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Author Topic: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes  (Read 36882 times)

briantroutman

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #75 on: May 04, 2016, 12:42:51 AM »

Williamsport, PA has Via Bella (not Via Bella Street as mislabeled on Google and Apple Maps). It’s essentially a frontage road providing downtown access to and from I-180. In this case, I suppose Via would be the suffix or “generic odonym”.

Regarding "Mews", there appear to be a lot of these in England.

A mews is a row of horse stables (or garages, in more modern times) with townhouses above them. In England, these mews probably are true to their name. In the US, it seems to be a term gratuitously used by suburban olde towne fake downtown developments.
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roadman65

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #76 on: May 04, 2016, 02:59:13 AM »

I never saw Trafficway before I visited Kansas City, MO.
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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #77 on: May 04, 2016, 07:21:40 AM »

Quote from: briantroutman
A mews is a row of horse stables (or garages, in more modern times) with townhouses above them. In England, these mews probably are true to their name. In the US, it seems to be a term gratuitously used by suburban olde towne fake downtown developments.

The example I cited is in one of the older neighborhoods of Norfolk, VA.
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empirestate

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #78 on: May 04, 2016, 08:03:52 AM »

How about the suffix 'Mall', on a road that doesn't border (or is private) a shopping mall?

Graham Mall is the example I can think of here. It does have to do with a transit 'mall', so I guess that doesn't count. Maybe?

Pall Mall and The Mall in London are probably the classic examples, although the Brits don't pronounce "mall" in the same way North Americans do.

They probably also wonder why Americans can't recognize your basic mall unless it's enclosed and has shops along it. :-D

The street I grew up on had a mall down its center, which was basically where kids went to play outside. "Going to the mall" didn't have the meaning for me that it now has for most American kids until much later.
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GaryV

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #79 on: May 04, 2016, 06:15:12 PM »

Then there's "Highway", for roads that are not necessarily freeways.
Lenawee County, MI, has dead end dirt roads that are called "Highways".
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opspe

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #80 on: June 15, 2016, 05:10:57 PM »

Got a few bumps here.

There's a few double-suffixed streets in Portland, such as SW Market Street Drive: https://goo.gl/maps/neu6PS557Hp.  There's also SW Ford Street Drive, SW Mill Street Terrace, and SW Broadway Drive (as opposed to plain old SW Broadway).  Another interesting one is NE Alameda, which officially has no street suffix because it's more or less the Spanish equivalent of "Broadway".

In Vancouver, there are several Diversions: Kitsilano Diversion, Victoria Diversion, Boyd Diversion: https://goo.gl/maps/cNvyUdm5FEo    There are also a few Connectors: Cassiar Connector, Aurora Connector (which they actually abbreviated): https://goo.gl/maps/fsJH3TCXMny
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rarnold

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #81 on: June 15, 2016, 05:35:33 PM »

Some areas of Idaho use "grade" as a suffix for roads. Santa Fe also uses avienda, calle, and camino as well as trail.
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JustDrive

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #82 on: July 09, 2016, 01:26:29 AM »

A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Alameda Street in Los Angeles translates to "Parkway Street"
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TEG24601

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #83 on: July 09, 2016, 10:28:43 AM »

A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Alameda Street in Los Angeles translates to "Parkway Street"


Sounds like the few places I've seen Broadway Street, Broadway Avenue, and Broadway Boulevard... when Broadway is already suffixed... way.  Thankfully Seattle really confuses people with a Broadway and a Broad Street.
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bzakharin

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #84 on: July 18, 2016, 12:06:58 PM »

A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Alameda Street in Los Angeles translates to "Parkway Street"


Sounds like the few places I've seen Broadway Street, Broadway Avenue, and Broadway Boulevard... when Broadway is already suffixed... way.  Thankfully Seattle really confuses people with a Broadway and a Broad Street.
Ha! New York has three Broadways and four Broad Streets. Manhattan has both, two blocks apart from each other. The Bronx and Queens have both as well. The continuation of Brooklyn's Broadway into Manhattan (under a different name) comes within two blocks of Manhattan's Broadway. Interestingly, the Broad Streets last only a few blocks, while the Broadways are major arteries.
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TR69

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #85 on: July 18, 2016, 07:59:20 PM »

Louisville has Evergreen Wynde.

Louisville also has Third Street Road and Seventh Street Road.
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Rothman

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #86 on: July 19, 2016, 10:05:29 AM »

A friend of mine lives on a Hollow in Austin, TX. 

Here in California we have plenty of examples of Avenida, Camino and Calle as prefixes, not suffixes, because that is how the Spanish language works. 

This leads to a street clearly named by someone who didn't speak Spanish: Camino Road.

Alameda Street in Los Angeles translates to "Parkway Street"


Sounds like the few places I've seen Broadway Street, Broadway Avenue, and Broadway Boulevard... when Broadway is already suffixed... way.  Thankfully Seattle really confuses people with a Broadway and a Broad Street.
Ha! New York has three Broadways and four Broad Streets. Manhattan has both, two blocks apart from each other. The Bronx and Queens have both as well. The continuation of Brooklyn's Broadway into Manhattan (under a different name) comes within two blocks of Manhattan's Broadway. Interestingly, the Broad Streets last only a few blocks, while the Broadways are major arteries.

Meh.  I wouldn't consider the Williamsburg Bridge Brooklyn's Broadway.
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ModernDayWarrior

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #87 on: July 19, 2016, 02:18:55 PM »

There are several streets in Missouri with the prefix "Trafficway," particularly in Kansas City. It often gets abbreviated to "Trfwy" and I remember being really confused by it when I was younger.
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kphoger

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #88 on: July 19, 2016, 02:23:00 PM »

There are several streets in Missouri with the prefix "Trafficway," particularly in Kansas City. It often gets abbreviated to "Trfwy" and I remember being really confused by it when I was younger.

As stated in the original post.

Was thinking about this when looking at my rand earlier. We are all familiar with the standard street name suffixes like Street, Road, Boulevard, Parkway, Freeway, Expressway, Avenue, etc., but occasionally (and perhaps regionally) we will find a different suffix. There was a post the other day that referred to the Norwood Lateral, and on my recent trip to California, I traveled the Sausalito Lateral. How often is that one used? In Kansas they use the suffix Trafficway, and I was reminded in a recent post of OKC's Tinker Diagonal and found a Turner Diagonal in the Kansas City area just now. Then there are the instances where there is no suffix, such as Richmond's "Boulevard". What others are out there?
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epzik8

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #89 on: July 28, 2016, 06:14:02 PM »

Columbia, Maryland is extremely infamous for this. A family who's friends with mine (specifically, that father and my father have been friends for ages) lived on a street suffixed "Hill" in Columbia. The area has suburban streets and cul-de-sacs with such suffixes as "Ride", "Sky", "Row", "Run", "Spring", "Star", "Calm", "Clover" and "Screen". It even extends into neighboring Ellicott City and Clarksville. The planners seemed to be extremely fond of "Hill" and "Row". My dad's sister, brother-in-law and my cousins, who lived more on the line between Columbia and Clarksville, were fortunate enough to live on a "Court".
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jay8g

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #90 on: August 01, 2016, 10:47:45 AM »

Apparently, there is an actual street in Seattle with the suffix "driveway" (Drwy on the signs).
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bzakharin

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #91 on: August 01, 2016, 01:05:50 PM »

There are a bunch off signed Driveways (Dwy on signs) off of Wood Avenue in Iselin, NJ (e.g. https://www.google.com/maps/@40.5611186,-74.3264692,3a,75y,79.18h,86.94t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sDGUuniB8MLpezEDZPr_y1w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!5m1!1e1). At one point, that's all they were, Driveways to buildings they were named after, but some of the buildings changed hands and the Driveway names were not updated. So, "Hilton Driveway" takes you to "Hotel Woodbridge" now.
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chays

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #92 on: September 01, 2016, 02:04:52 PM »

Lawton, OK, has the Quanah Parker Trailway.

https://goo.gl/maps/HR3oCisJb9J2
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Avalanchez71

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #93 on: September 01, 2016, 04:38:01 PM »

Course
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jlwm

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #94 on: September 02, 2016, 02:45:05 AM »

Houston has Buffalo Speedway (abbreviated Spdwy or Spwy on street signs).
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #95 on: September 02, 2016, 04:31:45 PM »

Apparently, there is an actual street in Seattle with the suffix "driveway" (Drwy on the signs).

The municipality of North Chevy Chase, Maryland has a few "driveways," including Kenilworth Driveway.

Not so far away, in the Chevy Chase area of the District of Columbia, is this circle (there are several others in D.C.).

Baltimore City has The Alameda and its own Broadway.
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Kacie Jane

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #96 on: September 02, 2016, 06:34:13 PM »

Ha! New York has three Broadways and four Broad Streets. Manhattan has both, two blocks apart from each other. The Bronx and Queens have both as well. The continuation of Brooklyn's Broadway into Manhattan (under a different name) comes within two blocks of Manhattan's Broadway. Interestingly, the Broad Streets last only a few blocks, while the Broadways are major arteries.

Meh.  I wouldn't consider the Williamsburg Bridge Brooklyn's Broadway.

Correct.  The continuation of Brooklyn's Broadway is actually Grand Street, not Kenmare/Delancey.  And Grand Street not only intersects Manhattan's Broadway, but makes it most of the way across the island to the Holland Tunnel.
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #97 on: September 08, 2016, 12:15:21 AM »

J.K. Rowling included a couple streets with uncommon suffixes (in the U.S., anyway; maybe they're more common in the UK) in her books: A street nearby Privet Drive is called "Wisteria Walk", and Professor Snape lives on a street named "Spinners End".

That exists in the real world in Long Beach, NY.  They have one for each month: January Walk, February Walk, and so on through December Walk.  The catch is that those streets are all pedestrian only, hence the names.

Baltimore City, Maryland  has a Leith Walk which  is open to bikes and motorized traffic as well as pedestrians.
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Aerobird

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #98 on: January 28, 2017, 06:14:57 PM »

Belatedly...I kept expecting to see this (first) one as I went through the thread, but if it was there, I missed it, therefore-

In Tallahassee, Florida, there's a group of roads in the north part of town that are suffixed "Ride": "North Ride", "Vinnedge Ride", "Ruadh Ride" and "South Ride". While not spectacularly so two of the three are rather hilly, so I suspect the first was named to reflect that and the others followed the pattern.

Further south in town there's the Indianhead neighborhood, which, when it was being built in the late 1940s-early 1950s, had the developers decide to name the streets with names from the Seminole language, working with the state librarian to do so, and therefore now the roads through the area are all suffixed "Nene" - which translates to "trail".

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Otto Yamamoto

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Re: Uncommon Street Name Suffixes
« Reply #99 on: January 28, 2017, 09:04:12 PM »

street names without suffixes

Broadway - very common

The Bowery
'The Bowery' is the area, the street is simply 'Bowery'

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