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Non-Road Boards => Off-Topic => Topic started by: bandit957 on January 30, 2019, 11:04:00 AM

Title: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on January 30, 2019, 11:04:00 AM
Why have attitudes changed towards students who were expelled from school?

I'm talking about within the United States. I know there's folks from other countries who read this, but my observations are based on what I've seen in the good ol' U.S. and A.

In my youth - 1980s and early 1990s - to be expelled from a school was frowned upon by some, but most people saw it as a sign of healthy rebellion. People recognized that the school was usually wrong. I used to write about my experiences with being kicked out of school, and everyone would cheer me on.

But in the mid-'90s, things changed. After that, nobody wanted to hear stories that glamorized expelled students anymore. It's not just my perception caused by me entering the adult world and being around more mature people. It's not just because I got Internet and was exposed to people who were less open-minded anyway. This was an actual societal change. I worked at the library before this happened and had co-workers who were much older, and they didn't hold my school experiences against me. When I wrote about it for a college class, even the professor was amused by it. But after that, everything went to hell.

Why? What is it about the mid-'90s that just completely turned society backwards? After that, I felt like I was living in a totalitarian police state.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 30, 2019, 11:39:41 AM
Kids are more serious about school nowadays.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on January 30, 2019, 11:53:47 AM
I really have no idea what you're talking about.  When we moved to GA, there was a phenomenon of teenagers dropping out of HS to attend a night vo-tech school, made more convenient that you were considered a legal adult in GA when you turned 17 and could get emancipated from your parents (and be able to do things like drop out of school without obtaining their permission), but they were starting to crack down on that practice.

Could also have something to do with the fact that there were a lot more jobs that didn't require a diploma (or a college degree, for that matter) a generation or two ago.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 30, 2019, 12:02:44 PM
I really have no idea what you're talking about.  When we moved to GA, there was a phenomenon of teenagers dropping out of HS to attend a night vo-tech school, made more convenient that you were considered a legal adult in GA when you turned 17 and could get emancipated from your parents (and be able to do things like drop out of school without obtaining their permission), but they were starting to crack down on that practice.

Could also have something to do with the fact that there were a lot more jobs that didn't require a diploma (or a college degree, for that matter) a generation or two ago.
It really depends where you live.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on January 30, 2019, 12:05:31 PM
I really have no idea what you're talking about.  When we moved to GA, there was a phenomenon of teenagers dropping out of HS to attend a night vo-tech school, made more convenient that you were considered a legal adult in GA when you turned 17 and could get emancipated from your parents (and be able to do things like drop out of school without obtaining their permission), but they were starting to crack down on that practice.

Could also have something to do with the fact that there were a lot more jobs that didn't require a diploma (or a college degree, for that matter) a generation or two ago.
It really depends where you live.

For me, it was northern Kentucky. Our schools here always talked about how they "don't put up with any foolishness", yet when any serious wrongdoing occurs, they're always the first to blame the victims and rally around the perpetrators.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on January 30, 2019, 12:28:56 PM
That seems to be similar everywhere. I always observed that schools won’t do anything about bullies until the victim gets fed up and lands a punch on their abusers, and then the school jumps in to protect bullies and punish the student for defending themselves.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on January 30, 2019, 12:47:10 PM
That seems to be similar everywhere. I always observed that schools won’t do anything about bullies until the victim gets fed up and lands a punch on their abusers, and then the school jumps in to protect bullies and punish the student for defending themselves.
Or they promote some feelgood horseshit that doesn't actually do anything to address the problem, like #WalkUpNotOut.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on January 30, 2019, 05:17:47 PM
It could be because expulsion has become a lot less common over time. I can't think of a single student getting expelled from my school from 1996 to 2007.  Because it was so rare, kids talked about getting expelled as though it were the death penalty; you must have had to do something really, really bad to get kicked out.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 30, 2019, 05:19:46 PM
It could be because expulsion has become a lot less common over time. I can't think of a single student getting expelled from my school from 1996 to 2007.  Because it was so rare, kids talked about getting expelled as though it were the death penalty; you must have had to do something really, really bad to get kicked out.
Yeah, I thought expulsion was something you only got if you like physically assaulted someone or something.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Big John on January 30, 2019, 05:42:30 PM
It could be because expulsion has become a lot less common over time. I can't think of a single student getting expelled from my school from 1996 to 2007.  Because it was so rare, kids talked about getting expelled as though it were the death penalty; you must have had to do something really, really bad to get kicked out.
Like 50 years ago, male students were expelled for having their hair too long. Now it is reserved for serious offensives.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: formulanone on January 30, 2019, 06:39:47 PM
Piecing together your posts, I feel as if there's a whole series of dangerous incidents that which happened decades ago which weren't explained to the right people at the right time. And that must suck, to be honest.

But...Nobody cares what you (or anyone else) did in high school. Why should anyone care about your situation over 25 years ago? Everyone else has moved on as an adult, and nobody cares much about how exciting your specific situations were because it's impossible to relate. The echoes of the past are silent and the individual actions of history are all but forgotten.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on January 30, 2019, 06:50:39 PM
I wonder if students don't get expelled as often because there is no parent left at home anymore during the day.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Ben114 on January 30, 2019, 07:28:46 PM
Today I heard about an expelled kid for the first time in my life. I'd say it's fairly uncommon nowadays, usually schools are just pushing detentions and suspensions.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: formulanone on January 30, 2019, 07:47:59 PM
Today I heard about an expelled kid for the first time in my life. I'd say it's fairly uncommon nowadays, usually schools are just pushing detentions and suspensions.

My wife teaches in a public school, and says that the only speedy expulsion process requires an arrest of the student. I'm sure it's going to vary a bit between school districts, and it all begins with an administration that cares to move the paperwork along the right channels.

There's one or two troublesome kids in her school, and she mumbles that expelling the student takes months for just being a bad kid, as opposed to breaking the law.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 30, 2019, 09:27:34 PM
I have never seen/heard of a student getting expelled.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on January 30, 2019, 09:45:19 PM
I wonder if students don't get expelled as often because there is no parent left at home anymore during the day.

My guess is it's part of a broader societal shift toward putting increasing weight on education. If a kid is expelled, where do they go after that? Functionally, expelling a student is making it more likely that they'll be unemployable in adulthood, which could lead to them relying on social programs that a high school graduate wouldn't. So there's a public policy interest in keeping as many kids in school as possible, and therefore on expelling as few as possible.

The only compelling modern reason I could think of for expelling a student is if they consistently present such an overwhelming hazard to themselves, school staff, or other students that they have to be separated from the school. That would have to be beyond mundane bullying and into "brings weapons to school" sort of territory.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: 1995hoo on January 30, 2019, 09:53:27 PM
My mom, who is now retired but who taught for many years in the Fairfax County Public Schools, said that in Fairfax County, "expelling" a kid normally means he's expelled from that particular school and will be sent to a different FCPS school going forward. She wasn't sure what would get a kid kicked out of the entire FCPS system. I assume things like bringing guns to school might qualify.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Thing 342 on January 30, 2019, 10:14:25 PM
The idea that the rate of expulsions has decreased over time is generally not true, the number of students expelled per year doubled over the period 1974-1998: https://books.google.com/books?id=BzacO6Vl1tQC&lpg=PA13&pg=PA15#v=onepage&q&f=false.
I would expect this increase further, as recent school shooting events have increased the likelihood that a generally violent student (or someone who brings a gun to school) will be expelled.

My mom, who is now retired but who taught for many years in the Fairfax County Public Schools, said that in Fairfax County, "expelling" a kid normally means he's expelled from that particular school and will be sent to a different FCPS school going forward. She wasn't sure what would get a kid kicked out of the entire FCPS system. I assume things like bringing guns to school might qualify.
It seems to vary from district to district. My school district (also in VA) sent students who were expelled (or darn near about to be) to external regional charter schools which focused on discipline in an attempt to "straighten them out". A specific example for my area was Enterprise Academy, which was idealized by my cohort as essentially some sort of child prison. My understanding is/was that these students would be eligible for re-admittance after 1 year if they behaved well enough.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on January 30, 2019, 11:14:40 PM
In my case, when I got kicked out of the Campbell County Schools, that was it. I was kicked out of the whole system, not just one school. I probably could have fought them when I was old enough, but I didn't have the energy or an incentive to do so.

But somehow, I was invited to my 20-year reunion. It turns out they kept me on the class list just so they could get state money.

The offense that got me kicked out was walking out of gym class in 7th grade. I walked out because the teacher hit me with a ping-pong paddle.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 31, 2019, 09:17:53 AM
In my case, when I got kicked out of the Campbell County Schools, that was it. I was kicked out of the whole system, not just one school. I probably could have fought them when I was old enough, but I didn't have the energy or an incentive to do so.

But somehow, I was invited to my 20-year reunion. It turns out they kept me on the class list just so they could get state money.

The offense that got me kicked out was walking out of gym class in 7th grade. I walked out because the teacher hit me with a ping-pong paddle.
Don't they have to give you some sort of education?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on January 31, 2019, 09:47:20 AM
In my case, when I got kicked out of the Campbell County Schools, that was it. I was kicked out of the whole system, not just one school. I probably could have fought them when I was old enough, but I didn't have the energy or an incentive to do so.

But somehow, I was invited to my 20-year reunion. It turns out they kept me on the class list just so they could get state money.

The offense that got me kicked out was walking out of gym class in 7th grade. I walked out because the teacher hit me with a ping-pong paddle.
Don't they have to give you some sort of education?

I think after I was kicked out, they just considered it my parents' responsibility to find another school.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 31, 2019, 09:51:11 AM
In my case, when I got kicked out of the Campbell County Schools, that was it. I was kicked out of the whole system, not just one school. I probably could have fought them when I was old enough, but I didn't have the energy or an incentive to do so.

But somehow, I was invited to my 20-year reunion. It turns out they kept me on the class list just so they could get state money.

The offense that got me kicked out was walking out of gym class in 7th grade. I walked out because the teacher hit me with a ping-pong paddle.
Don't they have to give you some sort of education?

I think after I was kicked out, they just considered it my parents' responsibility to find another school.
But schooling is mandatory up till 16 so I thought that the state would have to find one.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on January 31, 2019, 09:57:59 AM
But schooling is mandatory up till 16 so I thought that the state would have to find one.

They're very inconsistent. I wasn't allowed to attend Campbell County Schools, but I also wasn't allowed to attend another public school without Campbell County's permission.

I was told to just live with it, because that was the consequences for acting up in 7th grade.

I was told this even though one of the biggest troublemakers in the Campbell County Schools didn't even live in the school district, but they let him go to school there anyway.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on January 31, 2019, 10:08:29 AM
Also, my middle school was right up the street from a home for troubled boys. Some of those kids didn't live in Campbell County, but the school accepted them anyway.

Probably most weren't real troublemakers. A lot of them came from broken homes, or their parents had died. Most didn't cause any real trouble at school. But I remember one who did. He was sent to this home because he was trouble back home. The rumor was that he tried to burn down his old school. But the Campbell County Schools tolerated him, and when other kids' parents complained about him starting trouble, the school said that disciplining him would violate his rights - even though he didn't even live in our district.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 31, 2019, 11:00:54 AM
Also, my middle school was right up the street from a home for troubled boys. Some of those kids didn't live in Campbell County, but the school accepted them anyway.

Probably most weren't real troublemakers. A lot of them came from broken homes, or their parents had died. Most didn't cause any real trouble at school. But I remember one who did. He was sent to this home because he was trouble back home. The rumor was that he tried to burn down his old school. But the Campbell County Schools tolerated him, and when other kids' parents complained about him starting trouble, the school said that disciplining him would violate his rights - even though he didn't even live in our district.
I don't get much of your story. So you got expelled but this other kid didn't? What?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on January 31, 2019, 11:16:25 AM
I don't get much of your story. So you got expelled but this other kid didn't? What?

I got expelled, even though this other kid wasn't punished for doing things that were far worse.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 31, 2019, 11:43:54 AM
I don't get much of your story. So you got expelled but this other kid didn't? What?

I got expelled, even though this other kid wasn't punished for doing things that were far worse.
So the school district was corrupt?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on January 31, 2019, 11:44:36 AM
I don't get much of your story. So you got expelled but this other kid didn't? What?

I got expelled, even though this other kid wasn't punished for doing things that were far worse.
So the school district was corrupt?

Yes.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on January 31, 2019, 12:10:59 PM
Functionally, expelling a student is making it more likely that they'll be unemployable in adulthood, which could lead to them relying on social programs that a high school graduate wouldn't. So there's a public policy interest in keeping as many kids in school as possible, and therefore on expelling as few as possible.
Would that we had the same attitudes towards giving teenagers lengthy prison sentences for minor offenses.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: hbelkins on January 31, 2019, 01:53:59 PM
Expulsion = fewer children enrolled = less state money, which is allocated per pupil and in Kentucky on the basis of average daily attendance (not enrollment.)
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on January 31, 2019, 01:55:06 PM
Don't they have to give you some sort of education?

But schooling is mandatory up till 16 so I thought that the state would have to find one.

School attendance is mandatory.  That means parents are required by law to have their kids in school.  It does not mean the school system has to keep track of every child in the city and do the legwork for them instead of the parents.  In other words, the school cannot be blamed for parents' unwillingness to put their kids in school.  Think about it another way:  how would the school system even know his parents weren't switching him to a private school or home-schooling?



I assume things like bringing guns to school might qualify.

The only classmate I ever had who "got missing" from school was one who brought a pistol to junior high, put it in his locker, and then bragged about it to his friends.  I didn't see that kid for four years after that—and that was in a town of less than 1300 people.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Beltway on February 01, 2019, 12:13:56 AM
I assume things like bringing guns to school might qualify.
The only classmate I ever had who "got missing" from school was one who brought a pistol to junior high, put it in his locker, and then bragged about it to his friends.  I didn't see that kid for four years after that—and that was in a town of less than 1300 people.

I can't think of any student that I can recall that was expelled from the schools I was at, and that was back in the 1960s and 1970s in strict school systems.  I'm sure there were some, but none that I knew of, as the high school had some drug problems.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: DandyDan on February 02, 2019, 03:56:44 AM
Isn't it true that nowadays, if a student were in line to get expelled, he or she would just end up at the alternative high school, at least if the school district has enough students? I know at the school my mother worked for that happened.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on February 02, 2019, 09:25:29 AM
Isn't it true that nowadays, if a student were in line to get expelled, he or she would just end up at the alternative high school, at least if the school district has enough students? I know at the school my mother worked for that happened.

I did end up at what was sort of like an alternative high school. It was a public school, but it had an alternative class. I liked it better than the previous few schools. I got along pretty good with the other students, and there wasn't really a dress code. But academics was lacking (my teacher said she wasn't certified to teach math), and the school treated us like preschoolers. Sometimes they wouldn't let us use the restroom all day. This was in the early '90s.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kevinb1994 on February 02, 2019, 01:40:21 PM
Isn't it true that nowadays, if a student were in line to get expelled, he or she would just end up at the alternative high school, at least if the school district has enough students? I know at the school my mother worked for that happened.

I did end up at what was sort of like an alternative high school. It was a public school, but it had an alternative class. I liked it better than the previous few schools. I got along pretty good with the other students, and there wasn't really a dress code. But academics was lacking (my teacher said she wasn't certified to teach math), and the school treated us like preschoolers. Sometimes they wouldn't let us use the restroom all day. This was in the early '90s.

This reminds me of the special needs private school system I went to after being removed first from the regular public school system I started out in, and then being removed from a regular private school.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 02, 2019, 04:01:27 PM
I assume things like bringing guns to school might qualify.
The only classmate I ever had who "got missing" from school was one who brought a pistol to junior high, put it in his locker, and then bragged about it to his friends.  I didn't see that kid for four years after that—and that was in a town of less than 1300 people.

I can't think of any student that I can recall that was expelled from the schools I was at, and that was back in the 1960s and 1970s in strict school systems.  I'm sure there were some, but none that I knew of, as the high school had some drug problems.
How bad was the drug problem? Was it mostly after school or were people like selling them during the school day?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: ce929wax on February 02, 2019, 05:09:30 PM
I personally have never been expelled (I'm a little surprised, I had issues growing up).  I guess what kept me from crossing that line is that my parents would have found me a school and I wouldn't have liked it one bit. 
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on February 03, 2019, 03:18:42 AM
I assume things like bringing guns to school might qualify.
The only classmate I ever had who "got missing" from school was one who brought a pistol to junior high, put it in his locker, and then bragged about it to his friends.  I didn't see that kid for four years after that—and that was in a town of less than 1300 people.

I can't think of any student that I can recall that was expelled from the schools I was at, and that was back in the 1960s and 1970s in strict school systems.  I'm sure there were some, but none that I knew of, as the high school had some drug problems.
How bad was the drug problem?

24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 03, 2019, 09:06:16 AM
I assume things like bringing guns to school might qualify.
The only classmate I ever had who "got missing" from school was one who brought a pistol to junior high, put it in his locker, and then bragged about it to his friends.  I didn't see that kid for four years after that—and that was in a town of less than 1300 people.

I can't think of any student that I can recall that was expelled from the schools I was at, and that was back in the 1960s and 1970s in strict school systems.  I'm sure there were some, but none that I knew of, as the high school had some drug problems.
How bad was the drug problem?

24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.
F*ck school
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: 1 on February 03, 2019, 09:18:53 AM
The math problem isn't that difficult. I didn't think marijuana was that cheap, though. At that price, a container of dimes and quarters would be worth more than the same weight of marijuana.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: formulanone on February 03, 2019, 09:51:16 AM
I assume things like bringing guns to school might qualify.
The only classmate I ever had who "got missing" from school was one who brought a pistol to junior high, put it in his locker, and then bragged about it to his friends.  I didn't see that kid for four years after that—and that was in a town of less than 1300 people.

I can't think of any student that I can recall that was expelled from the schools I was at, and that was back in the 1960s and 1970s in strict school systems.  I'm sure there were some, but none that I knew of, as the high school had some drug problems.
How bad was the drug problem?

24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.

d. If Bartholomew is finding local competition too stiff, should he create a downline to his buddy Franco with 40% of the remaining batch, knowing that he has a habit of "getting high on his own supply", or just wait for the moment when there's a drought, and markup his stale ratweed to prospective new buyers?

I uh, watched a lot of Miami Vice.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 03, 2019, 03:42:57 PM
Isn't it true that nowadays, if a student were in line to get expelled, he or she would just end up at the alternative high school, at least if the school district has enough students? I know at the school my mother worked for that happened.

Certainly not in school districts that don't have alternative schools.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: hbelkins on February 03, 2019, 08:09:04 PM
24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.

Are you trying to weed out the math experts here?  :-D :-D :-D

I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 03, 2019, 08:16:24 PM
24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.

Are you trying to weed out the math experts here?  :-D :-D :-D

I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.
a) 100
b) 75 cents
c) $75

a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Takumi on February 03, 2019, 08:40:06 PM
24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.

Are you trying to weed out the math experts here?  :-D :-D :-D

I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.
a) 100
b) 75 cents
c) $75

a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?
c) How many times is A. Befroman going to beat this unfunny dead horse?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 03, 2019, 08:41:37 PM
24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.

Are you trying to weed out the math experts here?  :-D :-D :-D

I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.
a) 100
b) 75 cents
c) $75

a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?
c) How many times is A. Befroman going to beat this unfunny dead horse?
A) Till H. Belkins stops being so easily trolled.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Takumi on February 03, 2019, 08:43:04 PM
I mean, you’re the one who seems to get worked up when he so much as breathes, so...
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: 1995hoo on February 03, 2019, 10:43:24 PM
Who is H. Belkins, anyway? A poster here?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kevinb1994 on February 03, 2019, 10:54:50 PM
Who is H. Belkins, anyway? A poster here?

Lol way to drag the joke out further.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bugo on February 03, 2019, 11:08:09 PM
[quote author=bandit957 link=topic=24377.msg2389962#msg2389962 date=1548864240
In my youth - 1980s and early 1990s - to be expelled from a school was frowned upon by some, but most people saw it as a sign of healthy rebellion. People recognized that the school was usually wrong. I used to write about my experiences with being kicked out of school, and everyone would cheer me on.

But in the mid-'90s, things changed. After that, nobody wanted to hear stories that glamorized expelled students anymore. It's not just my perception caused by me entering the adult world and being around more mature people. It's not just because I got Internet and was exposed to people who were less open-minded anyway. This was an actual societal change. I worked at the library before this happened and had co-workers who were much older, and they didn't hold my school experiences against me. When I wrote about it for a college class, even the professor was amused by it. But after that, everything went to hell.
[/quote]

I graduated high school in 1992 and I never saw a cop in school except at an anti-drug brainwashing event in middle school. When I first learned that there were cops in schools that stayed there all day, it blew my mind. I can't imagine what it must be like having a cop patrolling your school hallway. When I was in high school, kids openly traded pocketknives in the classroom and the rednecks would come to school with a hunting rifle in the rack in the back window of their pickup trucks. Now they would be arrested and charged with a crime.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bugo on February 03, 2019, 11:11:21 PM
Piecing together your posts, I feel as if there's a whole series of dangerous incidents that which happened decades ago which weren't explained to the right people at the right time. And that must suck, to be honest.

But...Nobody cares what you (or anyone else) did in high school. Why should anyone care about your situation over 25 years ago? Everyone else has moved on as an adult, and nobody cares much about how exciting your specific situations were because it's impossible to relate. The echoes of the past are silent and the individual actions of history are all but forgotten.

I care. No matter what you think of Bandit, his posts generate a lot of conversation, much of which is hilarious. I've been a fan of his for years now.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on February 03, 2019, 11:11:49 PM
I graduated high school in 1992 and I never saw a cop in school except at an anti-drug brainwashing event in middle school. When I first learned that there were cops in schools that stayed there all day, it blew my mind. I can't imagine what it must be like having a cop patrolling your school hallway. When I was in high school, kids openly traded pocketknives in the classroom and the rednecks would come to school with a hunting rifle in the rack in the back window of their pickup trucks. Now they would be arrested and charged with a crime.

I also graduated in 1992, and I never saw cops regularly patrolling schools. But the alternative class regularly called the cops when kids acted up. There was a class for younger kids there (maybe 10 or 11), and I remember seeing the cops stomp in and arrest kids.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bugo on February 04, 2019, 03:37:48 AM
24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.

10 grams for $1? Where is Bartholomew's dispensary located? That's damn cheap. 10 grams would cost you anywhere between $50 and $200 in Oklahoma dispensaries right now. Prices are high because there isn't a lot of product out there yet and growers are asking astronomical prices for flower and concentrates but it will soon be harvest time and there will be a glut of product on the market. There are dozens of dispensaries about to be open. Tulsa alone dispensaries that are licensed by the OMMA. Some of these dispensaries will never open and quite a few still haven't opened yet. New stores are opening all the time but there are still a lot of dispensaries that are marked "Coming soon!" on Weedmaps. The glut of product combined with intense competition should drive prices down. There are only about 40,000 registered patients in the state which makes a small number of potential customers. It's going to be interesting to see from such a close vantage point.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on February 04, 2019, 05:10:04 AM
The math problem isn't that difficult. I didn't think marijuana was that cheap, though. At that price, a container of dimes and quarters would be worth more than the same weight of marijuana.

10 grams for $1? Where is Bartholomew's dispensary located? That's damn cheap. 10 grams would cost you anywhere between $50 and $200 in Oklahoma dispensaries right now. Prices are high because there isn't a lot of product out there yet and growers are asking astronomical prices for flower and concentrates but it will soon be harvest time and there will be a glut of product on the market. There are dozens of dispensaries about to be open. Tulsa alone dispensaries that are licensed by the OMMA. Some of these dispensaries will never open and quite a few still haven't opened yet. New stores are opening all the time but there are still a lot of dispensaries that are marked "Coming soon!" on Weedmaps. The glut of product combined with intense competition should drive prices down. There are only about 40,000 registered patients in the state which makes a small number of potential customers. It's going to be interesting to see from such a close vantage point.

I dunno about your school, but in mine, everything in word problems involving money was priced absurdly high or low, probably out of a desire to not want to revise the problems between textbook editions to track inflation. I considered making the prices more realistic, but I figured a thorough survey of weed prices probably isn't something someone with no OMMA card should have in their search history.

24. Bartholomew purchased one kilogram of marijuana for $25.
a) If Bartholomew divides the weed into 10-gram bags, how many bags will he have?
b) If Bartholomew sells each bag for $1, what will his profit margin be on each bag?
c) If Bartholomew sells all of the bags, how much profit will he make altogether?
Be sure to show your work on a separate piece of paper.

Are you trying to weed out the math experts here?  :-D :-D :-D

I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.
a) 100
b) 75 cents
c) $75

The answer to 24b is actually 75% (margin is expressed as a percentage). 75¢ is the markup. Half credit.

When I first learned that there were cops in schools that stayed there all day, it blew my mind. I can't imagine what it must be like having a cop patrolling your school hallway.
In my experience, they didn't really do much other than occasionally interrupt classes to sit up at the front and BS with the teacher.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 04, 2019, 07:22:06 AM
I think the lesson we can all learn from this is “people who’ve never done drugs really shouldn’t attempt drug humor.”
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bugo on February 04, 2019, 07:47:57 AM
I know. But the thought of 10 cent grams is hilarious so I had to run with it.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: hbelkins on February 04, 2019, 12:06:30 PM
a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?

I don't know who this H. Belkins character is, but I certainly can't eat as much as I used to. I don't frequently patronize buffets these days, because I certainly don't get my money's worth anymore.

And aren't you making unwarranted assumptions about this H. Belkins person, considering you've never met him before?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 04, 2019, 12:20:33 PM
a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?

I don't know who this H. Belkins character is, but I certainly can't eat as much as I used to. I don't frequently patronize buffets these days, because I certainly don't get my money's worth anymore.

And aren't you making unwarranted assumptions about this H. Belkins person, considering you've never met him before?
A sense of humor is a wonderful thing. Get one.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kevinb1994 on February 04, 2019, 02:09:53 PM
a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?

I don't know who this H. Belkins character is, but I certainly can't eat as much as I used to. I don't frequently patronize buffets these days, because I certainly don't get my money's worth anymore.

And aren't you making unwarranted assumptions about this H. Belkins person, considering you've never met him before?
A sense of humor is a wonderful thing. Get one.

That’s what she said.  :bigass:
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 04, 2019, 02:21:08 PM
a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?

I don't know who this H. Belkins character is, but I certainly can't eat as much as I used to. I don't frequently patronize buffets these days, because I certainly don't get my money's worth anymore.

And aren't you making unwarranted assumptions about this H. Belkins person, considering you've never met him before?
A sense of humor is a wonderful thing. Get one.

That’s what she said.  :bigass:
In England they say "said the actress to the Bishop."
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kevinb1994 on February 04, 2019, 02:26:11 PM
a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?

I don't know who this H. Belkins character is, but I certainly can't eat as much as I used to. I don't frequently patronize buffets these days, because I certainly don't get my money's worth anymore.

And aren't you making unwarranted assumptions about this H. Belkins person, considering you've never met him before?
A sense of humor is a wonderful thing. Get one.

That’s what she said.  :bigass:
In England they say "said the actress to the Bishop."

And so the Bishop danced.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Takumi on February 04, 2019, 04:35:59 PM
a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?

I don't know who this H. Belkins character is, but I certainly can't eat as much as I used to. I don't frequently patronize buffets these days, because I certainly don't get my money's worth anymore.

And aren't you making unwarranted assumptions about this H. Belkins person, considering you've never met him before?
A sense of humor is a wonderful thing. Get one.

It’d require the subject material to be funny though...
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 04, 2019, 04:48:45 PM
a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?

I don't know who this H. Belkins character is, but I certainly can't eat as much as I used to. I don't frequently patronize buffets these days, because I certainly don't get my money's worth anymore.

And aren't you making unwarranted assumptions about this H. Belkins person, considering you've never met him before?
A sense of humor is a wonderful thing. Get one.

It’d require the subject material to be funny though...
It's hilarious to me.  Whether it's funny to you, or any other boarder, is no concern of mine.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 04, 2019, 04:53:24 PM
It’d require the subject material to be funny though...
It's hilarious to me.  Whether it's funny to you, or any other boarder, is no concern of mine.

It was a joke, dude.  Get a sense of humor.

- K. Phoger
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 04, 2019, 05:05:28 PM
It’d require the subject material to be funny though...
It's hilarious to me.  Whether it's funny to you, or any other boarder, is no concern of mine.

It was a joke, dude.  Get a sense of humor.

- K. Phoger
Are you sure it's not K.P. Hoger?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on February 05, 2019, 04:19:05 AM
I think the lesson we can all learn from this is “people who’ve never done drugs really shouldn’t attempt drug humor.”

It was more meant to be a "textbook math problems are silly and out of touch" joke (would anyone called Bartholomew on a daily basis smoke weed?), but eh, if it wasn't funny, it wasn't funny.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Takumi on February 05, 2019, 08:35:57 AM
(would anyone called Bartholomew on a daily basis smoke weed?)
(https://static-media.fxx.com/img/FX_Networks_-_FXX/872/243/Simpsons_11_17_P4_640x360_333594179727.jpg)
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 05, 2019, 08:57:33 AM
I think the lesson we can all learn from this is “people who’ve never done drugs really shouldn’t attempt drug humor.”

It was more meant to be a "textbook math problems are silly and out of touch" joke (would anyone called Bartholomew on a daily basis smoke weed?), but eh, if it wasn't funny, it wasn't funny.
In fairness, there are probably no more than 5 people in history who were ever able to do drug humor well.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: hbelkins on February 05, 2019, 10:34:11 AM
I think the lesson we can all learn from this is “people who’ve never done drugs really shouldn’t attempt drug humor.”

It was more meant to be a "textbook math problems are silly and out of touch" joke (would anyone called Bartholomew on a daily basis smoke weed?), but eh, if it wasn't funny, it wasn't funny.
In fairness, there are probably no more than 5 people in history who were ever able to do drug humor well.

Cheech & Chong were two of them. The other three?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: vdeane on February 05, 2019, 12:32:17 PM
I think the lesson we can all learn from this is “people who’ve never done drugs really shouldn’t attempt drug humor.”

It was more meant to be a "textbook math problems are silly and out of touch" joke (would anyone called Bartholomew on a daily basis smoke weed?), but eh, if it wasn't funny, it wasn't funny.
I thought it was hilarious, but then, I don't know anything about drugs.  I just thought it was funny to see a stereotypical math word problem after someone asked "what sort of drug problem".
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 05, 2019, 01:50:10 PM
I think the lesson we can all learn from this is “people who’ve never done drugs really shouldn’t attempt drug humor.”

It was more meant to be a "textbook math problems are silly and out of touch" joke (would anyone called Bartholomew on a daily basis smoke weed?), but eh, if it wasn't funny, it wasn't funny.
In fairness, there are probably no more than 5 people in history who were ever able to do drug humor well.

Cheech & Chong were two of them. The other three?
Josh Gordon?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 05, 2019, 02:29:08 PM
I think the lesson we can all learn from this is “people who’ve never done drugs really shouldn’t attempt drug humor.”

It was more meant to be a "textbook math problems are silly and out of touch" joke (would anyone called Bartholomew on a daily basis smoke weed?), but eh, if it wasn't funny, it wasn't funny.
In fairness, there are probably no more than 5 people in history who were ever able to do drug humor well.

Cheech & Chong were two of them. The other three?
I don't really know, I didn't have anyone in mind when I threw out that hypothetical.  I would probably submit Robin Williams (before he went clean), Mitch Hedberg, and P.J. O'Rourke.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 05, 2019, 03:04:32 PM

- K. Phoger

Are you sure it's not K.P. Hoger?

It's actually M. Ozart.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 05, 2019, 03:28:07 PM

- K. Phoger

Are you sure it's not K.P. Hoger?

It's actually M. Ozart.
MY NAME IS FRANKENSTEIN!
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 05, 2019, 04:19:31 PM
MY NAME IS FRANKENSTEIN!

Are you sure it's not Frank N. Stein?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 05, 2019, 05:15:56 PM
My name is Roadgeekteen
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on February 05, 2019, 06:05:14 PM
MY NAME IS FRANKENSTEIN!

Are you sure it's not Frank N. Stein?

It's F. Rankenstein. Come on.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 05, 2019, 06:49:27 PM
MY NAME IS FRANKENSTEIN!

Are you sure it's not Frank N. Stein?

It's F. Rankenstein. Come on.
It's Franken S. Tein.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 05, 2019, 08:44:46 PM
My middle name is Earl. (https://youtu.be/sNNGG9gLqhI?t=120)
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 05, 2019, 09:08:22 PM
My middle name is Earl. (https://youtu.be/sNNGG9gLqhI?t=120)
No, E. Arl
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 05, 2019, 09:09:24 PM
Whatever, Roadgee.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: csw on February 05, 2019, 11:13:08 PM
a) If H. Belkins pays $20 to enter an all-you-can-eat buffet, how much money will the owners lose?
b) How long will it take H. Belkins to start blubbering about the fact that I made this joke, in seconds?

I don't know who this H. Belkins character is, but I certainly can't eat as much as I used to. I don't frequently patronize buffets these days, because I certainly don't get my money's worth anymore.

And aren't you making unwarranted assumptions about this H. Belkins person, considering you've never met him before?
A sense of humor is a wonderful thing. Get one.

It’d require the subject material to be funny though...
It's hilarious to me.  Whether it's funny to you, or any other boarder, is no concern of mine.
don't worry, it's hilarious to more people than just you. I'm in tears over here.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: formulanone on February 06, 2019, 07:14:07 AM
Piecing together your posts, I feel as if there's a whole series of dangerous incidents that which happened decades ago which weren't explained to the right people at the right time. And that must suck, to be honest.

But...Nobody cares what you (or anyone else) did in high school. Why should anyone care about your situation over 25 years ago? Everyone else has moved on as an adult, and nobody cares much about how exciting your specific situations were because it's impossible to relate. The echoes of the past are silent and the individual actions of history are all but forgotten.

I care. No matter what you think of Bandit, his posts generate a lot of conversation, much of which is hilarious. I've been a fan of his for years now.

Eh, it's not a slight. We all have things to get over; maybe it's all therapeutic. And his posts are a welcome break from the usual around here.

Speaking as fellow 45-year-olds, talking about how much you rebelled against your high school authority is like talking about how shiny your tricycle was back in the day. Someone who hasn't been through the same things (say, a co-worker or acquaintance) and expecting that they should still care about the events of years ago, seems out-of-depth, because it won't trigger the same response after as the years go on.

Maybe it's because I find ever-decreasing relevance to the events in past to those in today's world, which has likely happened since the dawn of man.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 06, 2019, 08:04:03 AM
Whatever, Roadgee.
That's Roadgee K. TEen to you.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on February 06, 2019, 09:21:56 AM
Eh, it's not a slight. We all have things to get over; maybe it's all therapeutic. And his posts are a welcome break from the usual around here.

Speaking as fellow 45-year-olds, talking about how much you rebelled against your high school authority is like talking about how shiny your tricycle was back in the day. Someone who hasn't been through the same things (say, a co-worker or acquaintance) and expecting that they should still care about the events of years ago, seems out-of-depth, because it won't trigger the same response after as the years go on.

Maybe it's because I find ever-decreasing relevance to the events in past to those in today's world, which has likely happened since the dawn of man.

It must still be relevant, because just a few weeks ago on Facebook, some asshole started bragging about how he punched me in the face 30 years ago and got me kicked off the school bus. This post wasn't in a high school group, and I hadn't posted anything about him. Then he had the nerve to complain that people who were harassed at school have ruined social media sites by lashing out at the world.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 06, 2019, 09:25:39 AM
Eh, it's not a slight. We all have things to get over; maybe it's all therapeutic. And his posts are a welcome break from the usual around here.

Speaking as fellow 45-year-olds, talking about how much you rebelled against your high school authority is like talking about how shiny your tricycle was back in the day. Someone who hasn't been through the same things (say, a co-worker or acquaintance) and expecting that they should still care about the events of years ago, seems out-of-depth, because it won't trigger the same response after as the years go on.

Maybe it's because I find ever-decreasing relevance to the events in past to those in today's world, which has likely happened since the dawn of man.

It must still be relevant, because just a few weeks ago on Facebook, some asshole started bragging about how he punched me in the face 30 years ago and got me kicked off the school bus. This post wasn't in a high school group, and I hadn't posted anything about him. Then he had the nerve to complain that people who were harassed at school have ruined social media sites by lashing out at the world.
I would wager that at least 60% of the people who read his post thought "what kind of lowlife brags about punching someone in the face 30 years ago?"  Maybe even 70%.  As for the other 30-40%, fuck them.  They have to go through life as emotionally stunted man-children, and it's their loss.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: formulanone on February 06, 2019, 09:52:59 AM
Eh, it's not a slight. We all have things to get over; maybe it's all therapeutic. And his posts are a welcome break from the usual around here.

Speaking as fellow 45-year-olds, talking about how much you rebelled against your high school authority is like talking about how shiny your tricycle was back in the day. Someone who hasn't been through the same things (say, a co-worker or acquaintance) and expecting that they should still care about the events of years ago, seems out-of-depth, because it won't trigger the same response after as the years go on.

Maybe it's because I find ever-decreasing relevance to the events in past to those in today's world, which has likely happened since the dawn of man.

It must still be relevant, because just a few weeks ago on Facebook, some asshole started bragging about how he punched me in the face 30 years ago and got me kicked off the school bus. This post wasn't in a high school group, and I hadn't posted anything about him. Then he had the nerve to complain that people who were harassed at school have ruined social media sites by lashing out at the world.
I would wager that at least 60% of the people who read his post thought "what kind of lowlife brags about punching someone in the face 30 years ago?"  Maybe even 70%.  As for the other 30-40%, fuck them.  They have to go through life as emotionally stunted man-children, and it's their loss.

My thoughts exactly; what kind kid thinks that's still cool? Feel free to call someone to publicly call them a piece of turd and move on.

Of course, there's going to be a few on the sidelines, wondering why it happened in the first place...but it sounds like a jerk for jerk's sake.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bandit957 on February 06, 2019, 10:00:38 AM
My thoughts exactly; what kind kid thinks that's still cool?

Of course, there's going to be a few on the sidelines, wondering why it happened in the first place...

He bragged on Facebook that he bullied me 30 years ago because I didn't have as much money as him, and then he whined that I "tried to bully" him in return. Then he boasted that he punched me in the face.

His pals were also the ones who recently started a Facebook group that encouraged motorists to run bicyclists off the road. After this group was founded, somebody apparently acted upon it and ran cars off the road. But I think this group is gone already. From what I hear, the police began an investigation of the vehicular assaults, but they received pressure from local political figures (one of whom lost in November) to drop the investigation.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 06, 2019, 10:12:03 AM
His pals were also the ones who recently started a Facebook group that encouraged motorists to run bicyclists off the road.
And once again I ask why I'm supposed to care about people like this.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: hbelkins on February 06, 2019, 11:18:52 AM
His pals were also the ones who recently started a Facebook group that encouraged motorists to run bicyclists off the road.
And once again I ask why I'm supposed to care about people like this.

Some of the anti-bicyclist sentiment that's exhibited in some of the NYC-related Facebook road groups is hilarious.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 06, 2019, 11:45:43 AM
His pals were also the ones who recently started a Facebook group that encouraged motorists to run bicyclists off the road.
And once again I ask why I'm supposed to care about people like this.

Some of the anti-bicyclist sentiment that's exhibited in some of the NYC-related Facebook road groups is hilarious.
"Bicyclists vs. motorists" is one of the few conflicts where I agree that everyone involved is at least a little bit wrong.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 06, 2019, 12:21:17 PM
My thoughts exactly; what kind kid thinks that's still cool?

Of course, there's going to be a few on the sidelines, wondering why it happened in the first place...

He bragged on Facebook that he bullied me 30 years ago because I didn't have as much money as him, and then he whined that I "tried to bully" him in return. Then he boasted that he punched me in the face.

His pals were also the ones who recently started a Facebook group that encouraged motorists to run bicyclists off the road. After this group was founded, somebody apparently acted upon it and ran cars off the road. But I think this group is gone already. From what I hear, the police began an investigation of the vehicular assaults, but they received pressure from local political figures (one of whom lost in November) to drop the investigation.
Don't tattle tale to the world.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 06, 2019, 12:59:36 PM
His pals were also the ones who recently started a Facebook group that encouraged motorists to run bicyclists off the road. After this group was founded, somebody apparently acted upon it and ran cars off the road. But I think this group is gone already. From what I hear, the police began an investigation of the vehicular assaults, but they received pressure from local political figures (one of whom lost in November) to drop the investigation.

Wow, and I thought my high school class was bad...
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 06, 2019, 01:03:24 PM
My thoughts exactly; what kind kid thinks that's still cool?

Of course, there's going to be a few on the sidelines, wondering why it happened in the first place...

He bragged on Facebook that he bullied me 30 years ago because I didn't have as much money as him, and then he whined that I "tried to bully" him in return. Then he boasted that he punched me in the face.

His pals were also the ones who recently started a Facebook group that encouraged motorists to run bicyclists off the road. After this group was founded, somebody apparently acted upon it and ran cars off the road. But I think this group is gone already. From what I hear, the police began an investigation of the vehicular assaults, but they received pressure from local political figures (one of whom lost in November) to drop the investigation.
And I thought that my Math class was naughty...
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bugo on February 06, 2019, 10:32:38 PM


I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.

I prefer the word "patient" over the slightly offensive "pothead". There are medical marijuana users and there are stoners. Just because a person uses cannabis that doesn't make them "potheads" or "stoners". They are using safe, effective medicine that is non-toxic and all natural. I still don't understand why you have such an irrational hatred of cannabis. Do you not care about sick patients who are not responding to any medication other than cannabis? Republicans are starting to jump on the legalization bandwagon. Perhaps you watched "Reefer Madness" and took it seriously.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 07, 2019, 07:53:40 AM


I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.

I prefer the word "patient" over the slightly offensive "pothead". There are medical marijuana users and there are stoners. Just because a person uses cannabis that doesn't make them "potheads" or "stoners". They are using safe, effective medicine that is non-toxic and all natural. I still don't understand why you have such an irrational hatred of cannabis. Do you not care about sick patients who are not responding to any medication other than cannabis? Republicans are starting to jump on the legalization bandwagon. Perhaps you watched "Reefer Madness" and took it seriously.
What's the problem about calling them "marijuana users"?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Beltway on February 07, 2019, 08:36:32 AM
I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.
I prefer the word "patient" over the slightly offensive "pothead". There are medical marijuana users and there are stoners. Just because a person uses cannabis that doesn't make them "potheads" or "stoners". They are using safe, effective medicine that is non-toxic and all natural. I still don't understand why you have such an irrational hatred of cannabis. Do you not care about sick patients who are not responding to any medication other than cannabis? Republicans are starting to jump on the legalization bandwagon. Perhaps you watched "Reefer Madness" and took it seriously.
What's the problem about calling them "marijuana users"?

Some people think that "pot" and "reefer" are pejorative terms.  I think that they are appropriate, that while there may be some rare medicinal usages of pot, that most people who like to take pot do it only for the sake of "getting high", so it is fair to call them "potheads" and "stoners".
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 07, 2019, 09:05:31 AM
I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.
I prefer the word "patient" over the slightly offensive "pothead". There are medical marijuana users and there are stoners. Just because a person uses cannabis that doesn't make them "potheads" or "stoners". They are using safe, effective medicine that is non-toxic and all natural. I still don't understand why you have such an irrational hatred of cannabis. Do you not care about sick patients who are not responding to any medication other than cannabis? Republicans are starting to jump on the legalization bandwagon. Perhaps you watched "Reefer Madness" and took it seriously.
What's the problem about calling them "marijuana users"?

Some people think that "pot" and "reefer" are pejorative terms.  I think that they are appropriate, that while there may be some rare medicinal usages of pot, that most people who like to take pot do it only for the sake of "getting high", so it is fair to call them "potheads" and "stoners".
The sound of pothead is just negative.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: abefroman329 on February 07, 2019, 09:39:59 AM
Some people think that "drunk" and "alcoholic" are pejorative terms.  I think that they are appropriate, that while there may be some rare therapeutic usages of alcohol, that most people who like to drink alcohol do it only for the sake of "getting drunk", so it is fair to call them "drunks" and "alcoholics".
Also, "take pot"?  Just stop talking.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Beltway on February 07, 2019, 09:47:11 AM
What's the problem about calling them "marijuana users"?
Some people think that "pot" and "reefer" are pejorative terms.  I think that they are appropriate, that while there may be some rare medicinal usages of pot, that most people who like to take pot do it only for the sake of "getting high", so it is fair to call them "potheads" and "stoners".
The sound of pothead is just negative.

How about "reefer user"?

Also, "take pot"?  Just stop talking.

Well, from what they say, in addition to smoking it, it can be mixed into food cooked or uncooked depending on the food, and that it causes a similar 'high' just that it takes longer to get there.

So "take pot" is a simple way to describe all the uses.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Rothman on February 07, 2019, 10:26:14 AM
I am sticking with "hippie," as in:

What is orange and looks good on a hippie?

Fire.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Beltway on February 07, 2019, 11:18:49 AM
Are you saying that some people want to set hippies on fire?
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 07, 2019, 12:01:33 PM
What's the problem about calling them "marijuana users"?

Possibly that "user" has a negative connotation.  Think about the difference between asking someone if they "enjoy alcoholic beverages," "drink alcohol," or "use alcohol."
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 07, 2019, 05:58:41 PM
What's the problem about calling them "marijuana users"?

Possibly that "user" has a negative connotation.  Think about the difference between asking someone if they "enjoy alcoholic beverages," "drink alcohol," or "use alcohol."
I use "people who smoke marijuana"
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on February 07, 2019, 10:37:47 PM
I'm sure the potheads here can figure this one out pretty quickly.
I prefer the word "patient" over the slightly offensive "pothead". There are medical marijuana users and there are stoners. Just because a person uses cannabis that doesn't make them "potheads" or "stoners". They are using safe, effective medicine that is non-toxic and all natural. I still don't understand why you have such an irrational hatred of cannabis. Do you not care about sick patients who are not responding to any medication other than cannabis? Republicans are starting to jump on the legalization bandwagon. Perhaps you watched "Reefer Madness" and took it seriously.
What's the problem about calling them "marijuana users"?

Some people think that "pot" and "reefer" are pejorative terms.  I think that they are appropriate, that while there may be some rare medicinal usages of pot, that most people who like to take pot do it only for the sake of "getting high", so it is fair to call them "potheads" and "stoners".

Rare?
(https://i.imgur.com/VyXAJ3o.png)

To apply for an OMMA card, you have to get approval from a licensed physician. Unless you think Oklahoma's doctors are willing to risk their medical license (and thus their career) 20,000 times just to hook some folks up with some weed, man, that's hardly rare.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Beltway on February 07, 2019, 10:57:40 PM
Some people think that "pot" and "reefer" are pejorative terms.  I think that they are appropriate, that while there may be some rare medicinal usages of pot, that most people who like to take pot do it only for the sake of "getting high", so it is fair to call them "potheads" and "stoners".
Rare?

Rare.  Oklahoma has 4 million population.

To apply for an OMMA card, you have to get approval from a licensed physician. Unless you think Oklahoma's doctors are willing to risk their medical license (and thus their career) 20,000 times just to hook some folks up with some weed, man, that's hardly rare.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on February 07, 2019, 11:33:04 PM
0.5% of the population does not meet my standards for "rare".
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Beltway on February 07, 2019, 11:34:57 PM
0.5% of the population does not meet my standards for "rare".

I would say that it does.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on February 07, 2019, 11:35:27 PM
Who are you to say what meets my standards for rare?

That's still 1 in 200. That means that at least one customer I talk to at work each day is statistically likely to have an OMMA card. Not rare.

This is with OMMA only having existed for six months, too. The number of cards issued will only go up.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Beltway on February 08, 2019, 01:05:14 AM
Who are you to say what meets my standards for rare?
That's still 1 in 200. That means that at least one customer I talk to at work each day is statistically likely to have an OMMA card. Not rare.
This is with OMMA only having existed for six months, too. The number of cards issued will only go up.

1 in 200 is pretty rare.  Certainly not "common" or ever "occasional".

Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Scott5114 on February 08, 2019, 04:31:17 AM
Who are you to say what meets my standards for rare?
That's still 1 in 200. That means that at least one customer I talk to at work each day is statistically likely to have an OMMA card. Not rare.
This is with OMMA only having existed for six months, too. The number of cards issued will only go up.

1 in 200 is pretty rare.  Certainly not "common" or ever "occasional".

It is roughly the same odds as rolling doubles three times in a row on a pair of six-sided dice (1/63 = 1/216). Which is what sends you jail in Monopoly. Going to jail in Monopoly is definitely not rare.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 08, 2019, 08:50:08 AM
Who are you to say what meets my standards for rare?
That's still 1 in 200. That means that at least one customer I talk to at work each day is statistically likely to have an OMMA card. Not rare.
This is with OMMA only having existed for six months, too. The number of cards issued will only go up.

1 in 200 is pretty rare.  Certainly not "common" or ever "occasional".

It is roughly the same odds as rolling doubles three times in a row on a pair of six-sided dice (1/63 = 1/216). Which is what sends you jail in Monopoly. Going to jail in Monopoly is definitely not rare.
But you go to jail in several other more common ways.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: MNHighwayMan on February 08, 2019, 10:16:28 AM
But you go to jail in several other more common ways.

Like the little known rule that too much shitposting online earns you jail time. :)
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kevinb1994 on February 08, 2019, 11:40:56 AM
But you go to jail in several other more common ways.

Like the little known rule that too much shitposting online earns you jail time. :)

LOL
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: Roadgeekteen on February 08, 2019, 12:07:30 PM
But you go to jail in several other more common ways.

Like the little known rule that too much shitposting online earns you jail time. :)
Welp that's it farewell my friends.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: hbelkins on February 08, 2019, 12:51:01 PM
To apply for an OMMA card, you have to get approval from a licensed physician. Unless you think Oklahoma's doctors are willing to risk their medical license (and thus their career) 20,000 times just to hook some folks up with some weed, man, that's hardly rare.

Given the number of doctors who risk their licenses to overprescribe prescription painkillers, you might be surprised.
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: kphoger on February 08, 2019, 01:54:17 PM
I use people who smoke marijuana

Sweet dreams are made of these.



1 in 200 is pretty rare.  Certainly not "common" or ever "occasional".

Then HIV is a rare disease (roughly 1 in 300 in the USA).
Title: Re: Changing attitudes towards expelled students
Post by: bugo on May 05, 2019, 03:23:25 PM
As of May 1, the OMMA has received 112,811 applications for patient licenses and has approved 104,548 of them. The number is expected to keep rising. Is that still "rare" in your eyes?