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Non-Road Boards => Off-Topic => Topic started by: bandit957 on April 11, 2018, 11:40:36 PM

Title: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bandit957 on April 11, 2018, 11:40:36 PM
What radio stations were the worst with banning songs because of lyrics that they considered too suggestive?

I always thought WKRQ in Cincinnati was one of the worst, or at least one of the most hypocritical. Back in 1987, this station went so far as to delete "I Want Your Sex" by George Michael from 'American Top 40'. I also remember this station butchering a couple songs in the '90s because of lyrics, such as "Sweat" by Inner Circle.

It seems like WCLU was fairly liberal about lyrics, but this station went away right before the George Michael hit was released. I lived far south enough that I could pick up the old WLAP-FM of Lexington, and it seems like they also didn't have many lyrical edits. But I'm not 100% sure if they played the George Michael song when it was new. (I'm sure they played it a couple years later, but rarely.)

WKRQ also reportedly refused to play "Relax" by Frankie Goes To Hollywood because an anti-porn group threatened to picket the station's advertisers. But they didn't delete it from 'American Top 40'. WCLU played "Relax" quite a bit, and I never heard of their advertisers being picketed. I was told a lot of stations deleted "The Humpty Dance" by Digital Underground from 'AT40', but WKRQ didn't.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: wxfree on April 12, 2018, 01:07:48 AM
On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: cjk374 on April 12, 2018, 06:47:21 AM
WLAP-FM....I bet their music stunk.  :rofl: :hyper: :-D
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Rothman on April 12, 2018, 07:24:11 AM
On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."


I believe WAQY did the same.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: texaskdog on April 12, 2018, 07:56:53 AM
Luda Chris just played at the Austin Rodeo and cut all the dirty words.  It was pretty cool.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: texaskdog on April 12, 2018, 07:58:19 AM
Our joke in the 80s was our local milquetoast radio station that played Rock You Like a Hurricane changed "give her inches and feed her well" to "give her pancakes and feed her well"
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 12, 2018, 09:04:00 AM
They all went to pretty extreme lengths post-Nipplegate - I remember hearing "masturbate" censored from Captain Jack by Billy Joel.

Then there's the maybe-an-urban-legend-maybe-not about Clear Channel stations banning songs from the airwaves post-9/11 that could even remotely be construed as connected to the attacks, such as the Everclear song with the lyric "swim out past the breakers/watch the world die."
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: jp the roadgeek on April 12, 2018, 10:24:29 AM
On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."


I believe WAQY did the same.

WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: hbelkins on April 12, 2018, 10:59:15 AM
I don't think I have ever heard "Money" played with the word "bullsh*t" edited out.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 12, 2018, 12:02:08 PM
I don't think I have ever heard "Money" played with the word "bullsh*t" edited out.

I have, but not nearly as frequently as I've heard it unedited.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 12, 2018, 12:03:39 PM
On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."


I believe WAQY did the same.

WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.

Nowadays radio stations cut that whole line, which is how they ran the video on Friday Night Videos 30 years ago.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 12, 2018, 12:04:12 PM
On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."

I've heard that and I've heard the word blanked out.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bandit957 on April 12, 2018, 12:12:45 PM
WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.

Most stations I've heard skip the second verse, since I think that was a standard edit. Even the old WCLU skipped that verse.

WKRQ butchered "Money For Nothing" worse than any other station did. They cut it down to about 2 minutes. For some reason, they cut off the "I want my MTV" chant at the beginning, so it sounded like it started with a person releasing their hand from the turntable.

Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: RobbieL2415 on April 12, 2018, 12:52:49 PM
I've heard the word "drugs" censored before on the Top 40 stations in my area.  Dead serious.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 12, 2018, 12:58:50 PM
I've heard the word "drugs" censored before on the Top 40 stations in my area.  Dead serious.

I remember when MTV would censor "joint" from the video for You Don't Know How It Feels.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 12, 2018, 12:59:49 PM
Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on April 12, 2018, 01:58:52 PM
On occasion I’d hear the uncensored “fuck” (“aw who the fuck are you?”) in The Who’s “Who Are You”.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: renegade on April 12, 2018, 02:13:57 PM
Before the whole Clear Channel/i(heart)radio clusterfuck, WEBN in Cincinnati played pretty much everything uncensored in all dayparts.  I always thought it was rather ballsy for them, as other radio stations kept their uncensored music to the late evening and overnight hours.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: PHLBOS on April 12, 2018, 03:59:11 PM
Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: 1 on April 12, 2018, 04:00:06 PM
Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: SectorZ on April 12, 2018, 09:20:38 PM
On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."

I was in a store recently and heard Jet Airliner unedited. I imagined somewhere someone found a manager to bitch about it, especially since Kittery Trading Post in Kittery, ME has a lot of 'those' types of moms...
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: jp the roadgeek on April 12, 2018, 09:28:22 PM
MTV used to edit "You Don't Know How it Feels (to be Me)" by Tom Petty by reversing the tape during the line "Let's Roll Another Joint" so joint sounded either like "now", "down", or even "meow"
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: signalman on April 12, 2018, 10:14:21 PM
MTV used to edit "You Don't Know How it Feels (to be Me)" by Tom Petty by reversing the tape during the line "Let's Roll Another Joint" so joint sounded either like "now", "down", or even "meow"
I always thought it sounded like now.  I'm glad that I'm not the only one.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Duke87 on April 12, 2018, 11:12:45 PM
WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.

Most stations I've heard skip the second verse, since I think that was a standard edit. Even the old WCLU skipped that verse.

That verse is omitted from the music video as well.

I've heard the word "drugs" censored before on the Top 40 stations in my area.  Dead serious.

In many cases an album with a parental advisory sticker will have an edited version, which tends to be edited down not merely to FCC guidelines but to almost G rating. Radio stations will often play the versions of these songs from the edited version of the album, with the accompanying overbearing censorship.

For example the edited version of "Ridin' Dirty" by Chamilionaire contains like 40 record scratches in the place of ostensibly dirty words, but many of them are totally mundane. What you will hear as "got a full *record scratch* in my *record scratch*" on the radio is really just "got a full clip in my pistol-a". Totally acceptable to play on the air, but not to market as kid-friendly since some parents think guns are inappropriate.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: KeithE4Phx on April 12, 2018, 11:15:09 PM
On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."

In both cases, and others in the '70s, there was an "AM" version and an "FM" version of those songs.  The version that aired on Ancient Modulation had the nasty words either edited out, or the artist/band recorded a cleaned-up version.  This was the version usually released as a single.

Another one was The Who's Who Are You, where "Who the f*** are you" was sung by Roger Daltrey as "Who the hell are you" on the AM-friendly single.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: KEVIN_224 on April 13, 2018, 09:21:28 AM
On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."


I believe WAQY did the same.

WAQY-FM 102.1 of Springfield, MA is classic rock station ROCK 102. When they play "Money For Nothing" by Dire Straits, they reverse-edit the word f----t, who has his own jet airplane and is a millionaire. WDRC-FM 102.9 of Hartford, a.k.a. 102.9 The Whale - Hartford's Classic Rock, plays the line unedited. WDRC-FM reverse-edits Roger Daltrey's f-bomb for the other song mentioned. WHCN-FM 105.9 of Hartford, a.k.a. The River 105.9, more or less leaves that line out.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: hbelkins on April 13, 2018, 10:57:18 AM
As a kid, I wore out a vinyl version of Johnny Cash's live San Quentin album. The album was full of bleeps. I can understand bleeping the single version of "A Boy Named Sue," but I never really understood why between-song banter was bleeped, since that was never going to get airplay. I wonder if an unbleeped version of that album was ever released?

Compare that to Bruce Dickinson's introduction of "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" on Iron Maiden's live album that came out in the mid-80s. "The moral of this story is, here's what not to do if a bird sh*ts on you." Or any live Ozzy Osbourne album. LOL
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: PHLBOS on April 13, 2018, 11:01:15 AM
Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
The above-AM/FM reference date back to a time when there was indeed a difference between a song that was played on an AM station vs. it being played on an FM station (usually the distinction was song length as well as content).  When the song came out circa 1970s, such was true.

Today such terminology is viewed more as a figure of speech.

A possible reason why one doesn't hear the version with the b-word in it on radio stations anymore may be due to the song author (Charlie Daniels) no longer wanting that version played anymore due to personal/religious convictions.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bandit957 on April 13, 2018, 11:41:13 AM
WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.

Most stations I've heard skip the second verse, since I think that was a standard edit. Even the old WCLU skipped that verse.

That verse is omitted from the music video as well.

The video used to include the second verse when it first came out. But I haven't seen the video in years.

'American Top 40' (which WKRQ carried) played the version that skipped the second verse. But 'Countdown America' (which WCLU carried) did play the second verse.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: BamaZeus on April 13, 2018, 12:03:19 PM
AT40 would play "I'm that type of guy" by LL Cool J and scramble the word "screwed" toward the end.  It kinda sounded like Pig Latin.

Instead of "when I screwed her, you couldn't understand it", you'd hear "When I (ood-scr) her, you couldn't understand it"

Even the official video just cuts it out altogether   2:42 mark 
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: kurumi on April 13, 2018, 12:06:01 PM
... What you will hear as "got a full *record scratch* in my *record scratch*" on the radio is really just "got a full clip in my pistol-a". Totally acceptable to play on the air, but not to market as kid-friendly since some parents think guns are inappropriate.

Well now what are we going to call the devil?

"Ah tole you once you very bad man ah'm the best that's ever bin"
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: OracleUsr on April 14, 2018, 04:01:25 AM
"Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People.  Some stations silenced "bullet" and "gun" in the chorus (of a song about school shooting)
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Rothman on April 14, 2018, 10:09:04 AM
"Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People.  Some stations silenced "bullet" and "gun" in the chorus (of a song about school shooting)
Huh.  Never heard that edited version, but I know there was that MIA hit that turned the gunshots to stomps.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Big John on April 14, 2018, 06:09:01 PM
"Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People.  Some stations silenced "bullet" and "gun" in the chorus (of a song about school shooting)
Huh.  Never heard that edited version, but I know there was that MIA hit that turned the gunshots to stomps.
Paper Planes?
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: michravera on April 14, 2018, 06:42:26 PM
Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
The above-AM/FM reference date back to a time when there was indeed a difference between a song that was played on an AM station vs. it being played on an FM station (usually the distinction was song length as well as content).  When the song came out circa 1974, such was true.

Today such terminology is viewed more as a figure of speech.

A possible reason why one doesn't hear the version with the b-word in it on radio stations anymore may be due to the song author (Charlie Daniels) no longer wanting that version played anymore due to personal/religious convictions.


Charlie Daniels was every bit as religious and rebellious in 1974 as he is now. If anything, calling the devil a "son of a bitch" would confirm his religiosity. If he had gotten more religious, he'd be more adamant about calling the devil a "son of a bitch" now than before!
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Rothman on April 14, 2018, 08:42:52 PM
"Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People.  Some stations silenced "bullet" and "gun" in the chorus (of a song about school shooting)
Huh.  Never heard that edited version, but I know there was that MIA hit that turned the gunshots to stomps.
Paper Planes?
Yep.  I think the stomps actually sounded better.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: jp the roadgeek on April 14, 2018, 11:38:17 PM
Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
The above-AM/FM reference date back to a time when there was indeed a difference between a song that was played on an AM station vs. it being played on an FM station (usually the distinction was song length as well as content).  When the song came out circa 1974, such was true.

Today such terminology is viewed more as a figure of speech.

A possible reason why one doesn't hear the version with the b-word in it on radio stations anymore may be due to the song author (Charlie Daniels) no longer wanting that version played anymore due to personal/religious convictions.


Charlie Daniels was every bit as religious and rebellious in 1974 as he is now. If anything, calling the devil a "son of a bitch" would confirm his religiosity. If he had gotten more religious, he'd be more adamant about calling the devil a "son of a bitch" now than before!

The song actually came out in 1979, late in the days of AM music stations; within 5 years, most AM stations would be dedicated to news and talk, unless it was a simulcast of the FM station. 
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Duke87 on April 15, 2018, 12:10:02 PM
As a kid, I wore out a vinyl version of Johnny Cash's live San Quentin album. The album was full of bleeps. I can understand bleeping the single version of "A Boy Named Sue," but I never really understood why between-song banter was bleeped, since that was never going to get airplay. I wonder if an unbleeped version of that album was ever released?

Kind of like Chumbawamba's album Tubthumper. There are various audio clips between the actual songs on the album, some of them feature bleeped expletives. As far as I am aware, no unbleeped version of the album exists. However, the clips that feature bleeps are sampled from a couple of different obscure British movies, which do not feature bleeps natively - so the uncensored audio does exist, but only in the source material.

I've toyed with the idea of trying to chase down copies of these movies so I could rip the uncensored audio and splice it into the Chumbawamba album but... that'd be more effort than it's worth. And not even really doable for the majority of them - most of the samples have added music in the background which would be lost if I swapped them out for rips directly from the movies.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: PHLBOS on April 16, 2018, 12:09:45 PM
The song actually came out in 1979, late in the days of AM music stations; within 5 years, most AM stations would be dedicated to news and talk, unless it was a simulcast of the FM station.
That may have been true for AM stations in New England but in other parts of the country such stations played music longer.

BTW: after doing a bit more checking.  The album version of the song contained b*tch whereas the 45 version (usually played on AM stations) had the word gun.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: jasonh300 on April 16, 2018, 06:11:38 PM
WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.

I believe you mean the word meaning "bundle of sticks".  The British word for cigarette is a shortened form of that word.

There was a radio edit of "Money for Nothing" that got played when the song was still in the Top 40 that had that part completely left out.  In later years, the classic rock stations would play the album version.  I haven't heard that song on the radio in years, but I'm guessing that the stations that play it use some kind of edited version to avoid offending anyone.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on April 17, 2018, 04:55:54 AM
There was a radio edit of "Money for Nothing" that got played when the song was still in the Top 40 that had that part completely left out.  In later years, the classic rock stations would play the album version.  I haven't heard that song on the radio in years, but I'm guessing that the stations that play it use some kind of edited version to avoid offending anyone.

It still depends on the station. I heard the uncensored version on Duluth's classic rock station recently (on a Sunday afternoon, so it wasn't a late night "who gives a shit" decision), but a lot of stations probably opt for the shorter version regardless because it means they can fit in more songs - and more importantly, more ads.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: english si on April 17, 2018, 05:58:55 AM
WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.
You mean the British word for a bundle of sticks (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faggot_(unit)) or delicious ball of off-cuts and offal (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faggot_(food)). There's 6 letters in that word, not three.

The British word for cigarette is just three letters, not 6 - cf the common phrase by malapropic smokers 'can I fum a bag off of you?' (and yes, this is still said with the letters swapped back, despite containing two words that also have definitions that are derogatory towards homosexuals. No one sees it as an anti-gay slur, because it isn't meant as such).

Dire Straits are using the US slur meaning (albeit satirically) in the song and even in the 80s in the UK they were having to censor it - one live performance on TV they used the word 'Queenie' instead after being told they couldn't say the 6-letter word - which was probably a worse slur. Wikipedia says that Canadian radio stations all agreed to ban the uncensored version about 7 years ago.

The autocorrect just says 'cigarette' for the 6-letter word and 'bundle of sticks' for the 3-letter word. While it is wrong in the same way (and needs to be fixed - I think this is the third time I've said the same thing - certainly twice about Money for Nothing), it doesn't say 'British word for'. Don't come to Britain and hand people some sticks if they ask for a cigarette, or think its a pack of smokes if you order cheap-meat balls off a menu!
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: hbelkins on April 17, 2018, 11:34:55 AM
When did they change "f a g" to automatically change to "bundle of sticks" here? I thought it used to be changed to "cigarette."

Guess I should see what the n-word now reverts to.

Addendum: After using the preview function, it still changes to "hep cat."

Are there any other words besides  "f a g" and the n-word that automatically get corrected? I think we've had that discussion before.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: 1 on April 17, 2018, 11:49:40 AM
When did they change "f a g" to automatically change to "bundle of sticks" here? I thought it used to be changed to "cigarette."

Guess I should see what the n-word now reverts to.

Addendum: After using the preview function, it still changes to "hep cat."

Are there any other words besides  "f a g" and the n-word that automatically get corrected? I think we've had that discussion before.

C-word if surrounded by spaces
could οf → could have, same for should οf and would οf
"Sent frοm my" and "using Τapatalk"
Racist ___clown
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: hbelkins on April 17, 2018, 12:39:29 PM
The first and fourth entries on that list make no sense. "Genius" and "mezzanine" for the offending words?

And now I know how those little white pieces of text get inserted into posts -- it's an auto-correct that's set by the admins.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: michravera on April 17, 2018, 03:25:39 PM
Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
The above-AM/FM reference date back to a time when there was indeed a difference between a song that was played on an AM station vs. it being played on an FM station (usually the distinction was song length as well as content).  When the song came out circa 1974, such was true.

Today such terminology is viewed more as a figure of speech.

A possible reason why one doesn't hear the version with the b-word in it on radio stations anymore may be due to the song author (Charlie Daniels) no longer wanting that version played anymore due to personal/religious convictions.


Charlie Daniels was every bit as religious and rebellious in 1974 as he is now. If anything, calling the devil a "son of a bitch" would confirm his religiosity. If he had gotten more religious, he'd be more adamant about calling the devil a "son of a bitch" now than before!

The song actually came out in 1979, late in the days of AM music stations; within 5 years, most AM stations would be dedicated to news and talk, unless it was a simulcast of the FM station.

But "Uneasy Rider" came out in 1973 or so. This wasn't Charlie's first rodeo.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: SectorZ on April 18, 2018, 07:24:54 PM
Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: jp the roadgeek on April 18, 2018, 09:07:02 PM
Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Henry on April 19, 2018, 09:42:02 AM
Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".
What is the difference? To me, they're both the same, like "dammit" and "damn it", with the former basically being a shortened version of the latter (with no space in between).
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: SectorZ on April 19, 2018, 10:58:05 AM
Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".
What is the difference? To me, they're both the same, like "dammit" and "damn it", with the former basically being a shortened version of the latter (with no space in between).

Envision a comma after 'God', though the comma existing or not means the same thing. It's also what Michael Sweet of Stryper tried to explain to people. Stryper is a Christian Metal band.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: hbelkins on April 20, 2018, 12:16:10 PM
Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".
What is the difference? To me, they're both the same, like "dammit" and "damn it", with the former basically being a shortened version of the latter (with no space in between).

Envision a comma after 'God', though the comma existing or not means the same thing. It's also what Michael Sweet of Stryper tried to explain to people. Stryper is a Christian Metal band.

They're still around? They had a niche back in the 80s, but weren't exactly one of the great hair bands, Christian message or no Christian message. Having said that, I have a vinyl copy of "To Hell With The Devil" stashed away somewhere.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 20, 2018, 01:23:11 PM
As a kid, I wore out a vinyl version of Johnny Cash's live San Quentin album. The album was full of bleeps. I can understand bleeping the single version of "A Boy Named Sue," but I never really understood why between-song banter was bleeped, since that was never going to get airplay. I wonder if an unbleeped version of that album was ever released?

I’ve never heard an uncensored version of A Boy Named Sue, so probably not. And that’s a lengthy censoring, too.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: SectorZ on April 20, 2018, 07:20:45 PM
Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".
What is the difference? To me, they're both the same, like "dammit" and "damn it", with the former basically being a shortened version of the latter (with no space in between).

Envision a comma after 'God', though the comma existing or not means the same thing. It's also what Michael Sweet of Stryper tried to explain to people. Stryper is a Christian Metal band.

They're still around? They had a niche back in the 80s, but weren't exactly one of the great hair bands, Christian message or no Christian message. Having said that, I have a vinyl copy of "To Hell With The Devil" stashed away somewhere.

Yup, still around. They've consistently come out with albums over the past 15 years or so. They're more of a standard heavy metal as opposed to hair metal, but that's standard M.O. for most of those bands still making music.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: ftballfan on April 21, 2018, 08:38:12 PM
WTCM (103.5 Traverse City, MI) has always played "Toes" by Zac Brown Band uncensored. Almost all other stations I've heard that song on plays the censored version.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 22, 2018, 01:31:12 PM
WTCM (103.5 Traverse City, MI) has always played "Toes" by Zac Brown Band uncensored. Almost all other stations I've heard that song on plays the censored version.

Is that the "toes in the water, ass in the sand" song?  Censoring of "ass" is so inconsistent.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: ftballfan on April 27, 2018, 09:45:08 AM
WTCM (103.5 Traverse City, MI) has always played "Toes" by Zac Brown Band uncensored. Almost all other stations I've heard that song on plays the censored version.

Is that the "toes in the water, ass in the sand" song?  Censoring of "ass" is so inconsistent.
Yes it is.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 27, 2018, 10:02:36 AM
I used to think there were two different versions of Need You Now, one where the two singers are "a little drunk" and one where they're "all alone," but apparently the male singer is "a little drunk" and the female singer is "all alone."  Because God forbid a woman in country music land do something so gauche as getting a little drunk.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: 20160805 on April 28, 2018, 12:00:00 PM
Last Saturday I heard Sirius (17 IIRC) play Green Day's "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" (2004) uncensored, leaving the "what's f***ed up" line in the second verse without bleeping or replacement.  My mom, who is a bit of a prude in terms of lyrical content in music, likes the song and didn't notice or object either.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: renegade on April 28, 2018, 12:25:43 PM
Last Saturday I heard Sirius (17 IIRC) play Green Day's "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" (2004) uncensored, leaving the "what's f***ed up" line in the second verse without bleeping or replacement.  My mom, who is a bit of a prude in terms of lyrical content in music, likes the song and didn't notice or object either.
That's because SiriusXM plays uncensored music.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Mr. Matté on April 28, 2018, 09:56:34 PM
Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".

This ain't swearing. The first word there is "God," how could that be a swear, the most popular word in the Bible? The second word, "damn" they use it all the time like they "damn a river to keep it from flooding." And even in the Bible, some guy is damned for cheating, or stealing, or committing insects in the family. And who damned him? God! God damned him! Beautiful words right out of the holy book, they shouldn't show their ignorance!
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: 1 on April 28, 2018, 10:00:26 PM
"damn a river to keep it from flooding."

https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=1633

committing insects in the family

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/InterspeciesRomance (warning: this is TV Tropes)
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: SectorZ on April 29, 2018, 09:47:52 AM
Last Saturday I heard Sirius (17 IIRC) play Green Day's "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" (2004) uncensored, leaving the "what's f***ed up" line in the second verse without bleeping or replacement.  My mom, who is a bit of a prude in terms of lyrical content in music, likes the song and didn't notice or object either.
That's because SiriusXM plays uncensored music.

Liquid Metal (and other stations) even have 'XL' at the beginning of the name because they have more explicit content compared to the others. In the case of Liquid Metal, it's barely due to the music but more to a single DJ.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Throckmorton on April 30, 2018, 12:25:03 AM
   
You know, I have the CD with the Folsom show and the San Quentin show and I haven't listened to it lately but I'm sure A Boy named Sue is not censored. Nor is any other part.   
   
I recall at least one local station used to bleep, "Christ," from the Ballad of John and Yoko.   
   
I also recall an MOR station here that would play an instrumental  cover of Lay Lady Lay and simply refer to it as, "a song written by Bob Dylan." No shit.   
   
   
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: OracleUsr on April 30, 2018, 06:39:21 AM
Then there's the radio mix of "Sitting at a Bar" by Rehab.  I was a bit taken aback when I heard that the lyrics didn't go like this:

She broke my heart in the trailer park
So I jacked the keys to her father's car
Crashed that Chevrolet and stepped away

Actually is like this:

She broke my heart in the trailer park
So I jacked the keys to her ()#*%)(ing car
Crashed that piece of #)%* and stepped away

But it makes a heck of a lot more sense.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 30, 2018, 09:14:26 AM
Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".

This ain't swearing. The first word there is "God," how could that be a swear, the most popular word in the Bible? The second word, "damn" they use it all the time like they "damn a river to keep it from flooding." And even in the Bible, some guy is damned for cheating, or stealing, or committing insects in the family. And who damned him? God! God damned him! Beautiful words right out of the holy book, they shouldn't show their ignorance!

I knew some Christians that would respond to "goddamn" with "God doesn't need a damn," which makes no sense to me.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: KEVIN_224 on April 30, 2018, 09:59:22 AM
Then on the national level, we had Casey Kasem nearly always refusing to say the title of a certain #2 hit of George Michael from the summer of 1987. Yes, I'm referring to "I Want Your Sex" from the Beverly Hills Cop 2 soundtrack. Thank goodness George's song wasn't confused with his duet with Aretha Franklin from earlier that year!  :-o
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 30, 2018, 10:08:10 AM
Then on the national level, we had Casey Kasem nearly always refusing to say the title of a certain #2 hit of George Michael from the summer of 1987. Yes, I'm referring to "I Want Your Sex" from the Beverly Hills Cop 2 soundtrack. Thank goodness George's song wasn't confused with his duet with Aretha Franklin from earlier that year!  :-o

That's oddly prudish, if you've heard his meltdown over being expected to transition from an upbeat song to a story about a dog dying.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: KEVIN_224 on April 30, 2018, 11:57:40 AM
Oh yes! I've DEFINITELY heard the melt down! It's really quite f-----g ponderous, if you've heard a different other outtake!  ;-)
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 30, 2018, 01:33:40 PM
Oh yes! I've DEFINITELY heard the melt down! It's really quite f-----g ponderous, if you've heard a different other outtake!  ;-)

What, the Troggs outtakes?  I haven't heard that one and I'm only aware of one Casey Kasem meltdown.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: SectorZ on April 30, 2018, 03:53:27 PM
Then on the national level, we had Casey Kasem nearly always refusing to say the title of a certain #2 hit of George Michael from the summer of 1987. Yes, I'm referring to "I Want Your Sex" from the Beverly Hills Cop 2 soundtrack. Thank goodness George's song wasn't confused with his duet with Aretha Franklin from earlier that year!  :-o

That's oddly prudish, if you've heard his meltdown over being expected to transition from an upbeat song to a story about a dog dying.


Holy crap I've never heard this until today. Obviously NSFW (audio only).
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on April 30, 2018, 03:59:24 PM
Then on the national level, we had Casey Kasem nearly always refusing to say the title of a certain #2 hit of George Michael from the summer of 1987. Yes, I'm referring to "I Want Your Sex" from the Beverly Hills Cop 2 soundtrack. Thank goodness George's song wasn't confused with his duet with Aretha Franklin from earlier that year!  :-o

That's oddly prudish, if you've heard his meltdown over being expected to transition from an upbeat song to a story about a dog dying.


Holy crap I've never heard this until today. Obviously NSFW (audio only).

It's spectacular.  And I'd heard a censored version on the radio for years before finding the uncensored version on YouTube.  Then I had my mind blown for the second time.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: jp the roadgeek on April 30, 2018, 09:19:33 PM
This one by Bill O'Reilly takes the cake:


And there's this Berman chestnut:

Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on May 01, 2018, 09:05:19 AM
There's also one of Howard Cosell that's isn't profane, but it's hilarious because it's Howard Cosell yelling I'VE GOT A TRAIN TO CATCH! in Howard Cosell voice.

Speaking of Berman, I was so disappointed when I learned the "you're with me, leather" story was an urban legend.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Desert Man on May 03, 2018, 07:07:14 PM
In 2018, radio stations freely play "born this way" by Lady Gaga, the unofficial song of the LGBT community. Her music vid. shown her aroused by giving birth (she performed in NYC fetish clubs as well LGBT bars before being discovered). Compared to 1991, radio stations were uncomfortable with "black or white" by Michael Jackson, due to lyrics about race relations, hatred and bias, and socio-political commentary about American society.

We became a more open-minded society, I mean go back to the 1950s when the word "pregnant" wasn't allowed on national TV on CBS: I Love Lucy when Lucille Ball visibly was, but in the 1970s, CBS again cautiously aired All in the Family poked fun of bigotry by Archie Bunker's uneducated racism, sexism, anti-semitism, hatred of Catholics (also he didn't like Italians and Poles), trans- and homophobia, and prejudice about the poor.   
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bing101 on May 03, 2018, 08:56:49 PM
https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/03/entertainment/kanye-radio-boycott-begins-trnd/index.html (https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/03/entertainment/kanye-radio-boycott-begins-trnd/index.html)

Update now a Detroit radio station is going after Kanye West over a rant he made on TMZ.

Quote


"We are over it. We don't want to hear Kanye's music, we don't want to play Kanye on our show, we don't want to talk about Kanye anymore," they said. "So we are taking a stand and we aren't playing his music anymore; we just are refusing to give him a platform."
The hosts said their decision followed West's controversial statements (https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/01/entertainment/kanye-west-slavery-choice-trnd/index.html) about slavery, adding the hashtag #MuteKanye.



On Tuesday, West appeared at TMZ's headquarters, where he said: "When you hear about slavery for 400 years ... For 400 years? That sounds like a choice."

During the Thursday morning radio show, Shay Shay also called West "reckless" for saying icons like Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X are "too far in the past and not relatable."
The Detroit hip-hop station is not alone.
On Wednesday, New York City radio host Ebro Darden appeared on CNN Tonight (https://www.cnn.com/videos/entertainment/2018/05/02/kanye-west-slavery-was-choice-lemon-cot-ctn.cnn/video/playlists/kanye-west/) with Don Lemon to discuss West's comments, where Lemon said the rapper "doesn't know history."
The next morning, Hot 97, where Darden's show airs, "'The Kanye boycott has begun.'"

Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: Henry on May 04, 2018, 09:50:24 AM
https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/03/entertainment/kanye-radio-boycott-begins-trnd/index.html (https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/03/entertainment/kanye-radio-boycott-begins-trnd/index.html)

Update now a Detroit radio station is going after Kanye West over a rant he made on TMZ.

Quote


"We are over it. We don't want to hear Kanye's music, we don't want to play Kanye on our show, we don't want to talk about Kanye anymore," they said. "So we are taking a stand and we aren't playing his music anymore; we just are refusing to give him a platform."
The hosts said their decision followed West's controversial statements (https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/01/entertainment/kanye-west-slavery-choice-trnd/index.html) about slavery, adding the hashtag #MuteKanye.



On Tuesday, West appeared at TMZ's headquarters, where he said: "When you hear about slavery for 400 years ... For 400 years? That sounds like a choice."

During the Thursday morning radio show, Shay Shay also called West "reckless" for saying icons like Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X are "too far in the past and not relatable."
The Detroit hip-hop station is not alone.
On Wednesday, New York City radio host Ebro Darden appeared on CNN Tonight (https://www.cnn.com/videos/entertainment/2018/05/02/kanye-west-slavery-was-choice-lemon-cot-ctn.cnn/video/playlists/kanye-west/) with Don Lemon to discuss West's comments, where Lemon said the rapper "doesn't know history."
The next morning, Hot 97, where Darden's show airs, "'The Kanye boycott has begun.'"

Being that he and R. Kelly are from Chicago (and I never cared much for either), will their hometown stations be the exceptions to their respective bans?
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on May 04, 2018, 10:08:08 AM
Compared to 1991, radio stations were uncomfortable with "black or white" by Michael Jackson, due to lyrics about race relations, hatred and bias, and socio-political commentary about American society.

The only thing controversial about Black or White was the second half of the music video for the song, which is why it was rarely seen after being aired for the first time.  Black or White was a call for racial harmony.  You may have this confused with other MJ songs.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: BamaZeus on May 04, 2018, 11:09:19 AM
I agree.  The video was the issue with Black or White, since he spent 5 minutes continuously grabbing his crotch.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bandit957 on May 04, 2018, 11:36:34 AM
I agree.  The video was the issue with Black or White, since he spent 5 minutes continuously grabbing his crotch.

...and destroying a car.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bing101 on May 04, 2018, 04:21:54 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2018/05/01/kanye-west-called-slavery-a-choice-tmzs-van-lathan-gave-a-forceful-and-thoughtful-rebuke/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.21dd247986f1

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2018/05/03/this-radio-stations-answer-to-kanye-wests-remarks-on-slavery-mute-his-music/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.d2a28ddd1e61

An Update on Kanye West being named in a radio station boycott in Detroit. Yes this is in regards to Kanye West's rants on slavery on TMZ.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on June 02, 2018, 10:43:58 PM
“Life in the Fast Lane” contains the line “we’ve been up and down this highway, haven’t seen a goddamn thing.” I’ve never heard it censored.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bandit957 on June 03, 2018, 08:43:21 AM
“Life in the Fast Lane” contains the line “we’ve been up and down this highway, haven’t seen a goddamn thing.” I’ve never heard it censored.

I never heard it censored until the past few years.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bandit957 on June 03, 2018, 08:45:19 AM
The distributors of 'American Top 40' rebroadcasts from the '80s actually censored the word 'whoring' in "I've Never Been To Me" by Charlene. Stations around here played this line without any problems in the '80s.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: i-215 on June 06, 2018, 04:37:57 PM
During the 1980s, the three pop-music radio stations in Salt Lake City had gentleman's agreement to never play Olivia Newton-John's "Physical."

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/595087294/Night-of-nostalgia-for-Newton-John-fans.html
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bandit957 on June 07, 2018, 09:19:53 PM
During the 1980s, the three pop-music radio stations in Salt Lake City had gentleman's agreement to never play Olivia Newton-John's "Physical."

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/595087294/Night-of-nostalgia-for-Newton-John-fans.html

I almost never heard "Physical" on the radio in Cincinnati, even during all those weeks it was #1. The only time I remember hearing it on the radio was when a local station (WLW, I think) played the song that was #1 during each Super Bowl, as that was the first time the Bengals made the Super Bowl. But my mom joined an exercise club that made her buy a record of the song. Judging by local airplay, I would have guessed the Foreigner song that was #2 all those weeks hit #1 instead.

Also, I've never heard "I Kissed A Girl" by Katy Perry on Cincinnati radio, even though it was #1 for weeks.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: US71 on June 09, 2018, 11:04:17 AM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: 20160805 on June 09, 2018, 11:11:07 AM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on June 09, 2018, 11:41:47 AM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.

The song rhymes “things” with “things.”
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: ErmineNotyours on June 11, 2018, 01:17:59 AM
I recorded a morning show on Clear Channel's (iHeart's) KJR-FM, Seattle in the months before and after Janet Jackson's left breast, and so I have both the uncensored and censored versions of Pink Floyd's "Money."

However, after all these years, no one has noticed a line towards the end of ZZ Top's "Legs":  "Oh I want her.  Shit, I gotta have her.  The girl is alright."  I've never heard it censored on radio or MTV.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: bandit957 on June 11, 2018, 09:08:28 AM
However, after all these years, no one has noticed a line towards the end of ZZ Top's "Legs":  "Oh I want her.  Shit, I gotta have her.  The girl is alright."  I've never heard it censored on radio or MTV.

I've heard it censored, but only recently.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: inkyatari on June 11, 2018, 11:19:32 AM
I've heard the word "drugs" censored before on the Top 40 stations in my area.  Dead serious.

Bonneville Broadcasting stations always censor this.

One thing I never understood was the censoring the word "god" in "god damn."  The Panic! At The Disco saone "I Write Sins Not Tragedies" had god censored out of the phrase.

I Remember as a kid watching The China Syndrome on TV, and they changed "jesus christ" to "judas priest."  Ugh.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on June 11, 2018, 11:28:11 AM
I Remember as a kid watching The China Syndrome on TV, and they changed "jesus christ" to "judas priest."
They made the exact same edit in a TV version of Back to the Future.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: renegade on June 11, 2018, 12:36:51 PM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.

The song rhymes “things” with “things.”
Do you really believe KidHick™ is some kind of poet-laureate?
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on June 11, 2018, 12:50:17 PM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.

The song rhymes “things” with “things.”
Do you really believe KidHick™ is some kind of poet-laureate?
I'm presenting a counter-point to the position that it's over-hated.  It's hated as much as one should hate a song that rhymes "things" with "things."
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: US71 on June 11, 2018, 02:13:17 PM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.

The song rhymes “things” with “things.”
Do you really believe KidHick™ is some kind of poet-laureate?
I'm presenting a counter-point to the position that it's over-hated.  It's hated as much as one should hate a song that rhymes "things" with "things."

I won't say I "hated" it: I just didn't care for it.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on June 11, 2018, 02:28:59 PM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.

The song rhymes “things” with “things.”
Do you really believe KidHick™ is some kind of poet-laureate?
I'm presenting a counter-point to the position that it's over-hated.  It's hated as much as one should hate a song that rhymes "things" with "things."

I won't say I "hated" it: I just didn't care for it.

Oh, I hate it.  With the fury of a thousand white-hot suns.

OK, just one white-hot sun.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: 20160805 on June 12, 2018, 06:51:05 AM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.

The song rhymes “things” with “things.”
"Light My Fire" by the Doors has the lines "Come on baby light my fire / Try to set the night on fire", which constitutes rhyming "fire" with "fire".  Even classic songs have dopey lyrics sometimes.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: inkyatari on June 12, 2018, 08:53:38 AM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.

The song rhymes “things” with “things.”
Do you really believe KidHick™ is some kind of poet-laureate?
I'm presenting a counter-point to the position that it's over-hated.  It's hated as much as one should hate a song that rhymes "things" with "things."

I won't say I "hated" it: I just didn't care for it.

Oh, I hate it.  With the fury of a thousand white-hot suns.

OK, just one white-hot sun.

If I wanted to listen to Warren Zevon, I wouldn't listen to Kid Rock.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on June 12, 2018, 08:57:44 AM
Does Kid Rock's All Summer Long still get bleeped out?

And we were trying different things
We were smoking funny things
Not around here, at least; then again, I've never heard it bleeped out to begin with.  Rip-offs of other songs notwithstanding, I've always felt that song was over-hated; it's just an average song that was never supposed to be profound.

The song rhymes “things” with “things.”
Do you really believe KidHick™ is some kind of poet-laureate?
I'm presenting a counter-point to the position that it's over-hated.  It's hated as much as one should hate a song that rhymes "things" with "things."

I won't say I "hated" it: I just didn't care for it.

Oh, I hate it.  With the fury of a thousand white-hot suns.

OK, just one white-hot sun.

If I wanted to listen to Warren Zevon, I wouldn't listen to Kid Rock.

What if you wanted to listen to Lynyrd Skynyrd, though?
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on June 12, 2018, 08:58:57 AM
Even classic songs have dopey lyrics sometimes.
Yes, such as "ever-changing world in which we live in" from Live and Let Die.

Kid Rock still sucks, though.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: inkyatari on June 12, 2018, 10:07:56 AM

If I wanted to listen to Warren Zevon, I wouldn't listen to Kid Rock.

What if you wanted to listen to Lynyrd Skynyrd, though?

Same.  He sampled both.

I also hate SOS from shakira for the over sampling of Tainted Love.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: US71 on June 12, 2018, 10:09:33 AM


What if you wanted to listen to Lynyrd Skynyrd, though?

I'd rather listen to Mason Williams
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: abefroman329 on June 12, 2018, 10:27:56 AM

If I wanted to listen to Warren Zevon, I wouldn't listen to Kid Rock.

What if you wanted to listen to Lynyrd Skynyrd, though?

Same.  He sampled both.

DAT'S DA JOKE

I also hate SOS from shakira for the over sampling of Tainted Love.

That's Rihanna, not Shakira.
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: inkyatari on June 12, 2018, 10:43:31 AM

If I wanted to listen to Warren Zevon, I wouldn't listen to Kid Rock.

What if you wanted to listen to Lynyrd Skynyrd, though?

Same.  He sampled both.

DAT'S DA JOKE

I also hate SOS from shakira for the over sampling of Tainted Love.

That's Rihanna, not Shakira.

I get them confused
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: wxfree on June 16, 2018, 01:25:13 AM
I just now heard this song.  It seems all of the stations around me banned it for being dirty.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QI9lg3gZvcQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QI9lg3gZvcQ)

I learned of it because of its publication in this list.

http://ultimateclassicrock.com/breast-songs/ (http://ultimateclassicrock.com/breast-songs/)
Title: Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
Post by: hbelkins on June 16, 2018, 02:22:49 PM
I just now heard this song.  It seems all of the stations around me banned it for being dirty.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QI9lg3gZvcQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QI9lg3gZvcQ)

I learned of it because of its publication in this list.

http://ultimateclassicrock.com/breast-songs/ (http://ultimateclassicrock.com/breast-songs/)

Jim Dandy to the rescue!

(Although I had heard of BOA, I'd never heard any of their songs until "Jim Dandy" was included on some cheap compilation CD I bought at Walmart back in the late 80s or early 90s. And I had no idea they were still going, or had attempted a comeback, in 1986.)

Also, after looking at that list you posted, I must again repeat something I've said for nearly 30 years now.

Bon Scott >>> Brian Johnson.