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Author Topic: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says  (Read 12662 times)

bing101

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bing101

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #51 on: November 04, 2017, 03:00:45 PM »

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vdeane

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #52 on: November 04, 2017, 06:11:34 PM »

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/11/03/wbz-would-owners-tells-employees-apply-for-their-jobs/Q8ZIoWcVH5bEPSN1Yy1kvM/story.html

Update WBZ Radio Boston will get changes soon.
How is shit like that even legal?

Also: Boston Globe no longer allows using incognito to bypass the paywall.
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bing101

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #53 on: November 04, 2017, 06:32:31 PM »

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/11/03/wbz-would-owners-tells-employees-apply-for-their-jobs/Q8ZIoWcVH5bEPSN1Yy1kvM/story.html

Update WBZ Radio Boston will get changes soon.
How is shit like that even legal?

Also: Boston Globe no longer allows using incognito to bypass the paywall.

Well Entercom was required by the DOJ, FCC and SEC to divest radio stations in Boston, Sacramento and San Francisco to get the deal with CBS radio through and the deal is subject to approval on November 17th.
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bandit957

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #54 on: November 05, 2017, 10:31:17 AM »

How is shit like that even legal?

It's not.
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SP Cook

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #55 on: November 05, 2017, 12:09:18 PM »

Actually 100% legal.

http://www.boston.com/jobs/globe/job_doc/archives/111305.shtml

As in most states, even far-left Mass. protects the law of contract.  These job creators will decide who will work there.  The rest, who seem to think they are doing the world a favor by working, can apply elsewhere.
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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #56 on: November 05, 2017, 04:32:50 PM »

The rest, who seem to think they are doing the world a favor by working, can apply elsewhere.

So would they be doing the world a favor if they sat around and loafed instead?
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Bruce

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #57 on: November 05, 2017, 05:03:07 PM »

While traditional radio might be dying, localized stations and online broadcasts are gaining in popularity.

The Seattle area has several low-power "hyper local" stations that have started up recently and are enjoying some success. One of them even hosted a mayoral debate.

jakeroot

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #58 on: November 05, 2017, 07:19:22 PM »

The Seattle area has several low-power "hyper local" stations that have started up recently and are enjoying some success. One of them even hosted a mayoral debate.

Which ones? Besides the four-thousand NPR stations, there's KOMO and KIRO, and then the various afternoon drive stations. There's more than a few AM stations, but I generally avoid them because I hate the quality.
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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #59 on: November 05, 2017, 07:34:53 PM »

The Seattle area has several low-power "hyper local" stations that have started up recently and are enjoying some success. One of them even hosted a mayoral debate.

Which ones? Besides the four-thousand NPR stations, there's KOMO and KIRO, and then the various afternoon drive stations. There's more than a few AM stations, but I generally avoid them because I hate the quality.

Generally in the FM band, near 100/105/107. http://www.thestranger.com/blogs/slog/2015/08/21/22737096/seattle-to-get-seven-new-hyperlocal-low-power-radio-stations

jakeroot

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #60 on: November 05, 2017, 07:45:10 PM »

The Seattle area has several low-power "hyper local" stations that have started up recently and are enjoying some success. One of them even hosted a mayoral debate.

Which ones? Besides the four-thousand NPR stations, there's KOMO and KIRO, and then the various afternoon drive stations. There's more than a few AM stations, but I generally avoid them because I hate the quality.

Generally in the FM band, near 100/105/107. http://www.thestranger.com/blogs/slog/2015/08/21/22737096/seattle-to-get-seven-new-hyperlocal-low-power-radio-stations

Oh, you mean like really local. I thought you meant "Puget Sound Region" (although you do, if you include online radio).

Didn't see that story, though. So no doubt that radio is anything but dead in Seattle!
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bing101

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #61 on: November 07, 2017, 12:52:30 PM »

http://savewbz1030.com/

Update someone has put up a petition about WBZ Radio going to Iheart inc.
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bing101

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bing101

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #64 on: November 09, 2017, 08:48:42 PM »

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Desert Man

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #65 on: November 17, 2017, 06:34:08 PM »

20-25 years from now, we don't need an AM/FM terrestrial radio set, as well a TV set if the home computer will provide you all the TV, radio/audio, news "paper" and cinema movies we need. This is an issue for these industries not yet converted to the internet. What can they do to survive? evolve, adapt and compromise, so their businesses and the medium continues in the next decade/21st century/new millennia/"Aquarian age".

Locally, the first radio station is (gone) KCMJ 970, began in 1940. By the end of the 1970s, the Palm Springs area had 12-14 AM wave stations and 5-7 FM wave (including transmitters from Riverside or Imperial). In the 1980s FM boom, FM from Los Angeles and San Diego put up translators or repeaters to reach Palm Springs (not always audible in Coachella or Indio), while Palm Springs' stations are clearly audible in Banning or Beaumont, sometimes Hemet or San Jacinto, and pretty much Yucca Valley or 29 Palms. By the end of the 1990s, we had 15-16 commercial and 8-9 public FM stations. Today, it's grown to a total of 45 (25 commercial, 8 religious and 10 public on FM, plus a news/talk station on 94.3-also 104.7) in the Palm Springs area, excluding Morongo Basin and San Gorgonio pass-only stations. The number of AM wave stations decreased to 7 or 8 and they're switching (or already have) to FM.   
« Last Edit: November 17, 2017, 06:55:07 PM by Desert Man »
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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #67 on: November 18, 2017, 10:25:27 PM »

From my wife's home region: San Francisco Bay area - 680 KNBR (San Francisco), 740 KCBS (San Jose) and similarly strong enough to "fry" your FM specific radio at night: 1530 KFBK (Sacramento). Here in Southern CA, the 3 real big ones are 640 KFI, 930 KHJ (changed to Spanish music in 1990 and now Catholic talk) and 1070 KNX from L.A., 600 KOGO and 760 KFMB from San Diego, 560 KBLU and 1230 KXO from Yuma, and 620 KTAR Phoenix. I have memories of 580 KFXM from Riverside-San Bernardino and 720 KDWN Las Vegas (Coast-to-Coast AM with Art Bell in Pahrump).

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Henry

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #68 on: November 20, 2017, 09:26:27 AM »

The Big Three TV networks are no longer involved in radio, which is indeed a sad time but has been expected since NBC got out of the business back in the 80s, and ABC sold off its stations to Citadel a decade ago (who, in turn, would be acquired by Cumulus).
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jakeroot

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #69 on: November 21, 2017, 12:40:51 AM »

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bing101

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #70 on: November 22, 2017, 09:57:14 AM »


The last DJ by Tom Petty.
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bing101

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Desert Man

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #72 on: November 24, 2017, 01:09:22 AM »

At night hours in the late 1980s, WNBC 660 from NYC in Palm Springs! I believe this is by a repeater or satellite service to reach the west coast. 660 is now WFAN sports radio, but in CA 660 is 2 directions: to the west a Punjabi station in Bakersfield and to the east with a stronger signal a Navajo language station in Arizona. 101.1 KHWY (former 660 AM) "the Highway" had its antennae in Amboy, technically a ghost town today, to serve truckers on I-40 as well I-15 and maybe I-10, but the nearest town it serves is 29 Palms. KHWY is country, co-owns KViBE 98.1 classic rock, but their nearest town is Barstow.   
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KRXV - also 98.9 and 99.7 in the Las Vegas, NV area.

I know KOGO 600 San Diego in early mornings reached Redding CA, and KSTN 1420 Stockton heard down to Kern county. The former KMPH 1260 AM owned by a TV station in Tulare/Fresno was based in Modesto to serve Stockton and Merced (the Sacramento region), as well down south to Bakersfield and Arvin (might reached the Los Angeles metro area in evening hours). In the 1990s, 990 AM from Mexicali and 1400 AM in Indio (both Spanish language) had higher wattage (esp. at night) than it does today - they have internet audio streaming - global coverage, a reality in this century or millennia.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XECL-AM - Spanish classic rock and pop oldies (not on FM).
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bing101

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #73 on: November 26, 2017, 09:38:18 AM »

As of 2017 the major owners of radio stations are Iheart, Cumulus, Entercom, Alpha media and Salem.

Amazing to think that these are the major OTA radio owners now that CBS is out of the picture last week.
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bing101

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Re: Traditional Radio Faces a Grim Future, New Study Says
« Reply #74 on: November 27, 2017, 09:33:30 AM »

The Big Three TV networks are no longer involved in radio, which is indeed a sad time but has been expected since NBC got out of the business back in the 80s, and ABC sold off its stations to Citadel a decade ago (who, in turn, would be acquired by Cumulus).

https://radioinsight.com/headlines/89657/abc-radio-to-expand-operations/

http://www.slacker.com/station/abc-news

And Cumulus back in 2015 ended the contract with ABC Radio. This move made historically ABC Radio affiliates like KABC 790 AM and KGO 810 AM become Westwood One affiliates back in 2015.

Note ABC Radio exists as a Podcast only brand in places like San Francisco and Los Angeles though where they previously had OTA affiliates.

http://www.slacker.com/artist/abc-news

Mainly ABC Radio news could only be found on Slacker Radio apps though.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2017, 12:48:22 PM by bing101 »
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