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Author Topic: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes  (Read 36476 times)

kphoger

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #150 on: April 01, 2019, 01:56:00 PM »

There is even an Calle El Segundo which means Second Street.

Actually, it means "El Segundo Street," as El Segundo is the name of a city, which in turn was named after a Standard Oil refinery, which in turn was named after its being the second such refinery in that part of the country.

"Second Street" would instead be either "Calle Segundo" or just "Calle Dos".
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Scott5114

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #151 on: April 13, 2019, 03:09:43 AM »

Other Spanish street names close by include Calle Palo Fierro, Calle Bravo, Via Carisma, Via Lazo, Avenida Granada, and Avenida Palmera. I could go on but again, you get the idea. There is even an Calle El Segundo which means Second Street.

And, to follow up on a few examples upthread, "Alameda" means "tree-lined avenue". It can be used as a complete street name, or "The Alameda" (which really should be "La Alameda", to keep it all in Spanish), or as part of a longer name such as "Alameda Padre Serra" (Father Serra Avenue, even though he is now a saint) in Santa Barbara.

Or, if you're in Norman, we have "Alameda Street"...tree-lined avenue street. Whoops.
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sandwalk

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #152 on: April 13, 2019, 05:58:47 PM »

Or, if you're in Norman, we have "Alameda Street"...tree-lined avenue street. Whoops.

We have Alameda Avenue in Denver.  :D
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US 89

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #153 on: April 16, 2019, 05:07:54 PM »

IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this.
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kphoger

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #154 on: April 16, 2019, 07:05:23 PM »

IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this.

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".
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