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Author Topic: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes  (Read 36471 times)

TheHighwayMan394

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #50 on: May 01, 2016, 12:53:02 AM »

Edina, MN has a "Chowen Curve", which is a western continuation of Chowen Avenue where that road turns back onto its north-south trajectory.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #51 on: May 01, 2016, 08:05:09 AM »

Washington D.C. has "Unit" which is used on streets that lie on borders between the NE/NW/SW/SE parts of town. There's even one called "G Unit".

That's actually a block number, not a suffix (example). "Unit" is DC's weird way of referring to the block with addresses 0-99.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #52 on: May 01, 2016, 08:25:33 AM »

One not mentioned in either this thread or the three other threads we've had on the subject (links posted earlier by Kurumi) is "Flat".  We have a few "Flats" in my area, including Jaffin Flat here in Greensboro and also Couture Flat in Lyndon.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #53 on: May 01, 2016, 09:55:07 AM »

Central Park West
Central Park South

I guess you haven't been up to my neighborhood, 'cause there's also Central Park North.  Then, in Brooklyn there's Prospect Park West and Prospect Park Southwest.  The Bronx has Van Cortlandt Park South and Bronx Park East.  There are probably others that I'm not thinking of.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #54 on: May 01, 2016, 09:56:52 AM »

Suffolk County out on Long Island has a whole batch of streets with names ending in "path" such as Straight Path (CR 2), Joshua's Path (NY 111), Old Willets Path (CR 108), Bicycle Path (yes, that's a street, not a bike path), Doctor's Path, Stephen Hands Path, etc.
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RG407

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #55 on: May 01, 2016, 10:53:08 PM »

There is a neighborhood near where I live in Longwood, Florida with tons of unusual suffixes.  The main road in the subdivision is Tollgate Trail, which isn't an unusual suffix, but look at some of the side streets....

Meadow Creek Cove
Heather Hill
Tollgate Branch
Western Fork
Eastern Fork
Fox Ridge Run
Sweetbriar Branch
Post 'n Rail Road  (not an unusual suffix at all, but the main name is pretty odd)
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kkt

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #56 on: May 01, 2016, 10:54:49 PM »

street names without suffixes

Broadway - very common

The Bowery
In Atlanta, there is a Boulevard.  No suffix as it is its own suffix.

Bellingham, Washington has one of those too.
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CNGL-Leudimin

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #57 on: May 02, 2016, 06:13:40 AM »

Motorway. I was surprised to see it as a valid suffix in the US.
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Rothman

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #58 on: May 02, 2016, 08:26:08 AM »

Just thought about this this morning.

Although officially called "Skull Fork," locals call it "going up Skull." (Floyd County, KY)

My father said heading up there was the first time he saw a trailer straddling a creek.  Didn't take a genius to figure out why.

Muddy Gut also came to mind (every couple of years some network goes down in there to do some story on the misery of being poor in Appalachia), but I guess its official name is "Muddy Gut Branch."
« Last Edit: May 02, 2016, 08:29:07 AM by Rothman »
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dgolub

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #59 on: May 02, 2016, 08:48:25 AM »

J.K. Rowling included a couple streets with uncommon suffixes (in the U.S., anyway; maybe they're more common in the UK) in her books: A street nearby Privet Drive is called "Wisteria Walk", and Professor Snape lives on a street named "Spinners End".

That exists in the real world in Long Beach, NY.  They have one for each month: January Walk, February Walk, and so on through December Walk.  The catch is that those streets are all pedestrian only, hence the names.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #60 on: May 02, 2016, 10:28:42 PM »

How uncommon are streets with a suffix of "Common?"
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1995hoo

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #61 on: May 02, 2016, 10:34:27 PM »

Washington D.C. has "Unit" which is used on streets that lie on borders between the NE/NW/SW/SE parts of town. There's even one called "G Unit".

That's not the street name, it's the block number. It's the "unit block" of whatever street, avenue, etc. It goes along with the 100 block, 200 block, etc. The unit block theoretically has addresses from 1 to 99. The next block is the 100 block and has numbers from 100 to 199 and so on up.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #62 on: May 02, 2016, 10:35:38 PM »

How about the suffix 'Mall', on a road that doesn't border (or is private) a shopping mall?

Graham Mall is the example I can think of here. It does have to do with a transit 'mall', so I guess that doesn't count. Maybe?
« Last Edit: May 02, 2016, 10:38:45 PM by SignGeek101 »
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #63 on: May 02, 2016, 10:55:12 PM »

How about the suffix 'Mall', on a road that doesn't border (or is private) a shopping mall?

Graham Mall is the example I can think of here. It does have to do with a transit 'mall', so I guess that doesn't count. Maybe?

Pall Mall and The Mall in London are probably the classic examples, although the Brits don't pronounce "mall" in the same way North Americans do.
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Rothman

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #64 on: May 03, 2016, 07:46:22 AM »

Although there are shops along it, there's also Nicollet Mall in Minneapolis.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #65 on: May 03, 2016, 11:20:33 AM »

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froggie

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #66 on: May 03, 2016, 11:33:34 AM »

A few more suffixes not mentioned yet, all of them in the Ghent neighborhood of Norfolk, VA:

Gardens (there are two of them)
Mews
Arch
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #67 on: May 03, 2016, 12:11:31 PM »

J.K. Rowling included a couple streets with uncommon suffixes (in the U.S., anyway; maybe they're more common in the UK) in her books: A street nearby Privet Drive is called "Wisteria Walk", and Professor Snape lives on a street named "Spinners End".

That exists in the real world in Long Beach, NY.  They have one for each month: January Walk, February Walk, and so on through December Walk.  The catch is that those streets are all pedestrian only, hence the names.
Philadelphia has walks meant for pedestrians including streets that are otherwise "streets" or "avenues", but have pedestrian-only segments signed as "walks". The Locust Walk is the main pedestrian thoroughfare of the University of Pennsylvania. Street Blades that identify walks are rare, but here's one at a pedestrian only intersection: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9499166,-75.1955628,3a,75y,187.78h,88.4t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sm1WO3Hg9OzNoHdnPN8GUxg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!5m1!1e1?hl=en-US and here's one at an intersection with a regular street: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9501969,-75.1994767,3a,75y,10.19h,89.62t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sTiEJ5whQMo68bmwnG0YXpQ!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo1.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DTiEJ5whQMo68bmwnG0YXpQ%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D108.44843%26pitch%3D0!7i13312!8i6656!5m1!1e1?hl=en-US
The exception is numbered streets. Those don't become walks, even the pedestrian segments.

How about the suffix 'Mall', on a road that doesn't border (or is private) a shopping mall?

Graham Mall is the example I can think of here. It does have to do with a transit 'mall', so I guess that doesn't count. Maybe?

Pall Mall and The Mall in London are probably the classic examples, although the Brits don't pronounce "mall" in the same way North Americans do.

In Philly, Independence Mall (East) is famous, partly because KYW, the local news radio station used to introduce itself every hour "From Independence Mall" for 35 years, though the studios moved to another location in 2014. It's co-signed as 5th street.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #68 on: May 03, 2016, 12:31:39 PM »

What about Central Park West, North, and South in NYC?  Using a direction as the suffix.  However, go Downtown and see "Bowery" without its suffix.

Lately Wichita, KS is dropping suffixes from their city streets and eliminating them along the interstates and the freeway parts of K96 and US 54. 

Then there is Park Row near City Hall and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Oh yes, for The Bronx there is a Concourse for the major boulevard that runs up and down the center ridge of the NYC borough.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #69 on: May 03, 2016, 07:17:04 PM »

What about Central Park West, North, and South in NYC?  Using a direction as the suffix.  However, go Downtown and see "Bowery" without its suffix.

Lately Wichita, KS is dropping suffixes from their city streets and eliminating them along the interstates and the freeway parts of K96 and US 54. 

Then there is Park Row near City Hall and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Oh yes, for The Bronx there is a Concourse for the major boulevard that runs up and down the center ridge of the NYC borough.

Bowery is the name the street, No Suffix
Grand Concourse is the short form of the Grand Boulevard and Concourse.
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roadman65

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #70 on: May 03, 2016, 07:39:27 PM »

What about Central Park West, North, and South in NYC?  Using a direction as the suffix.  However, go Downtown and see "Bowery" without its suffix.

Lately Wichita, KS is dropping suffixes from their city streets and eliminating them along the interstates and the freeway parts of K96 and US 54. 

Then there is Park Row near City Hall and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Oh yes, for The Bronx there is a Concourse for the major boulevard that runs up and down the center ridge of the NYC borough.

Bowery is the name the street, No Suffix
Grand Concourse is the short form of the Grand Boulevard and Concourse.


And how common is it to have a street name with a suffix?

Also Concourse is still unusual as you do not hear it often a major artery or any side street with that particular suffix.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #71 on: May 03, 2016, 08:30:27 PM »

Behchokǫ̀ in Canada's Northwest Territories (along NT 3, between Yellowknife and Fort Providence) has most if not all of its roads suffixed with "Tili", a suffix I've seen nowhere else. I don't know whether "tili" means street, road, or some other road type in the native Dogrib language.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #72 on: May 03, 2016, 11:09:16 PM »

Regarding "Mews", there appear to be a lot of these in England.  The only time I ever saw one in the USA was in New York City; there's a "Washington Mews" off Washington Square Park.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #73 on: May 03, 2016, 11:28:33 PM »

Someone mentioned "Street Rd." in suburban Philadelphia.  There's also an "Avenue Rd." in Toronto.

Then there's "Highway", for roads that are not necessarily freeways.
Brooklyn has King's Hwy.
Alexandria, VA has the (potentially controversial) Jefferson Davis Hwy.
MD has highways named Ritchie (MD-2), Crain (MD-3), Defense (MD-450), etc.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #74 on: May 03, 2016, 11:35:54 PM »

Alexandria, VA has the (potentially controversial) Jefferson Davis Hwy.

It is US 1 through parts of Alexandria, and Arlington too, as well as other places outside northern Virginia. Whatever one might think of the name, the route designation qualifies it as a "highway" even with the urban setting and all the traffic lights.
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