AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

The next forum trivia night will take place on OCTOBER 30, 2019 at 8:15 PM Eastern.

Author Topic: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes  (Read 39283 times)

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11064
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: Today at 03:19:14 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #150 on: April 01, 2019, 01:56:00 PM »

There is even an Calle El Segundo which means Second Street.

Actually, it means "El Segundo Street," as El Segundo is the name of a city, which in turn was named after a Standard Oil refinery, which in turn was named after its being the second such refinery in that part of the country.

"Second Street" would instead be either "Calle Segundo" or just "Calle Dos".
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 8309
  • Age: 29
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 01:44:38 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #151 on: April 13, 2019, 03:09:43 AM »

Other Spanish street names close by include Calle Palo Fierro, Calle Bravo, Via Carisma, Via Lazo, Avenida Granada, and Avenida Palmera. I could go on but again, you get the idea. There is even an Calle El Segundo which means Second Street.

And, to follow up on a few examples upthread, "Alameda" means "tree-lined avenue". It can be used as a complete street name, or "The Alameda" (which really should be "La Alameda", to keep it all in Spanish), or as part of a longer name such as "Alameda Padre Serra" (Father Serra Avenue, even though he is now a saint) in Santa Barbara.

Or, if you're in Norman, we have "Alameda Street"...tree-lined avenue street. Whoops.
Logged

sandwalk

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 199
  • Northern Ohio Native

  • Age: 34
  • Location: Colorado
  • Last Login: December 07, 2019, 10:46:43 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #152 on: April 13, 2019, 05:58:47 PM »

Or, if you're in Norman, we have "Alameda Street"...tree-lined avenue street. Whoops.

We have Alameda Avenue in Denver.  :D
Logged

US 89

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2332
  • 189 to Evanston!

  • Location: Salt Lake City/Atlanta
  • Last Login: Today at 06:02:02 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #153 on: April 16, 2019, 05:07:54 PM »

IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this.
Logged
Interstate clinches: 14 82 86ID 215UT 225 345 444 575 985
US clinches: 91 491 550

Flickr
Imgur

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11064
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: Today at 03:19:14 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #154 on: April 16, 2019, 07:05:23 PM »

IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this.

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

mrsman

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2474
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Silver Spring, MD
  • Last Login: Today at 03:19:31 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #155 on: May 30, 2019, 04:41:36 PM »


Calle 16 de Septiembre

What is the point of streets named after days of the year? I know they are everywhere, but I don't know why they exist.

The dates are significant.

16 de Septiembre, for example, is Independence Day in Mexico.  So, instead of the street being called Ca. Independencia, it's called Ca. 16 de Septiembre instead.

Another street nearby is named in commemoration of the Battle of Puebla:  instead of being called Ca. Batalla de Puebla, it's called Ca. 5 de Mayo instead.

Surprisingly there are only a handful of 4th of July Roads out there, and they are all in very small towns.
Logged

mrsman

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2474
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Silver Spring, MD
  • Last Login: Today at 03:19:31 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #156 on: May 30, 2019, 04:48:44 PM »

IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this.

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".

Even in the US we have that problem in some places:

There is Street Road in the Philadelphia area.

Broadway in NYC (and L.A. and Denver and many other towns) does not need any other suffix.  Yet there is Broadway Ave in Pittsburgh and Broadway Street in Myrtle Beach.
Logged

plain

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 801
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Richmond Virginia
  • Last Login: December 12, 2019, 12:20:52 AM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #157 on: May 30, 2019, 10:15:26 PM »

Tarleton Bivouac in James City County, VA

Image from GSV

SM-S820L

Logged
Newark born, Richmond bred

TheGrassGuy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 197
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 04:58:16 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #158 on: November 27, 2019, 12:09:08 PM »

Close and Terrence
Logged

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11064
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: Today at 03:19:14 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #159 on: November 27, 2019, 02:02:56 PM »

Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

TheGrassGuy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 197
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 04:58:16 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #160 on: November 27, 2019, 02:10:15 PM »

Logged

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11064
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: Today at 03:19:14 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #161 on: November 27, 2019, 02:35:06 PM »

Terrace is a completely normal generic to me.
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

ipeters61

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 686
  • Age: 25
  • Location: Dover, Delaware
  • Last Login: Today at 10:43:18 AM
    • Personal Website
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #162 on: November 27, 2019, 02:56:26 PM »

IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this.

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".

Even in the US we have that problem in some places:

There is Street Road in the Philadelphia area.

Broadway in NYC (and L.A. and Denver and many other towns) does not need any other suffix.  Yet there is Broadway Ave in Pittsburgh and Broadway Street in Myrtle Beach.
I read on Wikipedia that actually Street Road's name is one of those archaic holdovers to when "Street" referred to the fact that the road was paved, predating when "street" was synonymous with "road."
Logged
Disclaimer: Opinions expressed on my posts on the AARoads Forum are my own and do not represent official positions of my employer.
Instagram | Clinched Map

TheGrassGuy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 197
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 04:58:16 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #163 on: November 27, 2019, 04:40:01 PM »

IMO, one of the worst Spanish road name screwups is in Albuquerque, and it's "Paseo del Norte Blvd". Paseo del Norte by itself means something like "North Drive" or "North Avenue".

This wasn't really an issue until recently, since traditional signage in Albuquerque didn't include street suffixes and most people from there leave them off when speaking. But since around 2010 or so, new street blades have included suffixes, so you get stuff like this.

It happens occasionally in Spanish-speaking countries as well.  Think that sign is a fluke?  Well, here is the official website of a local government office, which lists the address as "Boulevard Paseo Rio Sonora Sur 189".

Even in the US we have that problem in some places:

There is Street Road in the Philadelphia area.

Broadway in NYC (and L.A. and Denver and many other towns) does not need any other suffix.  Yet there is Broadway Ave in Pittsburgh and Broadway Street in Myrtle Beach.
I read on Wikipedia that actually Street Road's name is one of those archaic holdovers to when "Street" referred to the fact that the road was paved, predating when "street" was synonymous with "road."
That would explain why there are like 10 different Street Roads in the Philly area.

There is a Charles Street Avenue in Baltimore:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Charles+St+Ave,+Towson,+MD+21204/@39.4015545,-76.6224599,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x89c80fc88ac0ae91:0xd5efda72018a3888!8m2!3d39.4015504!4d-76.6202712

EDIT: There is also one in Waltham, MA, along with a Prospect Street Avenue!
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Charles+St+Ave,+Waltham,+MA+02453/@42.3732802,-71.2488671,18.08z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89e38325a83d9637:0x9c1bf389c1de30b!8m2!3d42.3734013!4d-71.2488381
Logged

TheGrassGuy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 197
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 04:58:16 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #164 on: November 27, 2019, 04:43:58 PM »

Tarleton Bivouac in James City County, VA

Image from GSV

SM-S820L
Nah, it looks to me that the road originally had a suffix, but it somehow got rubbed off over time. It also seems to me that there is a chance that Google Maps might have actually made a mistake, though I can neither confirm nor disprove this without consulting official sources, which I'm not sure how you can find this stuff out.

(Link to Google Maps: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Tarleton+Bivouac,+Roberts,+VA+23185/@37.2137484,-76.618731,15.33z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89b07d61493aea45:0x1fc2a3ce40d32f54!8m2!3d37.2106014!4d-76.6129841)
Logged

plain

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 801
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Richmond Virginia
  • Last Login: December 12, 2019, 12:20:52 AM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #165 on: November 27, 2019, 05:16:56 PM »

Tarleton Bivouac in James City County, VA

Image from GSV

SM-S820L
Nah, it looks to me that the road originally had a suffix, but it somehow got rubbed off over time. It also seems to me that there is a chance that Google Maps might have actually made a mistake, though I can neither confirm nor disprove this without consulting official sources, which I'm not sure how you can find this stuff out.

(Link to Google Maps: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Tarleton+Bivouac,+Roberts,+VA+23185/@37.2137484,-76.618731,15.33z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89b07d61493aea45:0x1fc2a3ce40d32f54!8m2!3d37.2106014!4d-76.6129841)


It's always been just Tarleton Bivouac (I have several friends on this loop). The blades were just made that way for some reason.
Logged
Newark born, Richmond bred

Techknow

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 121
  • Location: San Francisco, CA
  • Last Login: Today at 05:27:21 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #166 on: November 27, 2019, 10:55:06 PM »

In Gilroy, CA, there is a road parallel to US 101 called "No Name Uno". There's even an hospital on the road with its address on an entrance sign that can be seen from the freeway!

The story behind it is here: https://gilroydispatch.com/2007/06/07/former-worker-says-he-coined-no-name-uno/

Someone in this thread already mentioned Bethany Curve in Santa Cruz, CA. There's also "Arroyo Seco", a residential street that is next to a canyon with the same name.
Logged

TheGrassGuy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 197
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 04:58:16 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #167 on: November 28, 2019, 10:37:40 AM »

In Gilroy, CA, there is a road parallel to US 101 called "No Name Uno". There's even an hospital on the road with its address on an entrance sign that can be seen from the freeway!

The story behind it is here: https://gilroydispatch.com/2007/06/07/former-worker-says-he-coined-no-name-uno/

Someone in this thread already mentioned Bethany Curve in Santa Cruz, CA. There's also "Arroyo Seco", a residential street that is next to a canyon with the same name.
Not a road, but one of the Florida Keys is named "No Name Key". https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Name_Key
Logged

TheGrassGuy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 197
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 04:58:16 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #168 on: November 28, 2019, 10:43:33 AM »

Van Nostrand Rise, Bridgewater, NJ:
https://maps.google.com/69nyiv61gAoYvT34A

Dogwood Hill, Warren, NJ:
https://maps.google.com/PVND2Gwh8VEDHnGFA
Logged

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2805
  • Last Login: December 12, 2019, 08:50:56 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #169 on: November 28, 2019, 02:32:03 PM »


Sacramento, CA has Capitol Mall as a name of a Downtown Street and this has to be one of a rare cases where mall gets used as a street suffix name.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capitol_Mall

« Last Edit: December 10, 2019, 10:45:12 PM by bing101 »
Logged

midwesternroadguy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 80
  • Location: Midwest
  • Last Login: December 04, 2019, 05:36:35 AM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #170 on: December 04, 2019, 05:34:07 AM »

In suburban Dakota County, MN the street naming grid includes suffixes such as “Path”.  Diamond “Path” is a 4-5 lane thoroughfare with no historical basis for the name.  Seriously?

Nearby Woodbury, MN has suffixes as “Cove”.  Doesn’t cove refer to a body of water typically?
Logged

TheGrassGuy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 197
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 04:58:16 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #171 on: December 04, 2019, 07:26:38 AM »

In suburban Dakota County, MN the street naming grid includes suffixes such as “Path”.  Diamond “Path” is a 4-5 lane thoroughfare with no historical basis for the name.  Seriously?

Nearby Woodbury, MN has suffixes as “Cove”.  Doesn’t cove refer to a body of water typically?

"Path" is not so uncommon. There are six to seven Deer Paths in the area where I grew up.
Logged

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11064
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: Today at 03:19:14 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #172 on: December 04, 2019, 12:38:20 PM »


In suburban Dakota County, MN the street naming grid includes suffixes such as “Path”.  Diamond “Path” is a 4-5 lane thoroughfare with no historical basis for the name.  Seriously?

Nearby Woodbury, MN has suffixes as “Cove”.  Doesn’t cove refer to a body of water typically?

"Path" is not so uncommon. There are six to seven Deer Paths in the area where I grew up.

"Cove" is also not so uncommon but highly location-dependent.  It's used extensively in Memphis as a generic for culs-de-sac, for example.
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

TheGrassGuy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 197
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 04:58:16 PM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #173 on: December 04, 2019, 12:42:28 PM »

And "Close" seems to be common in Great Britain.
Logged

roadman65

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9648
  • Location: Orlando, fl
  • Last Login: December 12, 2019, 10:52:42 AM
Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #174 on: December 04, 2019, 01:01:08 PM »

Kenilworth, NJ has Via Vitale.
New York City has Grand Concourse and Bowery with no suffix at all.
Logged
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.