AARoads Forum

Non-Road Boards => Off-Topic => Topic started by: bandit957 on January 19, 2019, 04:37:39 AM

Title: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 19, 2019, 04:37:39 AM
Did kids at your school ever act up while the school was administering a standardized test? In my day, they always did. They always passed gas, loudly busted bubble gum, defaced the test packets, flicked Skittles across the room, knocked over desks, talked loudly, and cheated by whispering the answers.

In other words, kids misbehaved a lot, because schools around here absolutely worshiped standardized tests.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: 1995hoo on January 19, 2019, 08:59:19 AM
One of the guys at my table kept farting during the SAT. The guidance counsellor (a woman) wanted to know what was so funny and none of us would say. She knew us well enough to know we weren’t cheating, but none of us wanted to say “Adam’s farting.”
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 19, 2019, 10:51:27 AM
Ere, no? But I always take them in a separate room because of my iep so I don't know what they do in normal classrooms.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: GaryV on January 19, 2019, 10:57:45 AM
Not a standardized test, but through junior high and high school we had to fill out the same career interest survey each year.  About 11th grade, the whole class decided they wanted to be undertakers.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 19, 2019, 11:03:37 AM
Not a standardized test, but through junior high and high school we had to fill out the same career interest survey each year.  About 11th grade, the whole class decided they wanted to be undertakers.
I had to that too this year, but we actually took it seriously.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Takumi on January 19, 2019, 11:46:01 AM
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: GaryV on January 19, 2019, 11:56:21 AM
Not a standardized test, but through junior high and high school we had to fill out the same career interest survey each year.  About 11th grade, the whole class decided they wanted to be undertakers.
I had to that too this year, but we actually took it seriously.
The 4th or 5th time for the same survey, it was hard to take it seriously.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 19, 2019, 12:47:32 PM
Not a standardized test, but through junior high and high school we had to fill out the same career interest survey each year.  About 11th grade, the whole class decided they wanted to be undertakers.
I had to that too this year, but we actually took it seriously.
The 4th or 5th time for the same survey, it was hard to take it seriously.
I think I do a survey next year to but I think it's a bit different.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: adventurernumber1 on January 19, 2019, 02:40:37 PM
I don't remember any notable examples of kids misbehaving during standardized tests, but I might understand if they did (if they couldn't take one more second of it), since standardized tests were typically the most dismal, stressful, and indescribably boring point of the year. I never personally misbehaved, but when I was real young, sometimes I would freeze up and start crying when I shut down during a hard part of the test. Standardized tests are also heavily worshipped now around here, but I don't think it's so much the fault of the individual schools as it is the corrupt and evil state department of education. They put enormous stress on students, but especially teachers - their jobs being threatened if their students don't do "perfect" on these detestable exams which the state refuses to release any kind of general idea of what will be on it to the teachers (information they kind of might need if they are to best prepare their students). The states doesn't give the schools money and funds unless they do the standardized tests. The tests are also forced to count as 20% of the students' final grade, even though they won't give the teachers any fucking idea of what is on it. I somehow made it out of this shitty endeavor (recently graduating from high school in May of 2018), but my younger brother is now suffering as well (about to be in high school), and it's like it just gets worse and worse every year. Right now my brother is under enormous stress because of these standardized tests (with his ability to pass 8th Grade completely affected by that alone, regardless of the fact that he is a good student and a hard worker), and under this cloud of draconian hell. Right now the education system is a piece of shit - it values stress, busy work, standardized tests, and grades rather than students actually learning something, and being informed citizens that can do good in the world. Instead of engaging students and teaching them something, every day in K-12 is now just absorbed by testing, stress, and overwhelming nonsensical work loads. I am now in college, and I value education much more now that I am out of that hell. It took me graduating and having my "high school vision" (a vision of nothing but stress, testing, grades, and unnecessary loads of busy-work that was forced upon me by the current state of the education system) taken off that only then could I see the true value of education, take learning into my own initiative, and understanding just what the hell education is actually supposed to look like (at least to a certain extent). College has its struggles, but it is much more just in the way that it is run, and it is a much higher quality of education. It is to hell with standardized tests, and busy-work (for the most part). In general, stress is significantly reduced for students, and especially teachers. It is an institution of greater freedom and less tyranny. Students are treated as free individuals instead of prisoners. I'm mind-blown at the fact that I was deprived of this kind of education due to the current state of the K-12 education system. I am now trying to master my subjects, especially those I am most interested and competent in, and I am actually learning something, free of the chains of the modern high school experience. It is an exhilarating feeling of freedom, and an expansion of the mind. Graduation was hands-down my favorite day of all of high school. I had some great friends who I was sad to part ways with, but every last one of us was damn glad to get out of there at last. We were all now free. I can now truly engage my mind with the right kind of education, and I do so free of oppression. The current K-12 education system needs to be fucking fixed - all our students are getting more and more bogged down each and every year. This is obviously not working. Something needs to change, that's for sure.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: SectorZ on January 19, 2019, 05:17:37 PM
I don't remember any notable examples of kids misbehaving during standardized tests, but I might understand if they did (if they couldn't take one more second of it), since standardized tests were typically the most dismal, stressful, and indescribably boring point of the year. I never personally misbehaved, but when I was real young, sometimes I would freeze up and start crying when I shut down during a hard part of the test. Standardized tests are also heavily worshipped now around here, but I don't think it's so much the fault of the individual schools as it is the corrupt and evil state department of education. They put enormous stress on students, but especially teachers - their jobs being threatened if their students don't do "perfect" on these detestable exams which the state refuses to release any kind of general idea of what will be on it to the teachers (information they kind of might need if they are to best prepare their students). The states doesn't give the schools money and funds unless they do the standardized tests. The tests are also forced to count as 20% of the students' final grade, even though they won't give the teachers any fucking idea of what is on it. I somehow made it out of this shitty endeavor (recently graduating from high school in May of 2018), but my younger brother is now suffering as well (about to be in high school), and it's like it just gets worse and worse every year. Right now my brother is under enormous stress because of these standardized tests (with his ability to pass 8th Grade completely affected by that alone, regardless of the fact that he is a good student and a hard worker), and under this cloud of draconian hell. Right now the education system is a piece of shit - it values stress, busy work, standardized tests, and grades rather than students actually learning something, and being informed citizens that can do good in the world. Instead of engaging students and teaching them something, every day in K-12 is now just absorbed by testing, stress, and overwhelming nonsensical work loads. I am now in college, and I value education much more now that I am out of that hell. It took me graduating and having my "high school vision" (a vision of nothing but stress, testing, grades, and unnecessary loads of busy-work that was forced upon me by the current state of the education system) taken off that only then could I see the true value of education, take learning into my own initiative, and understanding just what the hell education is actually supposed to look like (at least to a certain extent). College has its struggles, but it is much more just in the way that it is run, and it is a much higher quality of education. It is to hell with standardized tests, and busy-work (for the most part). In general, stress is significantly reduced for students, and especially teachers. It is an institution of greater freedom and less tyranny. Students are treated as free individuals instead of prisoners. I'm mind-blown at the fact that I was deprived of this kind of education due to the current state of the K-12 education system. I am now trying to master my subjects, especially those I am most interested and competent in, and I am actually learning something, free of the chains of the modern high school experience. It is an exhilarating feeling of freedom, and an expansion of the mind. Graduation was hands-down my favorite day of all of high school. I had some great friends who I was sad to part ways with, but every last one of us was damn glad to get out of there at last. We were all now free. I can now truly engage my mind with the right kind of education, and I do so free of oppression. The current K-12 education system needs to be fucking fixed - all our students are getting more and more bogged down each and every year. This is obviously not working. Something needs to change, that's for sure.

Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: SectorZ on January 19, 2019, 05:18:56 PM
I don't remember much screwing around on those tests in school. I had Iowa tests, and some precursor to the horror that is now the state standardized testing in MA (MCAS).
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: adventurernumber1 on January 19, 2019, 05:19:45 PM
I don't remember any notable examples of kids misbehaving during standardized tests, but I might understand if they did (if they couldn't take one more second of it), since standardized tests were typically the most dismal, stressful, and indescribably boring point of the year. I never personally misbehaved, but when I was real young, sometimes I would freeze up and start crying when I shut down during a hard part of the test. Standardized tests are also heavily worshipped now around here, but I don't think it's so much the fault of the individual schools as it is the corrupt and evil state department of education. They put enormous stress on students, but especially teachers - their jobs being threatened if their students don't do "perfect" on these detestable exams which the state refuses to release any kind of general idea of what will be on it to the teachers (information they kind of might need if they are to best prepare their students). The states doesn't give the schools money and funds unless they do the standardized tests. The tests are also forced to count as 20% of the students' final grade, even though they won't give the teachers any fucking idea of what is on it. I somehow made it out of this shitty endeavor (recently graduating from high school in May of 2018), but my younger brother is now suffering as well (about to be in high school), and it's like it just gets worse and worse every year. Right now my brother is under enormous stress because of these standardized tests (with his ability to pass 8th Grade completely affected by that alone, regardless of the fact that he is a good student and a hard worker), and under this cloud of draconian hell. Right now the education system is a piece of shit - it values stress, busy work, standardized tests, and grades rather than students actually learning something, and being informed citizens that can do good in the world. Instead of engaging students and teaching them something, every day in K-12 is now just absorbed by testing, stress, and overwhelming nonsensical work loads. I am now in college, and I value education much more now that I am out of that hell. It took me graduating and having my "high school vision" (a vision of nothing but stress, testing, grades, and unnecessary loads of busy-work that was forced upon me by the current state of the education system) taken off that only then could I see the true value of education, take learning into my own initiative, and understanding just what the hell education is actually supposed to look like (at least to a certain extent). College has its struggles, but it is much more just in the way that it is run, and it is a much higher quality of education. It is to hell with standardized tests, and busy-work (for the most part). In general, stress is significantly reduced for students, and especially teachers. It is an institution of greater freedom and less tyranny. Students are treated as free individuals instead of prisoners. I'm mind-blown at the fact that I was deprived of this kind of education due to the current state of the K-12 education system. I am now trying to master my subjects, especially those I am most interested and competent in, and I am actually learning something, free of the chains of the modern high school experience. It is an exhilarating feeling of freedom, and an expansion of the mind. Graduation was hands-down my favorite day of all of high school. I had some great friends who I was sad to part ways with, but every last one of us was damn glad to get out of there at last. We were all now free. I can now truly engage my mind with the right kind of education, and I do so free of oppression. The current K-12 education system needs to be fucking fixed - all our students are getting more and more bogged down each and every year. This is obviously not working. Something needs to change, that's for sure.



Ah yes, that was a mouthful. I probably should have organized that into more paragraphs, but for some reason I did not.  :paranoid:  :-D
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 19, 2019, 05:20:23 PM
I don't remember much screwing around on those tests in school. I had Iowa tests, and some precursor to the horror that is now the state standardized testing in MA (MCAS).

The Iowa test (which plagues the whole country, not just Iowa) was absolutely horrible. And it was useless.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bing101 on January 19, 2019, 05:31:01 PM

Well here's a talk on the issue by Ridder.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 19, 2019, 05:43:43 PM
I don't remember any notable examples of kids misbehaving during standardized tests, but I might understand if they did (if they couldn't take one more second of it), since standardized tests were typically the most dismal, stressful, and indescribably boring point of the year. I never personally misbehaved, but when I was real young, sometimes I would freeze up and start crying when I shut down during a hard part of the test. Standardized tests are also heavily worshipped now around here, but I don't think it's so much the fault of the individual schools as it is the corrupt and evil state department of education. They put enormous stress on students, but especially teachers - their jobs being threatened if their students don't do "perfect" on these detestable exams which the state refuses to release any kind of general idea of what will be on it to the teachers (information they kind of might need if they are to best prepare their students). The states doesn't give the schools money and funds unless they do the standardized tests. The tests are also forced to count as 20% of the students' final grade, even though they won't give the teachers any fucking idea of what is on it. I somehow made it out of this shitty endeavor (recently graduating from high school in May of 2018), but my younger brother is now suffering as well (about to be in high school), and it's like it just gets worse and worse every year. Right now my brother is under enormous stress because of these standardized tests (with his ability to pass 8th Grade completely affected by that alone, regardless of the fact that he is a good student and a hard worker), and under this cloud of draconian hell. Right now the education system is a piece of shit - it values stress, busy work, standardized tests, and grades rather than students actually learning something, and being informed citizens that can do good in the world. Instead of engaging students and teaching them something, every day in K-12 is now just absorbed by testing, stress, and overwhelming nonsensical work loads. I am now in college, and I value education much more now that I am out of that hell. It took me graduating and having my "high school vision" (a vision of nothing but stress, testing, grades, and unnecessary loads of busy-work that was forced upon me by the current state of the education system) taken off that only then could I see the true value of education, take learning into my own initiative, and understanding just what the hell education is actually supposed to look like (at least to a certain extent). College has its struggles, but it is much more just in the way that it is run, and it is a much higher quality of education. It is to hell with standardized tests, and busy-work (for the most part). In general, stress is significantly reduced for students, and especially teachers. It is an institution of greater freedom and less tyranny. Students are treated as free individuals instead of prisoners. I'm mind-blown at the fact that I was deprived of this kind of education due to the current state of the K-12 education system. I am now trying to master my subjects, especially those I am most interested and competent in, and I am actually learning something, free of the chains of the modern high school experience. It is an exhilarating feeling of freedom, and an expansion of the mind. Graduation was hands-down my favorite day of all of high school. I had some great friends who I was sad to part ways with, but every last one of us was damn glad to get out of there at last. We were all now free. I can now truly engage my mind with the right kind of education, and I do so free of oppression. The current K-12 education system needs to be fucking fixed - all our students are getting more and more bogged down each and every year. This is obviously not working. Something needs to change, that's for sure.
Standardized tests are annoying because although students at my school don't really cheat, there is SO MUCH BUREAUCRATIC RED TAPE NONSENSE RULES! I'm only in 10th grade, so all the standardized tests that I have taken only require you do get like a 33% or so to pass so I really don't give a shit.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: adventurernumber1 on January 19, 2019, 05:54:39 PM
I don't remember any notable examples of kids misbehaving during standardized tests, but I might understand if they did (if they couldn't take one more second of it), since standardized tests were typically the most dismal, stressful, and indescribably boring point of the year. I never personally misbehaved, but when I was real young, sometimes I would freeze up and start crying when I shut down during a hard part of the test. Standardized tests are also heavily worshipped now around here, but I don't think it's so much the fault of the individual schools as it is the corrupt and evil state department of education. They put enormous stress on students, but especially teachers - their jobs being threatened if their students don't do "perfect" on these detestable exams which the state refuses to release any kind of general idea of what will be on it to the teachers (information they kind of might need if they are to best prepare their students). The states doesn't give the schools money and funds unless they do the standardized tests. The tests are also forced to count as 20% of the students' final grade, even though they won't give the teachers any fucking idea of what is on it. I somehow made it out of this shitty endeavor (recently graduating from high school in May of 2018), but my younger brother is now suffering as well (about to be in high school), and it's like it just gets worse and worse every year. Right now my brother is under enormous stress because of these standardized tests (with his ability to pass 8th Grade completely affected by that alone, regardless of the fact that he is a good student and a hard worker), and under this cloud of draconian hell. Right now the education system is a piece of shit - it values stress, busy work, standardized tests, and grades rather than students actually learning something, and being informed citizens that can do good in the world. Instead of engaging students and teaching them something, every day in K-12 is now just absorbed by testing, stress, and overwhelming nonsensical work loads. I am now in college, and I value education much more now that I am out of that hell. It took me graduating and having my "high school vision" (a vision of nothing but stress, testing, grades, and unnecessary loads of busy-work that was forced upon me by the current state of the education system) taken off that only then could I see the true value of education, take learning into my own initiative, and understanding just what the hell education is actually supposed to look like (at least to a certain extent). College has its struggles, but it is much more just in the way that it is run, and it is a much higher quality of education. It is to hell with standardized tests, and busy-work (for the most part). In general, stress is significantly reduced for students, and especially teachers. It is an institution of greater freedom and less tyranny. Students are treated as free individuals instead of prisoners. I'm mind-blown at the fact that I was deprived of this kind of education due to the current state of the K-12 education system. I am now trying to master my subjects, especially those I am most interested and competent in, and I am actually learning something, free of the chains of the modern high school experience. It is an exhilarating feeling of freedom, and an expansion of the mind. Graduation was hands-down my favorite day of all of high school. I had some great friends who I was sad to part ways with, but every last one of us was damn glad to get out of there at last. We were all now free. I can now truly engage my mind with the right kind of education, and I do so free of oppression. The current K-12 education system needs to be fucking fixed - all our students are getting more and more bogged down each and every year. This is obviously not working. Something needs to change, that's for sure.
Standardized tests are annoying because although students at my school don't really cheat, there is SO MUCH BUREAUCRATIC RED TAPE NONSENSE RULES! I'm only in 10th grade, so all the standardized tests that I have taken only require you do get like a 33% or so to pass so I really don't give a shit.

At my high school (and now middle school too, with my brother's class), they treat it like a legitimate test you would take in the classroom in terms of how it affected your grade - it would count as 20% of your final grade, as your "final exam." The teachers used to be able to make their own final exam, but not anymore (in the classes that require EOC's - which is many of the core classes). It is extremely stressful, and these stupid things could make or break your final grade. If you have a C in a class and bomb the EOC, you would probably fail the course. And these teachers' jobs are on the line (because the state department of education makes it to be that way), and they have no way of knowing how specifically to prepare their students for the test (thanks to the state's censorship of information that is any kind of general idea of what might be on it). It is agonizing to see the pain that good, honest teachers have to go through because of this crap - and the students' academic success is heavily affected by these ridiculous standardized tests as well.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: cjk374 on January 19, 2019, 06:02:20 PM
And people wonder why home schooling is so popular.  :hmm:  :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: SectorZ on January 19, 2019, 06:47:58 PM
I don't remember much screwing around on those tests in school. I had Iowa tests, and some precursor to the horror that is now the state standardized testing in MA (MCAS).

The Iowa test (which plagues the whole country, not just Iowa) was absolutely horrible. And it was useless.

Slipknot, annoying ethanol mandates, their damn primary caucus, and these tests. Got to admit, Iowa doesn't offer a lot to society...
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: hbelkins on January 19, 2019, 07:46:37 PM
I took the GRE one Saturday morning back in 1982 in a classroom on the Morehead State University campus. I'd gotten up early and before the test, went to Hardee's to get a couple of breakfast biscuits. Hardee's was fairly new in town then and my dad had always loved getting their steak biscuits whenever we went on vacation to Hardee's country, which when I was younger was Virginia and North Carolina. The Abingdon, Va., Hardee's was where we stopped most frequently.

At any rate, I took breakfast into the testing room and was eating before the test began. The administrator said no food was allowed in the testing room, and I'd have to go out in the hall to finish breakfast. The guy I was sitting beside, an acquaintance, said, "It's a shame when a man can't even eat a biscuit before taking a test." That guy was Rocky Adkins, current minority leader in the Kentucky House of Representatives, and now a candidate for governor.

Kids didn't really misbehave during testing when I was in elementary or high school. We were expected to be quiet and orderly, and we mostly were.

I don't remember much screwing around on those tests in school. I had Iowa tests, and some precursor to the horror that is now the state standardized testing in MA (MCAS).

Our achievement tests were always the California Test of Basic Skills.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 19, 2019, 10:21:44 PM
I don't remember any notable examples of kids misbehaving during standardized tests, but I might understand if they did (if they couldn't take one more second of it), since standardized tests were typically the most dismal, stressful, and indescribably boring point of the year. I never personally misbehaved, but when I was real young, sometimes I would freeze up and start crying when I shut down during a hard part of the test. Standardized tests are also heavily worshipped now around here, but I don't think it's so much the fault of the individual schools as it is the corrupt and evil state department of education. They put enormous stress on students, but especially teachers - their jobs being threatened if their students don't do "perfect" on these detestable exams which the state refuses to release any kind of general idea of what will be on it to the teachers (information they kind of might need if they are to best prepare their students). The states doesn't give the schools money and funds unless they do the standardized tests. The tests are also forced to count as 20% of the students' final grade, even though they won't give the teachers any fucking idea of what is on it. I somehow made it out of this shitty endeavor (recently graduating from high school in May of 2018), but my younger brother is now suffering as well (about to be in high school), and it's like it just gets worse and worse every year. Right now my brother is under enormous stress because of these standardized tests (with his ability to pass 8th Grade completely affected by that alone, regardless of the fact that he is a good student and a hard worker), and under this cloud of draconian hell. Right now the education system is a piece of shit - it values stress, busy work, standardized tests, and grades rather than students actually learning something, and being informed citizens that can do good in the world. Instead of engaging students and teaching them something, every day in K-12 is now just absorbed by testing, stress, and overwhelming nonsensical work loads. I am now in college, and I value education much more now that I am out of that hell. It took me graduating and having my "high school vision" (a vision of nothing but stress, testing, grades, and unnecessary loads of busy-work that was forced upon me by the current state of the education system) taken off that only then could I see the true value of education, take learning into my own initiative, and understanding just what the hell education is actually supposed to look like (at least to a certain extent). College has its struggles, but it is much more just in the way that it is run, and it is a much higher quality of education. It is to hell with standardized tests, and busy-work (for the most part). In general, stress is significantly reduced for students, and especially teachers. It is an institution of greater freedom and less tyranny. Students are treated as free individuals instead of prisoners. I'm mind-blown at the fact that I was deprived of this kind of education due to the current state of the K-12 education system. I am now trying to master my subjects, especially those I am most interested and competent in, and I am actually learning something, free of the chains of the modern high school experience. It is an exhilarating feeling of freedom, and an expansion of the mind. Graduation was hands-down my favorite day of all of high school. I had some great friends who I was sad to part ways with, but every last one of us was damn glad to get out of there at last. We were all now free. I can now truly engage my mind with the right kind of education, and I do so free of oppression. The current K-12 education system needs to be fucking fixed - all our students are getting more and more bogged down each and every year. This is obviously not working. Something needs to change, that's for sure.
Standardized tests are annoying because although students at my school don't really cheat, there is SO MUCH BUREAUCRATIC RED TAPE NONSENSE RULES! I'm only in 10th grade, so all the standardized tests that I have taken only require you do get like a 33% or so to pass so I really don't give a shit.

At my high school (and now middle school too, with my brother's class), they treat it like a legitimate test you would take in the classroom in terms of how it affected your grade - it would count as 20% of your final grade, as your "final exam." The teachers used to be able to make their own final exam, but not anymore (in the classes that require EOC's - which is many of the core classes). It is extremely stressful, and these stupid things could make or break your final grade. If you have a C in a class and bomb the EOC, you would probably fail the course. And these teachers' jobs are on the line (because the state department of education makes it to be that way), and they have no way of knowing how specifically to prepare their students for the test (thanks to the state's censorship of information that is any kind of general idea of what might be on it). It is agonizing to see the pain that good, honest teachers have to go through because of this crap - and the students' academic success is heavily affected by these ridiculous standardized tests as well.
Oh that really sucks!  :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: I hate bureaucratic crap like that :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:! Stupid politicians.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Beltway on January 19, 2019, 11:56:39 PM
Kids didn't really misbehave during testing when I was in elementary or high school. We were expected to be quiet and orderly, and we mostly were.

Pretty much the same at the schools I attended. 

Cutting up during standardized tests was especially frowned upon and might get you sent to the principal's office, and you were warned ahead of time.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 21, 2019, 02:25:21 PM
They always passed gas

How dare they!

Thread drift:  Are you able to hold in your farts?  I'm not.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 21, 2019, 02:55:15 PM
They always passed gas

How dare they!

Thread drift:  Are you able to hold in your farts?  I'm not.
I really don't notice anyone farting.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 21, 2019, 02:56:19 PM
It's funny when people fart.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 21, 2019, 04:09:59 PM
pooing is cool
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 21, 2019, 04:13:57 PM
pooing is cool

So is not acting like a complete bellend during exams.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 21, 2019, 04:17:47 PM
pooing is cool
Not during an exam... maybe.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Beltway on January 21, 2019, 05:25:01 PM
They always passed gas
How dare they!
Thread drift:  Are you able to hold in your farts?  I'm not.

It takes some work, but I am not going to let one go when there are people around, at least not indoors.

I many have done that (actually did a few) in the 7th Grade, but not as an adult.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 21, 2019, 05:35:56 PM
They always passed gas
How dare they!
Thread drift:  Are you able to hold in your farts?  I'm not.

It takes some work, but I am not going to let one go when there are people around, at least not indoors.

I many have done that (actually did a few) in the 7th Grade, but not as an adult.
I actually have a hard time keeping them in sometimes, but I think I'm getting better.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: SectorZ on January 21, 2019, 06:05:57 PM
They always passed gas
How dare they!
Thread drift:  Are you able to hold in your farts?  I'm not.

It takes some work, but I am not going to let one go when there are people around, at least not indoors.

I many have done that (actually did a few) in the 7th Grade, but not as an adult.
I actually have a hard time keeping them in sometimes, but I think I'm getting better.

Bandit, proud of what you started here?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: In_Correct on January 21, 2019, 06:58:43 PM
There was nothing nearly as bad during my Standardized Tests. The worst thing I can think of is a class mate's cell phone rang despite the teacher warning us it is an automatic failure and dismissal.

The teacher did tell her to go outside in the hall while she talks to her, the classmate protesting the entire time. But she did not fail and she did not get kicked out. The teacher only griped: "Do you know that you caused everybody lose time on their test?!" and said if there was one more interruption she would kick her out.

During the intermission, that class mate and the other class mates mocked the teacher even though she was not kicked out.

I know it was an accident, but if I am supposed to follow the rules (go as far as leave the battery out or even not bring my cell phone) I want every body else to follow the rules also.

I was not able to concentrate after that disruption happened. While that is the only disruption that ever happened, I certainly would cringe if there was any farting and giggling.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 21, 2019, 07:00:09 PM
They always passed gas
How dare they!
Thread drift:  Are you able to hold in your farts?  I'm not.

It takes some work, but I am not going to let one go when there are people around, at least not indoors.

I many have done that (actually did a few) in the 7th Grade, but not as an adult.
I actually have a hard time keeping them in sometimes, but I think I'm getting better.

Bandit, proud of what you started here?

Yes.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 21, 2019, 07:05:26 PM
I remember once in high school, we had our standardized test in a huge auditorium. People kept loudly passing gas the whole time. Finally, the guidance counselor (an elderly nun) stood up in front of the room and said, "Whoever is doing that is going to have to be isolated."
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on January 21, 2019, 07:20:03 PM
They always passed gas

How dare they!

Thread drift:  Are you able to hold in your farts?  I'm not.

Depends on a few things. Usually if I can’t hold it in it means something more ominous that needs an imminent release is waiting for launch.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 21, 2019, 09:13:31 PM
I remember once in high school, we had our standardized test in a huge auditorium. People kept loudly passing gas the whole time. Finally, the guidance counselor (an elderly nun) stood up in front of the room and said, "Whoever is doing that is going to have to be isolated."
nuns work at schools?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 21, 2019, 09:15:59 PM
I remember once in high school, we had our standardized test in a huge auditorium. People kept loudly passing gas the whole time. Finally, the guidance counselor (an elderly nun) stood up in front of the room and said, "Whoever is doing that is going to have to be isolated."
nuns work at schools?

This was in a Catholic school.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 21, 2019, 09:17:59 PM
I remember once in high school, we had our standardized test in a huge auditorium. People kept loudly passing gas the whole time. Finally, the guidance counselor (an elderly nun) stood up in front of the room and said, "Whoever is doing that is going to have to be isolated."
nuns work at schools?

This was in a Catholic school.
What does "isolated" mean?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 21, 2019, 09:18:59 PM
I remember once in high school, we had our standardized test in a huge auditorium. People kept loudly passing gas the whole time. Finally, the guidance counselor (an elderly nun) stood up in front of the room and said, "Whoever is doing that is going to have to be isolated."
nuns work at schools?

This was in a Catholic school.
What does "isolated" mean?

I think someone said something about being "isolated" in a "stink chamber."
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: 1 on January 21, 2019, 09:19:15 PM
I remember once in high school, we had our standardized test in a huge auditorium. People kept loudly passing gas the whole time. Finally, the guidance counselor (an elderly nun) stood up in front of the room and said, "Whoever is doing that is going to have to be isolated."
nuns work at schools?

This was in a Catholic school.
What does "isolated" mean?

In this context, removed from the rest of the group and put in a separate room.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 21, 2019, 09:53:02 PM
or even not bring my cell phone

*gasp*



nuns work at schools?

:pan:  You've never heard of a Catholic school?

What does "isolated" mean?

Being given the test in a room away from other people, I assume.  This is not hard to comprehend.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 21, 2019, 09:55:27 PM
Farts don't do anything except stink up the place and make a stupid sound, but 100% of everyone who has ever lived agree they're hilarious.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 21, 2019, 10:03:59 PM
Old people farts are the best.  Especially when they walk and mini-farts escape with every step.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: adventurernumber1 on January 21, 2019, 10:09:18 PM
And then sometimes incidents like this happen on live TV.  :bigass:  :rofl:



Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Beltway on January 21, 2019, 11:31:12 PM
Farts don't do anything except stink up the place and make a stupid sound, but 100% of everyone who has ever lived agree they're hilarious.

Not really ... loud belching is humorous, though.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: SectorZ on January 22, 2019, 08:26:51 AM
Farts don't do anything except stink up the place and make a stupid sound, but 100% of everyone who has ever lived agree they're hilarious.

Not really ... loud belching is humorous, though.

I once knew a woman (note I didn't call her a lady) that could not only belch loudly but with significant hang time. She actually belched the alphabet once. After a while, you just go from being disgusted to impressed.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 22, 2019, 08:47:37 AM
Farts don't do anything except stink up the place and make a stupid sound, but 100% of everyone who has ever lived agree they're hilarious.

Not really ... loud belching is humorous, though.

I once knew a woman (note I didn't call her a lady) that could not only belch loudly but with significant hang time. She actually belched the alphabet once. After a while, you just go from being disgusted to impressed.

When I was in school, kids used to fart different melodies. In grade school, some kid farted the "shave and a haircut" melody after hearing it used for the "Volkswagen does it again" jingle. In high school, someone farted the melody of the chorus of "Stayin' Alive."
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 22, 2019, 09:31:04 AM
One of the gym teachers in junior high was proctoring the test I took one year, and she really didn't like me, and was convinced I'd Christmas-treed the test because I finished it so quickly.  I probably should've taken my results to her after they came in (somewhere north of the 90th percentile), but I don't think she had the intellectual capacity to understand why that was proof I didn't Christmas-tree the test.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Beltway on January 22, 2019, 10:02:06 AM
Not really ... loud belching is humorous, though.
I once knew a woman (note I didn't call her a lady) that could not only belch loudly but with significant hang time. She actually belched the alphabet once. After a while, you just go from being disgusted to impressed.

I call that the "after belch" or the residual belch.  The belch that continues after the initial belch ends.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: LM117 on January 22, 2019, 10:23:58 AM
Old people farts are the best.  Especially when they walk and mini-farts escape with every step.

When did you meet my grandma? :-D
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: LM117 on January 22, 2019, 10:27:12 AM
Not a standardized test, but through junior high and high school we had to fill out the same career interest survey each year.  About 11th grade, the whole class decided they wanted to be undertakers.

No love for Kane?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: In_Correct on January 22, 2019, 10:49:05 AM
I remember once in high school, we had our standardized test in a huge auditorium. People kept loudly passing gas the whole time. Finally, the guidance counselor (an elderly nun) stood up in front of the room and said, "Whoever is doing that is going to have to be isolated."
nuns work at schools?

This was in a Catholic school.
What does "isolated" mean?

In this context, removed from the rest of the group and put in a separate room.

also as a form of punishment.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: hbelkins on January 22, 2019, 11:05:19 AM
One of the gym teachers in junior high was proctoring the test I took one year, and she really didn't like me, and was convinced I'd Christmas-treed the test because I finished it so quickly.

Please explain that term. I've never heard it used in this manner before. How does one "Christmas-tree" a test? Hang ornaments on it and draw a star on top?  :-D
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 22, 2019, 11:15:22 AM
One of the gym teachers in junior high was proctoring the test I took one year, and she really didn't like me, and was convinced I'd Christmas-treed the test because I finished it so quickly.

Please explain that term. I've never heard it used in this manner before. How does one "Christmas-tree" a test? Hang ornaments on it and draw a star on top?  :-D
Say you have five potential multiple-choice answers on a Scantron answer sheet.  You would fill in the bubbles as follows:

       E
     DE
   CDE
  BCDE
ABCDE
  BCDE
    CDE
      DE
        E

and so on.  When you turned the test sideways, it would look like a row of Christmas trees.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Beltway on January 22, 2019, 11:15:45 AM
One of the gym teachers in junior high was proctoring the test I took one year, and she really didn't like me, and was convinced I'd Christmas-treed the test because I finished it so quickly.
Please explain that term. I've never heard it used in this manner before. How does one "Christmas-tree" a test? Hang ornaments on it and draw a star on top?  :-D

I've heard it, it refers to multiple choice tests.

To fill in a test bubbling the answers randomly, like placing christmas bulbs on a tree, to guess because you don't know the answer or are to lazy to do it right.
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Christmas%20tree%27d
. . . . . . . .

Many students think that they can “Christmas-tree” multiple choice tests and pass with flying colors.  As a result, many teachers have started to design harder multiple choice tests that measure the student’s ability to comprehend, not just recall the material.  Students who want to know how to take a multiple choice test properly need to realize that teachers have gone beyond testing the superficial recall of knowledge.
http://www.edu-nova.com/articles/multiple-choice-tests/
. . . . . . . .

If there are 4 choices, I wonder how this would get more than 25% of the questions right, based on chance?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 22, 2019, 11:28:00 AM
If there are 4 choices, I wonder how this would get more than 25% of the questions right, based on chance?
I don't know that it's possible to fully randomize the answers, since that would mean you could potentially have a test where all the answers are A, B, C, or D, so I would think the actual chances of getting the correct answer to a question is slightly north or south of 25% (don't know enough about math to say).
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Brian556 on January 22, 2019, 11:41:10 AM
I think its every unreasonable for the teachers to expect students to not fart. Its just not humanly possible to not do it. Most of the time its woman that complain about farting and get students in trouble for it. This is just one of the examples that show how selfish and bitchy a lot of women are
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 22, 2019, 11:45:03 AM
I think its every unreasonable for the teachers to expect students to not fart.
It's not unreasonable to expect them to leave the room when they do it and go to the bathroom to fart or, failing that, fart in the hallway.  I spend a lot of time in meetings at work and I've never heard someone fart in a meeting.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 22, 2019, 01:00:13 PM
I think its every unreasonable for the teachers to expect students to not fart. Its just not humanly possible to not do it. Most of the time its woman that complain about farting and get students in trouble for it. This is just one of the examples that show how selfish and bitchy a lot of women are
At least leave the room
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 22, 2019, 02:24:42 PM
One of the gym teachers in junior high was proctoring the test I took one year, and she really didn't like me, and was convinced I'd Christmas-treed the test because I finished it so quickly.  I probably should've taken my results to her after they came in (somewhere north of the 90th percentile), but I don't think she had the intellectual capacity to understand why that was proof I didn't Christmas-tree the test.

Way back when, my dad took the ACT the day after moving.  He was exhausted from the move, and he just didn't have the energy for the exam.  So, for every question, he picked whichever answer looked the best—without having read the question first.  He ended up testing into remedial English and advanced physics.  Funny thing is, he was very literate (English literature was his concentration during college) and had never taken a single physics course.  Ended up re-taking the ACT a little later.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Brian556 on January 22, 2019, 02:34:39 PM
Back in my teens and 20's, I farted a lot. A co-worker counted 60 times in one shift, and that was a typical day for me. Due to this frequency, I couldn't really avoid doing it in front of others
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 22, 2019, 02:34:56 PM
One of the gym teachers in junior high was proctoring the test I took one year, and she really didn't like me, and was convinced I'd Christmas-treed the test because I finished it so quickly.  I probably should've taken my results to her after they came in (somewhere north of the 90th percentile), but I don't think she had the intellectual capacity to understand why that was proof I didn't Christmas-tree the test.

Way back when, my dad took the ACT the day after moving.  He was exhausted from the move, and he just didn't have the energy for the exam.  So, for every question, he picked whichever answer looked the best—without having read the question first.  He ended up testing into remedial English and advanced physics.  Funny thing is, he was very literate (English literature was his concentration during college) and had never taken a single physics course.  Ended up re-taking the ACT a little later.
Similarly, when we were children, my brother excelled at the quantitative portions of standardized testing, and I excelled at the qualitative portions.  When we both took the GMAT as adults, his qualitative/quantitative scores and mine were basically flip-flopped.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 22, 2019, 02:35:38 PM
Back in my teens and 20's, I farted a lot. A co-worker counted 60 times in one shift, and that was a typical day for me. Due to this frequency, I couldn't really avoid doing it in front of others
It's not your co-workers' faults that you were raised in a barn.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Ben114 on January 22, 2019, 02:46:35 PM
What the kids at an old school of mine would do is go to the bathroom and talk about it while waiting to get in.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 22, 2019, 03:36:08 PM
What the kids at an old school of mine would do is go to the bathroom and talk about "it" ;-) while waiting to get in.

FTFY
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Beltway on January 22, 2019, 03:43:40 PM
I think its every unreasonable for the teachers to expect students to not fart. Its just not humanly possible to not do it. Most of the time its woman that complain about farting and get students in trouble for it. This is just one of the examples that show how selfish and bitchy a lot of women are
At least leave the room

What happens if the instructor won't let you leave the room? 

What happens if you tell the instructor -why- you need to leave the room briefly, and they still won't let you leave the room? 
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 22, 2019, 03:56:51 PM
I think its every unreasonable for the teachers to expect students to not fart. Its just not humanly possible to not do it. Most of the time its woman that complain about farting and get students in trouble for it. This is just one of the examples that show how selfish and bitchy a lot of women are
At least leave the room

What happens if the instructor won't let you leave the room? 

What happens if you tell the instructor -why- you need to leave the room briefly, and they still won't let you leave the room?
If you had a doctor's note, this wouldn't happen.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 22, 2019, 04:07:07 PM
If you had a doctor's note, this wouldn't happen.

You can get a doctor's note in advance of farting?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Beltway on January 22, 2019, 04:09:05 PM
I think its every unreasonable for the teachers to expect students to not fart. Its just not humanly possible to not do it. Most of the time its woman that complain about farting and get students in trouble for it. This is just one of the examples that show how selfish and bitchy a lot of women are
At least leave the room
What happens if the instructor won't let you leave the room? 
What happens if you tell the instructor -why- you need to leave the room briefly, and they still won't let you leave the room?
If you had a doctor's note, this wouldn't happen.

If it is only occasional then you probably wouldn't have a doctor's note.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 22, 2019, 04:29:17 PM
I think its every unreasonable for the teachers to expect students to not fart. Its just not humanly possible to not do it. Most of the time its woman that complain about farting and get students in trouble for it. This is just one of the examples that show how selfish and bitchy a lot of women are
At least leave the room
What happens if the instructor won't let you leave the room? 
What happens if you tell the instructor -why- you need to leave the room briefly, and they still won't let you leave the room?
If you had a doctor's note, this wouldn't happen.

If it is only occasional then you probably wouldn't have a doctor's note.
If it's only occasional then you can a) leave the room or b) hold it.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Scott5114 on January 23, 2019, 08:34:56 AM
I don't remember any notable examples of kids misbehaving during standardized tests, but I might understand if they did (if they couldn't take one more second of it), since standardized tests were typically the most dismal, stressful, and indescribably boring point of the year. I never personally misbehaved, but when I was real young, sometimes I would freeze up and start crying when I shut down during a hard part of the test. Standardized tests are also heavily worshipped now around here, but I don't think it's so much the fault of the individual schools as it is the corrupt and evil state department of education. They put enormous stress on students, but especially teachers - their jobs being threatened if their students don't do "perfect" on these detestable exams which the state refuses to release any kind of general idea of what will be on it to the teachers (information they kind of might need if they are to best prepare their students). The states doesn't give the schools money and funds unless they do the standardized tests. The tests are also forced to count as 20% of the students' final grade, even though they won't give the teachers any fucking idea of what is on it.

In Oklahoma, the stress on the students is greatly reduced because the standardized tests are not part of the student's grade. Therefore, the teachers and administration plead with the students to try to get them to give a shit, with not much of a success. It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.

Fortunately for the teachers, the Oklahoma education department does at least give the teachers a basic idea of what will be covered, so they can at least be sure that they're covering the material (and there's often a week or two of review).

Also, keep in mind that some of this comes from the U.S. Dept. of Ed., by way of federal laws and programs like No Child Left Behind. State ed departments have to follow federal rules for how to disburse federal funds, like with FHWA and the MUTCD.

Right now the education system is a piece of shit - it values stress, busy work, standardized tests, and grades rather than students actually learning something, and being informed citizens that can do good in the world. Instead of engaging students and teaching them something, every day in K-12 is now just absorbed by testing, stress, and overwhelming nonsensical work loads.

It was becoming that way when I graduated in 2007. This is a salient point that too many adults in this country are blind to—students are helpless upon graduation because the relevant metrics don't measure whether anyone actually learns anything. There were too many classes I just barely skated by because I would sit in class, absorb the material from the book or the teacher, and know, remember, and understand it—but my grade actually measured my patience for fill-in-the-blank worksheets and rote repetition of math problems. I was able to pass by being able to happily regurgitate all the information on the test, because I did know it, I just didn't like having my time wasted when I could prove I knew the material.

Homework is a huge killer of education—after spending all day out of the house doing any one activity, it is entirely human to be mentally exhausted and burnt-out, and to want to use the scant remaining hours in the day on recharging with something fun. It is the same reason why I don't want to come home from work and count change into rolls, because I do that for nine hours a day at work and I need to change gears. But we measure children on their ability to come home and remain focused on busy work.

Is it any wonder that after twelve years of high school, I burnt out of college after one year and found working more appealing?

But if you tell this to anyone who graduated in years past, you get the tired, hideously malformed reasoning that Kids These Days Are Just Lazy, And Don't LikeWork, displaying the irony that they can't entertain an argument more complex than the most banal thinking that can be displayed about younger generations, and has been for millennia. (There are "Kids these days are so lazy!" treatises dating back to Roman times. Look them up.)

And it's not effective work either—there are so many people out there ages 18 to 99 who cannot meaningfully handle the real world because the education system does not even try to address things like logic, or sound reasoning, or encourage intellectual curiosity. Too many people, when confronted with an unfamiliar situation, like an unfamiliar task on a computer or how to use a tool they've never used before, shut down and bray for someone to do it for them instead of taking the initiative to try to collect information and solve the problem themselves.

Public education needs to be retooled to focus on education rather than grades, and to work smarter instead of harder.

Way back when, my dad took the ACT the day after moving.  He was exhausted from the move, and he just didn't have the energy for the exam.  So, for every question, he picked whichever answer looked the best—without having read the question first.  He ended up testing into remedial English and advanced physics.  Funny thing is, he was very literate (English literature was his concentration during college) and had never taken a single physics course.  Ended up re-taking the ACT a little later.

I ended up doing more or less the same thing on a placement exam in college orientation. Better grades are better grades, right? So I naively guessed on the questions I didn't know, same as I'd do on any other multiple choice test. Ended up "lucking" into a math class that was far harder than I needed to be in and lost my scholarship as a result.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Scott5114 on January 23, 2019, 08:44:30 AM
Most of the time its woman that complain about farting and get students in trouble for it. This is just one of the examples that show how selfish and bitchy a lot of women are

Dude, come on.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 23, 2019, 09:24:17 AM
It was becoming that way when I graduated in 2007. This is a salient point that too many adults in this country are blind to—students are helpless upon graduation because the relevant metrics don't measure whether anyone actually learns anything. There were too many classes I just barely skated by because I would sit in class, absorb the material from the book or the teacher, and know, remember, and understand it—but my grade actually measured my patience for fill-in-the-blank worksheets and rote repetition of math problems. I was able to pass by being able to happily regurgitate all the information on the test, because I did know it, I just didn't like having my time wasted when I could prove I knew the material.
I had no idea how to study or learn when I got to college, partly because I didn't need to and still get grades for most of my K-12 career.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 23, 2019, 09:41:03 AM
I don't remember any notable examples of kids misbehaving during standardized tests, but I might understand if they did (if they couldn't take one more second of it), since standardized tests were typically the most dismal, stressful, and indescribably boring point of the year. I never personally misbehaved, but when I was real young, sometimes I would freeze up and start crying when I shut down during a hard part of the test. Standardized tests are also heavily worshipped now around here, but I don't think it's so much the fault of the individual schools as it is the corrupt and evil state department of education. They put enormous stress on students, but especially teachers - their jobs being threatened if their students don't do "perfect" on these detestable exams which the state refuses to release any kind of general idea of what will be on it to the teachers (information they kind of might need if they are to best prepare their students). The states doesn't give the schools money and funds unless they do the standardized tests. The tests are also forced to count as 20% of the students' final grade, even though they won't give the teachers any fucking idea of what is on it.

In Oklahoma, the stress on the students is greatly reduced because the standardized tests are not part of the student's grade. Therefore, the teachers and administration plead with the students to try to get them to give a shit, with not much of a success. It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.

Fortunately for the teachers, the Oklahoma education department does at least give the teachers a basic idea of what will be covered, so they can at least be sure that they're covering the material (and there's often a week or two of review).

Also, keep in mind that some of this comes from the U.S. Dept. of Ed., by way of federal laws and programs like No Child Left Behind. State ed departments have to follow federal rules for how to disburse federal funds, like with FHWA and the MUTCD.

Right now the education system is a piece of shit - it values stress, busy work, standardized tests, and grades rather than students actually learning something, and being informed citizens that can do good in the world. Instead of engaging students and teaching them something, every day in K-12 is now just absorbed by testing, stress, and overwhelming nonsensical work loads.

It was becoming that way when I graduated in 2007. This is a salient point that too many adults in this country are blind to—students are helpless upon graduation because the relevant metrics don't measure whether anyone actually learns anything. There were too many classes I just barely skated by because I would sit in class, absorb the material from the book or the teacher, and know, remember, and understand it—but my grade actually measured my patience for fill-in-the-blank worksheets and rote repetition of math problems. I was able to pass by being able to happily regurgitate all the information on the test, because I did know it, I just didn't like having my time wasted when I could prove I knew the material.

Homework is a huge killer of education—after spending all day out of the house doing any one activity, it is entirely human to be mentally exhausted and burnt-out, and to want to use the scant remaining hours in the day on recharging with something fun. It is the same reason why I don't want to come home from work and count change into rolls, because I do that for nine hours a day at work and I need to change gears. But we measure children on their ability to come home and remain focused on busy work.

Is it any wonder that after twelve years of high school, I burnt out of college after one year and found working more appealing?

But if you tell this to anyone who graduated in years past, you get the tired, hideously malformed reasoning that Kids These Days Are Just Lazy, And Don't LikeWork, displaying the irony that they can't entertain an argument more complex than the most banal thinking that can be displayed about younger generations, and has been for millennia. (There are "Kids these days are so lazy!" treatises dating back to Roman times. Look them up.)

And it's not effective work either—there are so many people out there ages 18 to 99 who cannot meaningfully handle the real world because the education system does not even try to address things like logic, or sound reasoning, or encourage intellectual curiosity. Too many people, when confronted with an unfamiliar situation, like an unfamiliar task on a computer or how to use a tool they've never used before, shut down and bray for someone to do it for them instead of taking the initiative to try to collect information and solve the problem themselves.

Public education needs to be retooled to focus on education rather than grades, and to work smarter instead of harder.

Way back when, my dad took the ACT the day after moving.  He was exhausted from the move, and he just didn't have the energy for the exam.  So, for every question, he picked whichever answer looked the best—without having read the question first.  He ended up testing into remedial English and advanced physics.  Funny thing is, he was very literate (English literature was his concentration during college) and had never taken a single physics course.  Ended up re-taking the ACT a little later.

I ended up doing more or less the same thing on a placement exam in college orientation. Better grades are better grades, right? So I naively guessed on the questions I didn't know, same as I'd do on any other multiple choice test. Ended up "lucking" into a math class that was far harder than I needed to be in and lost my scholarship as a result.
Yeah, the teachers are like "try your best your parents will see". I still don't give a crap.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: 1 on January 23, 2019, 10:06:50 AM
In Massachusetts, Lexington and almost anywhere within 2 towns teaches students correctly.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 23, 2019, 10:39:49 AM
In Massachusetts, Lexington and almost anywhere within 2 towns teaches students correctly.
I'm three towns away  :-/.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kevinb1994 on January 23, 2019, 02:19:05 PM
In Massachusetts, Lexington and almost anywhere within 2 towns teaches students correctly.
I'm three towns away  :-/.

Well you’re one, two, three towns away from the whole ball game! ;-)
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 23, 2019, 02:20:12 PM
It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.

For the vast majority of institutional education, a student never finds out what questions he got wrong on a test, let alone what the right answers were.  The general formula goes like this:

1.  Learn the material.
2.  Take a test over the material.
3.  Get graded on the test.
4.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
5.  Learn the next topic's material.
6.  Take a test over the new material.
7.  Get graded on the test.
8.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
9.  Repeat steps 5–8 for the rest of your school life.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: SectorZ on January 23, 2019, 02:30:19 PM
In Massachusetts, Lexington and almost anywhere within 2 towns teaches students correctly.

I'm feeling a lack of confidence in your own school system?

I'm also 3 away, so guess I'm out...
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: US 89 on January 23, 2019, 02:36:47 PM
It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.

For the vast majority of institutional education, a student never finds out what questions he got wrong on a test, let alone what the right answers were.  The general formula goes like this:

1.  Learn the material.
2.  Take a test over the material.
3.  Get graded on the test.
4.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
5.  Learn the next topic's material.
6.  Take a test over the new material.
7.  Get graded on the test.
8.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
9.  Repeat steps 5–8 for the rest of your school life.

You forgot to mention that in many classes, the tests are cumulative and require mastering the concepts from previous tests.  :pan:
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 23, 2019, 02:45:23 PM
In Massachusetts, Lexington and almost anywhere within 2 towns teaches students correctly.
I'm three towns away  :-/.

Well you’re one, two, three towns away from the whole ball game! ;-)
My school district is top in the state I think.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 23, 2019, 03:24:19 PM
It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.
For the vast majority of institutional education, a student never finds out what questions he got wrong on a test, let alone what the right answers were.  The general formula goes like this:

[…]

You mean you didn't get your exams back after they were graded to see what you missed?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: 1 on January 23, 2019, 03:26:10 PM
It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.
For the vast majority of institutional education, a student never finds out what questions he got wrong on a test, let alone what the right answers were.  The general formula goes like this:

[…]

You mean you didn't get your exams back after they were graded to see what you missed?

For regular tests, yes. For state testing, no.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 23, 2019, 03:27:27 PM
The way kphoger worded his post made it sound like he was talking about all exams though.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 23, 2019, 03:55:01 PM


It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.

For the vast majority of institutional education, a student never finds out what questions he got wrong on a test, let alone what the right answers were.  The general formula goes like this:

[…]

You mean you didn't get your exams back after they were graded to see what you missed?

I've had a grand total of one teacher do that, and he only did it on the semester finals (high school).  He also only did it for two of the four years I had him as a teacher.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 23, 2019, 04:01:33 PM
This speaks volumes to the different school experiences that are possible. I don't remember having a single teacher in high school that didn't give graded exams back.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 23, 2019, 04:06:09 PM
I don't remember having a single teacher in high school that didn't give graded exams back.
It would mean never being able to use the same exam twice.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 23, 2019, 04:14:06 PM
This speaks volumes to the different school experiences that are possible. I don't remember having a single teacher in high school that didn't give graded exams back.

So did you also learn what the correct answers were?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 23, 2019, 04:22:58 PM
This speaks volumes to the different school experiences that are possible. I don't remember having a single teacher in high school that didn't give graded exams back.
So did you also learn what the correct answers were?

If I had wanted to, yes. Most of my teachers were pretty open about going over exam problems during free periods in class/after school ended.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kevinb1994 on January 23, 2019, 05:56:32 PM
In Massachusetts, Lexington and almost anywhere within 2 towns teaches students correctly.

I'm feeling a lack of confidence in your own school system?

I'm also 3 away, so guess I'm out...

Well then, you’re also one, two, three towns away from the whole ball game! ;-)
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: hbelkins on January 23, 2019, 07:02:04 PM
The discussion about flatulence in class reminds me of an incident that happened when I was in college.

A friend of mine was seated behind me in class, taught by a black professor (the mention of his pigmentation becomes relevant later in this tale), and he popped one out. I think he and I were the only ones who heard it. He grunted or sighed a little after passing gas. I couldn't help but laugh a little, and Professor Mays took exception to that. "What's funny," he asked. "I just thought of something," was my response. "I can think of a few things too," was his reply. I don't remember what was being discussed in class that day. Later, my friend said his gut had been killing him and he couldn't help but let one slip.  At least it wasn't deadly, in addition to not being silent.

As I said, this professor was black. He was, I learned later, a native of Harlan County in southeastern Kentucky, near the Virginia border. He was teaching and living in Morehead, Ky., which didn't have a large population of blacks. Many of the black faculty members lived elsewhere -- many in Lexington or Maysville -- and commuted to Morehead. He was notorious for dating students. Someone in authority called him in to discuss this. He said, "would you prefer that I date white non-students?" The decision was made that by all means, he should continue to date students of his own race vs. older women of another race. This was in the early 1980s. At the time, the county clerk in Rowan County was the mother of someone who would later go on to notoriety as her mother's successor. Kim Davis. You may have heard of her.  :bigass:
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Scott5114 on January 23, 2019, 07:29:44 PM
It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.

For the vast majority of institutional education, a student never finds out what questions he got wrong on a test, let alone what the right answers were.  The general formula goes like this:

1.  Learn the material.
2.  Take a test over the material.
3.  Get graded on the test.
4.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
5.  Learn the next topic's material.
6.  Take a test over the new material.
7.  Get graded on the test.
8.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
9.  Repeat steps 5–8 for the rest of your school life.

This was not my experience at any point in school in Oklahoma (roughly 1996–2007)—non-standardized tests (i.e. those drawn up and proctored by the teachers themselves, which makes up the vast majority of them) were marked up in red pen and returned same as any other homework. How is learning even possible without the ability to know what you got wrong? (If I put that the 16th president was Abraham Omaha and never get feedback that I was wrong, I'm apt to keep thinking well of good old President Omaha.) This has cumulative effects in some subjects—if you fail to comprehend certain math topics, you have no hope of understanding more advanced topics that rely on those.

Additionally, not returning tests makes it impossible to hold teachers accountable when they make mistakes in grading—which is not as rare as you'd like it to be. It also would essentially mean that the grade is whatever the teacher says it is. Teachers are human too, and that's far too much power for someone to hold: a teacher could give a student a failing grade for entirely personal reasons. On a marked-up test, the teacher has to make at least a perfunctory attempt to justify the poor grade.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 23, 2019, 07:43:15 PM
At the time, the county clerk in Rowan County was the mother of someone who would later go on to notoriety as her mother's successor. Kim Davis. You may have heard of her.

Yes, the horrible woman who got jailed for refusing to do her job. A real role model. :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: formulanone on January 23, 2019, 07:45:00 PM
It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.

For the vast majority of institutional education, a student never finds out what questions he got wrong on a test, let alone what the right answers were.  The general formula goes like this:

1.  Learn the material.
2.  Take a test over the material.
3.  Get graded on the test.
4.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
5.  Learn the next topic's material.
6.  Take a test over the new material.
7.  Get graded on the test.
8.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
9.  Repeat steps 5–8 for the rest of your school life.

I'd say at least 90% of my tests involved knowing what you got right or wrong, from elementary school right through college. There were obvious exceptions for standardized tests (graded off-site) and final exams, where you rarely found out anything other than a score, although some professors let you meet up a few days later to see what you got right or wrong.

Got a good scare on one final, where the professor gave two different multiple-choice tests on Scantron (https://www.scantron.com/scanners-forms/), but inserted the wrong "key" which failed my test in one fell swoop. I was teetering between an A and a B, so he seemed shocked enough to try again, and then immediately figured out his error. It's a good thing I visited...
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 24, 2019, 08:11:10 AM
The discussion about flatulence in class reminds me of an incident that happened when I was in college.

A friend of mine was seated behind me in class, taught by a black professor (the mention of his pigmentation becomes relevant later in this tale), and he popped one out. I think he and I were the only ones who heard it. He grunted or sighed a little after passing gas. I couldn't help but laugh a little, and Professor Mays took exception to that. "What's funny," he asked. "I just thought of something," was my response. "I can think of a few things too," was his reply. I don't remember what was being discussed in class that day. Later, my friend said his gut had been killing him and he couldn't help but let one slip.  At least it wasn't deadly, in addition to not being silent.

As I said, this professor was black. He was, I learned later, a native of Harlan County in southeastern Kentucky, near the Virginia border. He was teaching and living in Morehead, Ky., which didn't have a large population of blacks. Many of the black faculty members lived elsewhere -- many in Lexington or Maysville -- and commuted to Morehead. He was notorious for dating students. Someone in authority called him in to discuss this. He said, "would you prefer that I date white non-students?" This was in the early 1980s. At the time, the county clerk in Rowan County was the mother of someone who would later go on to notoriety as her mother's successor. Kim Davis. You may have heard of her.  :bigass:
Do you ever tell stories that are interesting?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: In_Correct on January 24, 2019, 10:20:59 AM
It doesn't help that the results come back so far after the test (I think sometimes the next school year, even) that by the time you get the results you don't even remember any of the questions or what you could have done better.



For the vast majority of institutional education, a student never finds out what questions he got wrong on a test, let alone what the right answers were.  The general formula goes like this:

1.  Learn the material.
2.  Take a test over the material.
3.  Get graded on the test.
4.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
5.  Learn the next topic's material.
6.  Take a test over the new material.
7.  Get graded on the test.
8.  Remain in the dark about what you hadn't learned.
9.  Repeat steps 5–8 for the rest of your school life.

This was not my experience at any point in school in Oklahoma (roughly 1996–2007)—non-standardized tests (i.e. those drawn up and proctored by the teachers themselves, which makes up the vast majority of them) were marked up in red pen and returned same as any other homework. How is learning even possible without the ability to know what you got wrong? (If I put that the 16th president was Abraham Omaha and never get feedback that I was wrong, I'm apt to keep thinking well of good old President Omaha.) This has cumulative effects in some subjects—if you fail to comprehend certain math topics, you have no hope of understanding more advanced topics that rely on those.

Additionally, not returning tests makes it impossible to hold teachers accountable when they make mistakes in grading—which is not as rare as you'd like it to be. It also would essentially mean that the grade is whatever the teacher says it is. Teachers are human too, and that's far too much power for someone to hold: a teacher could give a student a failing grade for entirely personal reasons. On a marked-up test, the teacher has to make at least a perfunctory attempt to justify the poor grade.

Some teachers did explain in red ink what I did wrong on a paper, but those were mostly Student - Teachers.

I remember about half of my regular Teachers giving Students the papers to grade.  :-o Some times we graded our own papers. Other times we graded other papers. There were even times when a complete different class graded the papers.

This short cut provides inaccuracy, (usually intentional inaccuracy) and guarantees that you don't know what you did wrong.

Perhaps some of the reason why Teachers "cheat" while grading papers is be cause teachers some times have to share class rooms. They must leave the class room during their conference periods, Coaches especially. Many Coaches teach class during only the mornings. Other teachers might have part time administrative duties such as counselor or the district's Registered Nurse (different from the campus based LPNs) any of these situations provides class room space for other part time and multi campus teachers.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 24, 2019, 11:31:28 AM
I remember about half of my regular Teachers giving Students the papers to grade.  :-o Some times we graded our own papers. Other times we graded other papers. There were even times when a complete different class graded the papers.

This short cut provides inaccuracy, (usually intentional inaccuracy) and guarantees that you don't know what you did wrong.
On the plus side, you've learned what the correct answer is.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 24, 2019, 11:48:48 AM
When people farted during the standardized tests, I usually just sat there and snickered. Now I wish I had loudly declared in a Downtown Julie Brown voice, "A bunkeroo now wafts!"
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 24, 2019, 12:38:33 PM
When people farted during the standardized tests, I usually just sat there and snickered. Now I wish I had loudly declared in a Downtown Julie Brown voice, "A bunkeroo now wafts!"
Sounds like a good way to go to the principals office
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: SectorZ on January 24, 2019, 02:34:33 PM
When people farted during the standardized tests, I usually just sat there and snickered. Now I wish I had loudly declared in a Downtown Julie Brown voice, "A bunkeroo now wafts!"

Was that the allegedly funny Julie Brown or the VJ with the British accent Julie Brown? MTV employing both at the same time was an odd thing.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: bandit957 on January 24, 2019, 02:35:21 PM
When people farted during the standardized tests, I usually just sat there and snickered. Now I wish I had loudly declared in a Downtown Julie Brown voice, "A bunkeroo now wafts!"

Was that the allegedly funny Julie Brown or the VJ with the British accent Julie Brown? MTV employing both at the same time was an odd thing.

The VJ with the British accent.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 24, 2019, 02:40:57 PM
non-standardized tests (i.e. those drawn up and proctored by the teachers themselves, which makes up the vast majority of them) were marked up in red pen and returned same as any other homework. How is learning even possible without the ability to know what you got wrong? (If I put that the 16th president was Abraham Omaha and never get feedback that I was wrong, I'm apt to keep thinking well of good old President Omaha.) This has cumulative effects in some subjects—if you fail to comprehend certain math topics, you have no hope of understanding more advanced topics that rely on those.

When you say "marked up", do you mean the correct answer was written in?  Or just that the question was marked as wrong?



Perhaps some of the reason why Teachers "cheat" while grading papers

My dad had a professor in seminary who was known to take everyone's essays, stack them up, throw the stack down a stairway, and then grade them based on where they landed.  Having a longer paper, therefore, improved one's chance of getting a good grade.  Students were known to write several pages of original material, then copy-and-paste that a few times.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Scott5114 on January 25, 2019, 02:45:17 AM
non-standardized tests (i.e. those drawn up and proctored by the teachers themselves, which makes up the vast majority of them) were marked up in red pen and returned same as any other homework. How is learning even possible without the ability to know what you got wrong? (If I put that the 16th president was Abraham Omaha and never get feedback that I was wrong, I'm apt to keep thinking well of good old President Omaha.) This has cumulative effects in some subjects—if you fail to comprehend certain math topics, you have no hope of understanding more advanced topics that rely on those.

When you say "marked up", do you mean the correct answer was written in?  Or just that the question was marked as wrong?

It depended on the type of assignment and the teacher:

Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 25, 2019, 08:51:48 AM
non-standardized tests (i.e. those drawn up and proctored by the teachers themselves, which makes up the vast majority of them) were marked up in red pen and returned same as any other homework. How is learning even possible without the ability to know what you got wrong? (If I put that the 16th president was Abraham Omaha and never get feedback that I was wrong, I'm apt to keep thinking well of good old President Omaha.) This has cumulative effects in some subjects—if you fail to comprehend certain math topics, you have no hope of understanding more advanced topics that rely on those.

When you say "marked up", do you mean the correct answer was written in?  Or just that the question was marked as wrong?

It depended on the type of assignment and the teacher:

  • Some particularly lazy teachers would just mark an X, but at least this let you look up the correct answer yourself if you wanted to take the initiative to do so. At the very least, you could approach the teacher and say "Why did I get question so-and-so wrong" and force them to justify it. If it was a marginal case, sometimes you could lawyer them into partial credit.
  • If it was multiple choice (the most common form of tests that I remember taking) the correct answer would usually be circled.
  • If it was fill in the blank or anything like that with short, definite answers, the correct one would often be written in.
  • Math teachers were generally insistent that you'd show your work; this meant that they could sometimes pick out what you did wrong and would circle the step that you got wrong. Some that taught more advanced math or science would even give you partial credit for demonstrating that you knew the process they were actually testing on, if you only got the wrong answer because you whiffed basic addition or something like that along the way.
  • Writing assignments (creative writing and essays) were generally graded with standard proofreading marks and the number of points deducted written in the margin. Some teachers would write brief remarks like "Unclear, does this refer to Caesar or Antony?" or "Contradicts what was stated in 4th paragraph" or stuff like that. I even had one English teacher that seemed to do running Roger Ebert-style commentary in the margins. I enjoyed that class because I got a good feel of her particularly dark sense of humor and writing things that she found enjoyable was a fun challenge.
Almost all teachers give partial credit. Sometimes the work is worth more than the answer.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Ben114 on January 26, 2019, 07:45:00 PM
In Massachusetts, Lexington and almost anywhere within 2 towns teaches students correctly.
and private schools
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: GCrites80s on January 29, 2019, 08:31:07 PM
When I was in the 12th grade, the entire school was taking some standardized test (don't remember which one) and that's when the school decided to bring in the drug-sniffing dogs to sniff the lockers and the cars in the student lot. Two kids got busted: a teacher's kid and a buddy of mine that is now a cop.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 29, 2019, 09:13:15 PM
When I was in the 12th grade, the entire school was taking some standardized test (don't remember which one) and that's when the school decided to bring in the drug-sniffing dogs to sniff the lockers and the cars in the student lot. Two kids got busted: a teacher's kid and a buddy of mine that is now a cop.
Why would drugs be a concern with standardized tests?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 29, 2019, 09:14:33 PM
When I was in the 12th grade, the entire school was taking some standardized test (don't remember which one) and that's when the school decided to bring in the drug-sniffing dogs to sniff the lockers and the cars in the student lot. Two kids got busted: a teacher's kid and a buddy of mine that is now a cop.
Why would drugs be a concern with standardized tests?

Can't be having average scores weighed down by the pot-smoking hippies.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 29, 2019, 09:22:02 PM
When I was in the 12th grade, the entire school was taking some standardized test (don't remember which one) and that's when the school decided to bring in the drug-sniffing dogs to sniff the lockers and the cars in the student lot. Two kids got busted: a teacher's kid and a buddy of mine that is now a cop.
Why would drugs be a concern with standardized tests?
I think the idea was that it was one of the few times when all of the students were in class and the cops could do this.

God knows how they got probable cause to search the entire school and the parking lot, other than some bootlicking principal.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on January 30, 2019, 01:39:20 AM
When I was in the 12th grade, the entire school was taking some standardized test (don't remember which one) and that's when the school decided to bring in the drug-sniffing dogs to sniff the lockers and the cars in the student lot. Two kids got busted: a teacher's kid and a buddy of mine that is now a cop.
Why would drugs be a concern with standardized tests?
God knows how they got probable cause to search the entire school and the parking lot, other than some bootlicking principal.

My impression is schools have generally felt they need little legal cause to abuse intimidate protect students, basically “you have no privacy/search protection rights on school grounds”.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 30, 2019, 10:48:05 AM
When I was in the 12th grade, the entire school was taking some standardized test (don't remember which one) and that's when the school decided to bring in the drug-sniffing dogs to sniff the lockers and the cars in the student lot. Two kids got busted: a teacher's kid and a buddy of mine that is now a cop.
Why would drugs be a concern with standardized tests?
God knows how they got probable cause to search the entire school and the parking lot, other than some bootlicking principal.

My impression is schools have generally felt they need little legal cause to abuse intimidate protect students, basically “you have no privacy/search protection rights on school grounds”.
From the sound of it this does not seem to threaten students.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: MNHighwayMan on January 30, 2019, 11:11:27 AM
From the sound of it this does not seem to threaten students.

I had a couple of classmates who died from snorting too much marijuana.

WHY WON'T YOU THINK OF THE CHILDREN!?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 30, 2019, 11:50:46 AM
From the sound of it this does not seem to threaten students.

I had a couple of classmates who died from snorting too much marijuana.

WHY WON'T YOU THINK OF THE CHILDREN!?
no it's becky
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 30, 2019, 01:31:09 PM
Question:  If you drive to my house, park in my driveway, and bring your luggage into my living room... then the police want to search your car and your luggage... do you still have to give consent, or is it my decision because everything is on my property?
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: index on January 30, 2019, 02:01:23 PM
Nobody does that these days. It wouldn't be worth failing the test/coming back to retake it and if anyone did make that happen they'd probably get crucified.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: abefroman329 on January 30, 2019, 02:11:27 PM
Question:  If you drive to my house, park in my driveway, and bring your luggage into my living room... then the police want to search your car and your luggage... do you still have to give consent, or is it my decision because everything is on my property?
IANAL
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 30, 2019, 03:37:17 PM
Question:  If you drive to my house, park in my driveway, and bring your luggage into my living room... then the police want to search your car and your luggage... do you still have to give consent, or is it my decision because everything is on my property?
IANAL

The reason I asked is that's basically what students do when they come to school:  leave their car in the parking lot, put their backpack in the locker...
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: Scott5114 on January 30, 2019, 04:49:57 PM
From personal experience, I can say that you would have to give consent, because the offending luggage is in your house. I had a situation where I had a roommate that was staying with me on-and-off but not on the lease (she had problems with her parents that led to her intermittently not having a place to stay otherwise). At some point, Norman PD had reason to think she had marijuana, so I woke up to the sound of the police officers in my living room. They tried to get me, as the leaseholder, to consent to searching the bedroom she was staying in, trying the "if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear" tactic, and I pushed back by pointing out that I had been asleep during whatever events had transpired that caused them to be in my apartment, so until I understood that, I couldn't consider the search reasonable, and if they felt otherwise to go get a warrant. They declined to do so and left.

Keeping in mind, as hinted to above, legally schools are considered to have the authority to do whatever they want to students; most legal rights, including constitutional ones, are nullified on school grounds. So sayeth the Supreme Court.
Title: Re: Misbehaving during standardized tests
Post by: kphoger on January 30, 2019, 04:54:23 PM
I was really asking the reverse:  would the police have legally needed your roommates permission anyway?