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National Boards => General Highway Talk => Topic started by: jon daly on August 13, 2018, 07:47:03 PM

Title: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: jon daly on August 13, 2018, 07:47:03 PM
I'm mentioning a couple of places you won't find on a map, but you will hear mentioned on traffic reports.

1. Sunset Ridge - This is a subdivision in East Hartford, Conn. which is next to a stretch of I-84. If you happen to be heading west on I-84 at the right time, you can see the sun setting over Hartford.

2. The Canyons - These are cuts in Cranston RI where I-295 goes between some rock formations.  I don't think that they're particularly canyonesque, but they have that nickname.

The former is a natural feature. The latter is semi-man-made, but I still think of it as more of a geographic feature than, say, the Mixmaster in Waterbury, Conn. which is totally artificial.

Does anyone have any other examples they'd like to add? The only other city whose traffic reports I'm familiar with is NYC (I can still pull in WCBS 880,) but I haven't listened to them much recently.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: abefroman329 on August 13, 2018, 07:56:31 PM
I think they still give travel times to/from “the Post Office” even though USPS hasn’t occupied the building the Eisenhower runs through for decades.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on August 13, 2018, 09:10:26 PM
Twin Cities terms

"Fish Lake" - the northwest I-94/494/694 junction in Maple Grove
"The River" - used to refer to either the Minnesota or Mississippi, depends on the context of the report being given; reports generally just say things like "X minutes from route X to the river" expecting commuters to know which one is being referred to based on the route given
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: SectorZ on August 13, 2018, 09:18:33 PM
Fox25 in Boston still uses "The Weston Tolls", which were removed over a year ago. Also weird that they use it for I-95/MA 128, when using 90 or the Mass Pike would make more sense since 95/128 don't go thru the tolls.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: kurumi on August 13, 2018, 09:33:07 PM
Some Bay Area names:

https://www.mercurynews.com/2008/12/05/from-the-two-trees-to-the-sig-sanchez-bay-area-road-nicknames-explained/

https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/COMMUTER-CHRONICLES-Cheat-Sheet-For-Freeway-3015140.php
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: 1995hoo on August 13, 2018, 09:38:40 PM
If a traffic reporter in the DC area refers to "the Freeway," it always means the Southwest–Southeast Freeway in the District (partially I-395 and partially I-695). There are other roads that have the word "Freeway" as part of their names, probably most notably the Whitehurst Freeway, but the word "Freeway" is never used by itself except to refer to the Southwest–Southeast Freeway (so the Whitehurst, for example, is either "the Whitehurst Freeway" or simply "the Whitehurst").

WTOP's Bob Marbourg likes to refer to "the Big Curve" on the Beltway in Maryland. I've never been completely sure which curve he means, but I think he means where the Outer Loop meets the I-270 Spur. He also refers to the Wilson Bridge and the American Legion Bridge as "the big bridges"; I don't know of anyone else who uses that expression for them.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Max Rockatansky on August 13, 2018, 09:40:29 PM
The “Grapevine” largely is referring to Grapevine Canyon on I-5 south of Bakersfield.  Really it has more or less evolved to assume the entire geographic once inhabited by the Ridge Route.  Usually the uphill grades are problematic enough that they are frequent traffic report metion.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: skluth on August 13, 2018, 10:52:14 PM
Every place I've lived has had its weird local place names which may not be found on a map. Some examples:

Green Bay, WI (where I was raised)
Three Corners - intersection of Main, Cedar, and Baird and once a much busier intersection
The Ledge - the local name for the section of the Niagara Escarpment that runs east of the city and up the Door Peninsula

St Louis, MO (where I lived most of the last 30 years)
The Grove - the business strip on Manchester Av between Kingshighway and Vandeventor
Dogtown - the neighborhood south of Forest Park and west of Hampton Av
Antique Row - Cherokee St, especially east of Jefferson
The Triangle - the area within Loughborough, Hampton, and Gravois

Sometimes, these names fall out of common use (not too many but old locals know the Triangle). Other times the names are new in an attempt to rebrand an area (The Grove). Sometimes, the city will actually adopt a long-used neighborhood reference (Shaw, Central West End) and make it the official neighborhood name. (St Louis has something like 40+ official neighborhoods.)

I'm not sure how many are in traffic reports. But the Grove and Dogtown are frequently mentioned in St Louis news reports as both are popular entertainment districts. Antique Row is also regularly mentioned, though usually reporters make sure to say it's on Cherokee.

I don't think Green Bay is big enough to have traffic reports outside of Packers game days. If they have them, they really don't need them.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Bruce on August 14, 2018, 12:16:38 AM
The Seattle Times compiled a list of traffic terms (http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=20020630&slug=bumper30m0) for the area in 2002, and it still holds true today, for the most part, despite massive reconstruction of I-5 and I-405.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Brandon on August 14, 2018, 12:40:26 AM
I think they still give travel times to/from “the Post Office” even though USPS hasn’t occupied the building the Eisenhower runs through for decades.

Usually, it's "the Old Post Office".  Then we have...

The Junction (Edens/Kennedy)
The Merge/Split (Ryan/Ford/I-57)
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 14, 2018, 01:10:18 AM
Chicago has some and I love listening to a Chicago traffic report.

Basically this is Chicago traffic lingo:

Outbound: Leaving downtown

Inbound: Heading downtown

The Kennedy: I-90 and I-94 together north of the Loop. I-90 continues to be the Kennedy after the Split until O'Hare.

The Split: When I-90 and I-94 break off from each other north of the Loop. I-90 heads to O'Hare and I-94 heads northeast.

Edens Expressway: I-94 north of the Split to Lake Cook Road.

Lake Cook Road: East-west street that marks the borders of Lake and Cook Counties on the north side.

Jane Addams Tollway: I-90 north of O'Hare to Wisconsin

Dan Ryan Expressway: I-90 and I-94 together south of the Loop

Skyway: Connects Dan Ryan to Indiana Toll Road. I-90 from 66th Street to the Indiana State Line.

95th Street: Southern end of Dan Ryan Expressway, marks beginning of Bishop Ford Freeway.

Bishop Ford Freeway: I-94 from 95th (Dan Ryan) to I-80.

Eisenhower/The Ike: I-290, which extends from downtown to the western suburbs

Veterans Memorial Highway: I-355 from Itasca to I-55

Stevenson Expressway: I-55 from Lake Shore Drive to the Tri-State

Tri-State Tollway: I-294 connects with I-94 on the north and the south end of the city, forming a semi-circle and connecting with every major interstate

Ronald Reagan Memorial Tollway: I-88 west from Tri-State

The Loop: Area in the heart of downtown that's encircled by the "L" tracks. Lake St. on the North, Wabash on the East, Van Buren on the South and Wells St on the West.

Old Post Office: Sometimes used instead of The Loop. Now vacant building that spans the Eisenhower as it turns into Congress Parkway.

The Circle: Where the Dan Ryan, the Kennedy and the Eisenhower meet

Hillside Strangler: Named after a nearby suburb. Where the Ronald Reagan Memorial Tollway, the Tri-State and the Eisenhower meet

Mannheim: Just east of the Hillside Strangler and near the western end of the Eisenhower.

And it might sound something like this.
Dan Ryan 20 minutes outbound, 30 minutes inbound.
The Ike 20 minutes outbound, 35 minutes inbound from Hillside Strangler to the Post Office.
Stevenson 25 minutes outbound, 30 minutes inbound.

Again outbound means going away from downtown and inbound means going towards downtown. Everyone in Chicago will know where the Post Office is at so using that as a landmark instead of the Loop makes it sound kind of cool and the expressway goes right through the building as it changes from the Eisenhower to Congress Parkway.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 14, 2018, 01:12:43 AM
I think they still give travel times to/from “the Post Office” even though USPS hasn’t occupied the building the Eisenhower runs through for decades.

Usually, it's "the Old Post Office".  Then we have...

The Junction (Edens/Kennedy)
The Merge/Split (Ryan/Ford/I-57)
I guess we just have a different opinion on names because I always called the Edens/Kennedy interchange The Split. But I do call the Ryan, Ford and I-57 interchange The Merge. One of my most hated interchanges because I-94 traffic has to go down to two lanes.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 14, 2018, 01:18:16 AM
For Detroit,
Most people call the freeways by their names rather than by their numbers so you'd hear The Ford instead of I-94 or The Ruether instead of I-696 or The Lodge instead of M-10 and so on. The Lodge will almost always be called that over M-10 same with The Southfield instead of M-39. Detroit doesn't do inbound and outbound or use minutes in their traffic reports like Chicago does.

WWJ 950AM does the best with traffic reports in Metro Detroit. WJR called their traffic reports The Big 7 because of the 7 major freeways, the Chrysler, Fisher, Lodge, Southfield, Ruether, Ford and Jeffries. For some reason I thought I-275 was included but I don't think it was.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: txstateends on August 14, 2018, 03:44:41 AM
If you are in north TX and you hear traffic reports on the radio with...

* "Decatur Cutoff", refers to US 287 (the US 81 part is rarely if ever mentioned) in north Fort Worth NW of its split from I-35W.  AFAIK, that part of US 287 has never had a local name, and I never saw anything that looked like a named street blade sign the few times I've been out that way.  So, I'm not sure where the "Decatur Cutoff" name comes from, but traffic reports are the only source you'll hear it from.

* "Fair Park Curve", is a long S-curve along I-30 east of downtown Dallas in the vicinity of Fair Park.  There is no street or freeway naming as such (the freeway is East R.L. Thornton Freeway, for a late Dallas businessman/banker/ex-mayor), so as with the "Decatur Cutoff", the only time you'll hear "Fair Park Curve" is on traffic reports.

* "Ferguson Curve", as with the "Fair Park Curve", another S-curve on I-30 east of downtown, but shorter, and in the vicinity of the Ferguson Road exit.  Also not an official name, only heard on traffic reports.

I really don't know where the traffic reporters came up with the names, other than maybe somebody decided years ago that the above terms would be good descriptive labeling conventions when referring to those spots on the radio.

Most all the other naming used when TV/radio traffic reports are on is a combo of actual numbered routes and/or freeway/tollroad/street names.  Occasionally you'll hear TxDOT terms or construction project monikers like "DFW Connector" for the TX 114-TX 121 overlap between Grapevine and DFW Airport, or "the TEXpress lanes" for the tolled express lanes that are on I-635, I-35E north of I-635, I-35W between downtown Fort Worth and I-820, and I-820 on the north side east of I-35W.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: ET21 on August 14, 2018, 08:41:00 AM
Chicago traffic reports also already combine IL-53 and I-355 into one long stretch from Lake Cook Road to I-80. The I-290 report usually ends with the time to and from IL-390, formally Thorndale Ave
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Eth on August 14, 2018, 08:59:20 AM
The most notable one in Atlanta is probably the "Grady Curve", referring to that portion of the otherwise north-south I-75/85 that bulges out to the east (https://www.google.com/maps/@33.7564438,-84.3919768,15.02z) near downtown in the vicinity of Grady hospital. I've also occasionally heard I-20 near its crossing of the Chattahoochee on the west side referred to as "Six Flags Hill", as it includes a noticeable incline passing by the theme park.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: jon daly on August 14, 2018, 10:10:08 AM
Good stuff, but how many of them are natural geographic features?

I did think of another man-made one, but I don't think it shows up in traffic reports, because Nrthampton, Mass. doesn't usually have enough traffic to warrant one.

I give you the Truck Eating Bridge:


https://blogs.gonomad.com/blog/2012/12/welcome-to-northampton-home-of-the-famous-truck-eating-bridge-the-town-where-size-matters.html

[I'm sure there are other truck eating bridges, but I've heard that one referred to as such when Northampton used to have a cool Adult Alternative radio station (WRNX) that I would listen to.]
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: skluth on August 14, 2018, 11:31:30 AM
Every place I've lived has had its weird local place names which may not be found on a map. Some examples:

Green Bay, WI (where I was raised)
Three Corners - intersection of Main, Cedar, and Baird and once a much busier intersection
The Ledge - the local name for the section of the Niagara Escarpment that runs east of the city and up the Door Peninsula

St Louis, MO (where I lived most of the last 30 years)
The Grove - the business strip on Manchester Av between Kingshighway and Vandeventor
Dogtown - the neighborhood south of Forest Park and west of Hampton Av
Antique Row - Cherokee St, especially east of Jefferson
The Triangle - the area within Loughborough, Hampton, and Gravois

Sometimes, these names fall out of common use (not too many but old locals know the Triangle). Other times the names are new in an attempt to rebrand an area (The Grove). Sometimes, the city will actually adopt a long-used neighborhood reference (Shaw, Central West End) and make it the official neighborhood name. (St Louis has something like 40+ official neighborhoods.)

I'm not sure how many are in traffic reports. But the Grove and Dogtown are frequently mentioned in St Louis news reports as both are popular entertainment districts. Antique Row is also regularly mentioned, though usually reporters make sure to say it's on Cherokee.

I don't think Green Bay is big enough to have traffic reports outside of Packers game days. If they have them, they really don't need them.

I hate to quote myself, but I can't believe I forgot these when discussing St Louis

Poplar Street Bridge or PSB - Formerly the Dickman Bridge, now the Clay Bridge taking I-55/64 across the Mississippi
The Depressed Lanes - the section of interstate between downtown and the Arch
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: PHLBOS on August 14, 2018, 11:36:05 AM
For the Greater Philadelphia area, the term Saint Gabriel’s Curve or St. Gabe's Curve refers to this stretch (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Audubon,+PA/@40.1149601,-75.4470911,14z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89c696b6a6950a27:0x28355aec7933fd7!8m2!3d40.1278839!4d-75.4318532) of US 422 in Audubon, PA
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 14, 2018, 01:30:59 PM
Detroit also has names for curves on a couple freeways. Like on the Lodge you have the Wyoming Curve and the Linwood Curve they are two curves within about a mile of each other between Davison and McNichols (Six Mile Road). I-75 has the Rochester Curve in Troy which is the curve where Rochester Road crosses over I-75 which is why it's called the Rochester Curve.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: 1995hoo on August 14, 2018, 04:15:33 PM
One I forgot yesterday: In Maryland there is a weird spot on the Clara Barton Parkway that the traffic reporters call the “Glen Echo Turnaround.”

http://goo.gl/maps/DNSVg5rinFA2
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Big John on August 14, 2018, 04:52:08 PM
Speaking of curves, there is a Plainfield Curve on I-43/94 in Milwaukee just north of the Mitchell Interchange
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Roadwarriors79 on August 14, 2018, 06:00:37 PM
In the Phoenix area:

-- Broadway Curve (where I-10/US 60 runs from N-S to E-W in Tempe)

-- Durango Curve (I-17 runs from E-W Maricopa Freeway to N-S Black Canyon Freeway)

Other terms used by traffic reporters:

-- The Stack (I-10/I-17 interchange west of downtown Phoenix)

-- The Split (I-10/I-17/US 60 interchange near Sky Harbor Airport, south end of I-17)

-- The Mini Stack (I-10/SR 51/Loop 202 interchange, also called the Short Stack)

-- Inner Loop (I-10 between the I-17 interchanges)

-- Dreamy Draw (SR 51 between Northern Ave and Shea Blvd)

-- North Stack (I-17/Loop 101 interchange)

-- Pecos Stack (I-10/Loop 202 interchange in Chandler and Ahwatukee area, Ahwatukee section goes to current Pecos Rd, which will be part of the future Loop 202 South Mountain Freeway)

-- SuperRedTan Interchange (US 60/Loop 202 interchange in Mesa, takes it name from Superstition Freeway, Red Mountain Freeway, and Santan Freeway)

-- Outer Loop (Loop 101 Agua Fria Freeway, the Outer Loop was the previous name for this section of Loop 101. Today it's only referred to distinguish the N-S portion of Loop 101 in the West Valley from the N-S section of the Pima Freeway in the East Valley)
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: US 89 on August 14, 2018, 06:28:03 PM
Salt Lake City/Wasatch Front terms:

-Point of the Mountain: the hill on I-15 between 14600 South and the Timpanogos Highway that separates Salt Lake County from Utah County. The actual "point" itself has largely been quarried away, but the name is still in common use.

-Lake Point: the I-80/SR-201 junction west of Salt Lake. The term can be extended to include the SR-36/I-80 junction as well.

-Spaghetti Bowl: the I-15/I-80/SR-201 interchange.

-Parleys Interchange: the I-80/I-215/Foothill interchange. Named for nearby Parleys Canyon.

-South Interchange: the south I-15/215 interchange.

-North Interchange: the north I-15/215 interchange.

-East Belt: the I-215 segment between I-80 and 6200 South.

-West Belt: the segment of I-215 between the north I-15 interchange and the south Redwood Road interchange.

-South Belt: 215 between Redwood Rd and 6200 South.

-Farmington split: the I-15/US 89/Legacy Parkway interchange. This was officially named the Wasatch Weave when it was first constructed, but that hasn't really caught on.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: inkyatari on August 15, 2018, 08:53:39 AM


Stevenson Expressway: I-55 from Lake Shore Drive to the Tri-State


I've heard traffic reports refer to The Stevenson all the way down to Joliet.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: ET21 on August 15, 2018, 09:02:18 AM


Stevenson Expressway: I-55 from Lake Shore Drive to the Tri-State


I've heard traffic reports refer to The Stevenson all the way down to Joliet.

I've heard it go out to I-355 for the most part on AM780 reports. Technically the Stevenson term ends once the highway heads out of Cook County.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: roadman on August 15, 2018, 09:22:41 AM
Some Boston area lingo:

The Cloverleaf - I-95 (128) at I-93 in Woburn/Reading/Stoneham

The Lane Drop - I-93 NB in Wilmington where road goes from four to three lanes

The Supermarket - I-90 (MassPike) in Newton where it passes under the Star Market building

The Barracks - I-90 (MassPike) in Weston where it passes by the State Police building

The Double Decker Bridge - I-495 in Lawrence where it crosses the Merrimack River - mainline is on upper level, C/D roads are on lower level.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: jon daly on August 15, 2018, 09:44:14 AM
I recall going up to Red Sox games and the Freedom Trail as a kid. The Supermarket was the first building I ever saw built over a highway.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: roadman on August 15, 2018, 10:00:16 AM
I recall going up to Red Sox games and the Freedom Trail as a kid. The Supermarket was the first building I ever saw built over a highway.
Fun fact:  The Supermarket was built when the Turnpike Extension was constructed - I have a copy of the contractor's "Building the Turnpike Extension" documentary that shows the building.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 15, 2018, 11:47:21 AM
There's also a Sheraton hotel built on top of the Mass Pike. It's one of the things I remember from driving into Boston.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 15, 2018, 11:50:33 AM


Stevenson Expressway: I-55 from Lake Shore Drive to the Tri-State


I've heard traffic reports refer to The Stevenson all the way down to Joliet.
Really? I thought the Stevenson Expressway was just Cook County.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: inkyatari on August 15, 2018, 12:09:27 PM


Stevenson Expressway: I-55 from Lake Shore Drive to the Tri-State


I've heard traffic reports refer to The Stevenson all the way down to Joliet.
Really? I thought the Stevenson Expressway was just Cook County.

Not saying this is a common thing, but I have heard it.

Chicago-centrism and all.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Laura on August 15, 2018, 12:48:59 PM

WTOP's Bob Marbourg likes to refer to "the Big Curve" on the Beltway in Maryland. I've never been completely sure which curve he means, but I think he means where the Outer Loop meets the I-270 Spur. He also refers to the Wilson Bridge and the American Legion Bridge as "the big bridges"; I don't know of anyone else who uses that expression for them.

Yep, when I used to commute to Rockville I used to listen to WTOP, and I always assumed that “The Big Curve” is the one on the outer loop before the I-270 spur.

In the Baltimore area:

The JFX: The Jones Falls Expressway, which is the part of I-83 inside the beltway.

The 83s: The 695-83 concurrency (between the JFX and the Harrisburg Expressway)

The Beltway is I-695 and is given “Outer Loop” and “Inner Loop” instead of N/S/E/W directions.

40 East: Pulaski Highway, which runs east from Baltimore

40 West: Baltimore National Pike, which runs west from Baltimore

MD 943 Warren Road: the only time this number is signed is in traffic reports and VMS signs.




iPhone
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Rothman on August 15, 2018, 01:50:37 PM
Had a friend that stayed in the hotel over the Pike.  He said it was horrible just because of the constant noise.

Is it still a Sheraton? I thought at one point it was a Marriott (long time ago).
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: PHLBOS on August 15, 2018, 03:44:20 PM
Some Boston area lingo:

The Cloverleaf - I-95 (128) at I-93 in Woburn/Reading/Stoneham

The Lane Drop - I-93 NB in Wilmington where road goes from four to three lanes

The Supermarket - I-90 (MassPike) in Newton where it passes under the Star Market building

The Barracks - I-90 (MassPike) in Weston where it passes by the State Police building

The Double Decker Bridge - I-495 in Lawrence where it crosses the Merrimack River - mainline is on upper level, C/D roads are on lower level.
You forgot The Split as in the Braintree Spilt (I-93/US 1 & MA 3).
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 15, 2018, 05:11:39 PM
Had a friend that stayed in the hotel over the Pike.  He said it was horrible just because of the constant noise.

Is it still a Sheraton? I thought at one point it was a Marriott (long time ago).
It's a Crowne Plaza. I haven't been in Boston since 2004.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: US 81 on August 16, 2018, 05:03:13 PM
If you are in north TX and you hear traffic reports on the radio with...

* "Decatur Cutoff", refers to US 287 (the US 81 part is rarely if ever mentioned) in north Fort Worth NW of its split from I-35W.  AFAIK, that part of US 287 has never had a local name, and I never saw anything that looked like a named street blade sign the few times I've been out that way.  So, I'm not sure where the "Decatur Cutoff" name comes from, but traffic reports are the only source you'll hear it from.
....

"Cut-off" is fairly common in Texas nomenclature (probably elsewhere as well) for the first or only road to breach or bypass a certain obstacle, usually in a rural setting. What is now N. Main/Saginaw Blvd/Bus 287 has, for most of my life, been a slow tedious traffic snarl.  When the US 287 freeway opened, it was referred to as the Decatur cutoff from common local (or regional?) usage. 

I'd never seen "Cut-Off" on any signage ever until rural roads started getting named (not just numbered) as part of the 911 upgrades. 
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: webny99 on August 16, 2018, 08:13:46 PM
Infamously, the "Can of Worms" junction of I-490, I-590, NY 590, and NY 96 in Rochester. It isn't labeled on any map, but you can tell at a first glance where the name came from.

Prior to the 1987 redesign, traffic was analogous to a can of worms, due to the weave movements (intense squirming and wriggling) required to stay on 590. Now, it's the physical ramps themselves, not the cars/traffic flow, that are better suited to the term.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: vdeane on August 16, 2018, 08:43:07 PM
Heck, the old Can of Worms was basically two closely-spaced Y interchanges with flyovers to allow access to Winton Road to/from the east and north thrown in.  Judging by the satellite imagery, it's quite possible that every lane was an exit-only lane from the perspective of either 490 or 590.  The current interchange had to sacrifice some connections (no more access from Blossom Rd to I-490, nor from Winton to NY 590 north).  The rail spur was actually fitted into the design, but was retired from service before construction.

I can only imagine what it must have been like to replace it.  My parents made it sound like there was a different traffic pattern every single day!

Speaking of Rochester traffic reports, "the 590 split" refers to the I-390/I-590 interchange.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: GenExpwy on August 17, 2018, 02:53:55 AM
The main issue with the old Can of Worms was that mainline through traffic on 490 had to weave with mainline through traffic on 590 in a space of (IIRC) about 300 feet (in both directions).

As an aside, if you assume that the switch from I-590 to NY 590 occurred in the exact middle of this, that would give you a 150-foot overlap of the mainlines of I-490 and I-590. This would be the second example (after Cleveland’s 271/480) of two 3dis overlapping.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: plain on August 17, 2018, 11:03:17 AM
The Richmond metro:

Bryan Park: the I-95/I-64 West/I-195 interchange

Shockoe Valley: the I-95/I-64 East/3rd St/5th St/7th St interchange

The Powhite: VA 76 Powhite Pkwy

The Expressway: VA 195 Downtown Expwy

Chippenham: VA 150 Chippenham Pkwy

The Outer/Inner Loop: Sometimes used by traffic reporters to describe the direction of travel on I-295 and/or VA 288

Everything else is just called by the numbers, etc.




The Hampton Roads region:

The HRBT: the I-64 Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel

The Monitor-Merrimac: the I-664 Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel (traffic reporters very rarely use the initials MMMBT or MMBT, but VDOT always does on VMS's around the region)

The JRB: the US 17/US 258 James River Bridge

The Downtown: the I-264 Downtown Tunnel

The Midtown: the US 58 Midtown Tunnel

Bowers Hill: the I-64/I-264/I-664/US 13/US 58/US 460 interchange(s) in Chesapeake

The High-Rise: The I-64 High-Rise Bridge over the Elizabeth River Southern Branch

Twin Bridges: I-64's crossing of the Elizabeth River Eastern Branch
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: roadman on August 17, 2018, 11:07:18 AM
Some Boston area lingo:

The Cloverleaf - I-95 (128) at I-93 in Woburn/Reading/Stoneham

The Lane Drop - I-93 NB in Wilmington where road goes from four to three lanes

The Supermarket - I-90 (MassPike) in Newton where it passes under the Star Market building

The Barracks - I-90 (MassPike) in Weston where it passes by the State Police building

The Double Decker Bridge - I-495 in Lawrence where it crosses the Merrimack River - mainline is on upper level, C/D roads are on lower level.
You forgot The Split as in the Braintree Spilt (I-93/US 1 & MA 3).
Yes I did - thank you.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: webny99 on August 17, 2018, 01:28:44 PM
The main issue with the old Can of Worms was that mainline through traffic on 490 had to weave with mainline through traffic on 590 in a space of (IIRC) about 300 feet (in both directions).

Because of the way it was described to me as a kid (obviously, I wasn't around prior to 1987), I used to think it was a giant, paved intersection which was basically a free-for-all as to who went when. No ramps, no lane markings, no stoplight, no nothing, just a giant paved zone where you just weaved in the direction you wanted to go.  :-D
It was a major lightbulb moment for me when I saw an old visual and realized it was actually a set of directional-T intersections. So it was crazy, but not quite as crazy as the free-for-all I'd assumed!

Heck, the old Can of Worms was basically two closely-spaced Y interchanges with flyovers to allow access to Winton Road to/from the east and north thrown in.  Judging by the satellite imagery, it's quite possible that every lane was an exit-only lane from the perspective of either 490 or 590.  The current interchange had to sacrifice some connections (no more access from Blossom Rd to I-490, nor from Winton to NY 590 north).

If anything, I wish a few more connections had been sacrificed, namely access from I-490 to Blossom Road, which creates the existing weave which wreaks havoc with afternoon traffic flow.

Here's a page about the interchange (http://www.empirestateroads.com/week/week1.html) with a historic visual that I enjoy studying. The redesign must have been incredible to witness, with everything changing. I-490 East to I-590 South is literally the only movement (including through movements) that has any similarity to its previous configuration.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on August 17, 2018, 03:59:10 PM
Twin Cities terms

"Fish Lake" - the northwest I-94/494/694 junction in Maple Grove

"The River" - used to refer to either the Minnesota or Mississippi, depends on the context of the report being given; reports generally just say things like "X minutes from route X to the river" expecting commuters to know which one is being referred to based on the route given

I thought the OP was only referring to “natural” terms, but since we’ve expanded here are some more:

“Burnsville Split” or “Forest Lake Split”: south and north junctions of I-35W and I-35E. Technically the north junction is in Columbus, but no one calls it that. Columbus was formerly a township that incorporated recently to prevent Forest Lake from annexing it.

“The Commons”:  I-35W and MN 62 junction, owing to its former configuration as the Crosstown Commons

“Bloomington Strip”: I-494 through Bloomington, usually referring to the stretch between MN 100 and MN 77 but sometimes includes US 169 on the west and MN 5’s airport split on the east
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: vdeane on August 18, 2018, 10:00:45 PM
As an aside, if you assume that the switch from I-590 to NY 590 occurred in the exact middle of this, that would give you a 150-foot overlap of the mainlines of I-490 and I-590. This would be the second example (after Cleveland’s 271/480) of two 3dis overlapping.
I don't know how it was actually signed, but since I-590 and NY 590 are technically separate routes (even though NY 590 is used as a continuation, and they share a set of mileposts and exit numbers), probably not.  NY 47 certainly would have, though.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Hurricane Rex on August 19, 2018, 02:35:46 PM
Oregon, or more specifically Portland area:
Fremont stack: the 4 level interchange on the east side of the Freemont Bridge
The sunset: US 26
Sylven: Also US 26, east if OR 217 (tgis and sunset are used interchangeably)
The baldock: I-5
The banfield: I-84
The rose quarter: I-5 between I-84 and I-405 and I-84 between mp 0 and 1, even though its more Lloyd Center than rose quarter.
The hook: Newberg Dundee bypass' west end.
The curves or Terwillager curves: I-5 between mp 296 and 298.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Bickendan on August 20, 2018, 06:02:12 PM
Oregon, or more specifically Portland area:
Fremont stack: the 4 level interchange on the east side of the Freemont Bridge
The sunset: US 26
Sylven: Also US 26, east if OR 217 (tgis and sunset are used interchangeably)
The baldock: I-5
The banfield: I-84
The rose quarter: I-5 between I-84 and I-405 and I-84 between mp 0 and 1, even though its more Lloyd Center than rose quarter.
The hook: Newberg Dundee bypass' west end.
The curves or Terwillager curves: I-5 between mp 296 and 298.

The funny thing is I'm confident I coined the term 'Fremont Stack' and 'Ross Island Maze' and have never used them outside this board. If they've been used outside on even on a rare colloquial basis, I'd love to know, because great minds and all that.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: GaryV on August 20, 2018, 06:13:39 PM
In Detroit, "The Interchanges" refers to I-94 (Ford Fwy) interchanges with I-75 (Chrysler) and M-10 (Lodge).
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: SSOWorld on August 20, 2018, 07:37:37 PM
I think they still give travel times to/from “the Post Office” even though USPS hasn’t occupied the building the Eisenhower runs through for decades.

Usually, it's "the Old Post Office".  Then we have...

The Junction (Edens/Kennedy)
The Merge/Split (Ryan/Ford/I-57)
And yet IDiOT refers to the Junction as Montrose.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: ne11931 on August 20, 2018, 08:55:11 PM
A couple in Boston that used to be regular ones in the past that aren't used anymore-
 
The "Schraftt's building", next to Route 93 in Charlestown.

The "Coca-Cola plant" at the end of the offramps from the Mass Pike at Cambridge St. in Allston, now a Double Tree Hotel.

One that is used occasionally that is confusing is Route 2 at Bedford Rd. in Lincoln described by reporters as "Tracy's Corner". It is not a "corner" although it is about a mile from "Crosby's Corner", and the gas station called Tracy's at that intersection was sold years ago and no longer has that name.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Brandon on August 21, 2018, 01:41:03 PM
I think they still give travel times to/from “the Post Office” even though USPS hasn’t occupied the building the Eisenhower runs through for decades.

Usually, it's "the Old Post Office".  Then we have...

The Junction (Edens/Kennedy)
The Merge/Split (Ryan/Ford/I-57)
And yet IDiOT refers to the Junction as Montrose.

The full term is "Montrose Junction" due to its location at Montrose, hence the travel times on the VMSs.

(https://www.travelmidwest.com/lmiga/messageSign?id=IL-TESTTSC-KENNEDY-W-9&small=true)
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: vdeane on August 21, 2018, 07:29:26 PM
The full term is "Montrose Junction" due to its location at Montrose, hence the travel times on the VMSs.

(https://www.travelmidwest.com/lmiga/messageSign?id=IL-TESTTSC-KENNEDY-W-9&small=true)
The last word on the VMS should rhyme with "right" for a proper poem.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: abefroman329 on August 21, 2018, 11:59:53 PM
The full term is "Montrose Junction" due to its location at Montrose, hence the travel times on the VMSs.

(https://www.travelmidwest.com/lmiga/messageSign?id=IL-TESTTSC-KENNEDY-W-9&small=true)
The last word on the VMS should rhyme with "right" for a proper poem.
It’s actually much more clever than it appears in Brandon’s post. On the actual VMS, the messages appear as follows:

PASS
ON THE
LEFT

DRIVE
ON THE
RIGHT
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: jon daly on August 22, 2018, 06:31:31 AM
But what does it say about ketchup?
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: abefroman329 on August 22, 2018, 07:46:14 AM
But what does it say about ketchup?
That you can put it on whatever food you want and anyone who says otherwise is a booger.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: jeffandnicole on August 22, 2018, 09:06:11 AM
The full term is "Montrose Junction" due to its location at Montrose, hence the travel times on the VMSs.

(https://www.travelmidwest.com/lmiga/messageSign?id=IL-TESTTSC-KENNEDY-W-9&small=true)
The last word on the VMS should rhyme with "right" for a proper poem.

Pass On the Left

Drive On the Right

23 Min to Montrose
54 Min to Your O'Hare Flight
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: 1 on August 22, 2018, 09:08:55 AM
Do those numbers change in real time in this thread? It says 17/48 for me, and I remember it saying something like 9/16 before.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: US 89 on August 22, 2018, 10:21:34 AM
Do those numbers change in real time in this thread? It says 17/48 for me, and I remember it saying something like 9/16 before.

I bet they do. I'm seeing 7/31 right now.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: CNGL-Leudimin on August 22, 2018, 11:07:36 AM
Do those numbers change in real time in this thread? It says 17/48 for me, and I remember it saying something like 9/16 before.

They do. Now the "Pass on the left, drive on the right" is gone and replaced with "I-90 roadwork continues to I-190 in various lanes", with 5 minutes to Montrose and 21 to O'Hare.

Edit  (2:50 p.m. local time of both the VMS and where Big Rig Steve is now, which is Sulphur Springs TX as of this edit): Now back to "Pass on the left, drive on the right", along with 12 min to Montrose and 31 to O'Hare. So yeah, the image is a real time reproduction of the VMS. I remember doing the same with NHS tropical cyclone advisories, they would update until the last one.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: machias on August 22, 2018, 10:30:59 PM
I think they still give travel times to/from “the Post Office” even though USPS hasn’t occupied the building the Eisenhower runs through for decades.

Usually, it's "the Old Post Office".  Then we have...

The Junction (Edens/Kennedy)
The Merge/Split (Ryan/Ford/I-57)
And yet IDiOT refers to the Junction as Montrose.

Pretty sure you don't have to refer to them as IDiOT. You may not agree with the way they do things but they're doing the best they can under the circumstances they have.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 23, 2018, 05:23:28 AM
A little off topic but the guy that sold the Post Office in 2016 died the day after he sold it.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on August 23, 2018, 05:25:38 AM
In Detroit, "The Interchanges" refers to I-94 (Ford Fwy) interchanges with I-75 (Chrysler) and M-10 (Lodge).
I'm from Detroit and am very familiar with Detroit and have never heard that term in my life.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Brandon on August 23, 2018, 10:50:13 AM
I think they still give travel times to/from “the Post Office” even though USPS hasn’t occupied the building the Eisenhower runs through for decades.

Usually, it's "the Old Post Office".  Then we have...

The Junction (Edens/Kennedy)
The Merge/Split (Ryan/Ford/I-57)
And yet IDiOT refers to the Junction as Montrose.

Pretty sure you don't have to refer to them as IDiOT. You may not agree with the way they do things but they're doing the best they can under the circumstances they have.

They aren't doing the best they can with what they have.  They can do better, much better.  IDOT consistently fails to work well with other DOTs.  They fail to adopt what's proven to work by other DOTs until it's in use in many, many other places (and then may not use it at all, for it "wasn't invented here").  They fail to plan for traffic loads even when local governments warn them about the traffic that will be created (I-80 and I-55 with the massive intermodal centers in Will County is a prime example).  They fail to plan ahead, often building 20 years after the initial need for the improvement was needed, and 25 years after it was identified.  So, yes, they have proven themselves worthy of the term "IDiOT" when they can't even keep up with WisDOT, InDOT, IowaDOT, MDOT, and MoDOT.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: inkyatari on August 23, 2018, 12:40:38 PM

Pretty sure you don't have to refer to them as IDiOT. You may not agree with the way they do things but they're doing the best they can under the circumstances they have.

They aren't doing the best they can with what they have.  They can do better, much better.  IDOT consistently fails to work well with other DOTs.  They fail to adopt what's proven to work by other DOTs until it's in use in many, many other places (and then may not use it at all, for it "wasn't invented here").  They fail to plan for traffic loads even when local governments warn them about the traffic that will be created (I-80 and I-55 with the massive intermodal centers in Will County is a prime example).  They fail to plan ahead, often building 20 years after the initial need for the improvement was needed, and 25 years after it was identified.  So, yes, they have proven themselves worthy of the term "IDiOT" when they can't even keep up with WisDOT, InDOT, IowaDOT, MDOT, and MoDOT.

Quoted for great truth.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: ET21 on August 23, 2018, 04:49:52 PM

Pretty sure you don't have to refer to them as IDiOT. You may not agree with the way they do things but they're doing the best they can under the circumstances they have.

They aren't doing the best they can with what they have.  They can do better, much better.  IDOT consistently fails to work well with other DOTs.  They fail to adopt what's proven to work by other DOTs until it's in use in many, many other places (and then may not use it at all, for it "wasn't invented here").  They fail to plan for traffic loads even when local governments warn them about the traffic that will be created (I-80 and I-55 with the massive intermodal centers in Will County is a prime example).  They fail to plan ahead, often building 20 years after the initial need for the improvement was needed, and 25 years after it was identified.  So, yes, they have proven themselves worthy of the term "IDiOT" when they can't even keep up with WisDOT, InDOT, IowaDOT, MDOT, and MoDOT.

Quoted for great truth.

Quoted a 2nd time. The Tollway is the best road agency in the state of Illinois right now
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: GaryV on August 23, 2018, 04:54:36 PM
In Detroit, "The Interchanges" refers to I-94 (Ford Fwy) interchanges with I-75 (Chrysler) and M-10 (Lodge).
I'm from Detroit and am very familiar with Detroit and have never heard that term in my life.
I hear it on WWJ almost every day.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Brandon on August 23, 2018, 05:27:12 PM

Pretty sure you don't have to refer to them as IDiOT. You may not agree with the way they do things but they're doing the best they can under the circumstances they have.

They aren't doing the best they can with what they have.  They can do better, much better.  IDOT consistently fails to work well with other DOTs.  They fail to adopt what's proven to work by other DOTs until it's in use in many, many other places (and then may not use it at all, for it "wasn't invented here").  They fail to plan for traffic loads even when local governments warn them about the traffic that will be created (I-80 and I-55 with the massive intermodal centers in Will County is a prime example).  They fail to plan ahead, often building 20 years after the initial need for the improvement was needed, and 25 years after it was identified.  So, yes, they have proven themselves worthy of the term "IDiOT" when they can't even keep up with WisDOT, InDOT, IowaDOT, MDOT, and MoDOT.

Quoted for great truth.

Quoted a 2nd time. The Tollway is the best road agency in the state of Illinois right now

You know it's bad when even ISTHA has had enough of IDOT and starts doing widening work on their own without IDOT's help.  See the I-88 widening from MP 138 to MP 140 for more (York Road bridge over I-88).
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: bzakharin on August 30, 2018, 03:32:54 PM
For the Greater Philadelphia area, the term Saint Gabriel’s Curve or St. Gabe's Curve refers to this stretch (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Audubon,+PA/@40.1149601,-75.4470911,14z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89c696b6a6950a27:0x28355aec7933fd7!8m2!3d40.1278839!4d-75.4318532) of US 422 in Audubon, PA
There is also the Conshohocken Curve which refers to this area of I-76:
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0712225,-75.2875643,16z/data=!5m1!1e1

They (the Philly traffic reporters) are also allergic to route numbers on the PA side except I-95 and US 202 even when there really is no other choice. I've heard one reporter fumbling for a name for US 1 in Bucks County "Route 1, um, the superhighway" (yes, I know it used to be called that, but how long ago and how many people know this?).
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: jeffandnicole on August 30, 2018, 03:40:48 PM
For the Greater Philadelphia area, the term Saint Gabriel’s Curve or St. Gabe's Curve refers to this stretch (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Audubon,+PA/@40.1149601,-75.4470911,14z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89c696b6a6950a27:0x28355aec7933fd7!8m2!3d40.1278839!4d-75.4318532) of US 422 in Audubon, PA
There is also the Conshohocken Curve which refers to this area of I-76:
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0712225,-75.2875643,16z/data=!5m1!1e1

They (the Philly traffic reporters) are also allergic to route numbers on the PA side except I-95 and US 202 even when there really is no other choice. I've heard one reporter fumbling for a name for US 1 in Bucks County "Route 1, um, the superhighway" (yes, I know it used to be called that, but how long ago and how many people know this?).

I was listening to a traffic report on KYW and for some reason the traffic reporter (the normal afternoon guy) was naming both the highway nickname and route number for nearly every roadway. I know I don't hear that very often!
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: bzakharin on September 01, 2018, 11:11:46 PM
For the Greater Philadelphia area, the term Saint Gabriel’s Curve or St. Gabe's Curve refers to this stretch (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Audubon,+PA/@40.1149601,-75.4470911,14z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89c696b6a6950a27:0x28355aec7933fd7!8m2!3d40.1278839!4d-75.4318532) of US 422 in Audubon, PA
There is also the Conshohocken Curve which refers to this area of I-76:
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0712225,-75.2875643,16z/data=!5m1!1e1

They (the Philly traffic reporters) are also allergic to route numbers on the PA side except I-95 and US 202 even when there really is no other choice. I've heard one reporter fumbling for a name for US 1 in Bucks County "Route 1, um, the superhighway" (yes, I know it used to be called that, but how long ago and how many people know this?).

I was listening to a traffic report on KYW and for some reason the traffic reporter (the normal afternoon guy) was naming both the highway nickname and route number for nearly every roadway. I know I don't hear that very often!
That does happen occasionally, especially "76 the Schuylkill" and "476 the blue route"
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Sctvhound on September 04, 2018, 11:51:26 PM
In the Charleston area, most of the bridges are just referred to by their names (the Ravenel, the Westmoreland, the Don Holt). The Wando bridge is 526 over the Wando River in Mt. Pleasant.

I-26 is just referred to as 26. 52 (Rivers Ave) is just referred to as Rivers.

One we used to have was before the Ravenel Bridge was built, when it was two bridges going over the Cooper River. We had the “302 merge”, where I-26 and the Crosstown (US 17) split, going from 3 lanes to 2 lanes. That was a chokepoint during afternoon rush hour.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: bzakharin on September 06, 2018, 03:08:13 PM
Not traffic reports, but I-295 VMS's in NJ show travel times to BEN (the Ben Franklin Bridge) and WALT (the Walt Whitman Bridge). I imagine most of the non-locals have no idea what those are. The other destinations are all route numbers, so those are ok. I don't recall ever seeing the Delaware Memorial Bridge on any of them, so not sure how (or whether) it's abbreviated.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: mrsman on September 21, 2018, 08:50:04 AM
We addressed this in a similar topic before:

 https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=12762.msg313363#msg313363  (https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=12762.msg313363#msg313363)

In that topic, I list some of the common names traffic reporters use in the L.A. area:

In the Los Angeles area, the South Bay Curve is that sharp bend in I-405 just south of LAX. The "Orange Crush" is where I-5, California 22 and California 57 all tie into each other.

Auto Club of So. Calif. (ACSC) used to print a map labeled "Guide to the L.A. Freeway System" that listed the multiple nicknames of the freeway features commonly used, especially by traffic reporters.  I don't have one in front of me, but this is what I remember:

4-level interchange: 110/101
Downtown Slot: 101 between 10 and 110
San Bernardino Split: 101/10 interchange
E LA Interchange: 5/101/10/60
Malfunction Junction: 405/22/605
El Toro Y: 5/405 in Orange County
Santa Ana Canyon: 91 between OC and Corona
Kellogg Interchange: 10/71/57 in Pomona
Kellogg Hill: 10 approaching the Kellogg Interchange from Covina
Sepulveda Pass: 405 between 101 and Sunset
Cauhenga Pass: 101 between Lankershim and Highland
McClure Tunnel: West end of I-10 approaching PCH
 Conejo Grade: 101 between Camarillo and Thousand Oaks
Calabasas Grade: 101 between Agoura Hills and Calabasas
Santa Susana Pass: 118 between Chatsworth and Simi Valley
Newhall Pass: I-5 between I-210 and CA 14
Castaic Grade: Steep climb of I-5 north of Santa Clarita, including section where roadways switch over
Grapevine: Usually refers to entire I-5 from Santa Clarita to Wheeler Ridge, but technically it's just the southern section
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: 1 on September 21, 2018, 08:52:07 AM
We addressed this in a similar topic before:

 https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=12762.msg313363#msg313363  (https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=12762.msg313363#msg313363)

The OP's intent was different. It quickly became a duplicate of that thread, though.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: jon daly on September 21, 2018, 03:19:56 PM
Yeah, I was thinking more about natural features referenced by traffic reporters. Then again, the Rhode Island canyons that I-295 travel through were cut by construction crews.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Gnutella on February 27, 2019, 01:57:46 PM
In Pittsburgh, I-376 was named the Penn-Lincoln Parkway because it also carries U.S. 22 and U.S. 30 for most of its length, and those two highways were named William Penn Highway and Lincoln Highway, respectively. As the years passed, the segment east of downtown Pittsburgh became known as the Penn-Lincoln Parkway East, and the segment west of downtown Pittsburgh became known as the Penn-Lincoln Parkway West. After a while, traffic reporters started referring to them as just the Parkway East and Parkway West. Then, when I-279 was built north of downtown Pittsburgh, traffic reporters called it the Parkway North for the sake of continuity, even though it was never part of the Penn-Lincoln Parkway. Also, the segment of I-376 between the Fort Pitt Tunnel and the Boulevard of the Allies is known in some circles as the Parkway Central.

In terms of features along the highways in Pittsburgh, the two most noteworthy are the Fort Pitt and Squirrel Hill Tunnels. The Fort Pitt Tunnel is part of the Parkway West, carrying it to the Fort Pitt Bridge and downtown Pittsburgh, with its famous vista emerging from the tunnel eastbound. The Squirrel Hill Tunnel is part of the Parkway East, about four miles east of downtown Pittsburgh, and is essentially the dividing line between the city of Pittsburgh and its eastern suburbs (the actual city limit is at the Edgewood/Swissvale interchange, less than a mile east of the tunnel). Other features on Pittsburgh highways include Green Tree Hill, which is a large hill on the Parkway West about two miles west of the Fort Pitt Tunnel, and The Bathtub, which is a segment of the Parkway Central in downtown Pittsburgh next to the Monongahela River that's prone to flooding.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: Flint1979 on February 27, 2019, 03:38:34 PM
In Detroit, "The Interchanges" refers to I-94 (Ford Fwy) interchanges with I-75 (Chrysler) and M-10 (Lodge).
I'm from Detroit and am very familiar with Detroit and have never heard that term in my life.
I hear it on WWJ almost every day.
Must be something new. I never hear it on WJR.
Title: Re: Traffic Report Geography
Post by: bing101 on March 06, 2019, 03:24:59 PM
For Sacramento the Cap City Freeway, the WX Freeway and the Elvas freeway.

Cap City Freeway refers to the West End of US-50 and the CA-51

WX Freeway refers to the Western portion of Cap City Freeway.

Elvas Freeway is CA-51 and Business 80.