony as Quebec is.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on May 15, 2014, 10:00:03 PM
I, quite honestly, have no idea. I like "Bd."

What I do know is that Ontario also uses "Boul." on French/bilingual signage.

An imponderable that occurs to me as I sit going through a stack of signing plans for Greater Montréal:  why "boul." instead of "blvd." as the standard abbreviation for boulevard?  "Bd." seems to be preferred in Parisian French.
Where do you get those plans, anyway?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 1995hoo on May 15, 2014, 10:03:23 PM
An imponderable that occurs to me as I sit going through a stack of signing plans for Greater Montréal:  why "boul." instead of "blvd." as the standard abbreviation for boulevard?  "Bd." seems to be preferred in Parisian French.

One could just as easily ask why English speakers use "Blvd." It doesn't seem to make any more nor less sense than "boul," but at least the French uses consecutive letters.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on May 15, 2014, 10:16:07 PM
I wouldn't be surprised if the reasoning is something along the lines of "we must use boul because the English-speaking places use blvd" given Quebec's language politics.  France is much less insecure about its language since they're in Europe's polyglot of languages rather than surrounded by English hegemony as Quebec is.

I considered that possibility, but couldn't quite see my way to that adding up to a complete explanation.  Judging from the historical photos Webfil posted upthread (second page), the use of boul. as the standard road-sign abbreviation was well established by 1970, before the language laws of 1974 (establishing French as the official language of Québec) and 1977 (establishing the fundamental right to speak and be spoken to in French in business and public life, and creating the provincial bodies that define standard Québec French usage).

Also, if the desire was to avoid the standard English abbreviations blvd. and bl., then Parisian French bd. was available as an alternative.  Indeed, I would expect that to be preferred for two reasons.  First, it is shorter.  Second, in much the same way English-speaking Canadians wear their Anglophilia on their sleeves (classic example:  PEng instead of PE as the abbreviation for registered Professional Engineer, by analogy with British MEng for holders of master's degrees in engineering and CEng for chartered engineer), one would expect officially endorsed French usages in Québec to adhere as closely as possible to Parisian norms except where the latter are clearly derived from English (e.g. week-end as a colloquial substitute for fin de semaine).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on May 15, 2014, 10:31:31 PM
Where do you get those plans, anyway?

SEAO (https://www.seao.ca/)--archived tender advertisements (and their supporting documentation) are available by choosing "Recherche avancée" and entering the appropriate parameters.

The best way I have found to zero in on the pure signing stuff is to use "supersignalisation" in a keyword search.  Recent signing jobs in the Montréal region (with contract numbers of the form 8503-AA-BBBB where AA seems to be the last two digits of a year while BBBB is a contract-specific index number) tend to have a fair number of GuidSIGN signface layouts in the proposal book (devis).

To view documentation you need to be signed in (the site will try to sell you a subscription, but the viewing function is available with free accounts), and have to have a copy of Acrobat or Acrobat Reader with the FileOpen plugin installed.  They don't make it easy to archive the stuff--you can download and save to disk but, unless you break the FileOpen encryption, you are limited to five views per file and can't re-merge files that are broken up into multiple parts.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on May 17, 2014, 12:24:58 AM
To view documentation you need to be signed in (the site will try to sell you a subscription, but the viewing function is available with free accounts), and have to have a copy of Acrobat or Acrobat Reader with the FileOpen plugin installed.  They don't make it easy to archive the stuff--you can download and save to disk but, unless you break the FileOpen encryption, you are limited to five views per file and can't re-merge files that are broken up into multiple parts.

Damn. I'll never understand those restrictions. Guess it's time to take screenshots of the documents.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 22, 2014, 12:58:17 PM
I wouldn't be surprised if the reasoning is something along the lines of "we must use boul because the English-speaking places use blvd" given Quebec's language politics.  France is much less insecure about its language since they're in Europe's polyglot of languages rather than surrounded by English hegemony as Quebec is.

I considered that possibility, but couldn't quite see my way to that adding up to a complete explanation.  Judging from the historical photos Webfil posted upthread (second page), the use of boul. as the standard road-sign abbreviation was well established by 1970, before the language laws of 1974 (establishing French as the official language of Québec) and 1977 (establishing the fundamental right to speak and be spoken to in French in business and public life, and creating the provincial bodies that define standard Québec French usage).

Also, if the desire was to avoid the standard English abbreviations blvd. and bl., then Parisian French bd. was available as an alternative.  Indeed, I would expect that to be preferred for two reasons.  First, it is shorter.  Second, in much the same way English-speaking Canadians wear their Anglophilia on their sleeves [...], one would expect officially endorsed French usages in Québec to adhere as closely as possible to Parisian norms except where the latter are clearly derived from English (e.g. week-end as a colloquial substitute for fin de semaine).

Excellent observations.

According to the "Language Toolbox" of the government (Banque de dépannage linguistique de l'Office québécois de la langue française), though "boul." stands as the definite form accepted by the Commission de toponymie du Québec (board responsible of naming places, attached to OQLF), "Bd"¹, "bd" and "Bd" are accepted in common and official usage as well. http://bdl.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/bdl/gabarit_bdl.asp?t1=1&id=1793

This aligns with your second paragraph; Québec still speaks French, and not "Québécois". Its rules and laws are decided by french people at L'Académie française in Paris ― the first seat on that board to be attributed to a Québécois in 2013 was in fact attributed to an Haïtian made Québécois in the mid-80's, who was born and raised in Caribbean French and Kreyol Ayisyen languages.


1. In French, one does not add punctuation at the end of an abbreviation when it ends with the same letter as the abbreviated word ends.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on July 22, 2014, 01:31:05 PM
Webfil--many thanks for the reply (and for your kind words).  The placename commission's choice of boul. as the standard abbreviation probably accounts for its use on road signs in lieu of bd and other alternatives.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on July 22, 2014, 05:02:01 PM
According to a report from a friend of mine, we've just lost a blue sign on A-10, namely the EB sign for exit 29 (R-133 / Iberville / Richelieu).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Ian on July 22, 2014, 06:31:17 PM
According to a report from a friend of mine, we've just lost a blue sign on A-10, namely the EB sign for exit 29 (R-133 / Iberville / Richelieu).

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8288/7866935222_b16ac8893c_z.jpg)

 :-(
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on July 22, 2014, 08:40:38 PM
That's too bad.

I am admittedly surprised that it lasted as long as it did.  I figured at least the eastbound sign would have been removed during the Richelieu River Bridge rehabilitation work that was completed a few years ago.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on July 23, 2014, 09:00:26 AM
I'm surprised they all last as long as they do. The only one that's in a somewhat good shape is the one for Sainte-Rose on the NB A-13 collector. All the other ones are barely legible at night. Someone at MTQ must be a roadgeek.

I'd collect them if I had the space (well, I'm sure the bottom three panels would look good in my hallway). Other people could have the two legends and the shield. :p

Anyway, most of A-10 is in the middle of a big signing project, and at first I didn't see any plans for exits 29 and 55, so I have no idea whether we're going to lose them all or not. I don't know if J. N. Winkler can confirm/infirm; I don't have time to go through the contract letting system right now, but I might at the end of the week.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on July 23, 2014, 11:40:15 AM
Anyway, most of A-10 is in the middle of a big signing project, and at first I didn't see any plans for exits 29 and 55, so I have no idea whether we're going to lose them all or not. I don't know if J. N. Winkler can confirm/infirm; I don't have time to go through the contract letting system right now, but I might at the end of the week.

I had a look and it seems the A-10 signing is being handled under contract number 8703-13-0302, which does cover Exits 29-55.  "Chemin des Patriotes" is being substituted for "Iberville."  (I don't recall offhand whether Signalisation Routière deprecates mixing street and town names on advance guide and exit direction signs, like the US MUTCD does.)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on July 23, 2014, 01:49:35 PM
I had a look and it seems the A-10 signing is being handled under contract number 8703-13-0302, which does cover Exits 29-55.  "Chemin des Patriotes" is being substituted for "Iberville."  (I don't recall offhand whether Signalisation Routière deprecates mixing street and town names on advance guide and exit direction signs, like the US MUTCD does.)

Iberville was annexed into Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. To the best of my knowledge, Tome 5 does not deprecate mixing street and town names (but I don't have a copy handy).

As of the end of the summer, the only surviving blue sign may well be the one on A-13.

EDIT: The contract number is 8701-13-0302.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on July 23, 2014, 09:31:50 PM
EDIT: The contract number is 8701-13-0302.

My apologies for the transcription error.  I assume you have looked at 8603-13-0302 (A-10 signing update Exits 68-90) as well?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on July 24, 2014, 09:26:56 AM
According to a report from a friend of mine, we've just lost a blue sign on A-10, namely the EB sign for exit 29 (R-133 / Iberville / Richelieu).

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8288/7866935222_b16ac8893c_z.jpg)

 :-(
That's not too far from my Uncle's house in Chambly, on the way to the townships. Sad to see it go.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on July 24, 2014, 10:11:18 AM
EDIT: The contract number is 8701-13-0302.

My apologies for the transcription error.  I assume you have looked at 8603-13-0302 (A-10 signing update Exits 68-90) as well?
Yup, I already had that one. At first, I thought 29 and 55 were safe as I didn't find this other project.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on July 24, 2014, 12:10:35 PM
I can remember when they opened the A-10 almost 50 yrs. ago, the signs were Red.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: xcellntbuy on July 24, 2014, 12:45:49 PM
I can remember when they opened the A-10 almost 50 yrs. ago, the signs were Red.
That blue sign has been standing for a long, long time.  Last time I traveled Autoroute 10 was in August 1980 and it was still a toll road.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 24, 2014, 12:52:54 PM
I can remember when they opened the A-10 almost 50 yrs. ago, the signs were Red.
Indeed. Autoroutes under the Office des Autoroutes jurisdiction also had sequential numbering and no trapezoidal marker for the exits, but trapezoidal BRS/BGS/BBS.
(http://www.aaroads.com/shields/img/QC/QC19520092l1.jpg) (http://www.aaroads.com/shields/show.php?image=QC19520092)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on July 24, 2014, 11:17:24 PM
I can remember when they opened the A-10 almost 50 yrs. ago, the signs were Red.
Indeed. Autoroutes under the Office des Autoroutes jurisdiction also had sequential numbering and no trapezoidal marker for the exits, but trapezoidal BRS/BGS/BBS.
(http://www.aaroads.com/shields/img/QC/QC19520092l1.jpg) (http://www.aaroads.com/shields/show.php?image=QC19520092)
I actually remember that sign from when my dad took us to Expo in 1967(I was nine at the time) and I want to say it was at the Chambly exit. I may have said this before, but I can remember when they first opened the Autoroute, the ramps were actually gravel(at least on ramps). We drove that road quite a bit, driving from Cowansville to Chambly to Montreal and the South Shore.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on July 25, 2014, 03:51:12 PM
I actually remember that sign from when my dad took us to Expo in 1967(I was nine at the time) and I want to say it was at the Chambly exit. I may have said this before, but I can remember when they first opened the Autoroute, the ramps were actually gravel(at least on ramps). We drove that road quite a bit, driving from Cowansville to Chambly to Montreal and the South Shore.
There are definitely no more left exits! After consulting my old Quebec maps, this is at what's now QC 134, Blvd. Tascherau. Current aerials show a wide median there, so I can believe it originally having had some inside ramps.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on July 25, 2014, 07:17:32 PM
The Taschereau interchange was only rebuilt about a decade or so ago.  Off the top of my head I am thinking it was maybe 2002 or so when it was done.  I know my old 1998 Montreal guide still showed the original configuration.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on July 26, 2014, 09:03:45 PM
The Taschereau interchange was only rebuilt about a decade or so ago.  Off the top of my head I am thinking it was maybe 2002 or so when it was done.  I know my old 1998 Montreal guide still showed the original configuration.
Is there a website for Canada with historic aerials or maps like Historicaerials.com? Even ACME Mapper has USGS quads that can be 40-50 years old, but the Canadian topo I know of is too up to date.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on July 26, 2014, 09:08:36 PM
There a old photo taken around 1967 of the Taschereau interchange on its original configuration at http://www.montrealroads.com/roads/eastern-townships/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on July 26, 2014, 10:20:27 PM
The Taschereau interchange was only rebuilt about a decade or so ago.  Off the top of my head I am thinking it was maybe 2002 or so when it was done.  I know my old 1998 Montreal guide still showed the original configuration.

Another data point:  contract 5330-04-0901 had an opening date of April 29, 2004 and the following description:

Quote
Réaménagement de l’échangeur Taschereau / autoroute 10, (phase 3), incluant la construction de voies réservées aux autobus, dans la municipalité de ville de Longueuil, (arrondissement de Brossard), MRC Champlain, circonscription électorale de La Pinière.

Le montant estimé du contrat se situe entre 20 000 000 $ et
25 000 000 $.

Edit:  Fun fact:  Boulevard Taschereau is named after Louis-Alexandre Taschereau, premier of Québec between 1920 and 1936.  He later died in 1952 at the age of 85.  His successors for almost 50 years after he left office all died at ages younger than 70, either in office or shortly after leaving it.  Pierre-Marc Johnson (later chair of the Johnson commission that investigated the Boulevard de la Concorde overpass collapse) briefly served as premier in 1985 and is the former premier with the earliest dates of incumbency after Taschereau who either is still living or died after age 70.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 27, 2014, 12:08:50 AM
The Taschereau interchange was only rebuilt about a decade or so ago.  Off the top of my head I am thinking it was maybe 2002 or so when it was done.  I know my old 1998 Montreal guide still showed the original configuration.
Is there a website for Canada with historic aerials or maps like Historicaerials.com? Even ACME Mapper has USGS quads that can be 40-50 years old, but the Canadian topo I know of is too up to date.

For Québec : Bibliothèque et Archives Nationales @ http://services.banq.qc.ca/sdx/cep/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on August 07, 2014, 06:25:57 AM
Does the photo radar in and around Montreal have any leaway?  Ie. If I were going 71 in a 70 would I get a ticket?  If not, at what speed would I like get a ticket?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on August 07, 2014, 08:47:09 AM
I actually remember that sign from when my dad took us to Expo in 1967(I was nine at the time) and I want to say it was at the Chambly exit. I may have said this before, but I can remember when they first opened the Autoroute, the ramps were actually gravel(at least on ramps). We drove that road quite a bit, driving from Cowansville to Chambly to Montreal and the South Shore.
There are definitely no more left exits! After consulting my old Quebec maps, this is at what's now QC 134, Blvd. Tascherau. Current aerials show a wide median there, so I can believe it originally having had some inside ramps.
You are correct, that's the Taschereau interchange, don't know what I was thinking, but coming from the memory of a nine-year-old, might have something to do with it, lol!. And the landscape has changed since that pic was taken. And so has the landscape for the Chambly/A-35 interchange.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on August 07, 2014, 10:26:04 AM
Does the photo radar in and around Montreal have any leaway?  Ie. If I were going 71 in a 70 would I get a ticket?  If not, at what speed would I like get a ticket?

I'm pretty sure it does. I'd give it about 10 km/h.*

* I'm not responsible for anything that happens.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on August 07, 2014, 11:07:16 AM
I was just curious. There are a number of speed cameras on the west island within the A40 construction.  While I wasn't speeding, I am not sure I went through all of them at exactly 70
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Ren97 on August 07, 2014, 09:21:30 PM
Does the photo radar in and around Montreal have any leaway?  Ie. If I were going 71 in a 70 would I get a ticket?  If not, at what speed would I like get a ticket?

Definitely, otherwise a few close ones would be sinking in debts... *cough*
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 04, 2014, 11:28:57 PM
Looks like October 8, 2014 will be the opening date for A-35:

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/35/A35_Oct082014.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/35/A35_cl_36_south_Oct03-14_aaroads.jpg)
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/35/A35_cl_36_south_Oct03-14_24x16.jpg (http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/35/A35_cl_36_south_Oct03-14_24x16.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on October 08, 2014, 02:16:38 PM
Confirmed by a friend who just drove it (incidentally, the same one who reported on the blue signs), A-35 is now open down to Saint-Sébastien since 10 or 11 o'clock this morning, much to the confusion of clueless travelers who frequently turn around in the median or stop on the shoulder to consult their GPS/phone.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Chris on October 08, 2014, 02:58:18 PM
They should be consulting the signs.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Chris on October 10, 2014, 12:49:50 PM
Autoroute 5 up to Wakefield opened to traffic today.

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/ottawa/2014/10/10/005-outaouais-ouverture-nouveau-troncon-autoroute-5.shtml
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on October 10, 2014, 09:37:34 PM
Autoroute 5 up to Wakefield opened to traffic today.

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/ottawa/2014/10/10/005-outaouais-ouverture-nouveau-troncon-autoroute-5.shtml

Cool!  I already had penciled it in to my post-Quebec City meet itinerary, but this nails it.

It worked out really well with Dr Frankenstein scheduling the Quebec City meet right around the end of Canada's construction season, in time for this opening and the ones for the A-35 and ON 404 extensions, as well as the latest new A-85 segments.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 10, 2014, 10:37:42 PM
If you are through the area, they should be finishing up the project to widen the 417 through Kanata on the Ontario side of the border.  If there any signs up (and if you take pictures while on the road), I wouldn't mind seeing some pics of the finished signs.  As far as I know, none of the overhead signs had been erected as of last week, but they should nearly be finished paving by now, and the signs should be pretty well all that's left.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: froggie on October 12, 2014, 08:28:48 AM
I took the A-35 extension yesterday (detailed in another thread).  Of note, and not in the photos Asphalt posted...there are stop signs on QC 133 at both ramp termini at the end of the extension (between Pike River and St. Sébastian).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 19, 2014, 12:17:57 PM
They should be consulting the signs.
I couldn't spot a single sign on the new stretch, with the exception of one "<= A-35 Saint-Sébastien" orange VMS located at the gore of exit 38 (connector leading to the old terminus), "Fin A-35 <T> 2 km" (that is to say 22 km after the last sign...) and the usual shenanigans (Max speed, km posts, no u-turns except for authorised vehicles). I witnessed many median-crossing u-turns too, and all of these u-turn spots were roughed out by many passages.

I also witnessed a driver pulling off towards a police car that happened to be ticketing another driver, and we suspected that she would inquire the cop for some info.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Pete from Boston on October 19, 2014, 01:56:34 PM

They should be consulting the signs.
I couldn't spot a single sign on the new stretch, with the exception of one "<= A-35 Saint-Sébastien" orange VMS located at the gore of exit 38 (connector leading to the old terminus), "Fin A-35 <T> 2 km" (that is to say 22 km after the last sign...) and the usual shenanigans (Max speed, km posts, no u-turns except for authorised vehicles).

I was through there yesterday and had the same impression—nothing at all but that VMS from Iberville to Saint-Sébastien, and no exits!

It is not an interesting road—really just flat and mostly straight, and the aforementioned lack of reading material—but it brings an end to getting stuck behind slow cars/trucks, and to the nagging concern that the limit suddenly dropped to 50km/h as it does on 133. 
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on October 20, 2014, 11:08:10 AM
I was through there yesterday and had the same impression—nothing at all but that VMS from Iberville to Saint-Sébastien, and no exits!

I think that the MTQ has run some issues with the locals in Saint-Alexandre, but I'm surprised that the possibility of an exit at Hwy 227 was scrapped completely. 23 km with no on- or off-ramps whatsoever is quite a long stretch, and the towns to the northeast of the new section (Mont-Saint-Grégoire, Sainte-Brigide, Farnham, etc.) remain pretty much unserved by the A-35 to and from the south.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on October 20, 2014, 11:14:07 AM
I think that the MTQ has run some issues with the locals in Saint-Alexandre, but I'm surprised that the possibility of an exit at Hwy 227 was scrapped completely. 23 km with no on- or off-ramps whatsoever is quite a long stretch, and the towns to the northeast of the new section (Mont-Saint-Grégoire, Sainte-Brigide, Farnham, etc.) remain essentially unserved by the highway to and from the south.
It hasn't been scrapped, the MTQ are waiting on a legal decision regarding the best location for the St-Alexandre exit. The ramps will be built within a year or two I guess.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on October 20, 2014, 12:05:33 PM
Yeah, I'm reading that the MTQ's initial plan was to reroute Hwy 227 onto an extension of Rang des Soixante across Chemin de la Grande-Ligne.

The BAPE (Bureau d'audiences publiques en environnement, Bureau of Environmental Public Inquiries) demanded that they scrap the Rang des Soixante extension, which they did.

Saint-Alexandre and its population objected, as it meant a 3.5 km drive between the town and the interchange which was sort of in the middle of nowhere, and a less-than-interesting access to its industrial area (over 5 km, with trucks going through town). At that point, the MTQ pretty much said "Yeah, we like that idea too, but the farmers and environmentalists don't because it means more pavement on crop fields. So go ahead and try to convince them for us. We'll wait for you." The town went ahead and submitted a request to the CPTAQ (Commission de protection du territoire agricole du Québec, Québec Agricultural Territory Protection Commission), which denied it.

The town turned to the courts and won, but at that point, the bureaucratic hurdles meant that the Rang des Soixante extension would not be ready in time, so they decided to go ahead and build the freeway regardless and build the exit later. I'm not sure what stage the project is at right now, but I think that the Ministry of Environment is still making them wait.

Articles (in French):
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/201308/13/01-4679627-a35-lautoroute-deserte.php
http://www.laveniretdesrivieres.com/Actualites/Economie/2013-04-24/article-3226864/A-35%3A-le-projet-au-ralenti/1
http://www.canadafrancais.com/Actualites/2012-06-29/article-3028229/Echangeur-de-lautoroute-35%3A-la-CPTAQ-rejette-la-demande-de-Saint-Alexandre/1
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 20, 2014, 12:12:44 PM
Interesting. I had wondered what the hold up was for the A-35 extension. I was out that way in June 2013, and even then the entire highway had already been paved.  (With the exception of the gap right at 227).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Pete from Boston on October 21, 2014, 12:02:12 AM
In other news, a charming little bridge finally opened in Lac-Mégantic, circumventing the off-limits bridge in the cleanup zone of the devastating 2013 oil derailment/spill/explosion/fire disaster, and ending the need to make a 4.5-mile detour to cross the Chaudière River.

Audio, no text, and much of it is about the simultaneous opening of the adjacent supermarket, but it's among the little English coverage:

http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/ID/2558107914/

Francais:

http://m.radio-canada.ca/regions/mauricie/2014/10/15/008-lac-megantic-pont-solidarite-inauguration.shtml

It is nice to see some progress out of such a sad, sad catastrophe.  If you're in the area, stop in and drop a few bucks in this town.  It sucks that they have this to live with.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on October 27, 2014, 09:50:17 AM
Autoroute 5 up to Wakefield opened to traffic today.

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/ottawa/2014/10/10/005-outaouais-ouverture-nouveau-troncon-autoroute-5.shtml
The new 6.5 km A-5 stretch from Chelsea to La Pêche was officially opened on October 20 (press release (http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/centredocumentation/Documents/salle-presse/2014/2014-10-20/communique-anglais.pdf) and a nice map (http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/centredocumentation/Documents/salle-presse/2014/2014-10-20/carte.pdf) of the project). In the planning stages is a final 1 km extension from the current end at R-366 in Wakefield to R-105.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on October 27, 2014, 11:10:12 AM
Autoroute 5 up to Wakefield opened to traffic today.

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/ottawa/2014/10/10/005-outaouais-ouverture-nouveau-troncon-autoroute-5.shtml
The new 6.5 km A-5 stretch from Chelsea to La Pêche was officially opened on October 20 (press release (http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/centredocumentation/Documents/salle-presse/2014/2014-10-20/communique-anglais.pdf) and a nice map (http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/centredocumentation/Documents/salle-presse/2014/2014-10-20/carte.pdf) of the project). In the planning stages is a final 1 km extension from the current end at R-366 in Wakefield to R-105.

I drove the new Chelsea to La Pêche segment on October 12, before the "official" opening.  (No photos except some sign photos which I took in lieu of taking notes -- I didn't get there until just before sunset.)

At least at that point, the northbound lanes between La Pêche and the current north end at R-366 were being worked on but still had one lane of traffic through the work zone; both southbound lanes were open.  My guess is that the old highway around Wakefield was a single two-lane roadway, which is being converted to northbound-only use, with a brand-new southbound roadway alongside. 
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on October 27, 2014, 12:52:17 PM
It was four lanes, and also divided for most of the length.  The pavement doesn't look too good on street view though; they probably wanted to work on that segment since it will be sandwiched between two new ones when A-5 is finally completed.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Chris on November 21, 2014, 11:21:04 AM
3 kilometers of autoroute 410 near Sherbrooke opened to traffic today.

http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/salle-de-presse/nouvelles/Pages/inauguration-troncon-autoroute40.aspx
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on November 21, 2014, 12:05:57 PM
3 kilometers of autoroute 410 near Sherbrooke opened to traffic today.

http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/salle-de-presse/nouvelles/Pages/inauguration-troncon-autoroute40.aspx

I'd seen the new pavement past the barricades at Rue Dunant, when I stopped by there after the Quebec city meet in October.  But I wasn't sure whether it would open so soon, or be deferred to next year.

In any case, it sounds like MTQ isn't done with A-410, with more kms to be added next year.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on November 21, 2014, 01:18:33 PM
Looks like we got some street view early: https://www.google.com/maps/@45.3683171,-71.9260917,3a,90y,95.32h,69.19t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sFxFk__RRazRY_CiKSF8hMg!2e0
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on November 21, 2014, 01:40:58 PM
Looks like we got some street view early: https://www.google.com/maps/@45.3683171,-71.9260917,3a,90y,95.32h,69.19t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sFxFk__RRazRY_CiKSF8hMg!2e0

That seems to be of a frontage road between Ch. Ste-Catherine to Rue Dunant, which was completely open (but the mainline wasn't) when I was there in October.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on November 21, 2014, 01:52:52 PM
Isn't this (https://www.google.com/maps/@45.367801,-71.9274067,3a,75y,74.82h,81.18t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1saALKRf1JU3DrHUY5NN41ZQ!2e0) the frontage road?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on November 21, 2014, 02:38:34 PM
I stopped by A-410 in Quebec in early October.  I took some photos of the A-410 extension.  At that time, I also wasn't certain of exactly what was going to be opening and when.

My pictures are here:
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/410/index.html (http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/410/index.html)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/410/A410_cl_8-25_east_Oct14.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on November 21, 2014, 05:28:51 PM
I'll be by in a week to spy on the new road and remaining construction.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on November 21, 2014, 05:35:45 PM
I'll be by in a week to spy on the new road and remaining construction.

Cool!  Could you let please us know the new exit numbers, if any, east of exit 7 (QC 216)?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Pete from Boston on November 21, 2014, 05:49:41 PM

3 kilometers of autoroute 410 near Sherbrooke opened to traffic today.

http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/salle-de-presse/nouvelles/Pages/inauguration-troncon-autoroute40.aspx

I'd seen the new pavement past the barricades at Rue Dunant, when I stopped by there after the Quebec city meet in October.  But I wasn't sure whether it would open so soon, or be deferred to next year.

In any case, it sounds like MTQ isn't done with A-410, with more kms to be added next year.

It's supposed to run out to Lennoxville.  Part of me feels like this is unsatisfying and wants to see it run up to the 610/112 rotary, but I am realistic about the traffic volumes east of Sherbrooke. 

Interesting tidbit: Lennoxville is one of the most anglophone places in Québec.  I was there last month and after being in "Parlez-vous anglais?" mode for a while, it was like a babel fish had suddenly slipped into my ear in Lennoxville—unsettling, but welcome. 
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on November 22, 2014, 10:00:28 AM
Cool!  Could you let please us know the new exit numbers, if any, east of exit 7 (QC 216)?

Rue Belvédère is exit #10.  I didn't see any of the westbound signs for the R-216 or Rue Dunant exit, but it would only make sense that they would be signed as exit 7 westbound as well.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on November 22, 2014, 10:13:14 AM
It's supposed to run out to Lennoxville.  Part of me feels like this is unsatisfying and wants to see it run up to the 610/112 rotary, but I am realistic about the traffic volumes east of Sherbrooke. 

Interesting tidbit: Lennoxville is one of the most anglophone places in Québec.  I was there last month and after being in "Parlez-vous anglais?" mode for a while, it was like a babel fish had suddenly slipped into my ear in Lennoxville—unsettling, but welcome. 

Getting a bit OT, but the part of Quebec west of Gatineau is pretty english as well.  I remember stopping at a chipstand in Shawville and was surprised to see that their menu was written in english.

In Ontario, the opposite is sometimes true.  There are a few locales in surprising locations, where there is still a predominant french community present.  For example, at the Tim Horton's in Welland, on the Niagara Peninsula, south of Toronto, it is common to hear french conversations in the dining room.  Penentanguishene on Georgian Bay, north of Toronto also has a sizable french community.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on November 22, 2014, 01:22:50 PM
I saw one photo of the interchange with Belvedere Street taken before A-410 opening. A diamond interchange with 2 roundabouts. /photo/1
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on November 22, 2014, 01:39:08 PM
I was looking at streetview, and two roundabouts have been constructed and opened on Route 143 south of Lennoxville several years in advance of the completion of A-410.

https://www.google.ca/maps/place/Lennoxville,+Sherbrooke,+QC/@45.3545022,-71.8613155,882m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x4cb7b2b212ebe473:0xfcc0156fecc3a65e (https://www.google.ca/maps/place/Lennoxville,+Sherbrooke,+QC/@45.3545022,-71.8613155,882m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x4cb7b2b212ebe473:0xfcc0156fecc3a65e)

I wish I had have known that when I was in Sherbrooke.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Pete from Boston on November 24, 2014, 01:17:53 PM
I saw that too, and didn't realize any construction had been done that far east when I was half a mile away. 

I have seen this interchange design elsewhere in Québec, but never as a terminus.  Is there any discussion of continuing this road east of 108?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on November 24, 2014, 01:57:07 PM
Yes, phase 2 involves crossing the river and veering north to reach R-108 again past Lennoxville. I don't think there is a timeframe set for construction yet. I can try to post a map tonight.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on November 24, 2014, 07:02:18 PM
Yes, phase 2 involves crossing the river and veering north to reach R-108 again past Lennoxville. I don't think there is a timeframe set for construction yet. I can try to post a map tonight.
I don't think work has even begun on anything east of the roundabouts.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on November 24, 2014, 10:50:15 PM
Here's an excerpt of the A-410 project map. It used to be on the MTQ website before they rebuilt it.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7555/15251002564_1b73f0c63d_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Pete from Boston on November 25, 2014, 08:13:59 AM

Here's an excerpt of the A-410 project map. It used to be on the MTQ website before they rebuilt it.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7555/15251002564_1b73f0c63d_o.jpg)

Cool, thanks for posting. 
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on December 09, 2014, 07:50:55 PM
Here's an excerpt of the A-410 project map. It used to be on the MTQ website before they rebuilt it.

What did the old 108/143 bridge look like? I didn't even know it was rebuilt, the scars are only apparent when I know what I'm looking for.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on December 09, 2014, 08:39:40 PM
What did the old 108/143 bridge look like? I didn't even know it was rebuilt, the scars are only apparent when I know what I'm looking for.
Unless I'm mistaken, the old bridge still appears to be available on GSV! old bridge (https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.352944,-71.859834&spn=0.004644,0.009645&sll=46.856368,-71.341693&sspn=0.287363,0.617294&t=h&hnear=Sherbrooke,+La+R%C3%A9gion-Sherbrookoise,+Quebec,+Canada&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.352864,-71.859971&panoid=XcFHxaADudlI_Z6TaLebvQ&cbp=12,29.74,,0,8.01&output=classic&dg=oo) vs new bridge (https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.349723,-71.864068&spn=0.004645,0.009645&sll=46.856368,-71.341693&sspn=0.287363,0.617294&t=h&hnear=Sherbrooke,+La+R%C3%A9gion-Sherbrookoise,+Quebec,+Canada&layer=c&cbll=45.349723,-71.864068&panoid=KcskMz1KBO_OZh4yR95OhQ&cbp=12,15.83,,0,12.51&z=17).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on December 11, 2014, 06:18:32 PM
What did the old 108/143 bridge look like? I didn't even know it was rebuilt, the scars are only apparent when I know what I'm looking for.
Unless I'm mistaken, the old bridge still appears to be available on GSV! old bridge (https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.352944,-71.859834&spn=0.004644,0.009645&sll=46.856368,-71.341693&sspn=0.287363,0.617294&t=h&hnear=Sherbrooke,+La+R%C3%A9gion-Sherbrookoise,+Quebec,+Canada&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.352864,-71.859971&panoid=XcFHxaADudlI_Z6TaLebvQ&cbp=12,29.74,,0,8.01&output=classic&dg=oo) vs new bridge (https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.349723,-71.864068&spn=0.004645,0.009645&sll=46.856368,-71.341693&sspn=0.287363,0.617294&t=h&hnear=Sherbrooke,+La+R%C3%A9gion-Sherbrookoise,+Quebec,+Canada&layer=c&cbll=45.349723,-71.864068&panoid=KcskMz1KBO_OZh4yR95OhQ&cbp=12,15.83,,0,12.51&z=17).
Clearly, I was expected to look along the bike path. >_<
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on March 13, 2015, 06:34:39 PM
Work to extend eastward Autoroute 70 is nearing the end of its suspension. Premier Philippe Couillard announced that the freeway will be extended towards Bagotville CFB.

Also, road to Opitciwan (logging road 0212, topic here (http://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=2353.msg226943#msg226943)) will get 2-lane bridges and be reconfigurated in some places to ensure "enhanced comfort and security". No pavement, though. Opitciwonok started to go shopping in Val-d'Or  (http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/abitibi/2013/10/11/001-obedjiwan-achats-abitibi.shtml)instead of Roberval, because routes 1046, 1009 are better maintained than 0212. Roberval merchants cried to the government about it (whose chief occurs to be local MP), hence the investments.

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/03/12/quebec-annonce-1754-m--en-investissements-routiers
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on March 14, 2015, 12:53:20 AM
Work to extend eastward Autoroute 70 is nearing the end of its suspension. Premier Philippe Couillard announced that the freeway will be extended towards Bagotville CFB.

Also, road to Opitciwan (logging road 0212, topic here (http://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=2353.msg226943#msg226943)) will get 2-lane bridges and be reconfigurated in some places to ensure "enhanced comfort and security". No pavement, though. Opitciwonok started to go shopping in Val-d'Or  (http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/abitibi/2013/10/11/001-obedjiwan-achats-abitibi.shtml)instead of Roberval, because routes 1046, 1009 are better maintained than 0212. Roberval merchants cried to the government about it (whose chief occurs to be local MP), hence the investments.

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/03/12/quebec-annonce-1754-m--en-investissements-routiers
I have found interesting that if A-70 were extended all the way to a hypothetical St. Lawrence River crossing, it would tie into A-85. Really, 85 should be numbered east-west, except it intersects 20 and heads to north-south NB 2.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: NE2 on March 14, 2015, 02:47:20 AM
Eastern Quebec's directions are 90 degrees off from the predominant Appalachian directions.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on March 14, 2015, 03:01:53 AM
I have found interesting that if A-70 were extended all the way to a hypothetical St. Lawrence River crossing, it would tie into A-85. Really, 85 should be numbered east-west, except it intersects 20 and heads to north-south NB 2.

NB 2 is km-marked west to east, with its exit 1 just east of the QC/NB border. A-85, and the QC 185 segments not yet upgraded to Autoroute, are km-marked south to north, with its exit 1 just west of the QC/NB border. I agree that A-85/QC 185 should've been marked west to east, but it would've been better to do that before the new A-85 segments and exits were built between St-Louis-du-Ha! Ha! and the border.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on March 14, 2015, 11:16:18 AM
Quebec does directions based on the St. Lawrence.  Parallel = est/ouest, perpendicular = nord/sud.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on March 16, 2015, 10:17:20 PM
Work to extend eastward Autoroute 70 is nearing the end of its suspension. Premier Philippe Couillard announced that the freeway will be extended towards Bagotville CFB.

Also, road to Opitciwan (logging road 0212, topic here (http://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=2353.msg226943#msg226943)) will get 2-lane bridges and be reconfigurated in some places to ensure "enhanced comfort and security". No pavement, though. Opitciwonok started to go shopping in Val-d'Or  (http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/abitibi/2013/10/11/001-obedjiwan-achats-abitibi.shtml)instead of Roberval, because routes 1046, 1009 are better maintained than 0212. Roberval merchants cried to the government about it (whose chief occurs to be local MP), hence the investments.

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/03/12/quebec-annonce-1754-m--en-investissements-routiers
I have found interesting that if A-70 were extended all the way to a hypothetical St. Lawrence River crossing, it would tie into A-85. Really, 85 should be numbered east-west, except it intersects 20 and heads to north-south NB 2.

Don't bother your mind with such thoughts. I would be surprised that any trafic volume growth in a 100-year time lapse would ever justify a multi-dozen-billion dollar, 20-kilometre bridge. Seriously.

The tridaily, summer-only 100-car ferry route suffice for now.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on June 08, 2015, 08:10:37 AM
Some new photos of Autoroute 73 south of Quebec City.  Quebec's MTQ has been busy over the past couple of years extending Autoroute 73 southerly with the ultimate goal of completing a four lane highway between Quebec City and Saint-Georges later in 2016.

These photos are similar to those shared by Oscar last year in this thread:
http://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=13846.0

Some pictures:

A-73 currently ends at Chemin du Golf, north of Beauceville, QC.
(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_61_ramp_south_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_61_onramp_north_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_cl_51_south_May15.jpg)
Construction underway east of Notre-Dame-des-Pins

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_structure_50_northwest_May15.jpg)
A massive structure is being constructed overtop of the Gilbert River

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_48_north_May15.jpg)
A short section of four lane autoroute opened east of Saint-Georges a couple of years ago.  This view looks northerly approaching the northern-most interchange of this short discontinuous segment.

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_cl_44-9_north_May15.jpg)
View of the completed section of A-73 east of Saint-Georges approaching the optimistically named Famine River.

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_43-1_south_May15.jpg)
Autoroute 73 will end at a roundabout with Route 204 east of Saint-Georges.

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/R/204/R204_cl_82-15_west_May15.jpg)
Approaching the roundabout with Autoroute 73 along Route 204.

More photos (and full-size versions of the above photos) here:
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/index.html
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/R/204/index.html
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on June 08, 2015, 11:08:26 AM
Some new photos of Autoroute 73 south of Quebec City.  Quebec's MTQ has been busy over the past couple of years extending Autoroute 73 southerly with the ultimate goal of completing a four lane highway between Quebec City and Saint-Georges later in 2016.

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_43-1_south_May15.jpg)
Autoroute 73 will end at a roundabout with Route 204 east of Saint-Georges.

Yuck on that US 201 shield (not-centred, series E or EM). The MTQ has done a much better job before:

https://goo.gl/maps/wYl0D

Thanks for the pictures.

Edit: Fixed link.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on June 08, 2015, 11:21:20 AM
Yuck on that US 201 shield (not-centred, series E or EM). The MTQ has done a much better job before:

http://goo.gl/maps/3ySKQ

I take your point, but I think that shield is a bit of an exception.  My impression (garnered both from visiting Québec in person about 16 years ago and, more recently, studying the pattern-accurate sign panel detail sheets I can find) is that MTQ tries to deploy Series E Modified in all guide-sign shields, including not just route and autoroute shields for its own roads but also Interstate shields.

The shields you and AsphaltPlanet posted are actually the first US route shields in Québec I can remember seeing.  I don't know if MTQ has actually tried to clone US state route shields, but there are just two bordering states (NY and NH) where the state route shield is not a generic square.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: froggie on June 08, 2015, 03:15:06 PM
Quote
but there are just two bordering states (NY and NH) where the state route shield is not a generic square.

Ahem...
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on June 08, 2015, 07:38:38 PM
Ahem...

Oops!  Sorry.  Now that I think about it again, it is actually Maine that is the exception in having a generic square for its state route shield.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: lordsutch on June 08, 2015, 07:43:41 PM
Some new photos of Autoroute 73 south of Quebec City.  Quebec's MTQ has been busy over the past couple of years extending Autoroute 73 southerly with the ultimate goal of completing a four lane highway between Quebec City and Saint-Georges later in 2016.

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_43-1_south_May15.jpg)
Autoroute 73 will end at a roundabout with Route 204 east of Saint-Georges.

Pretty sure "USA" is not a French word (that would be "É.-U."). MTQ may need to have a word with the language police.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on June 08, 2015, 08:54:06 PM
Pretty sure "USA" is not a French word (that would be "É.-U."). MTQ may need to have a word with the language police.
:eyebrow:
Neither are french "New York", "New Hampshire", "Toronto", "Ottawa", "Sherbrooke", "Beaconsfield", though they appear on signs.

The shields you and AsphaltPlanet posted are actually the first US route shields in Québec I can remember seeing.  I don't know if MTQ has actually tried to clone US state route shields, but there are just two bordering states (NY and NH) where the state route shield is not a generic square.
The only foreign trailblazers that MTQ signs are NHS routes connections ― with the sole exceptions of ON-101 and ON-34 that are not signed from Québec. US-201 is the only US-route connecting to Canada's NHS in Québec, while there are no state routes that do.

Some new photos of Autoroute 73 south of Quebec City.  Quebec's MTQ has been busy over the past couple of years extending Autoroute 73 southerly with the ultimate goal of completing a four lane highway between Quebec City and Saint-Georges later in 2016.
Saint-Georges is in Beauce-Sartigan, not Les Etchemins (http://www.mamrot.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/cartes/mrc/290.pdf), JSYK.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SP Cook on June 08, 2015, 09:33:48 PM

Neither are french "New York", "New Hampshire", "Toronto", "Ottawa", "Sherbrooke", "Beaconsfield", though they appear on signs.



That is a matter of opinion.  I used to work for a guy (total certified jerk, but that is off-topic), who had been a language guy in the Air Force.   One day I said that I guess my first name was easy to translate (since it is out of the Bible, and thus has a cognate in pretty much every language).  He said no, that you never translate proper nouns.  If your name is Matthew, then that is your name.  You are not Mateo in Spain, Matthieu in France, and so on.  Likewise, he maintained that New York is New York in every language, you do not translate New as Neuvo, Nouveau, Neu, Nowy and so on.

If you remember when the Olympics were in Turin, NBC (and everybody else) called the place by its Italian name, Torino.

Then again, the Catholic Church disagrees, translating the name of the popes.  So I guess it is a matter of opinion.

Anyway, I seem to remember some signs in Quebec that read l'Etat de New York and ville de New York.

In any event, "Toronto" in French is "Toronto".  It is actually a Mohawk word.




Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 1995hoo on June 08, 2015, 10:46:55 PM
On the other hand, a certain chicken joint is known as Poulet Frite Kentucky in Quebec due to the language laws. I suppose one might argue that "Fried Chicken" is a generic term describing the product, but I think most people would disagree and would accept that "Kentucky Fried Chicken" (or "KFC") is a proper noun as the name of the restaurant.

Consider also that several provinces have different names in French (Île du Prince Édouard; Nouveau-Brunswick; Columbie Britannique; Nouvelle-Écosse; Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on June 08, 2015, 11:09:50 PM
On the other hand, a certain chicken joint is known as Poulet Frite Kentucky in Quebec due to the language laws.

I've seen at least one PFK well outside Quebec (in Ontario's Niagara region) and the reach of those language laws.

Some new photos of Autoroute 73 south of Quebec City.  Quebec's MTQ has been busy over the past couple of years extending Autoroute 73 southerly with the ultimate goal of completing a four lane highway between Quebec City and Saint-Georges later in 2016.

Any plans to fill the gap between Beauceville and Saint-Georges earlier, as a two-lane Autoroute? The construction photo you posted (thanks!) indicates no such intention, with both roadways similarly far from completion.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on June 08, 2015, 11:48:00 PM

I take your point, but I think that shield is a bit of an exception.  My impression (garnered both from visiting Québec in person about 16 years ago and, more recently, studying the pattern-accurate sign panel detail sheets I can find) is that MTQ tries to deploy Series E Modified in all guide-sign shields, including not just route and autoroute shields for its own roads but also Interstate shields.

I think I'd rather see Clearview shields than than EM ones. Looks ugly. I've seen a few Ontario shields in series D though.

The shields you and AsphaltPlanet posted are actually the first US route shields in Québec I can remember seeing.  I don't know if MTQ has actually tried to clone US state route shields, but there are just two bordering states (NY and NH) where the state route shield is not a generic square.

Come to think of it, are there any other US hwy shields in Canada other than the US 1 shields in NB?

On the other hand, a certain chicken joint is known as Poulet Frite Kentucky in Quebec due to the language laws. I suppose one might argue that "Fried Chicken" is a generic term describing the product, but I think most people would disagree and would accept that "Kentucky Fried Chicken" (or "KFC") is a proper noun as the name of the restaurant.

Consider also that several provinces have different names in French (Île du Prince Édouard; Nouveau-Brunswick; Columbie Britannique; Nouvelle-Écosse; Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador).

Yet Canadian Tire (an outdoor store in Canada) is still "Canadian Tire" in Quebec. "East side Marios" (the restaurant) is still "East side Marios". I heard that the word 'Stop' on stop signs is allowed in Montreal in certain sections, but I might be mistaken.

Ontario says Etats Unis for the USA, and Quebec uses "Nouveau Brunswick" for NB.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ARMOURERERIC on June 09, 2015, 12:00:22 AM
I looked at Google satellite and comparing the location of the Gilbert River Bridge construction with the northern terminus of the St George's section, they do not seem to align very well.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: lordsutch on June 09, 2015, 12:35:32 AM
I heard that the word 'Stop' on stop signs is allowed in Montreal in certain sections, but I might be mistaken.

Legally "Stop" is considered a French word by Québec (presumably because it is used universally on octagonal red signs in France, Belgium, and Monaco), even though "Arrêt" is preferred, so it can be signed alone.

However, the Canadian federal government apparently doesn't think "Stop" is a French word, since they (redundantly?) translate it at border crossings and federal facilities like airports.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on June 09, 2015, 07:58:59 AM
Any plans to fill the gap between Beauceville and Saint-Georges earlier, as a two-lane Autoroute? The construction photo you posted (thanks!) indicates no such intention, with both roadways similarly far from completion.

It looks to me like A-73 will open as a four lane road, and not in stages as a super-2.  I think construction is supposed to be done by the end of construction season this year.  It looked to me like most of the structural work had been completed for the extension, but a lot of rock work and grading seems to remain.  Construction is progressing well on the twinning work near Sainte-Marie.  I quite like the area to the south of Quebec City.  Some of the roads are pretty entertaining to drive.

I took some photos of the A-85 extension towards Nouveau-Brunswick, and A-20 east towards Trois Pistoles as well, but I haven't had a chance to do anything with the photos yet.  The A-85 photos that I have, again, aren't really all that different than what you posted photos of last year.  A-85 is quite a road though, I'm looking forward to driving the highway again once the northbound lanes have been completed through Degelis.

I don't know if anybody knows this, but a section of R-112 has been permanently closed for the past couple of years west of Thetford Mines.  I don't know the full story behind the closure, but from what I gathered from the French article I (attempted to) read, the mining operations have undermined the stability of the existing highway.  A new permanent realigned road is currently under construction.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: english si on June 09, 2015, 08:25:08 AM
Neither are french ... "Beaconsfield"
Given it would be named after Benjamin Disraeli (given the title 'The Earl of Beaconsfield'), it surely is the French. However, what would the French be if it was named after the Bucks* town? Some sort of corruption of "compensation dans les hêtres"? Or a false entymology and "le champ de balise"?

*ie the county of Bouquinquan (OK, that's an obsolete exonym that strangely exists for such a low-importance town, when there's but a handful of French exonyms in the UK).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: dcbjms on June 09, 2015, 08:54:51 AM
Neither are french ... "Beaconsfield"
Given it would be named after Benjamin Disraeli (given the title 'The Earl of Beaconsfield'), it surely is the French.

Not the only one in this case, as there is a Disraeli located in the Chaudière-Appalaches region.

However, what would the French be if it was named after the Bucks* town? Some sort of corruption of "compensation dans les hêtres"? Or a false entymology and "le champ de balise"?

Most likely, if the town came before Disraeli was given the title, either it would be left alone or a saint's name would have been appended to the name to make it work.  Both are quite common out in the RoQ (the Rest of Québec outside Montréal and Québec City) - an example of the second strategy, for example, would be the town of Saint-Étienne-de-Bolton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-%C3%89tienne-de-Bolton,_Quebec).  Fortunately, as far as I'm aware, Quebec does not have any placenames containing, nor for that matter does it have any need for, the words "sur" and "sous", so the respective abbreviations "s/" and "s/s", used in France, are not needed on signage.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on June 09, 2015, 09:45:31 AM
Any plans to fill the gap between Beauceville and Saint-Georges earlier, as a two-lane Autoroute? The construction photo you posted (thanks!) indicates no such intention, with both roadways similarly far from completion.

It looks to me like A-73 will open as a four lane road, and not in stages as a super-2.  I think construction is supposed to be done by the end of construction season this year.  It looked to me like most of the structural work had been completed for the extension, but a lot of rock work and grading seems to remain.  Construction is progressing well on the twinning work near Sainte-Marie.  I quite like the area to the south of Quebec City.  Some of the roads are pretty entertaining to drive.

I took some photos of the A-85 extension towards Nouveau-Brunswick, and A-20 east towards Trois Pistoles as well, but I haven't had a chance to do anything with the photos yet.  The A-85 photos that I have, again, aren't really all that different than what you posted photos of last year.  A-85 is quite a road though, I'm looking forward to driving the highway again once the northbound lanes have been completed through Degelis.

I don't know if anybody knows this, but a section of R-112 has been permanently closed for the past couple of years west of Thetford Mines.  I don't know the full story behind the closure, but from what I gathered from the French article I (attempted to) read, the mining operations have undermined the stability of the existing highway.  A new permanent realigned road is currently under construction.

Yup, it had closed due to the mining operations who had undermined the stability of the highway and it collapsed a bit later
http://www.lapresse.ca/la-tribune/regions/201207/17/01-4556495-deux-sections-de-la-112-glissent-au-fond-de-la-mine.php
The new gap should open this Fall.

As for A-73, there some photos I saw on this French site https://sites.google.com/site/autoroute73/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on June 09, 2015, 10:24:53 AM
I don't know if anybody knows this, but a section of R-112 has been permanently closed for the past couple of years west of Thetford Mines.  I don't know the full story behind the closure, but from what I gathered from the French article I (attempted to) read, the mining operations have undermined the stability of the existing highway.
Pretty much. In a nutshell, the pavement of the original R-112 and a realignment attempt are both currently located, in crumbs, somewhere at the bottom of the adjacent asbestos mine.

http://www.lapresse.ca/la-tribune/regions/201207/17/01-4556495-deux-sections-de-la-112-glissent-au-fond-de-la-mine.php

This page (in French) covers up the ongoing work to relocate R-112 for a second time.
https://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/infrastructures-transport/p-routiers-100M/chaudiere-appalaches/Pages/relocalisation-rte-112.aspx

On shields:
My understanding is that in Québec, all shields on BGSes have to use Series E(M) for legibility (basically, a stricter version of what NYSDOT does with their state route shields). However, in several cases, U.S. and Interstate shields do violate that rule and are posted with Series D numerals. Notably, older signs with U.S. 201 on A-20 and service lanes near A-73, A-73 itself just past the bridge out of Québec City, I-89 shields on A-10's service lanes and I-87 shields on A-30's mainline in the eastbound direction. Then, R-133 SB incorrectly uses Series EM on I-89 reassurance signs. As you can see, adherence to that rule is somewhat inconsistent.

Now, to clear up the language issue.

The initial goal of the Charter of the French Language (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charter_of_the_French_Language) (or Bill 101) was to force businesses to function in French (serve in French, use signage, displays and menus in French, and conduct internal business in French), as well as to get people born in Québec to go to school in French. This was in a time when Quebec was seeing a rapid transition to English in commercial activities and other aspects. Montreal was the largest city in Canada and was getting a steady influx of Anglophones from the rest of Canada who didn't bother to learn the local language, with those same people opening businesses here and only hiring English speakers and, worse, serving only in English. Some major retail outlets in Montreal would only display and serve in English, and fail (or even outright refuse) to help locals speaking the majority language. The whole situation was a source of great frustration for Montrealers as well as many other Quebecers.

So that's the context. This forum is not the place to debate the current or former challenges, goals, applications, relevance and acceptability of Bill 101; I only provided the above paragraph as basis for understanding how and why it happened.

While I haven't read the Charter in its entirety, my understanding is that, in terms of signage, its primary goal is towards commercial signage. I cannot say if it applies to highway signage at all, and I regard the MTQ's recent amendments to its few standard bilingual sign design patterns as futile at best. (The English text on the new Radar Detectors Prohibited and Truck Speed Limiters Required signs is illegible at any decent speed.)

"U.S.A." is a place name and can probably appear in any language and still be OK. While Ontario and New Brunswick do use the French form "É.-U.", it's on bilingual signage in conjunction with the English form. Since Québec does not use bilingual signage (partly a result of Bill 101 declaring French as the province's only official language), using only É.-U. would fail at directing much of the target audience of that sign legend, and U.S.A. is widely understood by French Canadians anyway.

"Stop" is defined in French dictionaries (mostly, I assume, due to telegraphy and road signage) and, because of that, is considered French when used on a Stop sign. "Arrêt" or "Stop" may be used at the discretion of the jurisdiction that erects the sign (and indeed, a handful of cities use "Stop"; Dorval, Montreal West, Granby, Sutton, just to name a few...) and the MTQ has sign patterns for both. "Arrêt/Stop" cannot be used because the "Stop" becomes either redundant or English...

Kentucky Fried Chicken did rename itself into Poulet Frit Kentucky (at least, partly) in order to comply with Bill 101. Now that it's KFC and PFK, it might actually be legal to just use the English acronym but hey, we're used to the French name now, and IANAL. Canadian Tire, East Side Marios, Dairy Queen and such are illegal, but I guess that they can cover the legal costs that come with not changing their name. Note, adding a French word to the name (e.g., Magasins Canadian Tire, Restaurant East Side Marios, etc.) is enough to make it "French". Businesses (and especially chains) with English names do attract some protestors, though, and I think it's ridiculous.

To conclude, store employees who refuse to help customers (especially tourists!) in English for ideological reasons are rarer than they're made out to be, and are generally regarded as idiots. Legally, the Charter requires French, but does not prohibit other languages.

Most likely, if the town came before Disraeli was given the title, either it would be left alone or a saint's name would have been appended to the name to make it work.  Both are quite common out in the RoQ (the Rest of Québec outside Montréal and Québec City) - an example of the second strategy, for example, would be the town of Saint-Étienne-de-Bolton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-%C3%89tienne-de-Bolton,_Quebec).  Fortunately, as far as I'm aware, Quebec does not have any placenames containing, nor for that matter does it have any need for, the words "sur" and "sous", so the respective abbreviations "s/" and "s/s", used in France, are not needed on signage.
One of Montreal's most important satellite cities is Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, and there's several other uses of "sur" in town and city names, but interestingly enough, not a single use of "sous". Québec, however, does not go to the same lengths as France to abbreviate place names on signage, and does not use "s/" and "s/s".
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SP Cook on June 09, 2015, 01:07:10 PM


Kentucky Fried Chicken did rename itself into Poulet Frit Kentucky (at least, partly) in order to comply with Bill 101. Now that it's KFC and PFK, it might actually be legal to just use the English acronym but hey, we're used to the French name now, and IANAL. Canadian Tire, East Side Marios, Dairy Queen and such are illegal, but I guess that they can cover the legal costs that come with not changing their name. Note, adding a French word to the name (e.g., Magasins Canadian Tire, Restaurant East Side Marios, etc.) is enough to make it "French". Businesses (and especially chains) with English names do attract some protestors, though, and I think it's ridiculous.


As I understand it, brand names are legal in any language.  Thus Dairy Queen if fine, as is McDonald's or Wendy's (even though 's is not used to show possession in French).  As, for that matter would an Indian or Arab or any name be OK.    The generic part of the name must be in French.

As to Kentucky Fried Chicken, or KFC, (which is called that everywhere else, including France) the authorities said "Kentucky" was brand name, and "fried chicken" was the generic product.  So KFC became PFK.  Later a company in a similar situation won an appeal, and KFC could go back to being KFC, but thought it was good business to stay PFK and does so.

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: dcbjms on June 09, 2015, 02:40:08 PM
On shields:
My understanding is that in Québec, all shields on BGSes have to use Series E(M) for legibility (basically, a stricter version of what NYSDOT does with their state route shields). However, in several cases, U.S. and Interstate shields do violate that rule and are posted with Series D numerals. Notably, older signs with U.S. 201 on A-20 and service lanes near A-73, A-73 itself just past the bridge out of Québec City, I-89 shields on A-10's service lanes and I-87 shields on A-30's mainline in the eastbound direction. Then, R-133 SB incorrectly uses Series EM on I-89 reassurance signs. As you can see, adherence to that rule is somewhat inconsistent.

Probably it's because on the BGSes the MTQ uses that squished-out version of the route shields which makes it easier to use Series E(M).  Otherwise, at least for the free-standing shields, IIRC it's Series E(M) if single-digit, Series D for two-digit, and Series B for three-digit.

Most likely, if the town came before Disraeli was given the title, either it would be left alone or a saint's name would have been appended to the name to make it work.  Both are quite common out in the RoQ (the Rest of Québec outside Montréal and Québec City) - an example of the second strategy, for example, would be the town of Saint-Étienne-de-Bolton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-%C3%89tienne-de-Bolton,_Quebec).  Fortunately, as far as I'm aware, Quebec does not have any placenames containing, nor for that matter does it have any need for, the words "sur" and "sous", so the respective abbreviations "s/" and "s/s", used in France, are not needed on signage.
One of Montreal's most important satellite cities is Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, and there's several other uses of "sur" in town and city names, but interestingly enough, not a single use of "sous". Québec, however, does not go to the same lengths as France to abbreviate place names on signage, and does not use "s/" and "s/s".

I knew I was forgetting something.  :pan:  Brain fart indeed.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on June 09, 2015, 02:58:22 PM
Otherwise, at least for the free-standing shields, IIRC it's Series E(M) if single-digit, Series D for two-digit, and Series B for three-digit.
This is true for autoroute shields, but national route shields were more or less recently changed to always use Series D.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 13, 2015, 09:37:47 PM
1 G$ funding was announced this afternoon for the completion A-85's last 40 kilometres.

I believe that would make it the first ever completed trunk autoroute in Québec, upon opening.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on July 14, 2015, 11:07:50 PM
1 G$ funding was announced this afternoon for the completion A-85's last 40 kilometres.

I believe that would make it the first ever completed trunk autoroute in Québec, upon opening.
If by completed you mean "incapable of being extended further" yes... unless you bridge the St. Lawrence.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on July 14, 2015, 11:33:20 PM
1 G$ funding was announced this afternoon for the completion A-85's last 40 kilometres.

I believe that would make it the first ever completed trunk autoroute in Québec, upon opening.

This project has gone too long now. It's good that it will be complete in the next few years, hopefully.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: iBallasticwolf2 on July 14, 2015, 11:34:58 PM
1 G$ funding was announced this afternoon for the completion A-85's last 40 kilometres.

I believe that would make it the first ever completed trunk autoroute in Québec, upon opening.
If by completed you mean "incapable of being extended further" yes... unless you bridge the St. Lawrence.

If your willing to bridge the St. Lawrence or use a large ferry then you could extend A-85 to A-70 and maybe replace A-70.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on July 15, 2015, 12:09:47 AM
1 G$ funding was announced this afternoon for the completion A-85's last 40 kilometres.

I believe that would make it the first ever completed trunk autoroute in Québec, upon opening.
If by completed you mean "incapable of being extended further" yes... unless you bridge the St. Lawrence.

If your willing to bridge the St. Lawrence or use a large ferry then you could extend A-85 to A-70 and maybe replace A-70.

That's what I was thinking. Maybe extend A-70 to the St. Lawrence, then end A-85 on the other side and have the ferry. A bridge wouldn't work; the river is 15 km wide at this point.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ghYHZ on July 15, 2015, 08:04:41 AM
Already a ferry at Riviere du Loup....

http://traverserdl.com/english/home/

Just adjust the end points slightly.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 20, 2015, 08:42:27 PM
1 G$ funding was announced this afternoon for the completion A-85's last 40 kilometres.

I believe that would make it the first ever completed trunk autoroute in Québec, upon opening.
If by completed you mean "incapable of being extended further" yes... unless you bridge the St. Lawrence.

Unless the North American urban hierarchy epicenter swings towards Halifax at some point where Saguenay/Maritimes economic movements would justify the building of a multi-thousand-million-dollar bridge over sea-condition Gulf of Saint Lawrence to replace a seasonnal, 100-car capacity ferry, that discussion pertains to "Fictional Highways".

The 1971 ministère de la Voirie master plan did feature some wacky, eccentric autoroute extensions, but not that one. And I was quoting that plan when referring to the first completed trunk autoroute.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: iBallasticwolf2 on July 20, 2015, 09:39:16 PM
The 1971 ministère de la Voirie master plan did feature some wacky, eccentric autoroute extensions, but not that one. And I was quoting that plan when referring to the first completed trunk autoroute.


A map of this whole plan would be very interesting. Were they trying to make a fully connected Autoroute system without gaps? If so then that would be a lot of autoroute miles with traffic counts under 5000.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 20, 2015, 10:57:34 PM
Copyright issues prevent me from reproducing the whole maps here.
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/extract_zpsac15f753.jpg)

Yes, that plan's mesh is tight and most of southern Québec is covered with a grid of expressways that would defy nowadays common sense, such as A-18 linking Saint-Albert to Plessisville or a freeway bridge between Lanoraie and Tracy. But nothing as alanlandish as a bridge between Rivière-du-Loup and Saint-Siméon.

Those were the times when growth expectations were sky-rocketing, and the province's population estimates for 2000 were above 10 000 000 people, with over 6 M people in the Greater Montréal. The 8 M threshold was reached in 2011 for the province, and Montréal reached 4 M in 2014.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: iBallasticwolf2 on July 20, 2015, 11:18:36 PM
Copyright issues prevent me from reproducing the whole maps here.
(http://i710.photobucket.com/albums/ww106/webfil/extract_zpsac15f753.jpg)

Yes, that plan's mesh is tight and most of southern Québec is covered with a grid of expressways that would defy nowadays common sense, such as A-18 linking Saint-Albert to Plessisville or a freeway bridge between Lanoraie and Tracy. But nothing as alanlandish as a bridge between Rivière-du-Loup and Saint-Siméon.

Those were the times when growth expectations were sky-rocketing, and the province's population estimates for 2000 were above 10 000 000 people, with over 6 M people in the Greater Montréal. The 8 M threshold was reached in 2011 for the province, and Montréal reached 4 M in 2014.

The plans don't look as outrageous as I expected. I was thinking along the lines of a Autoroute from Saguenay to Ontario following the Trans-Canada highway partially.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: froggie on July 22, 2015, 02:02:27 PM
Quote
Copyright issues prevent me from reproducing the whole maps here.

Could the maps be redrawn/recreated elsewhere then posted?  I want to say I saw something along those lines on a website in the far past (~10yrs ago), but can't find it now.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on August 07, 2015, 01:45:23 PM
A-440 in Laval, Qc now has a new name: Autoroute Jean-Noël-Lavoie (now deceased first Mayor of Laval). Article in French here: http://www.courrierlaval.com/Actualites/2015-08-06/article-4238051/LA-440-devient-lAutoroute-Jean-Noel-Lavoie/1 (http://www.courrierlaval.com/Actualites/2015-08-06/article-4238051/LA-440-devient-lAutoroute-Jean-Noel-Lavoie/1)

In other Laval news, MTQ still considers plans for A-19 to be extended north from A-440 to A-640 as a non-restricted boulevard instead of a full autoroute. Article in French here: http://www.courrierlaval.com/Actualites/Societe/2015-08-06/article-4238000/Le-MTQ-etudie-toujours-l%26rsquo%3Boption-du-boulevard-urbain/1 (http://www.courrierlaval.com/Actualites/Societe/2015-08-06/article-4238000/Le-MTQ-etudie-toujours-l%26rsquo%3Boption-du-boulevard-urbain/1)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on August 08, 2015, 02:40:14 PM

In other Laval news, MTQ still considers plans for A-19 to be extended north from A-440 to A-640 as a non-restricted boulevard instead of a full autoroute. Article in French here: http://www.courrierlaval.com/Actualites/Societe/2015-08-06/article-4238000/Le-MTQ-etudie-toujours-l%26rsquo%3Boption-du-boulevard-urbain/1 (http://www.courrierlaval.com/Actualites/Societe/2015-08-06/article-4238000/Le-MTQ-etudie-toujours-l%26rsquo%3Boption-du-boulevard-urbain/1)

A very bad idea. The ROW is still there for a full autoroute, these bureaucrats are so stubborn. :banghead:
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on September 11, 2015, 09:33:14 AM
Some new pictures of Autoroute 20 east of Wolf River, QC.  These photos were taken on a road trip that I took back in May.  The two-lane extension of Autoroute 20 from east of Cacouna to Trois-Pistoles is scheduled to open this fall, so these photos are definitely a bit out of date:

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/A20_dv_519_east_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/A20_dv_520-25_west_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/A20_cl_521_east_w_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/A20_dv_524_east_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/A20_dv_526-75_east_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/A20_cl_527_east_t_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/A20_cl_528_west_t_May15.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/A20_cl_538-9_east_w_May15.jpg)
Full resolution, and more photos are available here:
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/20/Page9.htm
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on September 11, 2015, 03:22:48 PM
Maybe the MTQ will eventually connect both ends together...

Thanks for the update.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Chris on October 30, 2015, 02:43:20 PM
The 3 kilometer extension of autoroute 410 to Route 108 south of Sherbrooke opened to traffic yesterday: http://www.lapresse.ca/la-tribune/sherbrooke/201510/29/01-4915300-le-nouveau-troncon-de-la-410-en-service.php
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on October 30, 2015, 06:43:34 PM
So when will MTQ finish A-410 to its final terminus further along QC 108?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on October 30, 2015, 07:51:01 PM
So when will MTQ finish A-410 to its final terminus further along QC 108?

When I drove through the construction site for the now-open A-410/QC 108 interchange, in May of this year, it looked like no work at all was being done east of the interchange.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on November 12, 2015, 08:25:16 PM
Maybe the MTQ will eventually connect both ends together...

Don't hold your breath on that. It looks like A-20 between Trois-Pistoles and Rimouski has been pulled from MTQ's 2015-2025 plans, to give priority to completing A-85:

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/est-quebec/2015/09/23/006-prolongement-20-jean-damour-fait-le-point.shtml

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/est-quebec/2015/11/12/001-autoroute-20-prolongement-chambre-commerce-rimouski-transports-jean-damour.shtml

http://rimouski.rougefm.ca/info-rimouski/2015/09/23/prolongement-de-lautoroute-20-sur-la-glace

MTQ says one reason for postponing (not killing) extending A-20 to Rimouski is the very expensive river crossing in Trois-Pistoles. Since bridge construction seems to be already underway, I'm not sure what happens to that part of the project.

BTW, extension of A-20 to Notre-Dame-des-Neiges southwest of Trois-Pistoles was supposed to be done around now, but apparently hasn't happened just yet.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on November 12, 2015, 09:28:41 PM
BTW, extension of A-20 to Notre-Dame-des-Neiges southwest of Trois-Pistoles was supposed to be done around now, but apparently hasn't happened just yet.

The new 15 km stretch appears to have opened a few days ago.

https://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/salle-de-presse/nouvelles/Pages/Ouverture-autoroute-20-entre-LIsle-Verte-et-Notre-Dame-des-Neiges.aspx (https://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/salle-de-presse/nouvelles/Pages/Ouverture-autoroute-20-entre-LIsle-Verte-et-Notre-Dame-des-Neiges.aspx)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on November 12, 2015, 10:10:10 PM
I'm surprised it took as long as it did to open.  It didn't look all that far away from completion when I was out there in May.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on November 12, 2015, 10:57:47 PM
Maybe the MTQ will eventually connect both ends together...

Don't hold your breath on that. It looks like A-20 between Trois-Pistoles and Rimouski has been pulled from MTQ's 2015-2025 plans, to give priority to completing A-85:

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/est-quebec/2015/09/23/006-prolongement-20-jean-damour-fait-le-point.shtml

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/est-quebec/2015/11/12/001-autoroute-20-prolongement-chambre-commerce-rimouski-transports-jean-damour.shtml

http://rimouski.rougefm.ca/info-rimouski/2015/09/23/prolongement-de-lautoroute-20-sur-la-glace

MTQ says one reason for postponing (not killing) extending A-20 to Rimouski is the very expensive river crossing in Trois-Pistoles. Since bridge construction seems to be already underway, I'm not sure what happens to that part of the project.

BTW, extension of A-20 to Notre-Dame-des-Neiges southwest of Trois-Pistoles was supposed to be done around now, but apparently hasn't happened just yet.

Well, to be honest, I'm glad MTQ is focusing on A85. That and A35 should be top priority IMO. Upgrading those roads has gone on too long already.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MrDisco99 on November 16, 2015, 11:04:07 AM
Is the A-20 meant to stay a super-2 north of exit 521?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on November 16, 2015, 11:58:29 AM
It's been designed so that it could eventually be widened to four lanes.  That said, it hasn't been designed to be widened to four lanes in the near future.

By the looks of the various two-lane overpasses that have been constructed, the abutments could be converted to a central pier with the approaching fill excavated and replaced with girders.  To me though, if they had any thoughts of widening the highway quickly, they'd have just built overpasses long enough at the outset.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cbeach40 on July 29, 2016, 08:36:53 AM
The area between A-5 and ON 417 has always struck me as a definite gap in Canada's freeway system.  Too bad it looks like the tunnel to fill that gap will be truck-only.

The gap in A-20 west of Montreal is much worse IMO.

That one is pretty bad. There really ought to be an option to bypass it via A-30 to the south or A-40 to the north. Then at least you wouldn't have a gap in the network there. ;)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on July 29, 2016, 08:06:59 PM
The area between A-5 and ON 417 has always struck me as a definite gap in Canada's freeway system.  Too bad it looks like the tunnel to fill that gap will be truck-only.

The gap in A-20 west of Montreal is much worse IMO.

That one is pretty bad. There really ought to be an option to bypass it via A-30 to the south or A-40 to the north. Then at least you wouldn't have a gap in the network there. ;)

Fair enough. Quebec has higher priorities for freeway connections (like A-85 and 35). I guess my cringing for A-20 is more of an emotional thing rather than a logical one.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on July 29, 2016, 11:02:41 PM
The area between A-5 and ON 417 has always struck me as a definite gap in Canada's freeway system.  Too bad it looks like the tunnel to fill that gap will be truck-only.

The gap in A-20 west of Montreal is much worse IMO.

That one is pretty bad. There really ought to be an option to bypass it via A-30 to the south or A-40 to the north. Then at least you wouldn't have a gap in the network there. ;)

Fair enough. Quebec has higher priorities for freeway connections (like A-85 and 35). I guess my cringing for A-20 is more of an emotional thing rather than a logical one.
I think A-20 is a higher priority than A-85. They've designed it, they've just never gotten funding in place. To me, the highest priority is making sure the Montréal infrastructure doesn't crumble, which it's already very good at doing, and then Québec City won't be far behind (but fewer bridges and better condition helps).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on July 30, 2016, 08:35:43 AM
Sure, but completed A-20 doesn't really do anything for infrastructure renewal in Montreal, aside from ensuring there are more maintenance requirements for the province in the future.

From a traffic perspective in the Montreal region, money would be much better spent on widening either A-20 or A-10 east of A-30 than it would be on completing the last remaining portions of A-20 through the west islands.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MisterSG1 on July 30, 2016, 09:18:12 AM
Sure, but completed A-20 doesn't really do anything for infrastructure renewal in Montreal, aside from ensuring there are more maintenance requirements for the province in the future.

From a traffic perspective in the Montreal region, money would be much better spent on widening either A-20 or A-10 east of A-30 than it would be on completing the last remaining portions of A-20 through the west islands.

What about widening A-30 in the stretch between A-10 and A-20? A six lane stretch of A-30 would make the A-30 bypass more reliable.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 7/8 on July 30, 2016, 10:51:01 AM
The area between A-5 and ON 417 has always struck me as a definite gap in Canada's freeway system.  Too bad it looks like the tunnel to fill that gap will be truck-only.

The gap in A-20 west of Montreal is much worse IMO.

That one is pretty bad. There really ought to be an option to bypass it via A-30 to the south or A-40 to the north. Then at least you wouldn't have a gap in the network there. ;)

Fair enough. Quebec has higher priorities for freeway connections (like A-85 and 35). I guess my cringing for A-20 is more of an emotional thing rather than a logical one.
I think A-20 is a higher priority than A-85. They've designed it, they've just never gotten funding in place. To me, the highest priority is making sure the Montréal infrastructure doesn't crumble, which it's already very good at doing, and then Québec City won't be far behind (but fewer bridges and better condition helps).

Sure, but completed A-20 doesn't really do anything for infrastructure renewal in Montreal, aside from ensuring there are more maintenance requirements for the province in the future.

From a traffic perspective in the Montreal region, money would be much better spent on widening either A-20 or A-10 east of A-30 than it would be on completing the last remaining portions of A-20 through the west islands.

What about widening A-30 in the stretch between A-10 and A-20? A six lane stretch of A-30 would make the A-30 bypass more reliable.

^ Above comments are from the Ontario's Highways thread - page 26

Just making sure, when you say the A-30 stretch from A-10 to A-20, are you referring to the west interchange with A-20, or the east interchange with A-20?

I've driven A-30 a few times from the west end to A-10 and I found it wasn't that busy. Is it already having traffic issues?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MisterSG1 on July 30, 2016, 11:04:56 AM
The area between A-5 and ON 417 has always struck me as a definite gap in Canada's freeway system.  Too bad it looks like the tunnel to fill that gap will be truck-only.

The gap in A-20 west of Montreal is much worse IMO.

That one is pretty bad. There really ought to be an option to bypass it via A-30 to the south or A-40 to the north. Then at least you wouldn't have a gap in the network there. ;)

Fair enough. Quebec has higher priorities for freeway connections (like A-85 and 35). I guess my cringing for A-20 is more of an emotional thing rather than a logical one.
I think A-20 is a higher priority than A-85. They've designed it, they've just never gotten funding in place. To me, the highest priority is making sure the Montréal infrastructure doesn't crumble, which it's already very good at doing, and then Québec City won't be far behind (but fewer bridges and better condition helps).

Sure, but completed A-20 doesn't really do anything for infrastructure renewal in Montreal, aside from ensuring there are more maintenance requirements for the province in the future.

From a traffic perspective in the Montreal region, money would be much better spent on widening either A-20 or A-10 east of A-30 than it would be on completing the last remaining portions of A-20 through the west islands.

What about widening A-30 in the stretch between A-10 and A-20? A six lane stretch of A-30 would make the A-30 bypass more reliable.

^ Above comments are from the Ontario's Highways thread - page 26

Just making sure, when you say the A-30 stretch from A-10 to A-20, are you referring to the west interchange with A-20, or the east interchange with A-20?

I've driven A-30 a few times from the west end to A-10 and I found it wasn't that busy. Is it already having traffic issues?

The east interchange.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 7/8 on July 30, 2016, 01:37:33 PM
They're working 24/7 on the Turcot interchange in Montreal. I could see why local residents would be bothered by this though.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/turcot-interchange-work-could-lead-to-depression-and-anxiety-psychologists-say-1.3699228 (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/turcot-interchange-work-could-lead-to-depression-and-anxiety-psychologists-say-1.3699228)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on July 30, 2016, 02:02:27 PM
The area between A-5 and ON 417 has always struck me as a definite gap in Canada's freeway system.  Too bad it looks like the tunnel to fill that gap will be truck-only.

The gap in A-20 west of Montreal is much worse IMO.

That one is pretty bad. There really ought to be an option to bypass it via A-30 to the south or A-40 to the north. Then at least you wouldn't have a gap in the network there. ;)

Fair enough. Quebec has higher priorities for freeway connections (like A-85 and 35). I guess my cringing for A-20 is more of an emotional thing rather than a logical one.
I think A-20 is a higher priority than A-85. They've designed it, they've just never gotten funding in place. To me, the highest priority is making sure the Montréal infrastructure doesn't crumble, which it's already very good at doing, and then Québec City won't be far behind (but fewer bridges and better condition helps).

Sure, but completed A-20 doesn't really do anything for infrastructure renewal in Montreal, aside from ensuring there are more maintenance requirements for the province in the future.

From a traffic perspective in the Montreal region, money would be much better spent on widening either A-20 or A-10 east of A-30 than it would be on completing the last remaining portions of A-20 through the west islands.

What about widening A-30 in the stretch between A-10 and A-20? A six lane stretch of A-30 would make the A-30 bypass more reliable.

^ Above comments are from the Ontario's Highways thread - page 26

Just making sure, when you say the A-30 stretch from A-10 to A-20, are you referring to the west interchange with A-20, or the east interchange with A-20?

I've driven A-30 a few times from the west end to A-10 and I found it wasn't that busy. Is it already having traffic issues?

I've never encountered any congestion on the new section of A-30 either.  But the older section, particularly between the A-10 and A-20 interchanges, is prone to traffic and could stand to be widened.  It's probably not the highest priority corridor to be widened in the area though.

One of the last times I went to Quebec City, I came through Montreal during Friday rush hour.  There was about a 4km queue to exit A-30 at the A-20 east interchange, and the eastbound lanes of A-20 were jammed until St-Hyacinthe, and were unpleasant all the way to Drummondville.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on July 31, 2016, 08:23:02 PM
Quebec Autoroute 740 photodump:

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_1_north_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_3_north_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_3-1_north_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_4_north_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_6_north_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_6-75_north_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_7_north_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_8-75_north_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_cl_3-1_north_t_Jul16_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_4-25_south_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_4-5_south_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_5_south_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_7-1_south_Oct14_forum.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/A740_dv_7-25_south_Oct14_forum.jpg)

The entire set is here:
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/index.html (http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/740/index.html)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: noelbotevera on August 03, 2016, 03:31:20 PM
So I did some research about the Montreal area and some interesting highways popped up to me, but some of them I have questions about. Here's my first observation.

1. A-20 was originally going to follow A-720, through the north bank of the St. Lawrence River, to a short freeway that Avenue Souligny uses, and ends at an overbuilt interchange with A-25 (Sortie 4), and up until 2011, A-25 ended abruptly here. A-20 would then follow the Louis Lafontine Bridge-Tunnel over the St. Lawrence River, bypassing Longueuil. Instead, A-25 used the Louis Lafontine Bridge-Tunnel to A-20. (information courtesy of AlpsRoads) However, it was not finished between the end of A-720 and Avenue Souligny, instead multiplexing with QC 132 through Longueuil. However, A-40 later did exactly that, following the north shore of the St. Lawrence River all the way through Montreal. So why was there a need for A-20 to follow the north shore if A-40 later took its place? Is it because QC 132 would be its own freeway and the main route through Longueuil, or was it because A-40 was not anticipated?

2. A-13 parallels A-15 up until it ends at A-640. It also was supposed to head northwest to Mirabel Airport. So what was the point of this Autoroute if A-15 did exactly what A-13 did; head northwest out of Montreal. Was A-13 supposed to be a bypass of the tolled A-15 at the time of its construction, or was it an airport connector, connecting Mirabel and P.E Trudeau?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on August 03, 2016, 05:27:14 PM
So I did some research about the Montreal area and some interesting highways popped up to me, but some of them I have questions about. Here's my first observation.

1. A-20 was originally going to follow A-720, through the north bank of the St. Lawrence River, to a short freeway that Avenue Souligny uses, and ends at an overbuilt interchange with A-25 (Sortie 4), and up until 2011, A-25 ended abruptly here. A-20 would then follow the Louis Lafontine Bridge-Tunnel over the St. Lawrence River, bypassing Longueuil. Instead, A-25 used the Louis Lafontine Bridge-Tunnel to A-20. (information courtesy of AlpsRoads) However, it was not finished between the end of A-720 and Avenue Souligny, instead multiplexing with QC 132 through Longueuil. However, A-40 later did exactly that, following the north shore of the St. Lawrence River all the way through Montreal. So why was there a need for A-20 to follow the north shore if A-40 later took its place? Is it because QC 132 would be its own freeway and the main route through Longueuil, or was it because A-40 was not anticipated?

2. A-13 parallels A-15 up until it ends at A-640. It also was supposed to head northwest to Mirabel Airport. So what was the point of this Autoroute if A-15 did exactly what A-13 did; head northwest out of Montreal. Was A-13 supposed to be a bypass of the tolled A-15 at the time of its construction, or was it an airport connector, connecting Mirabel and P.E Trudeau?

NIMBYS contested the A-20 original alignment.

A-13 was planned to be both, an A-15 relief route and airport connector linking Mirabel and Dorval and also linking with A-50.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on August 03, 2016, 11:34:36 PM
So I did some research about the Montreal area and some interesting highways popped up to me, but some of them I have questions about. Here's my first observation.

1. A-20 was originally going to follow A-720, through the north bank of the St. Lawrence River, to a short freeway that Avenue Souligny uses, and ends at an overbuilt interchange with A-25 (Sortie 4), and up until 2011, A-25 ended abruptly here. A-20 would then follow the Louis Lafontine Bridge-Tunnel over the St. Lawrence River, bypassing Longueuil. Instead, A-25 used the Louis Lafontine Bridge-Tunnel to A-20. (information courtesy of AlpsRoads) However, it was not finished between the end of A-720 and Avenue Souligny, instead multiplexing with QC 132 through Longueuil. However, A-40 later did exactly that, following the north shore of the St. Lawrence River all the way through Montreal. So why was there a need for A-20 to follow the north shore if A-40 later took its place? Is it because QC 132 would be its own freeway and the main route through Longueuil, or was it because A-40 was not anticipated?

2. A-13 parallels A-15 up until it ends at A-640. It also was supposed to head northwest to Mirabel Airport. So what was the point of this Autoroute if A-15 did exactly what A-13 did; head northwest out of Montreal. Was A-13 supposed to be a bypass of the tolled A-15 at the time of its construction, or was it an airport connector, connecting Mirabel and P.E Trudeau?
Montreal is a big city. Parallel freeways are necessary.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 7/8 on August 04, 2016, 12:33:36 PM
Does anybody know why A-20 has you driving on the left between QC 138 and the Turcot? It just seems like more work, with overpasses required to get the lanes back to the right side on each end.

It'll be a bit sad to see this interesting section go when they reconstruct the interchange.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on August 04, 2016, 12:55:59 PM
I spotted this video showing the progress of A-73 construction between Notre-Dame-des-Pins and Beauceville filmed last April. http://www.beauce.tv/regarder.php?vId=7064
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on August 04, 2016, 01:07:29 PM
Does anybody know why A-20 has you driving on the left between QC 138 and the Turcot? It just seems like more work, with overpasses required to get the lanes back to the right side on each end.

It'll be a bit sad to see this interesting section go when they reconstruct the interchange.
That might have been the easiest way to deal with the railroad tracks.  The EB lanes are pretty straight, but the WB lanes swerve twice.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: noelbotevera on August 09, 2016, 11:56:57 PM
I found a couple more odd things about the Montreal freeway system.

A-520 ends oddly. The speed limit decreases from 70 km/h to 50 km/h, and it merges into it's frontage roads. There's also a traffic light for some odd reason. Also, there is no direct way to A-40 WB. You have to follow A-520's frontage road, make a left onto the other side of A-40, and follow its frontage road to the next exit (or loop around back to A-520 and A-40 EB). The interchange also seems to be a corrupted trumpet and all the movements are made via A-520's and A-40's frontage roads.

From A-40 EB to A-520 WB/Frontage Road WB has you exit at Sortie 65, and the frontage road splits, with the right fork looping, and then merges with A-520 EB back to A-520 WB, and then splits again, between the frontage road and A-520 WB. A-40 WB to A-520 WB has it bad too. You exit at Sortie 65, following, the A-40 WB frontage road and having to merge left and weave with the A-40 EB frontage road, and must continue straight to A-520 WB (the left fork takes you to A-40/A-520's frontage road and A-40 EB). A-520 EB to A-40 EB just takes a direct ramp to A-40 EB, while A-520 EB to A-40 WB has the situation I described earlier.

So what's the reason behind this? Is A-520 the original route of A-20, and the frontage roads were built before A-520, or was this meant to be a way to efficiently and cheaply build interchanges between Autoroutes? Because interchanges such as A-15 to A-720/A-20 don't have this problem.

(On another note, it turns out the extension of A-13 to Mirabel was cancelled because of NIMBYs and the fact that Mirabel turned out to be useless, and thus the extension would be a waste of money. I personally think the current route though to A-640 is useful to bypass congestion on A-15 in Laval and Montreal.) 

Another thing is that A-15 strangely resets exit numbers after the concurrency with A-40. I'm guessing that A-15 ended here, and the extension to the US was built later (it could be vice versa though).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 7/8 on August 10, 2016, 12:24:35 PM
I found a couple more odd things about the Montreal freeway system.

A-520 ends oddly. The speed limit decreases from 70 km/h to 50 km/h, and it merges into it's frontage roads. There's also a traffic light for some odd reason. Also, there is no direct way to A-40 WB. You have to follow A-520's frontage road, make a left onto the other side of A-40, and follow its frontage road to the next exit (or loop around back to A-520 and A-40 EB). The interchange also seems to be a corrupted trumpet and all the movements are made via A-520's and A-40's frontage roads.

I'm not sure what the story is behind this interchange, but I can see why they didn't bother putting in an easy way to get from A-520 EB to A-40 WB. Traffic heading for A-40 WB could just use A-13 NB or surface streets as Boulevard Cavendish.

The A-13 and A-520 interchange also requires using frontage roads to switch between the two highways. I think this one is due to the space constraints and resultant tight ramps. If the ramps merged directly onto the autoroute, there wouldn't be enough space for safe acceleration lanes.

------

My family often stays at the Fairfield Inn & Suites in Dorval, and we wondered what the heck was up with these "ramps to nowhere." This article from May 2nd suggests they'll finally be put to good use. http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/dorvals-so-called-ramps-to-nowhere-to-be-completed-by-fall-2017 (http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/dorvals-so-called-ramps-to-nowhere-to-be-completed-by-fall-2017)

Quote
The two so-called ramps to nowhere off Highway 20 in Dorval will be completed by the fall of 2017. The announcement was made during a technical briefing by Transport Quebec on Monday.

Work on the two ramps just east of Dorval Circle on the westbound side of the highway has been stalled for years while the provincial government, CN, CP and two hotels affected by the revamping of the roadways in the area worked out their differences.

The two ramps will provide access to and from the airport from Highway 20 and Highway 520 and, by extension, create a direct link from the airport to the downtown core.

Linking the ramps to the highways will relieve congestion in Dorval Circle because airport traffic will take the new direct route.

The ramps sat unfinished for years because both CN and CP refused to approve the original plan, which involved moving tracks and interrupting rail service. The new design won’t move tracks, but it will see the demolition of 10 per cent of one of the unfinished ramps.

Transport Ministry engineer Kamal Boulhrouz said the ramp must be reworked to accommodate the technical requirements of the new design.

“It was built when the plan was to move rail tracks,” Boulhrouz said during Monday’s briefing. “From a cost perspective, the demolition of 10 per cent of the ramp is much less expensive than moving tracks.”

When pushed by journalists as to why the ramps were built before negotiations with the affected parties were complete, Boulhrouz said the project was “very complicated” and had many players — each with interests and needs to accommodate.

“Today’s news is good,” he said. “We’ve come up with a solution that works for everyone.”

The cost of demolishing and rebuilding 10 per cent of the ramp is included in the $344-million contract awarded to contractor TNT. The vast reworking of what is called the Dorval Exchange North project is scheduled for completion in 2019.

The Transport Ministry’s director for the Dorval project, Martin Cormier, said 75 per cent of the overall project is complete. All roadwork in the area, which includes redoing Michel-Jasmin Ave., will be completed by fall 2018 and the finishing touches, including landscaping, will be done by 2019.

The cost of completing the link of the two ramps with the highways and the airport is $18 million.

The overhaul of the Dorval exchange also affected the parking lots for both Hôtel MTL Express (formerly Best Western) and Hôtel Marriott Fairfield. There were also concerns about vibrations and noise.

In March, the Tribunal administratif du Québec ordered the Transport Ministry to pay Hôtel MTL Express a provisional indemnity of around $5 million for the expropriation of part of its parking lot and to cover costs incurred by the hotel during the transformation process. The exact amount of the compensation will be calculated once the work is complete.

Transport Ministry spokesman Sarah Bensadoun said the agreement with Hôtel Marriott Fairfield “is confidential since it was a private negotiation.”

Cormier said there will be some lane closures on westbound Highway 20 and Highway 520 during the completion of the roadwork. Details about closures are posted at www.quebec511.info.

Neither Cormier or Boulhrouz had information about the redevelopment of the southern portion of the Dorval Exchange, which is supposed to include the reworking of Dorval Ave. and new stations for buses and trains. The shape of that overhaul might well be affected by the announcement last month by the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec of a $5.5-billion light-rail project that will link the South Shore, North Shore and the West Island with the airport and the downtown core. Boulhrouz said the light-rail system would not overlap with work being done on the Dorval Exchange North project because its route runs north of the project.

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on August 10, 2016, 08:18:55 PM

Another thing is that A-15 strangely resets exit numbers after the concurrency with A-40. I'm guessing that A-15 ended here, and the extension to the US was built later (it could be vice versa though).
15 always went the way it does. However, the two autoroutes are considered completely different freeways, hence the reset for Laurentides.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on August 10, 2016, 10:02:16 PM
Another major stub I can think of comes from the A-40/73, A-573 interchange in Quebec City:

https://goo.gl/maps/2izEgmmzD8n

A-40 was supposed to be extended west of here I believe, but of course, never happened.

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on August 21, 2016, 11:14:17 PM
I confess, I haven't done a thorough search, but does anyone have any insights as to what is happening with the Boneventure in Montreal? Is it just being demolished and decommissioned?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on August 21, 2016, 11:35:16 PM
A friend just explained to me that it's being converted to a ground-level boulevard of sorts with "green spaces" in an effort to reconnect the neighborhood.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: noelbotevera on August 22, 2016, 05:10:38 AM
Another major stub I can think of comes from the A-40/73, A-573 interchange in Quebec City:

https://goo.gl/maps/2izEgmmzD8n

A-40 was supposed to be extended west of here I believe, but of course, never happened.
I find the ending of A-40 more stubby than that. It should end at A-440, but for some reason continues to QC 368 and magically becomes QC 138.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 7/8 on August 22, 2016, 07:14:33 AM
I confess, I haven't done a thorough search, but does anyone have any insights as to what is happening with the Boneventure in Montreal? Is it just being demolished and decommissioned?

A friend just explained to me that it's being converted to a ground-level boulevard of sorts with "green spaces" in an effort to reconnect the neighborhood.

I found this article which says your friend is right. :nod: Though the article says only part of the highway is being demolished.

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/say-goodbye-to-elevated-stretch-of-bonaventure-expressway (http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/say-goodbye-to-elevated-stretch-of-bonaventure-expressway)

(Normally I would quote from the article, but it's more work on my iPad than a computer)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Transportfan on August 22, 2016, 10:36:26 AM
Here's two videos of the entire length 185/A-85. It looks like even the northern section of 185 definitely needs twinning:


Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on August 22, 2016, 01:21:15 PM
Another major stub I can think of comes from the A-40/73, A-573 interchange in Quebec City:

https://goo.gl/maps/2izEgmmzD8n

A-40 was supposed to be extended west of here I believe, but of course, never happened.
I find the ending of A-40 more stubby than that. It should end at A-440, but for some reason continues to QC 368 and magically becomes QC 138.
Technically QC 138 enters from the interchange with QC 368.  While they could have extended A-440 to that point, MTQ probably wanted to go from one through number to another to make it easier for long distance travelers, who just need to follow A-40 and QC 138 without worrying about a section of A-440 in between.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on August 29, 2016, 09:01:57 PM
Exit renumbering on R-175:

Crossing the Quebec Bridge northbound into Quebec City on R-175 there are two numbered exits (132 and 133) for Boul. Champlain and Chemin St-Louis respectively. Before the recent surface and sign works on the bridge the BGS looked like this (GSV captures):

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8445/28704263874_d24340bb03_z.jpg)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8183/28704264034_3ca88b72ac_z.jpg)

New signs have been installed as of August 2016:

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8050/29293532356_e0c1124d88_z.jpg)

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8587/28704258554_1cfbdcfaf3_z.jpg)

Exits 132 and 133 are now become 22 and 23, following the mileage of R-175 starting in St-Lambert. The former exit numbers were based on the exit numbers of parallel autoroute A-73.

There's a third gantry down the road for exit 23, of which I have no picture yet.

Of note, this southbound unnumbered exit early warning sign:

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8237/28704268334_8f6b82a9ff_z.jpg)

Has been replaced by this:

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8549/29293531466_d158b974f9_z.jpg)

Southbound, exit "23" for Ch. St-Louis is unnumbered, and there's no exit "22" for Boul. Champlain due to the presence of the CN track along the west side of R-175.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on August 30, 2016, 12:03:32 AM
I guess that really cements 175 ending at 218 instead of 173. Don't forget the important acknowledgement of QC 136!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on August 30, 2016, 01:33:45 PM
I think it's funny that they're acknowledging QC 136 when they're planning on duplicating the number.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on August 30, 2016, 02:35:06 PM
I guess that really cements 175 ending at 218 instead of 173. Don't forget the important acknowledgement of QC 136!
Indeed, R-136 is pretty well advertised now at its western end, with still no other acknowledgment along its length or eastern end! (wherever that is!).

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8518/28720697364_5b6a62cd61_z.jpg)

I think it's funny that they're acknowledging QC 136 when they're planning on duplicating the number.
Yeah, that's a bit lame in my opinion. There's no vital need to duplicate numbers. And Boul. Champlain should probably be downgraded to a R-3xx with the low speed limits and short length (it's the shortest extant R-1xx unless I'm mistaken).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 7/8 on September 08, 2016, 10:58:37 PM
http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/roadwork-more-hell-on-the-way-this-fall (http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/roadwork-more-hell-on-the-way-this-fall)

Quote
Roadwork: More hell on the way this fall on Montreal highways

If you thought traffic was bad now, road planners have an ominous message: it’s going to get even worse, and the added pain could last two years or longer.

“It’s the worst I have ever seen it,” said long-time traffic observer Rick Leckner. “We have to stop complaining and do what we can to try to reduce the problem by staying off the roads.”

Planners from Transport Quebec, the city, and several other agencies called reporters in for an hour-long briefing Thursday about the roadwork planned for the next few months, most of it on main routes to downtown.

The bulk of the interruptions will occur in what’s being called the Bonaventure-Champlain-Turcot triangle, the three major projects underway in the city’s centre.

Ville-Marie Expressway: reduced lanes for two years or longer

The Ville-Marie Expressway, used by more than 100,000 motorists daily, will never be the same again as of November. That’s when cars on the eastbound side will be diverted to part of the rebuilt expressway, which will be known as Route 136 when it reopens fully in 2020.

Only two lanes of the rebuilt expressway will be built by November, so traffic will be reduced to two lanes from the current four lanes until some time in 2018. The section affected is from the Highway 20/Décarie entrance until the entrance to Ville-Marie tunnel. Sarah Bensadoun, a spokesperson for Transport Quebec, said it was not possible to say when in 2018 the expressway would be back up to four lanes.

It gets worse: the eastbound expressway will be completely closed for 15 to 20 weekends on the same stretch of road, starting in mid-October.

The lane closures are added to long-term closures already in place in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, where the Montreal West and St-Pierre interchanges have been closed since December, and will remain so until 2019. A possible alternate road, St-Jacques St. was demolished over the Décarie Expressway and won’t be reopened for at least a year, Bensadoun said. 

Bridge work

There are six weekends of work blitzes scheduled for both the Champlain and the Mercier bridges. On the weekends of Sept 10-11, and Oct. 1-2, the South Shore-bound Champlain Bridge will be closed for work on the structure’s beams. Montreal-bound traffic will be closed on the bridge over the Sept. 17-18 and Oct. 15-16 weekends. Lanes of the Mercier Bridge leading to the South Shore will be closed on Oct. 8-9 and Oct. 22-23, but traffic will be diverted to the other side of the bridge, so one lane of traffic in each direction will be maintained during those weekends. The Montreal-bound Mercier will be closed on the weekend of Oct. 29-30, with no Montreal-bound traffic permitted.

Other closures

A portion of St-Patrick St. in the Sud-Ouest borough, from around Pitt St. to Atwater Ave., will be closed from September to December.

Greene Ave. from Dorchester Blvd. to St-Antoine St. will be closed starting in September for undetermined period.

The exit for Wellington St. in Verdun from Highway 15 will be closed until 2017 as part of work on the new Champlain Bridge.

There will also be work done around the Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine tunnel that will cause some lanes to be reduced, and some overnight closures.

Commuters called to do their part

Both Transport Minister Jacques Daoust and Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre called on commuters to do their part by trying to stay off the roads and take public transit. Montreal’s Chamber of Commerce said it will try to help by bringing together businesses to put in place measures like alternative hours, or carpooling incentives, to try to ease rush hour traffic.

Mitigation measures

The province said it is pouring in $60 million into incentives to take public transit. Among the measures are 25 new buses for the Société de transport de Montréal, which will result in 130 new departures. There will also be more buses added to the commuter routes off-island, more departures on the métro’s Green Line, and more parking spaces around transit hubs. A new train station in Lachine on the Candiac Line is due to open at the end of the year.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on September 30, 2016, 05:43:10 PM
A-73 construction is complete, all it need is the marked paint lines
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/quebec/2016/09/23/007-prolongement-autoroute-73-ouverture-saint-georges.shtml

Althought then the former mayor of St-Georges complained about that detail.
http://www.enbeauce.com/actualites/politique/299664/autoroute-73-claude-morin-met-le-frein-a-lenthousiasme-de-roger-carette

Edit: A-73 is now open! http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/09/29/lautoroute-de-la-beauce-ouvre-vendredi-1
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on September 30, 2016, 06:21:23 PM
A-73 construction is complete, all it need is the marked paint lines
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/quebec/2016/09/23/007-prolongement-autoroute-73-ouverture-saint-georges.shtml

Althought then the former mayor of St-Georges complained about that detail.
http://www.enbeauce.com/actualites/politique/299664/autoroute-73-claude-morin-met-le-frein-a-lenthousiasme-de-roger-carette

Edit: A-73 is now open! http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/09/29/lautoroute-de-la-beauce-ouvre-vendredi-1
Assuming it still has southern end at QC 204 roundabout, instead of continuing a few km farther south to a proper ending at 173.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on September 30, 2016, 07:36:07 PM
Assuming it still has southern end at QC 204 roundabout, instead of continuing a few km farther south to a proper ending at 173.

Right. But if the auto-translation of the article Stephane linked is correct, MTQ plans to study a short southward extension (not all the way to 173), to address the anticipated congestion in downtown St.-Georges.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on September 30, 2016, 10:32:06 PM
Althought then the former mayor of St-Georges complained about that detail.
http://www.enbeauce.com/actualites/politique/299664/autoroute-73-claude-morin-met-le-frein-a-lenthousiasme-de-roger-carette

He seems a bit demanding on this freeway. I read the mayor of St Georges wants A-73 to I-95 near Skowhagan.  :-D   :rofl:

Traffic counts on US 201 don't go above 5000 for most of the length north of I-95 (so it won't happen).

(in french, translate to kind of understand it):
http://www.journaldequebec.com/2016/09/29/lautoroute-de-la-beauce-ouvre-vendredi
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 01, 2016, 03:13:39 PM
Assuming it still has southern end at QC 204 roundabout, instead of continuing a few km farther south to a proper ending at 173.

Right. But if the auto-translation of the article Stephane linked is correct, MTQ plans to study a short southward extension (not all the way to 173), to address the anticipated congestion in downtown St.-Georges.

In fact, the article says the mayor will push for study concerning a southward extension. MTQ says it will evaluate the traffic patterns, and that if it reveals either a southern extension (albeit a surface street, a bypass boulevard alike to 74e Rue, a 4-lane 'freeway') or improvements to the actual networks are needed, it will consider building it.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 14, 2016, 07:55:47 PM
I was out on the recently completed section of Autoroute 73 south of Quebec City last weekend.  I took some pictures:

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_48_south_Oct16.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_51_north_Oct16.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_51_south_Oct16.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_cl_52_south_NB_Oct16.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_cl_52_north_t_Oct16.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_53-25_south_Oct16.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/A73_dv_59_north_Oct16.jpg)

The whole and full size images can be found here:
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/73/index.html
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Chris on October 15, 2016, 03:57:51 AM
Great photos.

French placenames aren't too favorable for signage due to the amount of -de-xxx ,or sur-xxx, or -les-xxx or -sous-xxx, etc, which makes placenames twice as long.

Imagine placenames like Washington-on-the-Potomac or New York City-at-the-Hudson :)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on October 15, 2016, 02:58:07 PM
Great photos.

French placenames aren't too favorable for signage due to the amount of -de-xxx ,or sur-xxx, or -les-xxx or -sous-xxx, etc, which makes placenames twice as long.

Imagine placenames like Washington-on-the-Potomac or New York City-at-the-Hudson :)

There's still Niagara-on-the-lake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niagara-on-the-Lake Close but no cigar I guess. ;)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 15, 2016, 05:29:14 PM
Great photos.

French placenames aren't too favorable for signage due to the amount of -de-xxx ,or sur-xxx, or -les-xxx or -sous-xxx, etc, which makes placenames twice as long.

Imagine placenames like Washington-on-the-Potomac or New York City-at-the-Hudson :)

There's still Niagara-on-the-lake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niagara-on-the-Lake Close but no cigar I guess. ;)

Stratford upon Avon, Newcastle upon Tyne, Barmby on the Marsh, Newton-le-Willow, Ashton-under-Lyne, Burley in Wharfedale, Shipton by Beningbrough.
Frankfurt am Main, Sankt Peter im Sulmtal, Bad Sankt Leonhard im Lavanttal, Sankt Michael in der Obersteiermark, Spittal an der Drau, Eggersdorf bei Graz.
Sveti Jurij ob Ščavnici, Ribnica na Pohorju.
San Vito al Tagliamento, Limone Sul Garda.
Heist-op-den-Berg, Bredene-aan-Zee.

Nothing to do with the language. Case in point.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: lordsutch on October 15, 2016, 09:58:05 PM
Stratford upon Avon, Newcastle upon Tyne, Barmby on the Marsh, Newton-le-Willow, Ashton-under-Lyne, Burley in Wharfedale, Shipton by Beningbrough.

At least in the UK usually they're abbreviated on signage unless there's ambiguity, and the locals typically use an abbreviated name (Geordies don't say "Newcastle upon Tyne" unless they're being pedantic); same in Germany.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Chris on October 16, 2016, 04:30:10 AM
U.S. placenames are generally not as long as those in Québec (or those listed in Europe). Usually the longest are like 'North xxx' or 'New xxx' or 'Cape xxx'.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: GenExpwy on October 26, 2016, 01:42:20 AM
Highway 15 overpass, completed last year, now being demolished

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-highway-15-overpass-torn-down-1.3811421 (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-highway-15-overpass-torn-down-1.3811421)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on October 26, 2016, 01:30:52 PM
How wasteful.  They shouldn't have replaced the bridge without accommodating the additional width.  Even if they hadn't picked an alternative yet, they should still be saying, "these are the options on the table, we need to accommodate them".  I hope the engineers are personally paying for this via fines and garnished wages and not the taxpayers of Canada.

Stuff like this makes me wonder if the Federal Bridge Corporation has anyone who can plan things out.  When they replaced the Seaway bridge, they build everything out really nice for the new bridge... and then proceded to rip some of it up just a couple months later for the temporary traffic pattern (and toll booth) to demolish the old bridge.  Not only did they rip up brand new infrastructure, the toll booths and permanent roadway are situated in such a way that there will be a permanent kink in the road where the old bridge pier was.  What they should have done is build the new bridge with the temporary connecting road and toll booth and built the permanent connections after the bridge pier was demolished (also, I would have built the booths on the other side of customs, so that people going from the US to Cornwall Island could make the trip without paying two bridge tolls, as used to be possible before customs was moved off the island).  It's as if someone designed the bridge not realizing that it would need to be built around the old bridge until they were nearly done.
https://www.google.com/maps/@45.0104431,-74.7390249,242m/data=!3m1!1e3
https://goo.gl/maps/wprUd1WQ4ak
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: compdude787 on October 26, 2016, 04:09:19 PM
Wow, what a colossal waste of money!! Unbelievable!  :verymad:
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: xcellntbuy on October 26, 2016, 05:49:16 PM
Highway 15 overpass, completed last year, now being demolished

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-highway-15-overpass-torn-down-1.3811421 (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-highway-15-overpass-torn-down-1.3811421)
Maybe its a sop to the Canadian Mob?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cu2010 on October 26, 2016, 06:46:51 PM
When they replaced the Seaway bridge, they build everything out really nice for the new bridge... and then proceded to rip some of it up just a couple months later for the temporary traffic pattern (and toll booth) to demolish the old bridge.  Not only did they rip up brand new infrastructure, the toll booths and permanent roadway are situated in such a way that there will be a permanent kink in the road where the old bridge pier was.  What they should have done is build the new bridge with the temporary connecting road and toll booth and built the permanent connections after the bridge pier was demolished (also, I would have built the booths on the other side of customs, so that people going from the US to Cornwall Island could make the trip without paying two bridge tolls, as used to be possible before customs was moved off the island).  It's as if someone designed the bridge not realizing that it would need to be built around the old bridge until they were nearly done.

To be fair, the "permanent" setup in Cornwall hasn't been determined yet. The Port of Entry remains an interim one.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on October 26, 2016, 08:40:26 PM
I would expect that the tolls booths would be permanent though, and that "interim" booth doesn't seem so temporary to me.  I get the impression that Canada (and Ontario) is happy where it is now, and they'd have to reconstruct the road to remove it.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: tdindy88 on October 26, 2016, 09:21:13 PM
Hearing about this, it's a good thing I got to drive on this Autoroute 15 bridge while it was up when I was in Montreal last June. On that note, it's a good thing I got to drive along 720 as well as I guess I'm hearing they are getting rid of that expressway.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 26, 2016, 09:22:22 PM
they aren't getting rid of the 720.  It's being renumbered as 136, and it's being realigned as part of the Turcot construction, but it's basically just being replaced with a new expressway on a slightly different alignment.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: compdude787 on October 27, 2016, 12:33:42 AM
they aren't getting rid of the 720.  It's being renumbered as 136, and it's being realigned as part of the Turcot construction, but it's basically just being replaced with a new expressway on a slightly different alignment.

How come they decided to renumber it from an autoroute to a provincial highway?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 27, 2016, 09:36:51 AM
^ No idea.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cbeach40 on October 27, 2016, 09:43:24 AM
they aren't getting rid of the 720.  It's being renumbered as 136, and it's being realigned as part of the Turcot construction, but it's basically just being replaced with a new expressway on a slightly different alignment.

How come they decided to renumber it from an autoroute to a provincial highway?

Lane width on the new 136 will be 3.5 m, minimum for an Autoroute is 3.75 m.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on October 27, 2016, 01:28:18 PM
I think it's interesting that they're removing the autoroute status for lanes being a little narrow (in US units: 11.5' instead of 12') while A-19, A-55, and A-955 have at-grades and traffic lights (why is A-955 still an autoroute?  Just make it QC 2xx!  Ditto for A-19).  I think there are a few at-grades lurking in other places too.  And quite a few autoroute-autoroute interchanges that go through service roads with no access control, including to stay on A-15 and A-20 near the Champlain Bridge.

And they really should use a number that isn't duplicated somewhere.  Especially after they JUST started signing QC 136 in Quebec City.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 27, 2016, 05:28:33 PM
they aren't getting rid of the 720.  It's being renumbered as 136, and it's being realigned as part of the Turcot construction, but it's basically just being replaced with a new expressway on a slightly different alignment.

How come they decided to renumber it from an autoroute to a provincial highway?

Lane width on the new 136 will be 3.5 m, minimum for an Autoroute is 3.75 m.

Is there a source for that online?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on October 27, 2016, 06:59:03 PM
they aren't getting rid of the 720.  It's being renumbered as 136, and it's being realigned as part of the Turcot construction, but it's basically just being replaced with a new expressway on a slightly different alignment.

How come they decided to renumber it from an autoroute to a provincial highway?

Lane width on the new 136 will be 3.5 m, minimum for an Autoroute is 3.75 m.
I feel like that's the cart leading the horse. They decided they wanted to downgrade it before they set about justifying it geometrically. The idea is just to calm traffic on that leg, which was originally constructed as a through highway.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on October 27, 2016, 07:40:47 PM
I think it's interesting that they're removing the autoroute status for lanes being a little narrow (in US units: 11.5' instead of 12') while A-19, A-55, and A-955 have at-grades and traffic lights (why is A-955 still an autoroute?  Just make it QC 2xx!  Ditto for A-19).  I think there are a few at-grades lurking in other places too.  And quite a few autoroute-autoroute interchanges that go through service roads with no access control, including to stay on A-15 and A-20 near the Champlain Bridge.

And they really should use a number that isn't duplicated somewhere.  Especially after they JUST started signing QC 136 in Quebec City.

Since the missing gap of A-55 was done between St-Celestin and TCH-20, it created a latent demand and traffic had raised on A-955 and looks like the push for a 4-lanes will be push from what I saw on this French articles.
http://www.lanouvelle.net/actualites/politique/2016/10/12/doublement-de-la-55-955---le-depute-rayes-offre-son-appui.html 
http://www.lapresse.ca/le-nouvelliste/actualites/201603/24/01-4964140-doublement-de-lautoroute-55-force-nouvelle-au-dossier.php
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on October 27, 2016, 08:06:31 PM
That's Quebec. Somehow, someway, somebody was on the take for that.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on October 27, 2016, 10:33:10 PM
I think it's interesting that they're removing the autoroute status for lanes being a little narrow (in US units: 11.5' instead of 12') while A-19, A-55, and A-955 have at-grades and traffic lights (why is A-955 still an autoroute?  Just make it QC 2xx!  Ditto for A-19).  I think there are a few at-grades lurking in other places too.  And quite a few autoroute-autoroute interchanges that go through service roads with no access control, including to stay on A-15 and A-20 near the Champlain Bridge.

And they really should use a number that isn't duplicated somewhere.  Especially after they JUST started signing QC 136 in Quebec City.

Since the missing gap of A-55 was done between St-Celestin and TCH-20, it created a latent demand and traffic had raised on A-955 and looks like the push for a 4-lanes will be push from what I saw on this French articles.
http://www.lanouvelle.net/actualites/politique/2016/10/12/doublement-de-la-55-955---le-depute-rayes-offre-son-appui.html 
http://www.lapresse.ca/le-nouvelliste/actualites/201603/24/01-4964140-doublement-de-lautoroute-55-force-nouvelle-au-dossier.php
That's ridiculous. Traffic isn't nearly that high on 955. I certainly agree with twinning A-55.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cbeach40 on October 28, 2016, 09:51:28 AM
they aren't getting rid of the 720.  It's being renumbered as 136, and it's being realigned as part of the Turcot construction, but it's basically just being replaced with a new expressway on a slightly different alignment.

How come they decided to renumber it from an autoroute to a provincial highway?

Lane width on the new 136 will be 3.5 m, minimum for an Autoroute is 3.75 m.

Is there a source for that online?

Only one I could find, in French:
http://fr.canoe.ca/infos/quebeccanada/archives/2011/02/20110208-173721.html
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 28, 2016, 05:55:58 PM
That's ridiculous. Traffic isn't nearly that high on 955. I certainly agree with twinning A-55.

I do not share your opinion on the ridiculousness of the proposition of upgrading 955.

The connection of A-55 and A-955 really drained traffic onto A-955 for movements with Victoriaville as an origin/destination. A-955 has seen its rates go up by 141 % since 2006 (2,700 VPD/15% truck → 6,000 VPD/20% truck) and traffic on R-122 has doubled since 2000 (3,500 VPD → 7,000 VPD) whilst rates have remained stable on R-161 between A-20 and Victo. Also, combined truck volumes of routes 161 and 122 were under 1000 trucks per day in 1998; freight traffic surely grew as fast as the passenger volumes.

While the roadway itself shows fewer geometrical problems, the volumes compare advantageously to A-5 in Wakefield, A-20 in Rimouski, A-50 in Petite-Nation region, A-85 or R-175 between Québec and Saguenay ― but A-955 would never get a politician as much votes as upgrades on the former highways would nor is it eliglible to federal funding.

MTQ could take advantage of provision for A-18 on route 122 (large ROW, 3,75 m-wide lanes ;-), non-access servitude, no intersection except for Rang 9) to build passing lanes.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on October 29, 2016, 12:11:11 PM
That's ridiculous. Traffic isn't nearly that high on 955. I certainly agree with twinning A-55.

I do not share your opinion on the ridiculousness of the proposition of upgrading 955.

The connection of A-55 and A-955 really drained traffic onto A-955 for movements with Victoriaville as an origin/destination. A-955 has seen its rates go up by 141 % since 2006 (2,700 VPD/15% truck → 6,000 VPD/20% truck) and traffic on R-122 has doubled since 2000 (3,500 VPD → 7,000 VPD) whilst rates have remained stable on R-161 between A-20 and Victo. Also, combined truck volumes of routes 161 and 122 were under 1000 trucks per day in 1998; freight traffic surely grew as fast as the passenger volumes.

While the roadway itself shows fewer geometrical problems, the volumes compare advantageously to A-5 in Wakefield, A-20 in Rimouski, A-50 in Petite-Nation region, A-85 or R-175 between Québec and Saguenay ― but A-955 would never get a politician as much votes as upgrades on the former highways would nor is it eliglible to federal funding.

MTQ could take advantage of provision for A-18 on route 122 (large ROW, 3,75 m-wide lanes ;-), non-access servitude, no intersection except for Rang 9) to build passing lanes.
Even 10,000 VPD is fine for two lanes.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: compdude787 on October 29, 2016, 01:07:18 PM
That's ridiculous. Traffic isn't nearly that high on 955. I certainly agree with twinning A-55.

I do not share your opinion on the ridiculousness of the proposition of upgrading 955.

The connection of A-55 and A-955 really drained traffic onto A-955 for movements with Victoriaville as an origin/destination. A-955 has seen its rates go up by 141 % since 2006 (2,700 VPD/15% truck → 6,000 VPD/20% truck) and traffic on R-122 has doubled since 2000 (3,500 VPD → 7,000 VPD) whilst rates have remained stable on R-161 between A-20 and Victo. Also, combined truck volumes of routes 161 and 122 were under 1000 trucks per day in 1998; freight traffic surely grew as fast as the passenger volumes.

While the roadway itself shows fewer geometrical problems, the volumes compare advantageously to A-5 in Wakefield, A-20 in Rimouski, A-50 in Petite-Nation region, A-85 or R-175 between Québec and Saguenay ― but A-955 would never get a politician as much votes as upgrades on the former highways would nor is it eliglible to federal funding.

MTQ could take advantage of provision for A-18 on route 122 (large ROW, 3,75 m-wide lanes ;-), non-access servitude, no intersection except for Rang 9) to build passing lanes.
Even 10,000 VPD is fine for two lanes.

Agreed. I think anything over 15,000 VPD is enough to justify widening to four lanes.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on October 30, 2016, 02:29:22 PM
Depends how's big is the part of truck traffic.

Another new exit ramp on A-30 will open on November 1 who'll link directly to PQ-229 as a relief route for commuters and travellers who goes to Varennes and have to use Exit 87 who's also got an additionnal share of traffic for commuters who goes to or come from Ste-Julie and St-Amable. http://lecontrecourant.ca/2016/10/28/ouverture-mardi-de-la-nouvelle-bretelle-de-sortie-reliant-lautoroute-30-a-la-route-229-a-varennes/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on October 30, 2016, 08:24:17 PM
Doesn't it say somewhere that, at least for Ontario, freeways are considered as soon as there is a 10 000 AADT for a stretch of roadway?

I'm not sure about Quebec's freeway priorities, but I don't see A-955 as a priority. It doesn't bring any significant economic value to the province, it's AADT is too low IMO, and MTQ is already bogged down with projects like the Turcot interchange, A-85 and (maybe A-35, if that ever gets done). I would even suggest dropping the Autoroute designation altogether from that route. Gosh, I would focus more on connecting A-20, and maybe A-530.

They should four lane A-55 first, and maybe when that's all done, it will be more viable to do A-955.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cbeach40 on October 31, 2016, 09:44:30 AM
Doesn't it say somewhere that, at least for Ontario, freeways are considered as soon as there is a 10 000 AADT for a stretch of roadway?

Not explicitly. Generally speaking if a two lane highway has an AADT of 10K it would probably be prudent to begin thinking of a freeway. But we have plenty of highways that work just fine with volumes well north of that.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on October 31, 2016, 11:10:20 AM
Doesn't it say somewhere that, at least for Ontario, freeways are considered as soon as there is a 10 000 AADT for a stretch of roadway?

I don't know about Ontario, but in the US that is a traditional warrant for widening to four-lane divided, not necessarily building a full freeway.  I think it dates from the 1950's.  In actuality, a decision to widen to four-lane divided or to upgrade to freeway would be based partly on a detailed HCM analysis and would be driven in part by corridor development considerations.  In Kansas, for example, we have several rural expressways and freeway bypasses (including several on US 54) with sub-10,000 AADT.

On a rural two-lane road, alignment has a heavy influence on level of service, since the primary determinant of LOS is the percentage of time spent driving with your speed constrained by a vehicle in front of you.  A flat straight road may operate satisfactorily with an AADT north of 10,000; in hilly or mountainous country a road may reach an unsatisfactory LOS at an AADT as low as 7,000 or 5,000 respectively.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on October 31, 2016, 01:08:15 PM
Doesn't it say somewhere that, at least for Ontario, freeways are considered as soon as there is a 10 000 AADT for a stretch of roadway?

I'm not sure about Quebec's freeway priorities, but I don't see A-955 as a priority. It doesn't bring any significant economic value to the province, it's AADT is too low IMO, and MTQ is already bogged down with projects like the Turcot interchange, A-85 and (maybe A-35, if that ever gets done). I would even suggest dropping the Autoroute designation altogether from that route. Gosh, I would focus more on connecting A-20, and maybe A-530.

They should four lane A-55 first, and maybe when that's all done, it will be more viable to do A-955.
I agree.  I don't see any reason for A-955; it pretty much only exists because it's an old alignment of A-55 (before it was rerouted to Drummondville).  My top priority for the A-55 corridor would be to eliminate the remaining at-grade intersections.  For that matter, I'd like to see all the at-grades and breezewoods on the autoroute system removed, and the gaps either filled in or fixed with renumbering/decommissioning (can we please get rid of A-30 near Becancour?  Make it an A-x55 and remove the at-grades or just make it a realignment of QC 132).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on November 19, 2016, 06:31:07 PM
While diagnosing a downloader that (very unusually) pulled in no new material the last time it was run, I discovered an agency name change:  Ministère des Transports du Québec is now Ministère des Transports, de la Mobilité durable et de l'Électrification des transports.  The name of the contracting office has also changed:  Service de la gestion contractuelle is now Service des contrats de construction et de services.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cpzilliacus on December 06, 2016, 12:50:16 PM
The Guardian:  Slippery slope: slo-mo snow mayhem in Montreal as buses, cars and trucks crash - Footage shows a bus sliding out of control and hitting a group of cars, before a pickup truck, second bus, police car and salt truck suffer the same fate (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/06/mayhem-montreal-snow-buses-cars-trucks-crash)

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dougtone on December 08, 2016, 06:31:40 AM
The Guardian:  Slippery slope: slo-mo snow mayhem in Montreal as buses, cars and trucks crash - Footage shows a bus sliding out of control and hitting a group of cars, before a pickup truck, second bus, police car and salt truck suffer the same fate (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/06/mayhem-montreal-snow-buses-cars-trucks-crash)

A funny take on this accident, mixing the video footage of the accident with some curling announcing.
http://www.msn.com/en-ca/video/other/bus-bonspiel-jennifer-jones-narrates-montreals-car-curling/vi-AAleWsR (http://www.msn.com/en-ca/video/other/bus-bonspiel-jennifer-jones-narrates-montreals-car-curling/vi-AAleWsR)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: 7/8 on December 17, 2016, 11:13:33 PM
Does anyone know the story behind this roundabout at exit 78 from A-10 west (in Bromont)? Here's the location: https://goo.gl/maps/5iVFf6VmCeT2 (https://goo.gl/maps/5iVFf6VmCeT2)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on December 18, 2016, 10:31:55 AM
Does anyone know the story behind this roundabout at exit 78 from A-10 west (in Bromont)? Here's the location: https://goo.gl/maps/5iVFf6VmCeT2 (https://goo.gl/maps/5iVFf6VmCeT2)

They reconfigurated that interchange in the mid-2000s due to the former diamond ramps had some traffic conflict between travellers going to A-10 westbound to Montreal and those coming from Sherbrooke.

As for why they have 2 roundabouts. It's just a supposition but I guess the 2nd one was perhaps for an access to future residential or commercial developments.

There was this former proposed plans of the town of Bromont who show a proposed interchange on A-10 where PQ-241 pass over A-10 without an interchange currently. https://web-beta.archive.org/web/20081205013922/http://www.bromont.net/Ville_de_Bromont/Services_municipaux/Documents_urbanisme/Cedule_C.htm#coin

I don't know if this proposed interchange (Exit 80?) is still on the plans.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on January 13, 2017, 11:02:12 AM
Video of Autoroute 10 through the eastern Townships of Quebec taken at the height of fall colours:

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on January 15, 2017, 10:57:57 PM
Video of Autoroute 10 through the eastern Townships of Quebec taken at the height of fall colours:


Looks like a sweet ride. Thanks for posting.



On another note, looks like the eastward extension of A-70 will be done by the end of summer 2017. I had not heard about this project in the past until now. To be honest, I question it. Does the traffic on QC 170 really justify the extension of an autoroute?

(in french):
http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/08/30/les-travaux-progressent-au-chantier-de-lautoroute-70
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on January 16, 2017, 09:36:30 AM
Thanks for watching.

I've never been that far north in Quebec, so I can't answer with any real knowledge of the area.  The one thing that I will say though, is that primary routes in Quebec often aren't tremendously efficient when they go through cities.  The MTQ likes four way stops, and fully protected signal phases, which can mean non-freeway autoroutes aren't tremendously quick.

There are mines, a large smelter, and a hazardous waste destruction facility in this region of Quebec, so, while I can't say with any certainty from lack of personal experience, there might be a higher than expected amount of trucks in this region of the province as well.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on January 17, 2017, 08:21:29 PM
PQ-170 and PQ-372 got lots of traffic between Jonquière, Chicoutimi and La Baie and that include truck and A-70 will serve as an alternate route.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on February 19, 2017, 01:59:58 PM
Looks like A-50 will be 4-laned from what I read on these French articles. They'll begin by specifics gaps first.
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/201702/18/01-5071013-la-funeste-autoroute-50-sera-elargie.php
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1017663/couillard-engagement-elargir-certains-troncons-autoroute-50
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on February 19, 2017, 05:10:30 PM
I've always thought A-55 was in worse condition (and thus higher priority) than A-50 when it came to twinning. I guess the AADT as well as the highway being referred to as "the route of death" because of the number of fatal collisions in the last few months means it will be twinned.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on February 19, 2017, 05:15:06 PM
The two lane segment of A-55 is comparatively a lot shorter than it is on A-50.  That said, there is still one traffic signal that remains on A-55 that definitely should be removed.  It's totally unexpected on a road that otherwise operates as a fairly busy two-lane freeway.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on February 19, 2017, 06:31:22 PM
No PPVA?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on February 19, 2017, 09:47:30 PM
No PPVA?
No... what?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on February 23, 2017, 12:06:48 AM
Sorry.  Panneau preparez-vous à arrêter (initialism PPVA) is the Transports Québec house term for the rectangular yellow-background boards with flashers that are used for upcoming stops (diamond warning sign for the appropriate hazard--signal, traffic queue, railroad crossing, etc.--patched between two flashers).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on February 23, 2017, 09:39:24 AM
^ They're definitely is a flashing warning sign in advance of the traffic signal.

But signs, or no signs, a traffic signal on a road that otherwise operates as a freeway is going to be elevated collision risk vs. a traffic signal on a standard arterial road.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on March 09, 2017, 11:55:00 AM
Looks like A-50 will be 4-laned from what I read on these French articles. They'll begin by specifics gaps first.
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1019404/autoroute-50-danger-faible-outaouais

Rumour has it : the announcement of A-50 twinning was a political move; good ol' voter-bait pavement. UQO engineer says A-50 is, by far, not the most dangerous 2-lane autoroute.

Fact is, A-50 has over 2.6 times less serious or deadly accidents per mileage driven than A-955, and 65% less than A-55. Moreover, it is way safer than R-148, which it replaces, or other R-1xx roads at all. The engineer suggests that the drivers' behaviour (distraction, fatigue, etc.) should be blamed, not the infrastructure itself. Indeed, Radio-Canada states that out of 7 coroner reports for deaths on A-50 it could get, only one did blame the configuration of the roadway.

Fluidity here is not an issue ― passing lanes are frequent ―, so... rather than twinning, why not build more parking or rest areas, then?

While the roadway itself shows fewer geometrical problems [prior to widening/conversion to autoroute], the volumes compare advantageously to A-5 in Wakefield, A-20 in Rimouski, A-50 in Petite-Nation region, A-85 or R-175 between Québec and Saguenay ― but A-955 would never get a politician as much votes as upgrades on the former highways would nor is it eliglible to federal funding.
Even 10,000 VPD is fine for two lanes.

Agreed. I think anything over 15,000 VPD is enough to justify widening to four lanes.
A-50 is under 15,000 VPD on all of its Super-2 section, except for a small stretch in Gatineau between exits 166 and 174 (barely over 16,000), where it acts both a Buckingham bypass and through route between Gatineau core and Montréal.

Case in point. The Bois-Francs super-2 (A-55/955) is more accident-prone than A-50, but twinning it would be less lucrative, one year away from the elections.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on March 12, 2017, 10:24:47 AM
speaking of Autoroute 50:

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Transportfan on March 12, 2017, 11:13:13 PM
Your video demonstrates how much governments prefers to close gaps in long freeway corridors rather than finish twinning shorter highways with more traffic: Compare the A-85, which has a lot less traffic, but is being built to a full freeway from the start, to the A-50.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on March 12, 2017, 11:19:53 PM
^ That's not exactly a fair comparison.  Route 148 was a terribly slow and meandering highway between Gatineau and Lachute before A-50 was completed.  Route 185 may be busier, but it's already a very high quality (and fast) highway in its current form.  Route 185 definitely should be a freeway, but completing the twinning won't have nearly as significant a benefit to area motorists as completing A-50 did.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on March 28, 2017, 10:26:57 PM
One more from Quebec from me...  Autoroute 30:

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 10, 2017, 06:17:31 PM
With the general election coming next year, the Government of Québec brought the R-138 extension out of the grave. Survey is currently being done to generate a DTM for an eventual planification of the construction schedule.

https://plannord.gouv.qc.ca/en/extension-of-route-138-along-the-lower-north-shore/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 11, 2017, 06:26:08 PM
Yup, I know that smell. It's the smell of pre-electoral pavement.

Quote
$265M in repairs, upgrades announced for James Bay Highway
'Essentially, it's northern development that goes through that [highway]," says Luc Blanchette
By Susan Bell, CBC News Posted: Jul 10, 2017 4:04 PM CT Last Updated: Jul 10, 2017 4:32 PM CT

The joint project covers the 620 kilometres of the James Bay Highway from Matagami to Radisson.

Quebec and Ottawa are investing $265 million to rebuild a good portion of the James Bay Highway — a vital link connecting the coastal Cree communities of James Bay with the south.

The announcement was made Monday afternoon by Cree Grand Chief Matthew Coon Come; federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau; member of the national assembly for the region Luc Blanchette; and Jean Boucher, member of parliament for Ungava.

The joint project covers the 620 kilometres of the James Bay Highway from Matagami to Radisson. It will see more than half of the road surface repaired — including the replacement of culverts, guardrails and signage — something Coon Come referred to on social media as "long awaited" by the people who use the route regularly. The federal minister of transport, Garneau, said the route is "an extremely" important bit of infrastructure.

"It is very clear that for northern development and for reliable access to the North, it is important to invest in infrastructure," said Garneau.

The Government of Canada is contributing more than $108 million, with the provincial government throwing in more than $156 million.

"Be it tourists, commercial transporters as well as our Cree and Jamesien citizens travelling with their families, these improvements will allow our people to travel on a safer, more secure road," said Coon Come. "Not to mention the savings on unplanned tire and suspension repairs that put a dent in our budgets."

Coon Come also acknowledged the improvements will lead to increased economic opportunities and tourism development.

'It's northern development'

The poor condition of the James Bay Highway is a constant topic of discussion on social media within the territory, with motorists regularly posting photos and videos of particularly bad sections.

In May, one traveller noted every pothole more than "9 inches [small] in diameter" from kilometre 238 south to Matagami. There were more than 50 on the list.

"It reflects our commitment to maintaining the quality of our transportation infrastructure across our vast territory," said Blanchette, MNA for Rouyn-Noranda-Témiscamingue. "This project will also facilitate the flow of people and goods. User safety on this key link to James Bay is our top concern."

Blanchette also said the Quebec government is providing funding for repairs to the 90 kilometres of the access road to the community of Chisasibi.

'It's really a very important project. Essentially, it's northern development that goes through that [highway]," said Blanchette. "We know that GoldCorp has made major investments with a large concentrator and there will be deposits in the vicinity. That's in their business plan. We had to support this kind of development there."

For Jean Boucher, MNA for Ungava, the improvements to the James Bay Highway will reinvigorate northern Quebec.

"By moving quickly on critical stretches, we will be increasing safety not only for the 11,000 people served by the James Bay Road, but also for the numerous hydroelectric, mining, forestry and tourism sector users in our region."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/james-bay-highway-1.4198498
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on July 11, 2017, 06:57:21 PM
It is amazing how much politics affects road construction projects and whether or not they happen.

Sure wish A-35 got some love...
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on July 23, 2017, 09:45:21 PM
I spotted on Google Streetview, this old railroad crossing sign, around Beauharnois, the photo was taken in August 2015, I don't know if it's still there.
https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.3096875,-73.896357,3a,37.5y,35.05h,94.28t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZdx8L7YY_aICfhqkGem2ew!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=fr
Also mirrored at
https://shrinktheweb.snapito.io/v2/webshot/spu-ea68c8-ogi2-3cwn3bmfojjlb56e?size=800x0&screen=1024x768&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.ca%2Fmaps%2F%4045.3096875%2C-73.896357%2C3a%2C37.5y%2C35.05h%2C94.28t%2Fdata%3D!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZdx8L7YY_aICfhqkGem2ew!2e0!7i13312!8i6656%3Fhl%3Dfr%3A%2F%2F

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on July 31, 2017, 11:24:02 PM
I spotted on Google Streetview, this old railroad crossing sign, around Beauharnois, the photo was taken in August 2015, I don't know if it's still there.
https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.3096875,-73.896357,3a,37.5y,35.05h,94.28t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZdx8L7YY_aICfhqkGem2ew!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=fr
Also mirrored at
https://shrinktheweb.snapito.io/v2/webshot/spu-ea68c8-ogi2-3cwn3bmfojjlb56e?size=800x0&screen=1024x768&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.ca%2Fmaps%2F%4045.3096875%2C-73.896357%2C3a%2C37.5y%2C35.05h%2C94.28t%2Fdata%3D!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZdx8L7YY_aICfhqkGem2ew!2e0!7i13312!8i6656%3Fhl%3Dfr%3A%2F%2F

Nice find. Not sure how old it is, but it obviously predates Quebec's monolingual french language law for signs.


The newest section of A-70 opened Saturday morning around 6:00. The new section stretches from the old eastern terminus to the Saguenay airport. Article below (in french):

Pic snipped from the article:

(https://images.radio-canada.ca/w_1600,h_900/v1/ici-info/16x9/autoroute-70.jpg)

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1047889/autoroute-70-ouverte-quietude--citoyens-saguenay
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on August 02, 2017, 04:38:36 AM
We've already added the new A-70 segment to the Travel Mapping project. Still unclear whether the new tie-in to route 170 at the new Ch. Grande-Anse interchange is completed, and what happened to the old tie-in near the Chicoutimi golf course. But I'd assume Travel Mapping's routing of route 170 (TM now has "preview" mapping of Quebec's provincial routes) will at some point also need to be tweaked.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on August 02, 2017, 10:36:42 AM
Still unclear whether the new tie-in to route 170 at the new Ch. Grande-Anse interchange is completed, and what happened to the old tie-in near the Chicoutimi golf course.

OpenStreetMap (http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=14/48.3567/-71.0164) has it pretty right.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on August 02, 2017, 10:57:40 AM
Still unclear whether the new tie-in to route 170 at the new Ch. Grande-Anse interchange is completed, and what happened to the old tie-in near the Chicoutimi golf course.

OpenStreetMap (http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=14/48.3567/-71.0164) has it pretty right.

OSM hasn't yet been updaed to reflect the completion of the A-70 extension, and any other related roadways that were opened on Friday. The Transports Quebec website press release (https://www.transports.gouv.qc.ca/fr/salle-de-presse/nouvelles/Pages/ameliorer-deplacements-citoyens-saguenay.aspx) indicates that parts of the project on A-70/170 tie-ins are still being worked on.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on August 04, 2017, 11:54:59 PM
Still unclear whether the new tie-in to route 170 at the new Ch. Grande-Anse interchange is completed, and what happened to the old tie-in near the Chicoutimi golf course.

OpenStreetMap (http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=14/48.3567/-71.0164) has it pretty right.

OSM hasn't yet been updaed to reflect the completion of the A-70 extension, and any other related roadways that were opened on Friday. The Transports Quebec website press release (https://www.transports.gouv.qc.ca/fr/salle-de-presse/nouvelles/Pages/ameliorer-deplacements-citoyens-saguenay.aspx) indicates that parts of the project on A-70/170 tie-ins are still being worked on.

Actually, now if you zoom in far enough you can see the new changes to QC 170, which are shown as open to traffic except for one ramp from WB 170 to Ch. Grande-Anse.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on August 28, 2017, 03:13:31 PM
Field note, confirmed by Google: QC 153 is simultaneously signed on 5th/6th Streets (one-way pair) and 3rd Street (two-way) in Grand-mère. 3rd St. feels like an unofficial bypass of downtown.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on August 28, 2017, 06:36:27 PM
Field note, confirmed by Google: QC 153 is simultaneously signed on 5th/6th Streets (one-way pair) and 3rd Street (two-way) in Grand-mère. 3rd St. feels like an unofficial bypass of downtown.

3rd Street is R-153 truck route. 153 between 351 and 359 is classified as a level 3 local highway (lowest mark in MTQ inventory); municipally-owned, -maintained and -signed. Both routes are most likely official. It could even be a mitigation measure requested by the MTQ to maintain route number consistency when trucks were prohibited downtown.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on August 29, 2017, 12:13:56 AM
I'm shocked the work on the A-35 has stalled.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on August 29, 2017, 10:51:19 AM
3rd Street is R-153 truck route. 153 between 351 and 359 is classified as a level 3 local highway (lowest mark in MTQ inventory); municipally-owned, -maintained and -signed. Both routes are most likely official. It could even be a mitigation measure requested by the MTQ to maintain route number consistency when trucks were prohibited downtown.

Are municipally maintained routes common in Quebec towns and cities?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on August 29, 2017, 12:24:44 PM
3rd Street is R-153 truck route. 153 between 351 and 359 is classified as a level 3 local highway (lowest mark in MTQ inventory); municipally-owned, -maintained and -signed. Both routes are most likely official. It could even be a mitigation measure requested by the MTQ to maintain route number consistency when trucks were prohibited downtown.

Are municipally maintained routes common in Quebec towns and cities?

I'd say more ubiquitous than common. There has been a «great download» in the early 90's ('92? '93?) of minor country roads, backroads and intraurban numbered routes, as well as the ROW itself and signage of the aformentionned to municipalities. Some funding for maintenance has been channelled through special programs. This is one of the reason in-town or minor road signage sometimes hasn't kept up with MTQ standards or is in a state of decay (for example R-112/125/138/335 inside the limits of the city of Montréal).

See Données Québec (https://www.donneesquebec.ca/recherche/fr/dataset/systeme-de-reference-lineaire-transports-quebec) for shapefiles of the inventory or Atlas des Transports (http://transports.atlas.gouv.qc.ca/Infrastructures/InfraClassesRoutes.asp) for a comprehensive rendering of this inventory.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: froggie on September 04, 2017, 12:49:30 PM
I'm shocked the work on the A-35 has stalled.

I'm not.  Not a whole lot of population or traffic...the former of which means not a lot of votes to be gained by finishing it.

I've always seen the A-35 proposal more as a means of getting Quebecois to New England instead of the other way around.  So, bluntly speaking, why would MTQ spend money on a roadway to speed its citizens going south of the border to spend money there?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Duke87 on September 04, 2017, 01:39:23 PM
I've always seen the A-35 proposal more as a means of getting Quebecois to New England instead of the other way around.  So, bluntly speaking, why would MTQ spend money on a roadway to speed its citizens going south of the border to spend money there?

I thought it was more about safety than about speed or throughput. QC 133 was perfectly capable of handling the traffic counts south of Iberville without getting unduly congested and is generally a good quality two-lane road. But there are several communities and a bunch of homes along the way, and a freeway is safer for both locals and travelers.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on September 04, 2017, 08:08:45 PM
I've always seen the A-35 proposal more as a means of getting Quebecois to New England instead of the other way around.  So, bluntly speaking, why would MTQ spend money on a roadway to speed its citizens going south of the border to spend money there?

I thought it was more about safety than about speed or throughput. QC 133 was perfectly capable of handling the traffic counts south of Iberville without getting unduly congested and is generally a good quality two-lane road. But there are several communities and a bunch of homes along the way, and a freeway is safer for both locals and travelers.

That gap of QC-133 was also a "blood alley" with numerous deadly accidents who happened over the years.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 11, 2017, 08:18:41 PM
Photos of median barrier construction on Autoroute 50 west of Mirabel.  The MTQ is constructing a concrete central divider for several kilometes of the Autoroute just west of the airport.  Despite the median barrier construction, the highway will remain a single lane in each direction:

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier1_east_Sep17_forum.jpg)
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier1_east_Sep17_24x16.jpg (http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier1_east_Sep17_24x16.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier2_east_Sep16_forum.jpg)
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier2_east_Sep16_24x16.jpg (http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier2_east_Sep16_24x16.jpg)

(http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier3_east_Sep17_forum.jpg)
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier3_east_Sep17_24x16.jpg (http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/PQ/A/50/A50_medianbarrier3_east_Sep17_24x16.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: bing101 on October 21, 2017, 05:37:31 PM
https://globalnews.ca/news/2099510/quebecs-longest-highway-construction-project-a-35-still-not-finished/

Wow Canada also has their version of the I-710 gap and its on A-35 Quebec.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on October 21, 2017, 06:41:52 PM
https://globalnews.ca/news/2099510/quebecs-longest-highway-construction-project-a-35-still-not-finished/

Wow Canada also has their version of the I-710 gap and its on A-35 Quebec.

Nothing like the I-710 gap:

-- the affected local residents in Quebec want the project to happen, while many of the ones in California have long been fiercely opposed

-- the problem with the A-35 gap seems to be money (my understanding is that funding priority has been shifted to completing the A-85 link to the Maritime Provinces, which is also a really important project)

-- there is some reasonable hope that the A-35 completion will happen by 2030; lotsa luck pulling that off with I-710.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 22, 2017, 02:27:16 PM
-- the problem with the A-35 gap seems to be money [...]
Funding is a problem indeed; MTQ once built highways like there were no tomorrow (36% of the Ministry's non-administrative expenditures went into network development, 2004-2014), but the crying lack of maintenance of the infrastructure over the last 20 years is catching up ― big time. Network development now weighs in for 11,7% in 2016 and 8,7% in 2017 budgets.

-- the affected local residents in Quebec want the project to happen[...]
Everybody wants to drive on a freeway but no one wants to pay for it. Typical freerider problem. Put a toll on the gap-filler, and only a handful of motorist will opt for the new option.

Currently, the road ― being  4-lane divided for 6 km and 2 or 3-lane (old chicken lane converted to variable direction passing lane) for the rest  ― accomodates 2800-4800 thru and local movements. Also, outside Pike River village, there is an average of one driveway every 1000 feet. A provincial law prevents non-agricultural activities in designated farmlands, so these figures ought not to grow. No passing problem. No volume problem. No danger zone. What's the matter?

"Economic" prestige of having the US border connected to the autoroutes network and local scuttlebutt aside, I hardly see how a bold 4-lane freeway is reasonable.

And I did not mention the social and environmental costs of cutting through the wet, floodable bogs of the Pike River estuary with a gravel dyke; barring the open water from flowing to the Champlain lake is nothing like a good idea in these areas prone to spring floods.

So, yeah, 2030 is optimistic.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on October 22, 2017, 08:15:54 PM
If you want the equivalent of the I-710 gap in Quebec, try the former A-720 (would be A-20).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: ATLRedSoxFan on October 24, 2017, 02:45:20 AM
You would think with the amount of trucks that use that artery, they'd find a way to fund it. It's not just a sleepy back road border road. The traffic does warrant it. Last time I crossed at Highgate, it took over 2 hours. A lot of it were truckers.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 24, 2017, 08:21:31 AM
You would think with the amount of trucks that use that artery, they'd find a way to fund it. It's not just a sleepy back road border road. The traffic does warrant it. Last time I crossed at Highgate, it took over 2 hours. A lot of it were truckers.

The presence or not of a freeway on one side of the border is not a guarantor of shorter waiting times.

Also, truck proportion is 20%. R-155 north of La Tuque and R-177 through Vérendrye WR, R-105 south of Mont-Laurier, R-167 north of La Doré, among others, have similar ratings and higher or equal truck percentages. How is a 4-lane freeway justifiable for 133 but not these roads?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cbeach40 on October 24, 2017, 09:55:53 AM
The presence or not of a freeway on one side of the border is not a guarantor of shorter waiting times.

So very, very yes. All a freeway border approach does is segregate the border traffic from local roads. Capacity is dictated by the border throughput as that is invariably far more restrictive than the capacity of the approach lanes.

Also, truck proportion is 20%. R-155 north of La Tuque and R-177 through Vérendrye WR, R-105 south of Mont-Laurier, R-167 north of La Doré, among others, have similar ratings and higher or equal truck percentages. How is a 4-lane freeway justifiable for 133 but not these roads?

Looked at the Vermont side. I-89 at the border had a 2015 AADT of 2400. With the higher truck volumes, that brings up the road to about maybe 5% of the capacity of a four lane freeway.

So no, there is no empirical traffic engineering justification for R-133 being a freeway.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on October 24, 2017, 10:46:48 AM
I don't know about Canada, but in the US I have never had the impression CBP deploys agents in a manner that would allow the agency to meet a maximum-delay target per crossing (say, wait no longer than five minutes for 95% of entering traffic).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on October 24, 2017, 03:53:15 PM
I am sure there are service delivery standards for both American and Canadian Border Patrol standards, however I am also sure that lots of factors, including manpower (sick leave) and security protocols prevent the border from meeting service delivery times 100 % of the time.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MisterSG1 on October 25, 2017, 12:41:20 AM
Quote
Looked at the Vermont side. I-89 at the border had a 2015 AADT of 2400. With the higher truck volumes, that brings up the road to about maybe 5% of the capacity of a four lane freeway.

So no, there is no empirical traffic engineering justification for R-133 being a freeway.

If you want to talk about warrants, perhaps you should see NB-2....the Grand Falls-Fredericton section in particular definitely doesn't warrant a freeway, but yet they got one.

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/env/pdf/EIA-EIE/Registrations-Engegistrements/documents/EIARegistration1474/EIARegistration1474-AppendixF.pdf (http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/env/pdf/EIA-EIE/Registrations-Engegistrements/documents/EIARegistration1474/EIARegistration1474-AppendixF.pdf)

If money could magically be found for that, then money can easily be found to turn QC-133 into a freeway.


And furthermore, perhaps it's an inconvenient truth that NB-95 was upgraded to a freeway (this connects to I-95 obviously) roughly 10 years ago and has an AADT less than 2500.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: oscar on October 25, 2017, 09:18:23 AM
I drove QC 133 last Saturday morning, from the border to A-35. I can't disagree that bypassing that part of QC 133 with an A-35 extension isn't a high priority, especially with sucky pavement quality on existing parts of the system elsewhere, and the greater need to finish A-85. (Can't say that other proposed additions to the Autoroute system, like A-20 from Trois-Pistoles to Rimouski, and a further extension to La Baie of the recently-extended A-70, would rate higher than finishing A-35.) 

There was no congestion or significant slowdown in Pike River, the one community on 133 south of A-35. And A-35 had light traffic until St-Jean-sur-Richelieu near its north end.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cbeach40 on October 25, 2017, 09:39:29 AM
Quote
Looked at the Vermont side. I-89 at the border had a 2015 AADT of 2400. With the higher truck volumes, that brings up the road to about maybe 5% of the capacity of a four lane freeway.

So no, there is no empirical traffic engineering justification for R-133 being a freeway.

If you want to talk about warrants, perhaps you should see NB-2....the Grand Falls-Fredericton section in particular definitely doesn't warrant a freeway, but yet they got one.

If money could magically be found wasted for that, then money can easily be found wasted to turn QC-133 into a freeway.

FTFY

And furthermore, perhaps it's an inconvenient truth that NB-95 was upgraded to a freeway (this connects to I-95 obviously) roughly 10 years ago and has an AADT less than 2500.

The inconvenient truth of it is that politicians control the money, and politics don't necessarily allocate money towards the empirically demonstrated greatest need.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 25, 2017, 10:17:42 AM
The inconvenient truth of it is that politicians control the money, and politics don't necessarily allocate money towards the empirically demonstrated greatest need.
AMEN! See also Québec city third bridge, etc.

There was no congestion or significant slowdown in Pike River, the one community on 133 south of A-35. And A-35 had light traffic until St-Jean-sur-Richelieu near its north end.
And even if there was something close to problematic volumes or an unacceptable level of service in Pike River, the solution would rather be a 2-3 lane bypass directly south of the town with non-access servitude; not a 4-lane divided, controlled-access freeway miles away from it.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Duke87 on October 25, 2017, 10:51:44 PM
I mean, realistically speaking I-89 and I-95 extending all the way to the border are kinda unnecessary too. But were built decades ago anyway since the federal government in the US threw a bunch of money at it. Naturally there is some desire to close the gap on the Canadian side since short gaps on the map just look messy. You also get the "last mile" argument - this is all that stands between there being a freeway all the way from Montreal to Boston!

Indeed, the presence of a relatively highly secured border is likely the only reason traffic counts are so low on what is otherwise the most direct route between two decently sized metro areas. I'd think the traffic to justify finishing the freeway would be there if the US and Canada permitted citizens to travel between the two countries freely.

On that note, I am kinda curious: anyone know if traffic counts on QC 133 were any higher back in the 90s, when crossing the border was easier?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cbeach40 on October 26, 2017, 08:19:03 AM
On that note, I am kinda curious: anyone know if traffic counts on QC 133 were any higher back in the 90s, when crossing the border was easier?

Don't have the Québec data myself, but generally speaking the Ontario ones have been in a steady decline for the last ten years. It really started before the passport rules came into effect in 2009. So while there's probably some causation, for the most part it seems to be correlation.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on October 26, 2017, 12:51:37 PM
On that note, I am kinda curious: anyone know if traffic counts on QC 133 were any higher back in the 90s, when crossing the border was easier?

Don't have the Québec data myself, but generally speaking the Ontario ones have been in a steady decline for the last ten years. It really started before the passport rules came into effect in 2009. So while there's probably some causation, for the most part it seems to be correlation.

(https://i.imgur.com/NnKoKJV.png)

Surprisingly, NAFTA had little to no effect on the volumes.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: mrsman on October 29, 2017, 08:24:18 AM
I mean, realistically speaking I-89 and I-95 extending all the way to the border are kinda unnecessary too. But were built decades ago anyway since the federal government in the US threw a bunch of money at it. Naturally there is some desire to close the gap on the Canadian side since short gaps on the map just look messy. You also get the "last mile" argument - this is all that stands between there being a freeway all the way from Montreal to Boston!

Indeed, the presence of a relatively highly secured border is likely the only reason traffic counts are so low on what is otherwise the most direct route between two decently sized metro areas. I'd think the traffic to justify finishing the freeway would be there if the US and Canada permitted citizens to travel between the two countries freely.

On that note, I am kinda curious: anyone know if traffic counts on QC 133 were any higher back in the 90s, when crossing the border was easier?

Agreed.  There are many rural interstates and other interstate-level freeways that do not need interstate level control.  4 lane expressways without traffic signals and with the occasional grade separation would generally be sufficient.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on December 06, 2017, 05:33:50 AM
Video of Quebec's northern-most autoroute:

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Henry on December 07, 2017, 09:22:47 AM
Those Autoroutes sure are interesting! I've always wondered why they went with the red, white and blue shield; was that to match up with the American Interstates?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MikeTheActuary on December 07, 2017, 09:47:33 AM
Something I've been wondering recently:

In the US, we most frequently refer to interstates as (e.g.) "I-40", albeit with several regional variations.

What is the conversational term for Quebec Autoroutes in Quebecer English?  "Autoroute 40", "A-30", "Highway 15", ...?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on December 07, 2017, 10:02:07 AM
If you listen to English radio in Montreal, it seems it’s often ‘highway’ or ‘the’.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: SignGeek101 on December 07, 2017, 11:22:34 AM
Those Autoroutes sure are interesting! I've always wondered why they went with the red, white and blue shield; was that to match up with the American Interstates?

Yes. It's a direct copy of the US Interstate system. It's not just the colours though. The grid system is also the same (low numbered even routes in the south, and low numbered odd routes in the west). The three digit autoroutes are also the same configuration as the US Interstates (A-610 and A-410 in Sherbrooke connect to A-10).

Something I've been wondering recently:

In the US, we most frequently refer to interstates as (e.g.) "I-40", albeit with several regional variations.

What is the conversational term for Quebec Autoroutes in Quebecer English?  "Autoroute 40", "A-30", "Highway 15", ...?

Most of the time I've heard "highway" used, especially in the English media. It's a pet peeve of mine. You don't translate names after all  :banghead:

The provincial government's English site uses 'Autoroute' though.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on December 07, 2017, 07:54:05 PM

The provincial government's English site uses 'Autoroute' though.

I remember some old maps who mention "autoroute" term like "Laurentian Autoroute", "North Shore Autoroute". "Eastern Townships Autoroute".
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on December 07, 2017, 10:06:53 PM
I spotted this archived topographic map of Orford area circa 1969-71 showing the gap of A-55 under construction at that time was originally planned to be numbered PQ-91 as an extension of I-91. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2703473
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on December 16, 2017, 08:47:01 AM
An update about Turcot interchange reconstruction. http://montrealgazette.com/news/weekend-traffic-update-avoid-the-turcot-interchange-and-get-used-to-doing-so
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on December 20, 2017, 04:19:18 PM
I spotted this archived topographic map of Orford area circa 1969-71 showing the gap of A-55 under construction at that time was originally planned to be numbered PQ-91 as an extension of I-91. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2703473

It's rare to quote myself, but here another map from 1968 showing PQ-91 or A-91. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2703345
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on December 20, 2017, 05:51:57 PM

The provincial government's English site uses 'Autoroute' though.

I remember some old maps who mention "autoroute" term like "Laurentian Autoroute", "North Shore Autoroute". "Eastern Townships Autoroute".

Those names were trranslations of the toll highways at the time; "Laurentian Autoroute" was the english rendition of "Autoroute des Laurentides", "North Shore Autoroute" was for "Autoroute de la Rive-Nord", and "Eastern Townships Autoroute" was for "Autoroute des Cantons-de-l'Est".

The word "autoroute" is probably the french form for the spanish "autopista", or the italian "autostrada".

In downtown Montreal, the word "expressway" is commonly used in English.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on December 20, 2017, 06:12:01 PM
An update about Turcot interchange reconstruction. http://montrealgazette.com/news/weekend-traffic-update-avoid-the-turcot-interchange-and-get-used-to-doing-so

I just remember many years ago, when the MTQ said there will be no major closures along the Turcot Interchange rebuilding project, because new structures will be built along the old ones.  At that time, I was saying that there was just real plain bullsh*t because the existing structures, one day or another, will have to disconnect from the old Turcot structures, and to connect to the new ones.  Now, we see the reality.  And the best is yet to come!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on December 20, 2017, 09:46:02 PM
I spotted this archived topographic map of Orford area circa 1969-71 showing the gap of A-55 under construction at that time was originally planned to be numbered PQ-91 as an extension of I-91. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2703473

It's rare to quote myself, but here another map from 1968 showing PQ-91 or A-91. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2703345
Before the edicts to restore the French language throughout the province. Look at all those English names.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on December 21, 2017, 03:15:53 AM
I spotted this archived topographic map of Orford area circa 1969-71 showing the gap of A-55 under construction at that time was originally planned to be numbered PQ-91 as an extension of I-91. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2703473

It's rare to quote myself, but here another map from 1968 showing PQ-91 or A-91. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2703345
Before the edicts to restore the French language throughout the province. Look at all those English names.

In Eastern Townships, there's still a lot of English names.  It's one of the most English-speaking area out of Montreal.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on February 05, 2018, 01:21:46 PM
I spotted a old article about A-55 (Transquebecoise) in the area of Shawinigan exterpted from a old newspaper clip (Le Nouvelliste, Nov. 28 1970) http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3199526 on page 4 who mentionned some folks suggested an alignment going south of St-Maurice River to reach PQ-19 (now PQ-155) between St-Georges-de-Champlain and Lac-la-Tortue to head to St-Tite.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on April 03, 2018, 01:37:10 PM
I spotted on Google Streetview, this old railroad crossing sign, around Beauharnois, the photo was taken in August 2015, I don't know if it's still there.
https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.3096875,-73.896357,3a,37.5y,35.05h,94.28t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZdx8L7YY_aICfhqkGem2ew!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=fr
Also mirrored at
https://shrinktheweb.snapito.io/v2/webshot/spu-ea68c8-ogi2-3cwn3bmfojjlb56e?size=800x0&screen=1024x768&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.ca%2Fmaps%2F%4045.3096875%2C-73.896357%2C3a%2C37.5y%2C35.05h%2C94.28t%2Fdata%3D!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZdx8L7YY_aICfhqkGem2ew!2e0!7i13312!8i6656%3Fhl%3Dfr%3A%2F%2F



I bump this one with an updated adress of that screenshot https://shrinktheweb.snapito.io/v2/webshot/spu-ea68c8-ogi2-3cwn3bmfojjlb56e?size=800x0&screen=1024x768&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.ca%2Fmaps%2F%4045.3096875%2C-73.896357%2C3a%2C37.5y%2C35.05h%2C94.28t%2Fdata%3D!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZdx8L7YY_aICfhqkGem2ew!2e0!7i13312!8i6656%3Fhl%3Dfr
along with an archived version on Archive.is http://archive.is/aasVw
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on April 04, 2018, 09:43:27 PM
Earlier today, a truck hit an overpass on A-40 at Repentigny.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on April 15, 2018, 01:19:13 PM
Not the 1st time we talked about this, there some new talk of the Quebec-Newfoundland tunnel.
https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/quebec-could-invest-in-underground-labrador-newfoundland-tunnel-1.3882622
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/fixed-link-study-results-1.4614188
http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/n-l-government-to-release-study-on-fixed-link-between-labrador-and-peninsula

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MikeTheActuary on April 23, 2018, 11:27:38 AM
A19 to be extended from A440 to A640:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/highway-19-quebec-laval-1.4628166

They've been planning to do it for 40 years, but this time they really mean it....?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Henry on April 26, 2018, 10:27:25 AM
It's always irked me that A-35 and I-89 still don't connect; A-15 and I-87 currently connect to each other, as do A-55 and I-91, so why the long wait? And to build 16 km to the border shouldn't take that long, either! By the time the Boston-Montreal freeway link is completed, I'll be approaching retirement age, but in the end, it should be worth it.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MikeTheActuary on April 26, 2018, 11:47:08 AM
It's always irked me that A-35 and I-89 still don't connect; A-15 and I-87 currently connect to each other, as do A-55 and I-91, so why the long wait?

Limited money, limited need, and limited political clout from the town of Pike River (if they're even bothered by traffic through town).

Would it be nice if the autoroute extended to the border?  Yes...but the existing roadway seems to adequately meet the need, at least based on the traffic volumes I've seen when commuting.

I can think of other transportation projects to spend money on, like getting the customs preclearance centre up and running in Gare Centrale and the Montrealer train service restored.  (The biggest problem with my work trips up to Montréal is finding a hotel near the office, within the corporate expense limit, that has parking.)

(I also wish that they'd have the southbound NEXUS lane open for longer hours at Highgate Springs, but somehow I don't think funding from that would come from either the Canadian federal or Québec national governments.)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on May 01, 2018, 12:24:47 AM
A19 to be extended from A440 to A640:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/highway-19-quebec-laval-1.4628166

They've been planning to do it for 40 years, but this time they really mean it....?

There was several times they really mean it.  At least twice since 2003, three times with this last announcement.

In province of Quebec, you can do up to ten electoral campaigns (knowing that a government mandate normally stands for four years) with a project like this one.  And next general elections are set to upcoming October 1st.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Kniwt on May 09, 2018, 03:39:49 PM
The CBC reports today on deteriorating conditions along the James Bay Highway. Repairs to some of the highway are scheduled for next month, but before that, there are potholes big enough to cause damage and injury:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/james-bay-highway-potholes-1.4654143

Quote
The James Bay Highway is 620 kilometres long and serves more than 11 thousand people, including several Cree communities, according to the Société de développement de la Baie James (SDBJ), which owns and maintains the road on behalf of the Quebec Transport Ministry and Hydro Quebec.

The poor state of the road is the subject of much discussion on social media, where a Facebook page has been dedicated to road conditions and warning other travellers where the worst potholes are.

Raymond Thibault, the chief executive officer of the SDBJ, admits the highway is in rough and even dangerous shape in some spots. He said crews have been out since the beginning of May doing temporary repairs with cold asphalt, but people should still drive carefully.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on May 26, 2018, 05:29:03 PM
Video of Autoroute 20 entering Montreal, showcasing the Turcot and Ville-Marie construction

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on June 06, 2018, 05:28:14 AM
While this time, here is a press release from the MTQ.


Redeveloping Route 117 With Four Lanes Between Labelle and Rivière-Rouge - The Government Confirms his Commitment

Rivière-Rouge, May 25th, 2018 - The Quebec government confirms his commitment and makes a real move in redeveloping Route 117 with four lanes, between Labelle and Rivière-Rouge.  In March 2018, the project was registered to 2018-2028 Quebec Infrastructure Plan, showing the will of the government to improve that route, especially about safety of travel.

So the amounts required to drive all studies needed to determine the best long-term scenario are reserved in the provincial budget.  The right-of-way, the number and the geometry of lanes, and the realisation schedule are some of the points to be analysed into the elaboration of an opportunity file.

Since 2006, Route 117 is the subject of a structured intervention plan.  Up to date, over 247 million$ were invested in traffic safety and flowing projects in the corridor connecting the Laurentians, Outaouais, and Abitibi-Témiscamingue regions.

The redeveloping of Route 117 between Labelle and Rivière-Rouge is a major project estimated to over 100 million$.

Quotes

   "The safety of road users is an essential issue and the improvement of Route 117 is a priority for our government. During the elaboration of this project, we will continue our collaboration with the SOS 117 Committee, in order to realise the right interventions at the right places."

   - André Fortin, minister of Transports, Sustainable mobility and Transport Electriffication.

   "Today, we confirm that the intention of the government is strong.  The registration of the project to the Quebec Infrastructure Plan shows it. Here to the completion of this major project, it's essential to recall that several interventions will be made on Route 117, always in order to improve safety for all, as we do since several years."

   - Christine St-Pierre, minister of International relationship and Francophonie, and minister responsible of the Laurentians region.

Highlights
  • Route 117 is a major axis that is part of the strategic network dedicated to foreign trade.  It is the only road connecting the Montreal motropolitan area and the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region.
  • The road stretch targeted by the project, located between Labelle and Rivière-Rouge, bears two lanes on one carriageway (one lane per direction).
  • The next steps for the Route 117 enlargement project are:
    • The opening of a project office, in order to start the necessary studies leading to the preparation of an opportunity file, according to the Directive sur la gestion des projets majeurs d'infrastructure publique (Directive on managing of major public infrastructure projects) - summer 2018;
    • Writing of the quote to update the opportunity study made in 2011, taking into account the opening of Labelle and Rivière-Rouge bypasses - fall 2018;
    • Drafting of tender documents for the preparation of preliminary draft projects - winter 2019;
    • Preparation of documents for the award of a professional services ontract for the preliminary draft - spring 2019;
    • Once the opportunity file has been completed, it will be submitted to the government authorities to determine the optimal long-term solution - 2020.
    In 2018, the realisation of the Route 117 Intervention Plan continues with the following intervention projects:
    • Rebuilding of intersection with route Principale in La Conception;
    • Rebuilding of intersection with chemin du Parc Industriel in Rivière-Rouge.

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Kniwt on June 06, 2018, 07:53:10 PM
Another report from the CBC of poor conditions on the James Bay Highway, with this photo of a now-fixed sinkhole:

(https://i.cbc.ca/1.4695012.1528322060!/fileImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/16x9_780/coonishish-inside-sinkhole.jpg)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/northern-quebec-highway-sinkhole-1.4694968

Quote
The Société de développement de la Baie James (SDBJ), which owns and maintains the James Bay Highway on behalf of the Quebec Transport Ministry and Hydro Quebec, says the sinkhole was caused by a corrugated metal culvert that failed. It was at the end of its lifespan.

... Culverts have a lifespan of 40 to 50 years, according to Thibault. The highway was built in the early 1970s to make way for hydroelectric development. About 330 culverts need replacing.

Thibault said the culvert in question is to be replaced this summer as part of a $265-million repair project to close to half the surface of the highway between now and 2021.

The work slated for this year includes $60 million to replace more than 60 culverts and repave more than 118 kilometres, including the section between kilometres 88 and 200. Eleven bridges will also be repaired and repaved, and guardrails replaced between kilometres 120 and 200.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Kniwt on June 08, 2018, 06:02:30 PM
The CBC reports today on twinning another part of A-50:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/highway-50-doubling-lacute-mirabel-1.4698374

Quote
Quebec's Ministry of Transport is calling for bids to study the doubling of Highway 50 between Mirabel and Lachute, a roughly 20-kilometre stretch starting about 130 kilometres east of Ottawa.

... Between 15,000 and 21,000 vehicles use the highway between Lachute and Mirabel every day, according to the ministry.

Highway 50, which connects the Ottawa-Gatineau region to Montreal, has been the scene of eight fatalities along undivided stretches since it opened in 2012.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on September 15, 2018, 06:19:26 PM
One poster on Skyscraperpage founded this archived document about the A-20 gap in Dorion and Ile-Perrot. http://collections.banq.qc.ca/ark:/52327/bs1906777
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: CapeCodder on September 18, 2018, 09:10:51 PM
Has anyone clinched Route 138 (the central portion, not the disconnected segments.) from the NY border to Natashquan? What's the quality of the road and is it paved to the very end or is it gravel after a certain point?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on September 18, 2018, 09:30:17 PM
Has anyone clinched Route 138 (the central portion, not the disconnected segments.) from the NY border to Natashquan? What's the quality of the road and is it paved to the very end or is it gravel after a certain point?
I did, but only up to Natashquan. The road is built and paved all the way to Kegashka now. The 40 km extension from Natashquan to Kegaska opened in 2013.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MikeTheActuary on September 18, 2018, 10:52:08 PM
Has anyone clinched Route 138 (the central portion, not the disconnected segments.) from the NY border to Natashquan? What's the quality of the road and is it paved to the very end or is it gravel after a certain point?

My wife and I thoroughly enjoyed our road trip to La Malbaie in June.  I *really* want to drive 138 out to its eastern end now.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: bing101 on September 26, 2018, 08:09:02 AM


Freeway Franks did a segment on A-15
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on September 29, 2018, 12:50:14 PM
The only "hidden" route in Quebec is no more, markers have just appeared along Boulevard Champlain in Quebec City from Pont Pierre-Laporte to Côte Gilmour. Of course, soon there will be a second Route 136 as A-720 in Montreal is being downgraded to Route status. Perhaps the MTQ figured that they could order a few more signs while they were renumbering Autoroute Ville-Marie and finally signpost Boul. Champlain, after decades of neglect!
 
(https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1980/44941722232_4162f9c1e3_c.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on September 29, 2018, 11:11:39 PM
They've been a little quiet about the A-720 downgrade as of late (at least in articles that made their way to the Facebook groups).  I keep hoping that they'll come to their senses and pick another number, or even better, just leave A-720 be.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Kniwt on October 11, 2018, 09:55:23 AM
The pothole-ridden James Bay Highway has now inspired a blues song. Filmed along the highway with lots of good scenery:


Story:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/james-bay-potholes-blues-1.4856127

Quote
For Manuan Lafond, singing the blues about the James Bay Highway in Quebec just feels right.

The 36-year-old singer, whose mother was Cree and father is Quebecois, has released a new single and video entitled James Bay Highway Blues.

The song was written in the middle of a 14-hour trip between Gatineau, where he lives, and Chisasibi, where he's from.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on November 01, 2018, 12:47:29 PM
They've been a little quiet about the A-720 downgrade as of late (at least in articles that made their way to the Facebook groups).  I keep hoping that they'll come to their senses and pick another number, or even better, just leave A-720 be.

I think the QC-136 designation, down from A-720, is just to please those environment-crazy groups.  In fact, the only difference is that lanes will be about one foot narrower, so at a speed limit of 70 km/h (+/-42 mph), that will make no difference in traffic, because in daytime, it will still be jam-packed, and at night, well... nobody cares about speed limits anyway!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on November 01, 2018, 12:56:53 PM
One still has to wonder why they selected 136, and not something that was actually available.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on November 01, 2018, 02:22:01 PM
One still has to wonder why they selected 136, and not something that was actually available.

As an east-west highway, there was no available number in, or around the greater Montreal area.

- 132: Used on South Shore of the St-Lawrence River.
- 134: Used on Jacques-Cartier Bridge, and Taschereau Blvd. from Longueuil to Delson.
- 136: Used in Quebec city, but not in Montreal.
- 138: Used on Sherbrooke St., in Montreal, north of the QC-136/A-720.
- 140: Not used, because there's a highway 40.
- 142: Would be available, but wouldn't fit because the highway we want to number is between 134 and 138.

Normally, highway numbers climbs from south to north (and from west to east); QC-132 is south of 134, that is south of 136, etc.  They also keep numbers that finishes with a 0 - or with a 5 in case of north-south highways - as a continuity at the end of an Interstate-standard highway; QC-155 continues at the end of A-55, for example.  But I say "normally" because the MTQ numbering system is full of exceptions.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on November 01, 2018, 08:41:53 PM
Interesting.  I didn't know Québec had such a sophisticated numbering system.  I probably would have went with QC 140, though - IMO grid violations are the lesser evil over duplicated numbers, especially since A-40 probably doesn't need a QC 140 to extend it (as QC 138 already does so).

The fact that the St. Lawrence runs due north in that area certainly has interesting consequences for route numbering, since it seems Québec bends its grid to every bend in the river.

Do the 2xx and 3xx routes have similar rules (beyond 2xx being south of the river and 3xx being north)?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on November 01, 2018, 09:09:18 PM
Do the 2xx and 3xx routes have similar rules (beyond 2xx being south of the river and 3xx being north)?
Yes. Moreover, routes 390-399 are reserved for Abitibi-Témiscamingue region, even though it's west of most 3xx routes.

I would have opted for a new route 138 alignment. None of it is maintained by the MTQ east of Ville Saint-Pierre anyways.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Fugazi on November 01, 2018, 09:23:47 PM
I do hope they will extend the new R-136 east over Rue Notre-Dame and Avenue Souligny.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on November 02, 2018, 12:59:41 PM
I do hope they will extend the new R-136 east over Rue Notre-Dame and Avenue Souligny.
I do too.  It could be a silver lining to losing A-720.  I see on street view they added km markers to Avenue Souligny in the past couple years - could that be an indication that they will in fact do this?  On the other hand, Avenue Souligny always had exit numbers for the A-25 interchange, so it might not be an indication of anything.

I would have opted for a new route 138 alignment. None of it is maintained by the MTQ east of Ville Saint-Pierre anyways.
That makes a lot of sense too.  All it would need is an extension of the A-20 overlap and a short overlap with A-25.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on November 04, 2018, 11:47:43 AM
I do hope they will extend the new R-136 east over Rue Notre-Dame and Avenue Souligny.
I do too.  It could be a silver lining to losing A-720.  I see on street view they added km markers to Avenue Souligny in the past couple years - could that be an indication that they will in fact do this?  On the other hand, Avenue Souligny always had exit numbers for the A-25 interchange, so it might not be an indication of anything.
Yes, the idea is to create a comprehensive highway designation to replace the ill-fated Trans-Canada/A-20/A-720 project. The upgrade of Notre-Dame street between Dickson and Papineau is still in the plans.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: cbeach40 on November 08, 2018, 01:39:37 PM
News:
Montreal spends more on roads than rest of Canada, with worse results
 (https://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/montreal-spends-more-on-roads-than-rest-of-canada-with-worse-results)

I am shocked! Shocked!  :-D
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Henry on November 09, 2018, 10:09:27 AM
News:
Montreal spends more on roads than rest of Canada, with worse results
 (https://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/montreal-spends-more-on-roads-than-rest-of-canada-with-worse-results)

I am shocked! Shocked!  :-D
Wow, I thought that Toronto or Vancouver would spend more. Of course, the streets and highways in both cities are way better managed.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on December 02, 2018, 12:23:16 AM
News:
Montreal spends more on roads than rest of Canada, with worse results
 (https://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/montreal-spends-more-on-roads-than-rest-of-canada-with-worse-results)

I am shocked! Shocked!  :-D
Wow, I thought that Toronto or Vancouver would spend more. Of course, the streets and highways in both cities are way better managed.

You know the joke that was running about road spending in Montreal?

It's the mayor of Montreal that have to meet three guys for a road project in the city.
The first guy came in the mayor's office; he's from Toronto, and after looking at the plans, he makes a tender for 4 millions$.  The mayor thanks the guy, and tell him the decision will be taken on next week.
The second guy came in; he's from Calgary, and makes a tender for 3 millions$; the mayor thanks him, and gives him the same information.
The third guy, from Montreal, came in mayor's office; he tells the mayor...
- I'll make the job for 5 millions$.
- Wait... what? 5 millions$?
- Yes, 5 millions$; one million for you, one for me, and we'll take the Calgary guy as a sub-contractor!"
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on February 09, 2019, 07:03:06 PM
Sometimes, it's fun to check old newspaper articles about some proposed highways.

From the Quebec City newspaper Le Soleil, September 15, 1980, I spotted that vintage article about A-65 (Autoroute de l'Amiante).
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2727488?docsearchtext=autoroute%20de%20l%27amiante
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dougtone on March 04, 2019, 06:50:06 AM
Why not check out the oldest covered bridge in Quebec (also Canada's oldest covered bridge), which was built in 1861. This is the Powerscourt Covered Bridge located near Hinchinbrooke, Quebec.

https://surewhynotnow.blogspot.com/2019/03/powerscourt-covered-bridge.html (https://surewhynotnow.blogspot.com/2019/03/powerscourt-covered-bridge.html)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on March 04, 2019, 08:59:54 AM
Speaking of covered bridge, one in Low in the Gatineau river valley had burned in January 2019.
http://pontscouverts.com/blogue/2019/01/23/hommage-au-pont-kelly/
http://pontscouverts.com/blogue/2019/02/01/drone-le-pont-kelly-avant-et-apres-le-feu/
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on March 04, 2019, 11:46:36 AM
Why not check out the oldest covered bridge in Quebec (also Canada's oldest covered bridge), which was built in 1861. This is the Powerscourt Covered Bridge located near Hinchinbrooke, Quebec.

Great article, Doug.

Not only is the Percy bridge a national historic site of Canada, it is a classified heritage property, benefiting from a legal protection : alteration, restoration, repairs, change in any way (including the type of paint, nails or screws) or demolition of all or part are strictly regulated, with fines of up to 1.5 M$ and one year of prison for offenders. Authorization of the minister is also required for land subdivision and construction in a 500 feet radius.

The claim asserting it is the only remaining example of a McCallum truss bridge is attributed to the ministry of Culture (http://www.patrimoine-culturel.gouv.qc.ca/rpcq/detail.do?methode=consulter&id=92730&type=bien), with research dating back to 2004; I'd like to see, with more and more archives available on the net, how that claim stands today. Another McCallum truss bridge was once built in Shannon, Québec by the Q&LSJ Railway. Some drawings (http://www.pontscouverts.com/Pontscouverts2/Pontages_2_files/Vol17_no4.pdf#page=6) and a bad photo (https://www.transports.gouv.qc.ca/fr/ministere/acces-information-renseignements-personnels/documents-reglement-diffusion/demande-acces/Documents/2017/03/lai-2016-2017-431-06204.pdf#page=12) of this bridge exist. It was later replaced by 2 Warren truss sections and 1 central Pratt truss section, then converted to auto traffic when the line was moved to a new alignment, then unfortunatelty supplanted by a generic concrete viaduc (https://www.journaldequebec.com/2016/10/31/shannon-inaugure-un-nouveau-pont-de-12-millions).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on March 04, 2019, 09:17:47 PM
Too bad then Google translator can't translate old newspaper articles. I spotted that article from February 25, 1975 about a provincial deputy who complained then A-73 was built on the east side of the Chaudiere River instead of the west side.
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3655535?docsearchtext=autoroute%20de%20l%27amiante

A small article mentionning the numbering of Quebec autoroutes.
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3646406?docsearchtext=autoroute%2065
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MNHighwayMan on March 04, 2019, 10:16:31 PM
You have to copy/paste it into Google Translate (and fix some of the formatting/errors caused by OCR.)

Here's the first link (translated title: "Highway 73: the cause of the West section was poorly defended")

Quote
The cause of the West section would have been poorly defended by the asbestos region. Thus, the member for Frontenac in the National Assembly, Dr. Henri Lecours, explained that the provincial government decided to build Highway 73 east of the Chaudière River.

According to Mr. Lecours, several municipalities in the County of Beauce spent thousands of dollars preparing a report in which the benefits of construction in East Chaudière were presented and the Ministère des Transports authorities reportedly based on this report to make their decision. Mr. Lecours added that he did not believe that representatives of the asbestos region addressed the good people who could have influenced the choice of the West route. According to him, we should have met the promoters of the inter-port project in Quebec and explained the advantages of a road for the transport of asbestos, "I know that if I had to take care of the file, it is to those people that I would have addressed myself, "said Mr. Lecours.

Access road

The member for Frontenac also pointed out that an access road could possibly be built between the asbestos region and Highway 73, joining the latter near Vallée Jonction. He admitted that this could be a solution to the problem while emphasizing that the distance would remain considerable. Mr. Lecours stated that a sharing solution was always possible: the construction of the highway east of Chaudière to Vallée Jonction and west of Vallée Jonction in Québec City.

Mr. Lecours also revealed that the work undertaken last year on Highway 49 was continuing. Special budgets are now being considered for the continuation of this work, and important statements should be made shortly, concludes Lecours.

Second link (translated title: "Numbering of motorways")

Quote
The Deputy Minister of Highways of Quebec, Mr. Claude Rouleau yesterday published the list of numbers that the highways currently under construction or will eventually be.

Highways on an east-west axis will have an even number, and north-south highways will have an odd number.

Among the highways projected - by the Highways, we note: Highway 50 which leaves from Hull to finish at St-Gabriel de Brandon via Lachute and Jolietle; Highway 30 from the US border to Gentilly north of Bécancour; Highway 13, from Ste-Scholastique to Ste-Barbe d'Huntingdon via Jesus Island and the island of Montreal; Highway 51 from Sherbrooke to Yamaska ​​through Drummondville; Highway 73, from Ste-Catherine de Portneuf to Jackman, on the Quebec-Maine border, passing through Quebec and Beauce; Highway 65, from Villeroy in Lotbinière County to Thetford Mines; Highway 18, from Plessisville to Ste-Clothilde d'Arthabaska, at the junction of Highway 55 and Highway 85, from Rivière-du-Loup to the New Brunswick border.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on March 14, 2019, 03:57:08 PM
I spotted some vintage photos on old newspaper articles about what was once A-51 between Richmond and Drummondville showing A-51 markers.
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3649585?docsearchtext=autoroute%2051  on page 6.
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3655576?docsearchtext=autoroute%2051  cahier 2 page 3a
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on March 14, 2019, 06:24:19 PM
I spotted some vintage photos on old newspaper articles about what was once A-51 between Richmond and Drummondville showing A-51 markers.
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3649585?docsearchtext=autoroute%2051  on page 6.
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3655576?docsearchtext=autoroute%2051  cahier 2 page 3a
You have won the internet for today, friend.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: jp the roadgeek on March 14, 2019, 11:13:45 PM
Would be interesting to see where A-30 would have met the US border.  I've always envisioned it following Route 138 to end near Malone, NY.  My grand plan would be to connect it via a short NYS reference route from the border to a proposed I-98 that would follow the US 11 corridor between Watertown and Champlain (part of my elaborate I-98 plan).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on March 15, 2019, 01:00:10 PM
My understanding is that A-30 was to follow the QC 132 corridor to NY at Fort Covington/Dundee.  Note that A-530 was originally intended to be part of (as was signed as until recently) A-30.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on March 17, 2019, 01:37:16 PM
My understanding is that A-30 was to follow the QC 132 corridor to NY at Fort Covington/Dundee.  Note that A-530 was originally intended to be part of (as was signed as until recently) A-30.

Valleyfield was deemed to receive A-530 anyways. The number was reserved for the R-201 corridor between A-20 and ill-fated A-30. The latter was programmed to meet the border near the actual railway border crossing.
(https://i.imgur.com/km1DZXq.png)
Excerpt from J.-G. Paquin (1971). Numérotage des autoroutes du Québec, réseau actuel et projeté, Ministère de la Voirie, Montréal, 28 pages. Fair use of copyrighted material for educational purposes.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on March 26, 2019, 01:33:40 PM
I saw an old photo of someone who did a A-55 promotion at Victoriaville from La Tribune, July 27 1974 on page 6.
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3649439
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on March 28, 2019, 11:34:45 PM
Not directly road-related, but the ferry expected to replace the ferry that crashed into two docks while replacing the problematic aerial substitute for the original ferry, crashed into another ship.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/ferry-follies-saaremaa-1.5074791
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on March 28, 2019, 11:42:25 PM
Not directly road-related, but the ferry expected to replace the ferry that crashed into two docks while replacing the problematic aerial substitute for the original ferry, crashed into another ship.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/ferry-follies-saaremaa-1.5074791
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DJG1-ekXYAAF1iv.jpg)
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on April 02, 2019, 03:46:41 PM
Not directly road-related, but the ferry expected to replace the ferry that crashed into two docks while replacing the problematic aerial substitute for the original ferry, crashed into another ship.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/ferry-follies-saaremaa-1.5074791

That reminds me of that editorial toon about the ferry in question. https://www.journaldequebec.com/2019/03/28/la-caricature-dygreck

And here some vintage articles about the raising fare of the Quebec tolls back in 1982. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3686945
http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/3686944
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Chris on April 02, 2019, 03:55:54 PM
A ship, built in Norway, with an Estonian name, crashed in Germany and is supposed to enter service in Québec. Interesting.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Bruce on May 28, 2019, 03:14:01 AM
I'm heading to Montreal (and potentially Ottawa) next week for a short trip, and I was hoping to get some advice on what to see in terms of road infrastructure. Is there anything worth renting a car for?
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Richard3 on May 28, 2019, 06:03:10 AM
I'm heading to Montreal (and potentially Ottawa) next week for a short trip, and I was hoping to get some advice on what to see in terms of road infrastructure. Is there anything worth renting a car for?

If you want to see some big worksites, there's three major ones around Montreal that are close enough each other to be seen as one huge site.  First, the Turcot Interchange, supposed to be completed by 2020.  Starting from Trudeau Int'l Airport, follow Hwy. 20 East; just after passing exit 63 (Mercier Bridge), you will enter the site.  Always check first on Quebec511 website (http://www.quebec511.info/en/Carte/Default.aspx (http://www.quebec511.info/en/Carte/Default.aspx)) in order to see what ramps are closed, because there's a lot of changes from day to day.

Then, from there, if you take Hwy. 15 South, you will see the brand new Samuel-de-Champain Bridge, that will open by the end of June, in two steps, and will replace the actual Champlain Bridge (second longest bridge in Canada, after the Confederation Bridge), that will be demolished later.  It is just on your left while you pass on the actual bridge.  Yuo can't miss it!

If you continue straight ahead at the exit of the actual bridge, in about 2 miles (3 km), you'll see the worksite of the REM South Terminal (REM stands for Réseau Express Métropolitain, a new light rail network to open by 2021) in the south quadrant of the Hwy. 10/Hwy. 30 interchange.

After passing this point, your best option to turn back to Montreal is to keep on Hwy. 10 East until Exit 22 (Hwy. 35); keep left to Chambly ramp, then take exit 55-O (Hwy. 10 West) to Montreal.  Then, just before the Champlain Bridge, take exit 6, then keep right to Hwy. 20 East/Route 132 East, in order to see the Montreal skyline, along the St. Lawrence River.  You will also have a look on Victoria Jubilee Bridge (first bridge built over St. Lawrence River), and Jacques-Cartier Bridge (inaugurated in 1930).

Then, take exit 89-N to Hwy. 25 North; you will cross the river by the Louis-H.-Lafontaine Tunnel-Bridge.  Built in 1967, and subject to a complete rebuilt in years to come, it's still the longest underwater tunnel in Canada.  If you continue straight ahead on Hwy. 25 North, you will cross the Olivier-Charbonneau Bridge (no-money electronic toll bridge; you'll be billed 8,89 CA$ in rush hour, or 7,89 CA$ out of rush hour). It's the last new bridge (not replacement) to be built around Montreal Island.

From now, you're on Jesus Island, in the city of Laval; take exit 17 (Hwy. 440) to have all the options ahead to Montreal. From Hwy. 440, there's two options to go to Ottawa; option 1 is by taking Hwy. 15 North (exit 22), and once on 15 North, exit 35 to Hwy. 50 West.  After Mirabel Airport, Hwy. 50 turns into a super-2 highway for the most part of its lenght to the Ottawa-Gatineau Region; option 2 is by exit 17-S (Hwy. 13 South), and once on 13 South, exit 6 to Hwy. 40 West (this point is in another worksite).  Once on Hwy. 40 West, you will cross the Lac des Deux-Monagnes by the Pont de l'Île-aux-Tourtes, then keep right to stay on Hwy. 40 West. About 22 miles (35 km) further, you'll enter province of Ontario, and Hwy. 40 will become Hwy. 417, towards Ottawa.

For sure, the best way to have a nice ride is to avoid rush hour.  The highway network in Montreal is on the limit of its capacity since decades; a simple fender bender, or just a vehicle stalled can turn a good ride into a nightmare, as a three-lane highway can become a real parking lot in minutes.

Welcome in Canada, and have plenty of nice rides!
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Bruce on May 30, 2019, 01:08:40 AM
Thanks a lot! I don't think I'll end up renting a car for this trip, as the VIA Rail fares are very cheap (especially with a discount code I found). I will try to check out as many of these sights as I can via public transit, rideshare, or car-share (if that is a thing...).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: mvak36 on June 18, 2019, 02:53:13 PM
Looks like some progress on the A35: https://globalnews.ca/news/5374897/quebec-highway-35-extension-us-border/
Quote
Federal and provincial government officials announced on Monday that plans are in the works to extend Quebec’s Highway 35 by nearly nine kilometres in the southbound direction — but that still leaves it 4.5 kilometres short of reaching the U.S. border.

Authorities also aren’t saying when the highway will be finished because they are worried about competition and privacy in the bidding process.

....

Provincial authorities still don’t know when the 8.9-kilometre section will be complete, but they could confirm a public call for tenders will begin this year.

“We should be able to start the construction as early as next year,” Treasury Board President Christian Dubé said.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: noelbotevera on June 28, 2019, 10:19:37 PM
Visited Montreal and Quebec City yesterday. Things of note:

-New Champlain Bridge wasn't yet open when I visited. Definitely looks nice, but doesn't seem to have a notable effect on traffic and the construction there along with Turcot made navigating that area both interesting and frustrating.

-Shame that A-440 (Quebec City) never connects with itself; however, I understand that Quebec City is intended to be pedestrian friendly. A freeway spur into Quebec City from the west would be nice - but Boulevard Charest moved when we visited, so for now it's passable.

-The A-20/A-25 and A-10/A-15/A-20 interchanges in Longueuil are horrible. I don't even know why they''re designed that way.

-I wish the Jacques Cartier bridge tie in on the Longueuil side was better. Considering that ramps carrying QC 134 - the main movement - narrow or utilize loops (well, curves) doesn't sound terribly functional.

-Question: Is Autoroute Decarie undergoing reconstruction as a part of the Turcot project? While I've never drove it, it definitely seems like a bottleneck in the freeway system.

All in all, I find that the best way of getting around Montreal as a tourist is via the metro. The metro definitely lacks in servicing Laval, Longueuil, Dorval Int'l, and Montreal north of A-25.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: vdeane on June 28, 2019, 10:53:33 PM
-New Champlain Bridge wasn't yet open when I visited. Definitely looks nice, but doesn't seem to have a notable effect on traffic and the construction there along with Turcot made navigating that area both interesting and frustrating.
I take it you took it south/eastbound?  It's open north/westbound.

Quote
-The A-20/A-25 and A-10/A-15/A-20 interchanges in Longueuil are horrible. I don't even know why they''re designed that way.
Probably has a lot to do with the fact that A-20 wasn't intended to go through here, but instead follow an extended A-720 to the Y interchange on A-25.  Plus freeway interchanges tend not to be great in Montréal.  Just look at the A-13/A-520 interchange.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: noelbotevera on June 28, 2019, 11:18:39 PM
-New Champlain Bridge wasn't yet open when I visited. Definitely looks nice, but doesn't seem to have a notable effect on traffic and the construction there along with Turcot made navigating that area both interesting and frustrating.
I take it you took it south/eastbound?  It's open north/westbound.

Quote
-The A-20/A-25 and A-10/A-15/A-20 interchanges in Longueuil are horrible. I don't even know why they''re designed that way.
Probably has a lot to do with the fact that A-20 wasn't intended to go through here, but instead follow an extended A-720 to the Y interchange on A-25.  Plus freeway interchanges tend not to be great in Montréal.  Just look at the A-13/A-520 interchange.
Yeah, never got the chance to take it NW bound. Never really had a reason to do such.

Well, that explains a lot. I wondered why Avenue Souligny/Sortie 4 on A-25 was drastically overbuilt; turns out even Montreal can't complete its freeway network.

Looking at a satellite view of the A-13/A-520 interchange, it seems like it was constrained by the runway and possibly development (no clue if development in Montreal reached out this far yet). Though really, there definitely was a better way to handle that interchange (perhaps flyovers and/or tunnels?).
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: MikeTheActuary on June 28, 2019, 11:58:58 PM
Quote
-The A-20/A-25 and A-10/A-15/A-20 interchanges in Longueuil are horrible. I don't even know why they''re designed that way.
Probably has a lot to do with the fact that A-20 wasn't intended to go through here, but instead follow an extended A-720 to the Y interchange on A-25.  Plus freeway interchanges tend not to be great in Montréal.  Just look at the A-13/A-520 interchange.

I had thought that the story of the 10/15/20 interchange was as simple as: autoroute along riverbank needs interchange with bridge with high clearance over seaway = funky interchange.   The 20/25 interchange would be similar, except the bridge involved doesn't need to be as high.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Alps on June 29, 2019, 05:55:22 PM
Quote
-The A-20/A-25 and A-10/A-15/A-20 interchanges in Longueuil are horrible. I don't even know why they''re designed that way.
Probably has a lot to do with the fact that A-20 wasn't intended to go through here, but instead follow an extended A-720 to the Y interchange on A-25.  Plus freeway interchanges tend not to be great in Montréal.  Just look at the A-13/A-520 interchange.

I had thought that the story of the 10/15/20 interchange was as simple as: autoroute along riverbank needs interchange with bridge with high clearance over seaway = funky interchange.   The 20/25 interchange would be similar, except the bridge involved doesn't need to be as high.
Double trumpet is also relatively easily tolled.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: AsphaltPlanet on June 30, 2019, 07:33:10 AM
Video of the new bridge:

Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: webfil on July 01, 2019, 02:50:28 PM
I had thought that the story of the 10/15/20 interchange was as simple as: autoroute along riverbank needs interchange with bridge with high clearance over seaway = funky interchange.   The 20/25 interchange would be similar, except the bridge involved doesn't need to be as high.
Double trumpet is also relatively easily tolled.
[/quote]
The toll booths were located on the other side of the bridge.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on July 01, 2019, 08:13:36 PM
I had thought that the story of the 10/15/20 interchange was as simple as: autoroute along riverbank needs interchange with bridge with high clearance over seaway = funky interchange.   The 20/25 interchange would be similar, except the bridge involved doesn't need to be as high.
Double trumpet is also relatively easily tolled.
The toll booths were located on the other side of the bridge.
[/quote]

I remember, the toll booths was on Ile-des-Soeurs.

I saw this old topo map showing Champlain bridge before A-10/A-15/A-20. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2245355
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Stephane Dumas on July 03, 2019, 01:20:34 PM
Little bump then Streetview show the northbound side of the new bridge.
https://www.google.com/maps/@45.468337,-73.5068522,3a,75y,100.4h,99.59t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sAF1QipPaMNEHjMxBwRsOXyyK8X2-A3fHoCkA55UGlakT!2e10!3e11!7i7680!8i3840
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on July 11, 2019, 05:22:38 PM
I have a couple of things to report regarding Transports Québec signing documentation.

*  I have more or less lost access to advertised construction contracts through SEAO, owing to software upgrades on their end.  As I explained (https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=2353.msg299737#msg299737) in this thread about five years ago, SEAO requires an (expensive) pay subscription to download documents without DRM, but uses FileOpen DRM to allow registered non-subscribers to open and view (not print, save, or extract) contract documents in PDF up to five times per document.  This is accomplished through a FileOpen client that bolts onto Acrobat; when the user opens a document, the client sends a hash to the server over the Internet and gets back a key that is used to decrypt the file.  There is a 3,000-line Python script, ineptpdf.py or ineptpdf.pyw, that duplicates the functionality of the client but can be run at the command line and allows the file to be saved without encryption.  I used it in combination with other PDF tools to build a collection of just under 3,000 MTQ signing sheets.  However, when I went back to SEAO earlier this month, I discovered that it had implemented HTTPS with HTST, and neither ineptpdf.pyw nor the FileOpen client I had had since 2014 would decrypt downloaded PDF files.  I was able to get them to open in Acrobat by upgrading to the current version of the FileOpen client, but active development of ineptpdf.pyw seems to have come to an end around 2012.  I suspect the underlying issue is that neither it nor the old FileOpen client could handle HTST, and the fix may be as simple as updating the script to use a newer Python library with HTST support, but I cannot rule out the underlying encryption having been strengthened.  For the time being I can do without access to MTQ contracts since SEAO archives in arrears and the pattern for signing contracts in recent years has been structural work only (no sign panels furnished or installed, therefore no sign panel detail sheets), but tracking down the ineptpdf.pyw developers is on my to-do list.

*  For at least a decade (I first found it in 2007, IIRC), MTQ has made renderings of standard traffic signs available for free download through a satellite of its main website.  The server name used to be something like "mtqsignalisation" but the facility has been branded as the Répertoire des dispositifs de signalisation routière du Québec (RSR) (http://www.rsr.transports.gouv.qc.ca/Dispositifs/Accueil.aspx) since about 2013.  The website appears to be a front end for a database where each sign has a five-digit index number.  Renderings are available for each index number in up to seven formats--PDF (called devis, consisting of a dimensioned drawing similar to a page in Standard Highway Signs), BMP, DXF, EPS, AI, PNG, and JPEG.  I wrote and have had a successful first run of a script to download all of the available renderings and file them by index number.  Some statistics are as follows:  2276 distinct index numbers;  index number range 12392 to 35259; 3 hours 18 minutes to finish full download over a relatively fast residential cable connection; 14,727 total files downloaded; 2.07 GB aggregate filesize; 1916 PDFs downloaded; 1910 PDFs with unique filenames (some index numbers have no corresponding PDF, while the same devis is used for multiple index numbers, such as the ones corresponding to various values for speed limit on the speed limit sign); 4645 total PDF pages of sign drawings.  The script also has the ability to be run in "incrementing" mode, where renderings are downloaded only if the corresponding index numbers have not previously been encountered.  I plan to monitor the RSR from now on to verify that index numbers are persistent (i.e., a given sign keeps the same index number) and determine the extent to which existing index numbers accumulate new renderings as time passes.  The RSR is updated biannually; new signs are added beginning January 1 and July 1, and are kept in the nouveautés section for up to three months.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: Dr Frankenstein on July 14, 2019, 12:27:58 AM
*  I have more or less lost access to advertised construction contracts through SEAO, owing to software upgrades on their end.  As I explained (https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=2353.msg299737#msg299737) in this thread about five years ago, SEAO requires an (expensive) pay subscription to download documents without DRM, but uses FileOpen DRM to allow registered non-subscribers to open and view (not print, save, or extract) contract documents in PDF up to five times per document.  This is accomplished through a FileOpen client that bolts onto Acrobat; when the user opens a document, the client sends a hash to the server over the Internet and gets back a key that is used to decrypt the file.  There is a 3,000-line Python script, ineptpdf.py or ineptpdf.pyw, that duplicates the functionality of the client but can be run at the command line and allows the file to be saved without encryption.  I used it in combination with other PDF tools to build a collection of just under 3,000 MTQ signing sheets.  However, when I went back to SEAO earlier this month, I discovered that it had implemented HTTPS with HTST, and neither ineptpdf.pyw nor the FileOpen client I had had since 2014 would decrypt downloaded PDF files.  I was able to get them to open in Acrobat by upgrading to the current version of the FileOpen client, but active development of ineptpdf.pyw seems to have come to an end around 2012.  I suspect the underlying issue is that neither it nor the old FileOpen client could handle HTST, and the fix may be as simple as updating the script to use a newer Python library with HTST support, but I cannot rule out the underlying encryption having been strengthened.  For the time being I can do without access to MTQ contracts since SEAO archives in arrears and the pattern for signing contracts in recent years has been structural work only (no sign panels furnished or installed, therefore no sign panel detail sheets), but tracking down the ineptpdf.pyw developers is on my to-do list.
That's a shame. I was relying on a similar method to crack those those documents, but I haven't used it in a while.

*  For at least a decade (I first found it in 2007, IIRC), MTQ has made renderings of standard traffic signs available for free download through a satellite of its main website.  The server name used to be something like "mtqsignalisation" but the facility has been branded as the Répertoire des dispositifs de signalisation routière du Québec (RSR) (http://www.rsr.transports.gouv.qc.ca/Dispositifs/Accueil.aspx) since about 2013.  The website appears to be a front end for a database where each sign has a five-digit index number.  Renderings are available for each index number in up to seven formats--PDF (called devis, consisting of a dimensioned drawing similar to a page in Standard Highway Signs), BMP, DXF, EPS, AI, PNG, and JPEG.  I wrote and have had a successful first run of a script to download all of the available renderings and file them by index number.  Some statistics are as follows:  2276 distinct index numbers;  index number range 12392 to 35259; 3 hours 18 minutes to finish full download over a relatively fast residential cable connection; 14,727 total files downloaded; 2.07 GB aggregate filesize; 1916 PDFs downloaded; 1910 PDFs with unique filenames (some index numbers have no corresponding PDF, while the same devis is used for multiple index numbers, such as the ones corresponding to various values for speed limit on the speed limit sign); 4645 total PDF pages of sign drawings.  The script also has the ability to be run in "incrementing" mode, where renderings are downloaded only if the corresponding index numbers have not previously been encountered.  I plan to monitor the RSR from now on to verify that index numbers are persistent (i.e., a given sign keeps the same index number) and determine the extent to which existing index numbers accumulate new renderings as time passes.  The RSR is updated biannually; new signs are added beginning January 1 and July 1, and are kept in the nouveautés section for up to three months.
Now that's very interesting... especially since the download UI on that site is very clunky.
Title: Re: Quebec's Highways
Post by: J N Winkler on July 14, 2019, 01:06:07 PM
That's a shame. I was relying on a similar method to crack those those documents, but I haven't used it in a while.

Alongside looking for the ineptpdf.pyw developers, I've been toying with the idea of delving into the code to see how hard it would be to retrofit HTST support.  It would be ideal if that automatically fell out of updating a Web library, and it may really be that easy--I just don't know.  I'm not giving up in any case, since I hate to lose existing capability.

Now that's very interesting... especially since the download UI on that site is very clunky.

It is possible to speed things up a little by choosing 100 signs per page and detail view (not "petit vignette" view, the default).  But I didn't want to try adding all 2276 signs to "shopping cart" and then download--that's just asking for server error, in my view--and it's tedious to subdivide.  Also, the order in which the signs are listed in default view is random, and changes with each fresh load of the Accueil page.

I thought it would save effort in the long run to keep track of index numbers, so I ended up writing a subroutine that basically does a complete download by adding a different sign to the shopping cart, downloading, and then emptying the cart (rinse and repeat 2276 times).

It turned out to be less painful than I was expecting.  The postdata your browser sends to the server as a given sign is added to "Mes dispositifs" reflects the renderings that are actually available for it.  However, the server doesn't validate this part of the postdata.  This allowed me to use fake postdata implying all seven kinds of renderings were available for all 2276 signs, which saved processing steps.

I did have the server expire my cookie midway through a full download, but that was easily fixed by using a test for no ZIP downloaded as a trigger to visit the Accueil page again to force a new session.