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Author Topic: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???  (Read 13974 times)

thenetwork

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #100 on: September 19, 2017, 11:26:19 PM »

Cleveland & Cuyahoga County is pretty much either the "East Side" or the "West Side" -- even if you live south of town you are still either East- or West-Side.  The Cuyahoga River is the dividing line all the way through Cuyahoga County.

The corner of Northeast Ohio roughly east of I-271 and North of I-80 is generally referred to as either the Western Reserve or the Snow Belt (due to all the water that gets sucked up over Lake Erie & dumps as snow in that region over the winter).

The area of Northern Ohio which includes Lorain, Huron and Erie County is known as the Firelands region.

Amish Country is generally Wayne, Holmes, and parts of Knox & Richland Counties, although parts of the Western Reserve mentioned above have been also called Amish Country.

Warren & Youngstown are part of the Mahoning Valley.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 07:36:04 PM by thenetwork »
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bing101

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #101 on: September 21, 2017, 12:04:26 PM »

http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2012/08/15/yolo-versus-yolo-whats-in-a-name/

Yes Yolo to non Sacramento area residents mean "You Only Live Once" However when Sacramento residents say Yolo its for completely different reasons and it means Yolo County the territory that has West Sacramento, Davis and Woodland. And we mean it to include areas west of the Sacramento river.

Note Yolo was originally named after the natives that lived in the Sacramento area prior to Spain taking over California.
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bing101

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #102 on: September 22, 2017, 11:02:17 AM »

https://www.kcet.org/redefine/understanding-californias-bay-delta-in-63-photos

Well when California refers to the Delta they mean the San Joaquin/Sacramento delta.

But in other parts of the country its the Mississippi delta.
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bing101

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #103 on: September 22, 2017, 09:19:56 PM »

http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/09/s-town_trial_will_be_held_in_b.html

Bibb County, Alabama most people outside of Alabama will know Bibb County, Alabama as the scene of the S-town podcasts.
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Bruce

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #104 on: October 30, 2017, 11:55:46 PM »

Washington:

Northwestern: Puget Sound region

Southeastern: Palouse

Central: Columbia Basin

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #105 on: October 31, 2017, 09:48:42 AM »

This part of Kansas is often just called "Southeast Kansas," which is rather boring.  The region just northeast of here is called the Flint Hills, which I think sounds kind of cool.

I grew up in Atwood, Kansas.  One time, I told someone in Kansas City that I was from western Kansas, and she said "You mean like Salina?"  No.  No, that's not...  OK, the world doesn't end at Manhattan, people!

Similarly, people in Chicago seem to think Champaign is in southern Illinois.
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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #106 on: October 31, 2017, 09:57:43 AM »

Similarly, people in Chicago seem to think Champaign is in southern Illinois.

Oh hell, people from Chicago (especially the North Side) think Kankakee is southern Illinois.  Their world ends at 130th Street.
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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #107 on: October 31, 2017, 12:55:43 PM »



Similarly, people in Chicago seem to think Champaign is in southern Illinois.

The term is "downstate," which also roughly applies to areas west of the Fox river, as well as south of I-80.
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bing101

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #108 on: October 31, 2017, 01:02:08 PM »

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jefferson_(proposed_Pacific_state)

Areas like the northern half of the Sacramento Valley to the redwood coast of California has been called as the proposed "State of Jefferson" its been mentioned multiple times from Six California proposal to future plans for decades.

Also parts of South Oregon has been mentioned to be part of this list for Jefferson. Note counties have varied over the years for this proposal.
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BakoCondors

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #109 on: November 05, 2017, 08:35:30 PM »

Bakersfield and Kern County in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California adopted the name 'Golden Empire.' The bus system in town has been called Golden Empire Transit since the 1960s but the name didn't really register in my mind until channel 17 changed its call letters from KJTV to KGET (Kern Golden Empire Television) and branded themselves the "Heart of The Golden Empire" back in the late-1980s.

Outsiders like to derisively call us the Armpit of California  :pan:
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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #110 on: November 05, 2017, 08:41:48 PM »

This part of Kansas is often just called "Southeast Kansas," which is rather boring.  The region just northeast of here is called the Flint Hills, which I think sounds kind of cool.

I grew up in Atwood, Kansas.  One time, I told someone in Kansas City that I was from western Kansas, and she said "You mean like Salina?"  No.  No, that's not...  OK, the world doesn't end at Manhattan, people!

Similarly, people in Chicago seem to think Champaign is in southern Illinois.
Its like people where I lived in NJ would call anything above the Bronx-Westchester Border as Upstate in NY.  Yet some on here were disagreeing with that philosophy that anything in the Empire State that is not NYC or Long Island is Upstate.

Also I lived in North Central Jersey, but those way south in Salem County would even consider Toms River (South of where I grew up) as North Jersey.  A few I knew from Woodstown and Elmer area thought the world ended at the ACE of course.
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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #111 on: November 06, 2017, 10:01:43 AM »


I grew up in Atwood, Kansas.  One time, I told someone in Kansas City that I was from western Kansas, and she said "You mean like Salina?"  No.  No, that's not...  OK, the world doesn't end at Manhattan, people!


I’m from Lawrence.  West of Topeka is western Kansas.  :D
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bing101

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #112 on: June 23, 2018, 12:11:55 PM »

"In The Valley" I know Southern California say this to mean the San Fernando Valley.

But in Northern California "In the Valley" can mean various areas like in the Bay Area it refers to Santa Clara Valley, But in Solano County and Sacramento it means Sacramento portion of the Central Valley.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #113 on: June 23, 2018, 01:49:36 PM »

In San Joaquin Valley the common slang is “Central Valley” with the locals.  A lot of outsiders lump into the larger geographic area of Northern California.

sparker

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #114 on: June 23, 2018, 02:50:35 PM »

"In The Valley" I know Southern California say this to mean the San Fernando Valley.

But in Northern California "In the Valley" can mean various areas like in the Bay Area it refers to Santa Clara Valley, But in Solano County and Sacramento it means Sacramento portion of the Central Valley.
In San Joaquin Valley the common slang is “Central Valley” with the locals.  A lot of outsiders lump into the larger geographic area of Northern California.

Over here in housing-crisis central, "the valley" is quickly becoming a catch-all term for the affordable housing area east of Altamont or the Diablos; it generally takes in Discovery Bay and parts of Brentwood (although the latter is generally considered the "gateway" between the Valley and the actual Bay Area -- with housing prices somewhere in between).  Nevertheless, it mostly refers to Tracy, Manteca, Lathrop, Patterson, and these days even Stockton and Lodi -- anywhere where 2500sf can be gotten for about $400K or less.  This exurb concept is starting to drift southeast on CA 99 to include Ripon and Salida; Modesto has defined the practical "outer limits" of commute distances for some time now.  The ACE commute rail line (San Jose-Stockton) is presently exploring establishing some additional service lines down toward Modesto and even Turlock (and extending the present service route up to Lodi), which might prompt some enhanced consideration of those areas as viable housing options. 
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #115 on: June 23, 2018, 03:05:23 PM »

"In The Valley" I know Southern California say this to mean the San Fernando Valley.

But in Northern California "In the Valley" can mean various areas like in the Bay Area it refers to Santa Clara Valley, But in Solano County and Sacramento it means Sacramento portion of the Central Valley.
In San Joaquin Valley the common slang is “Central Valley” with the locals.  A lot of outsiders lump into the larger geographic area of Northern California.

Over here in housing-crisis central, "the valley" is quickly becoming a catch-all term for the affordable housing area east of Altamont or the Diablos; it generally takes in Discovery Bay and parts of Brentwood (although the latter is generally considered the "gateway" between the Valley and the actual Bay Area -- with housing prices somewhere in between).  Nevertheless, it mostly refers to Tracy, Manteca, Lathrop, Patterson, and these days even Stockton and Lodi -- anywhere where 2500sf can be gotten for about $400K or less.  This exurb concept is starting to drift southeast on CA 99 to include Ripon and Salida; Modesto has defined the practical "outer limits" of commute distances for some time now.  The ACE commute rail line (San Jose-Stockton) is presently exploring establishing some additional service lines down toward Modesto and even Turlock (and extending the present service route up to Lodi), which might prompt some enhanced consideration of those areas as viable housing options.

That’s still incredulous to me that people would rather have a 90-120 minute commute to work just to retain a job in the Bay Area Megalopolis.  I’ve usually tended to bail on a Metro Area once it’s approached the 3.5-4.5 million mark in the course of my own life.  At some point you’d work-life balance or lack thereof would chase people to places like Fresno, Redding or Bakersfield.  You can definitely tell that particular part of the Central Valley is starting to merge with the Bay Area, the traffic is awful heading westward during morning rush hour. 

Right now the Fresno Area is generally to be considered about a million people.  It’s pretty obvious that places like Madera, Hanford and Visalia are starting to morph it into a larger metro area.  I’d give it a solid 3-4 decades before some of those civic gaps in the farm lands start to close.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 03:08:07 PM by Max Rockatansky »
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Super Mateo

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #116 on: June 23, 2018, 03:57:15 PM »



Similarly, people in Chicago seem to think Champaign is in southern Illinois.

The term is "downstate," which also roughly applies to areas west of the Fox river, as well as south of I-80.

The area I live in is being marketed as the Chicago Southland, which includes the suburbs from Burbank south and from Homer Glen east, and complete excludes anything in Indiana.  However, I've lived here my entire life, and I've never heard anyone call this area the Chicago Southland.

Really, though, people from Chicagoland only recognize two areas in Illinois:  Chicagoland and Downstate.  ANYTHING that isn't Chicagoland is considered Downstate and vice versa.

My brother lives in a region of North Carolina that includes Pinehurst, Southern Pines, Aberdeen, etc.  From what little I've seen, they seem to refer to the area as the Sand Hills.
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bing101

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #117 on: June 23, 2018, 05:29:26 PM »

"In The Valley" I know Southern California say this to mean the San Fernando Valley.

But in Northern California "In the Valley" can mean various areas like in the Bay Area it refers to Santa Clara Valley, But in Solano County and Sacramento it means Sacramento portion of the Central Valley.
In San Joaquin Valley the common slang is “Central Valley” with the locals.  A lot of outsiders lump into the larger geographic area of Northern California.

Over here in housing-crisis central, "the valley" is quickly becoming a catch-all term for the affordable housing area east of Altamont or the Diablos; it generally takes in Discovery Bay and parts of Brentwood (although the latter is generally considered the "gateway" between the Valley and the actual Bay Area -- with housing prices somewhere in between).  Nevertheless, it mostly refers to Tracy, Manteca, Lathrop, Patterson, and these days even Stockton and Lodi -- anywhere where 2500sf can be gotten for about $400K or less.  This exurb concept is starting to drift southeast on CA 99 to include Ripon and Salida; Modesto has defined the practical "outer limits" of commute distances for some time now.  The ACE commute rail line (San Jose-Stockton) is presently exploring establishing some additional service lines down toward Modesto and even Turlock (and extending the present service route up to Lodi), which might prompt some enhanced consideration of those areas as viable housing options.

Solano County especially when you see that they are the commuter county for two distinct census areas like the San Francisco Bay Area and the Greater Sacramento area. I do remember hearing that Temecula was the so-Cal version of Solano county where its the commuter area for San Diego and Los Angeles though.
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WestDakota

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #118 on: June 24, 2018, 12:07:20 AM »

Also interesting: there is no federal government-defined area that corresponds to the traditional nine-county definition of the Bay Area. The San Francisco-Oakland MSA only includes five counties (and the San Jose MSA includes an outlying county), and the San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland CSA includes three outlying counties (for a total of twelve).

While the government does recognize CSAs and MSAs, it's not an important distinction. The Kansas City CSA/MSA lies in two states and across multiple counties and municipalities, but there is no "CSA law" or "MSA jurisdiction."  CSAs and MSAs are much more related to TV/media markets than anything else.  The definition of the Bay Area is fluid, like most everywhere else.  Take Chicago - the traditional 6 county definition of Chicagoland is Cook, DuPage, Lake (IL), Kane, Will, and McHenry.  However, one could easily make an argument for Grundy, Lake (IN), Porter, Berrien, Kenosha, and other counties being in the mix depending on what's being looked at.  Hell, there are parts of lower Berrien County (Michigan) that are closer to the loop than parts of outer McHenry.

An MSA is definitely a government-created entity. 

Quoting wikipedia (which has a source to back it up)
"MSAs are defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and used by the Census Bureau and other federal government agencies for statistical purposes."
Businesses sometimes use these to determine if they will allow a franchise into the market.  For instance, It was seen by some as important when the Bismarck, ND MSA got over 100,000 people as it opened up more franchises that would consider the area.

The TV/media markets are completely separate and are controlled by the FCC.  While sometimes similar, they can be a lot broader or narrower depending on the area.  For instance, all of Western North Dakota is in one media market for TV, but the four main towns (Bismarck, Minot, Dickinson, Williston) each have their own metropolitan or micropolitan MSA from the census side.
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sparker

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #119 on: June 24, 2018, 01:02:05 AM »

"In The Valley" I know Southern California say this to mean the San Fernando Valley.

But in Northern California "In the Valley" can mean various areas like in the Bay Area it refers to Santa Clara Valley, But in Solano County and Sacramento it means Sacramento portion of the Central Valley.
In San Joaquin Valley the common slang is “Central Valley” with the locals.  A lot of outsiders lump into the larger geographic area of Northern California.

Over here in housing-crisis central, "the valley" is quickly becoming a catch-all term for the affordable housing area east of Altamont or the Diablos; it generally takes in Discovery Bay and parts of Brentwood (although the latter is generally considered the "gateway" between the Valley and the actual Bay Area -- with housing prices somewhere in between).  Nevertheless, it mostly refers to Tracy, Manteca, Lathrop, Patterson, and these days even Stockton and Lodi -- anywhere where 2500sf can be gotten for about $400K or less.  This exurb concept is starting to drift southeast on CA 99 to include Ripon and Salida; Modesto has defined the practical "outer limits" of commute distances for some time now.  The ACE commute rail line (San Jose-Stockton) is presently exploring establishing some additional service lines down toward Modesto and even Turlock (and extending the present service route up to Lodi), which might prompt some enhanced consideration of those areas as viable housing options.

Solano County especially when you see that they are the commuter county for two distinct census areas like the San Francisco Bay Area and the Greater Sacramento area. I do remember hearing that Temecula was the so-Cal version of Solano county where its the commuter area for San Diego and Los Angeles though.


When it comes to general Bay Area commutes, of course the I-80 corridor through Solano County must be considered.  However, it is something of a stretch to consider that a viable option for commuters to the South Bay ("Silicon Valley" if you will), as any reasonable route (80/880 or 680) would have to wade through a mass of E-W commuters through the Walnut Creek/Concord area to & from their residences.  Thus that specific group of long-distance commuters has generally chosen the area from Brentwood east into San Joaquin County (plus tentacles into Stanislaus County as well) as the least troublesome option for affordable family-type housing.  The north side of Stockton (the location of most newer housing development) and even Lodi are becoming outposts of this phenomenon; it could be fairly said that if it weren't for the presence of the Delta and its inhospitality to development, a line from Discovery Bay to Lodi could be drawn with housing dominating everything below that line. 

And adding to that is the southward expansion of the Sacramento area due to similar dynamics there (albeit somewhat scaled-down in overall pricing).  I have a business associate in Folsom who is being priced out of her residence; she is in the process of relocating south to Galt, where rental housing remains relatively reasonable.  Galt's only about a dozen miles north of Lodi;  I predict that within 20-25 years housing will dominate the CA 99 corridor all the way from Sacramento to Turlock .  I-5 traverses the eastern reaches of the Delta, including areas unsuitable for such development because of unstable (read waterlogged) ground -- the same stuff that made that I-5 stretch the last in the Valley to be opened to traffic in 1981, so south of Elk Grove the rural status quo will likely persist.  But 99, situated on solid ground, is more than ripe for such activity.
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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #120 on: June 24, 2018, 04:11:45 AM »

Western Slope and Four Corners were already mentioned for Colorado. I'd add:

Front Range: Denver Metro + points north on I-25 corridor including Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Boulder, Longmont
The Foothills: Transition areas immediately west of Denver such as Evergreen, Genesee, Indian Hills, Hi-Wan, Morrison, Conifer - a lot of bedroom communities
Palmer Divide: Area south of Denver around Castle Rock, Elizabeth, The Pinery, rural Douglas and Elbert counties
Eastern Plains: Pretty much the entire (flat) eastern half of Colorado out towards Kansas, from Fort Morgan and Sterling to Limon, Burlington, and down to Lamar
High Country: Pretty much the whole mountain areas and resorts - Breckenridge, Silverthorne, Loveland, Vail, etc...

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #121 on: June 24, 2018, 08:17:52 AM »

Locals call my part of the state the Crystal Coast, or Eastern North Carolina, or simply "The East".

"Down East"  refers specifically to far eastern Carteret County and all those little communities like Otway and Harkers Island-they even have their own language down there. When ever I would take a call from someone who is from down there (which was very rare) I had to get my partner to translate for me (she's from that area). Oddly enough I haven't had a call from a downeaster since she transferred to a different shift a few years ago.

Far eastern Pamlico County is called the Lowlands-appropriately named, they flood every time some one takes their dog out for a walk. Oh and their mosquitoes are so large the FAA requires them to have position lights and tail numbers, too, lol.

Funny thing, here in New Bern when true locals (not transplants like myself) say "down in the county" they aren't referring to Craven County where New Bern is located, they are talking about Pamlico County. They call the areas of Craven County not in New Bern as "out in the county".
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bing101

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #122 on: June 25, 2018, 03:07:12 AM »

"In The Valley" I know Southern California say this to mean the San Fernando Valley.

But in Northern California "In the Valley" can mean various areas like in the Bay Area it refers to Santa Clara Valley, But in Solano County and Sacramento it means Sacramento portion of the Central Valley.
In San Joaquin Valley the common slang is “Central Valley” with the locals.  A lot of outsiders lump into the larger geographic area of Northern California.

Over here in housing-crisis central, "the valley" is quickly becoming a catch-all term for the affordable housing area east of Altamont or the Diablos; it generally takes in Discovery Bay and parts of Brentwood (although the latter is generally considered the "gateway" between the Valley and the actual Bay Area -- with housing prices somewhere in between).  Nevertheless, it mostly refers to Tracy, Manteca, Lathrop, Patterson, and these days even Stockton and Lodi -- anywhere where 2500sf can be gotten for about $400K or less.  This exurb concept is starting to drift southeast on CA 99 to include Ripon and Salida; Modesto has defined the practical "outer limits" of commute distances for some time now.  The ACE commute rail line (San Jose-Stockton) is presently exploring establishing some additional service lines down toward Modesto and even Turlock (and extending the present service route up to Lodi), which might prompt some enhanced consideration of those areas as viable housing options.

Solano County especially when you see that they are the commuter county for two distinct census areas like the San Francisco Bay Area and the Greater Sacramento area. I do remember hearing that Temecula was the so-Cal version of Solano county where its the commuter area for San Diego and Los Angeles though.


When it comes to general Bay Area commutes, of course the I-80 corridor through Solano County must be considered.  However, it is something of a stretch to consider that a viable option for commuters to the South Bay ("Silicon Valley" if you will), as any reasonable route (80/880 or 680) would have to wade through a mass of E-W commuters through the Walnut Creek/Concord area to & from their residences.  Thus that specific group of long-distance commuters has generally chosen the area from Brentwood east into San Joaquin County (plus tentacles into Stanislaus County as well) as the least troublesome option for affordable family-type housing.  The north side of Stockton (the location of most newer housing development) and even Lodi are becoming outposts of this phenomenon; it could be fairly said that if it weren't for the presence of the Delta and its inhospitality to development, a line from Discovery Bay to Lodi could be drawn with housing dominating everything below that line. 

And adding to that is the southward expansion of the Sacramento area due to similar dynamics there (albeit somewhat scaled-down in overall pricing).  I have a business associate in Folsom who is being priced out of her residence; she is in the process of relocating south to Galt, where rental housing remains relatively reasonable.  Galt's only about a dozen miles north of Lodi;  I predict that within 20-25 years housing will dominate the CA 99 corridor all the way from Sacramento to Turlock .  I-5 traverses the eastern reaches of the Delta, including areas unsuitable for such development because of unstable (read waterlogged) ground -- the same stuff that made that I-5 stretch the last in the Valley to be opened to traffic in 1981, so south of Elk Grove the rural status quo will likely persist.  But 99, situated on solid ground, is more than ripe for such activity.

Wait Isn't Sutter, Yuba and Butte Counties supposedly becoming the northern growth areas for Sacramento and is supposedly going to get more affordable housing in areas north of Sacramento and meant for people who got priced out of Davis and Sacramento itself. I do remember hearing some of the long time residents of Sacramento talk about moving to these areas when I worked and went to school there years ago. I do know this part that Lodi and Galt were considered to become growth areas for Sacramento but the Delta Issue just overshadowed that argument though over housing in the area.
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GreenLanternCorps

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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #123 on: June 25, 2018, 10:56:23 AM »

The Dayton area is usually called The Miami Valley due to the Great Miami River and the Little Miami river.

But that is never used outside of it due to the city in Florida.
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Re: What Do Locals Call Your Part Of The State???
« Reply #124 on: June 25, 2018, 11:38:26 AM »

Ft Smith/Van Buren is the River Valley

Fayetteville/Springdale, etc is NW Arkansas

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a man hears what he wants to hear
And disregards the rest -- Simon & Garfunkel

 


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