AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Regional television markets  (Read 23286 times)

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2733
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 12:25:32 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #50 on: December 17, 2017, 01:20:23 PM »

http://www.ocregister.com/2017/12/14/how-the-disney-fox-deal-affects-local-sports-coverage/

Note this article talks about how  Fox Sports West/Prime Ticket is affected by the Fox/Disney deal.


http://www.adweek.com/tvspy/disney-deal-to-aquire-fox-does-not-include-station-group/197823

http://www.adweek.com/tvnewser/after-disney-sale-a-new-fox-will-include-fox-news-sports-business-and-tv-network/352012

Also this deal prevents Disney from taking over the Fox O&O division. This deal only affects some Fox Regional sports division going to Disney and the film division of Fox going to Disney.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2017, 10:59:48 PM by bing101 »
Logged

Desert Man

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 824
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Sou Cal USA
  • Last Login: March 01, 2019, 09:57:16 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #51 on: December 31, 2017, 01:32:07 PM »

KSBI (My Net) from Oklahoma City has an over-air transmitter on channel 15 in Tulsa. In much of Oklahoma, 5 out-of-state TV stations can be found: WFAA (ABC) Houston, KTEN (NBC) and KXII (CBS) Sherman TX, KCWE (CW) Kansas city, and KNWA (Fox) Fort Smith AR. And Anadarko, Claremore and Tahlequah OK have Native American programming stations.
Logged
Get your kicks...on Route 99! Like to turn 66 upside down. The other historic Main street of America.

ftballfan

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1152
  • Age: 27
  • Location: Ypsilanti, MI
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 03:14:54 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #52 on: December 31, 2017, 03:00:33 PM »

KSBI (My Net) from Oklahoma City has an over-air transmitter on channel 15 in Tulsa. In much of Oklahoma, 5 out-of-state TV stations can be found: WFAA (ABC) Houston, KTEN (NBC) and KXII (CBS) Sherman TX, KCWE (CW) Kansas city, and KNWA (Fox) Fort Smith AR. And Anadarko, Claremore and Tahlequah OK have Native American programming stations.
KTEN is actually based in Ada, OK and KXII used to be based in Ardmore, OK
Logged

KEVIN_224

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1608
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 03:43:55 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #53 on: January 01, 2018, 11:20:20 PM »

WFAA-TV (ABC) channel 8 is from Dallas. KTRK-TV (ABC) channel 13 is from Houston. As far as I know, KTEN-TV and KXII-TV are still licensed to the areas mentioned. I believe Ada/Ardmore used to rely on Lawton, OK for ABC, via KSWO-TV channel 7.
Logged

JMoses24

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 554
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Oklahoma City
  • Last Login: August 06, 2019, 09:33:38 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #54 on: January 07, 2018, 09:44:16 AM »

It goes back to even before the days of sat TV.  Denver stations existed first and were microwaved into many other places.  Later in the BUD (big ugly dish) era, among the options to get network stations was a package called "Netlink Denver 5" which was the Denver local stations. 

As to reforming TV markets, WV's micro markets are fast approaching the critical level where they should die.  First, for complex historical-political reasons none of transmitters are in the same towns, and this combined with the terrain, mean that essentially everyone has to have cable or a dish.  The edges of the state are covered by other states (Washington and Pittsburgh mostly).  The only real and legitimate market is, of course, Huntington-Charleston, with enough people to allow for serious news coverage and such.  That leaves:

- Parkersburg.  Historically just one station (NBC), everyone get provider TV and the H-C or Columbus stations anyway.  Shut it down and make H-C (the 2 WV counties) and Columbus (the one OH one) a little bigger.

- Bluefield-Beckley-Oak Hill.  Historically just two stations (NBC and ABC) which were so far apart no place could get both OTA.  CBS, and later Fox, was brought in by cable from H-C, Roanoke, or even Bristol.   (Now has a CBS with .2 Fox at a yet third independent location).  Population bleed has reduced what was always a small market to near nothing.  News coverage is pure amateur hour.  Kids just out of school and sales guy with no talent, using 30 year old SD equipment.  Shut it down and make H-C larger.

- Wheeling.  Historically just 2 stations (NBC and CBS) with ABC from Pittsburgh.  Just a few miles from Pittsburgh, the area got its own TV stations when the Rust Belt was not yet rusting.  Population bleed means no money for anything.  News operations are worse than Bluefield's.   Serves no purpose.  Shut it down and get Pittsburgh stations, which everybody does anyway.

- Clarksburg.  Also always missing ABC, which comes from Pittsburgh, along with all the other Pittsburgh stations.  Worse market in the state.  No money for anything.  In fact so amateurish that several counties have been "captured" by Nielsen's methods by Pittsburgh.  Shut it down and let Pittsburgh and H-C get larger.

In doing so the result is the two panhandles and the northern edge of the state served by the cities that are part of (DC or Pittsburgh) and the rest of the state being one market (similar to New Mexico or Utah) which would be 12 places larger in the list of markets, with the economy to support a serious effort at news and other local programming.


Huntington's WOWK, Lewisburg's WVNS, Wheeling's WTRF and Clarksburg's WBOY are ALL owned by the same company anyway, Nexstar, and even simulcast one 5:30 newscast. If not for WBOY, that whole thing could be CBS West Virginia. WTAP and low powered stations WIYE and WOVA in Parkersburg, WDTV in the Clarksburg market and WSAZ Charleston are owned by Gray Television (as is WDBJ out of Roanoke, which can be received in Pocahontas County). WVAH and WCHS in Charleston's DMA and WTOV in Wheeling's DMA are lock, stock and barrel Sinclair stations although WVAH is technically owned by a shell of Sinclair. In each of these cases, a case can be made for simply making the stations in the smaller cities into satellites for the Charleston/Huntington stations.
Logged

Buck87

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 902
  • Aesculus glabra

  • Age: 32
  • Location: Bellevue, Ohio
  • Last Login: August 17, 2019, 11:12:25 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #55 on: January 07, 2018, 10:22:43 AM »

My hometown is half in the Toledo market and half in the Cleveland market. I live on the Cleveland market side and on Spectrum we have all 4 Toledo channels in HD plus 3 of the 4 Cleveland channels (all but CBS) in SD....while when we had DirecTV it was all 4 Cleveland channels plus Mansfield's channel 68 and none of the Toledo channels.
Logged
When it comes to volume, the Ohio River is not a tributary. The Upper Mississippi is.

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2733
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 12:25:32 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #56 on: January 07, 2018, 11:44:44 AM »

Logged

KEVIN_224

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1608
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 03:43:55 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #57 on: January 08, 2018, 07:35:42 AM »

That's ridiculous! Nearby Providence, RI already has WJAR-TV (NBC) channel 10! Boston isn't that far from Providence. I wonder if the people at WHDH-TV (IND) channel 7 of Boston, the previous NBC affiliate, care!  :-D
Logged

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2733
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 12:25:32 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #58 on: January 08, 2018, 10:34:35 AM »

That's ridiculous! Nearby Providence, RI already has WJAR-TV (NBC) channel 10! Boston isn't that far from Providence. I wonder if the people at WHDH-TV (IND) channel 7 of Boston, the previous NBC affiliate, care!  :-D

The same thing happened when NBC was taking over KNTV San Jose but for some reason NBC didn't consider that Solano County residents already had NBC from KCRA Sacramento when they were advertising NBC3 for Bay area residents.

Are there places within New England that just happened to be commuter counties of both Providence and Boston?
Logged

bandit957

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1662
  • A natural gas bunk!

  • Age: 46
  • Location: Bellevue, KY
  • Last Login: August 17, 2019, 11:26:59 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #59 on: January 08, 2018, 10:53:48 AM »

http://www.adweek.com/tvspy/nbc-boston-reveals-new-logo-on-anniversary/198466

WBTS-TV in Boston has been renamed NBC 10 Boston.

I was wondering why I never heard of this station before, and it turns out it's a low-power station. This has to be the only major market in America where a major network is on such a weak signal.

I'm surprised NBC allows this, quite frankly.
Logged
The highway to not having your teeth fall out...

Number of remaining teeth: https://goo.gl/maps/dgsWdCme9s72

ftballfan

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1152
  • Age: 27
  • Location: Ypsilanti, MI
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 03:14:54 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #60 on: January 08, 2018, 01:14:41 PM »

It goes back to even before the days of sat TV.  Denver stations existed first and were microwaved into many other places.  Later in the BUD (big ugly dish) era, among the options to get network stations was a package called "Netlink Denver 5" which was the Denver local stations. 

As to reforming TV markets, WV's micro markets are fast approaching the critical level where they should die.  First, for complex historical-political reasons none of transmitters are in the same towns, and this combined with the terrain, mean that essentially everyone has to have cable or a dish.  The edges of the state are covered by other states (Washington and Pittsburgh mostly).  The only real and legitimate market is, of course, Huntington-Charleston, with enough people to allow for serious news coverage and such.  That leaves:

- Parkersburg.  Historically just one station (NBC), everyone get provider TV and the H-C or Columbus stations anyway.  Shut it down and make H-C (the 2 WV counties) and Columbus (the one OH one) a little bigger.

- Bluefield-Beckley-Oak Hill.  Historically just two stations (NBC and ABC) which were so far apart no place could get both OTA.  CBS, and later Fox, was brought in by cable from H-C, Roanoke, or even Bristol.   (Now has a CBS with .2 Fox at a yet third independent location).  Population bleed has reduced what was always a small market to near nothing.  News coverage is pure amateur hour.  Kids just out of school and sales guy with no talent, using 30 year old SD equipment.  Shut it down and make H-C larger.

- Wheeling.  Historically just 2 stations (NBC and CBS) with ABC from Pittsburgh.  Just a few miles from Pittsburgh, the area got its own TV stations when the Rust Belt was not yet rusting.  Population bleed means no money for anything.  News operations are worse than Bluefield's.   Serves no purpose.  Shut it down and get Pittsburgh stations, which everybody does anyway.

- Clarksburg.  Also always missing ABC, which comes from Pittsburgh, along with all the other Pittsburgh stations.  Worse market in the state.  No money for anything.  In fact so amateurish that several counties have been "captured" by Nielsen's methods by Pittsburgh.  Shut it down and let Pittsburgh and H-C get larger.

In doing so the result is the two panhandles and the northern edge of the state served by the cities that are part of (DC or Pittsburgh) and the rest of the state being one market (similar to New Mexico or Utah) which would be 12 places larger in the list of markets, with the economy to support a serious effort at news and other local programming.


Huntington's WOWK, Lewisburg's WVNS, Wheeling's WTRF and Clarksburg's WBOY are ALL owned by the same company anyway, Nexstar, and even simulcast one 5:30 newscast. If not for WBOY, that whole thing could be CBS West Virginia. WTAP and low powered stations WIYE and WOVA in Parkersburg, WDTV in the Clarksburg market and WSAZ Charleston are owned by Gray Television (as is WDBJ out of Roanoke, which can be received in Pocahontas County). WVAH and WCHS in Charleston's DMA and WTOV in Wheeling's DMA are lock, stock and barrel Sinclair stations although WVAH is technically owned by a shell of Sinclair. In each of these cases, a case can be made for simply making the stations in the smaller cities into satellites for the Charleston/Huntington stations.
The 5:30 newscast also gets into the DC area via Nexstar-owned independent WDVM, based in Hagerstown, MD and covering the western DC suburbs. Formerly NBC for Hagerstown, Winchester, and Cumberland, the station doesn't appear to have suffered much from losing NBC and in fact has added cable carriage in metro DC (it is carried on Verizon Fios and Comcast Montgomery County) that it never had as an NBC affiliate.

Fun fact: Hagerstown-Winchester-Martinsburg was close to becoming a separate market at one time. WWPX (now Ion) was originally a FOX affiliate and attempted to affiliate with CBS as well. ABC would have come from WHSV (which no longer serves the area) and WJLA.
Logged

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2733
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 12:25:32 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #61 on: January 10, 2018, 08:33:00 PM »

http://www.adweek.com/tvspy/fox-may-buy-10-sinclair-stations/198878

Update Fox could get 10 Sinclair owned stations.
Logged

jp the roadgeek

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2933
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Outside the I-291 beltway
  • Last Login: Today at 03:00:30 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #62 on: January 11, 2018, 02:26:42 PM »

That's ridiculous! Nearby Providence, RI already has WJAR-TV (NBC) channel 10! Boston isn't that far from Providence. I wonder if the people at WHDH-TV (IND) channel 7 of Boston, the previous NBC affiliate, care!  :-D

It’s similar to how WCTX channel 59 in New Haven rebranded itself to My TV 9 (based on common location on many cable systems) when WWOR My 9 is available on cable in many of the areas WCTX is.
Logged
Interstates I've clinched: 97, 290 (MA), 291 (CT), 291 (MA), 293, 295 (DE-NJ-PA), 295 (RI-MA), 384, 391, 395 (CT-MA), 395 (MD), 495 (DE), 610 (LA), 684, 691, 695 (MD), 695 (NY), 795 (MD)

SectorZ

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 943
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Tewksbury, MA
  • Last Login: August 17, 2019, 08:38:10 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #63 on: January 11, 2018, 02:36:27 PM »

That's ridiculous! Nearby Providence, RI already has WJAR-TV (NBC) channel 10! Boston isn't that far from Providence. I wonder if the people at WHDH-TV (IND) channel 7 of Boston, the previous NBC affiliate, care!  :-D

The same thing happened when NBC was taking over KNTV San Jose but for some reason NBC didn't consider that Solano County residents already had NBC from KCRA Sacramento when they were advertising NBC3 for Bay area residents.

Are there places within New England that just happened to be commuter counties of both Providence and Boston?

Plenty. I actually know someone who's insane enough to commute from Bristol RI (southeast of Providence) to Andover MA (20 miles NW of Boston). Foxboro, despite being "Boston" to the sports world, is closer to Providence. A line from Worcester MA to Brockton MA would be a good line for where you can have potential of commuting to either city.
Logged

spooky

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 696
  • Last Login: August 15, 2019, 01:18:33 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #64 on: January 12, 2018, 07:47:25 AM »

http://www.adweek.com/tvspy/nbc-boston-reveals-new-logo-on-anniversary/198466

WBTS-TV in Boston has been renamed NBC 10 Boston.

I was wondering why I never heard of this station before, and it turns out it's a low-power station. This has to be the only major market in America where a major network is on such a weak signal.

I'm surprised NBC allows this, quite frankly.

Considering NBC owns the station, I'm guessing they are OK with it.
Logged

bandit957

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1662
  • A natural gas bunk!

  • Age: 46
  • Location: Bellevue, KY
  • Last Login: August 17, 2019, 11:26:59 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #65 on: January 12, 2018, 10:10:05 AM »

http://www.adweek.com/tvspy/nbc-boston-reveals-new-logo-on-anniversary/198466

WBTS-TV in Boston has been renamed NBC 10 Boston.

I was wondering why I never heard of this station before, and it turns out it's a low-power station. This has to be the only major market in America where a major network is on such a weak signal.

I'm surprised NBC allows this, quite frankly.

Considering NBC owns the station, I'm guessing they are OK with it.

I'm sure NBC can afford a bigger station. I think the networks just don't care about their own product much anymore.
Logged
The highway to not having your teeth fall out...

Number of remaining teeth: https://goo.gl/maps/dgsWdCme9s72

ftballfan

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1152
  • Age: 27
  • Location: Ypsilanti, MI
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 03:14:54 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #66 on: January 12, 2018, 09:05:36 PM »

http://www.adweek.com/tvspy/nbc-boston-reveals-new-logo-on-anniversary/198466

WBTS-TV in Boston has been renamed NBC 10 Boston.

I was wondering why I never heard of this station before, and it turns out it's a low-power station. This has to be the only major market in America where a major network is on such a weak signal.

I'm surprised NBC allows this, quite frankly.

Considering NBC owns the station, I'm guessing they are OK with it.
In a related note, Comcast (the dominant cable company in the Boston area and in most large cities nationwide) owns NBC
Logged

KEVIN_224

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1608
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 03:43:55 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #67 on: January 12, 2018, 11:16:42 PM »

While next door in Rhode Island, Cox dominates, serving 36 of their 39 municipalities. I think the missing 3 are in southeast RI. Greater Hartford is a split between Comcast and Cox. For years, the only true Comcast franchises in Connecticut were Middletown and New Haven.

Comcast owns WVIT-TV (NBC) channel 30 of New Britain/Hartford.
Logged

Flint1979

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2268
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Michigan
  • Last Login: August 17, 2019, 11:51:06 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #68 on: January 12, 2018, 11:28:02 PM »

IIRC there is a Nevada county which is part of the market... of Denver!
What? Which one? I thought that all would be in Las Vegas or SLC markets if out of state.

I'm pretty sure either Eureka or Lander county (maybe both) have been in the Denver market before.

I know the Denver market extended into South Dakota at some point.
Why wouldn't they be in Salt Lake Cities market?

The only thing I can think of is that Denver would be a much larger market to begin with, so the Denver stations probably had more influence in getting on cable. But if that was the case, San Francisco would probably make just as much sense. Denver might have had a "superstation" or something, like WTBS in Atlanta or WGN in Chicago.
KWGN was a regional superstation out of Denver. It remains available on most cable systems in Colorado and Wyoming, as well as on several systems in western Nebraska and Kansas.
Logged

renegade

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 438
  • Change My Mind

  • Age: -41
  • Location: Metro Detroit
  • Last Login: August 17, 2019, 12:59:01 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #69 on: January 13, 2018, 01:19:45 PM »

KWGN was a regional superstation out of Denver. It remains available on most cable systems in Colorado and Wyoming, as well as on several systems in western Nebraska and Kansas.
Still available to Dish Network subscribers who are grandfathered into the Superstations package, along with WPIX and WWOR, New York, WSBK, Boston and KTLA, Los Angeles.
Logged

SidS1045

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 873
  • Age: 68
  • Location: Stoneham MA
  • Last Login: August 14, 2019, 09:39:00 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #70 on: January 13, 2018, 09:32:42 PM »

Logged
"A nation of sheep will beget a government of wolves." - Edward R. Murrow

SidS1045

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 873
  • Age: 68
  • Location: Stoneham MA
  • Last Login: August 14, 2019, 09:39:00 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #71 on: January 13, 2018, 09:42:29 PM »

I was wondering why I never heard of this station before, and it turns out it's a low-power station. This has to be the only major market in America where a major network is on such a weak signal.

I'm surprised NBC allows this, quite frankly.

Over-the-air NBC is on two full-power signals (60.2 and 60.5) in the Boston metro, in addition to the LPTV signal (8.1)...and with 82.5% of Boston area homes on cable, the LPTV signal makes little or no difference.
Logged
"A nation of sheep will beget a government of wolves." - Edward R. Murrow

KeithE4Phx

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 204
  • Location: Mesa, AZ
  • Last Login: Today at 01:32:06 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #72 on: January 13, 2018, 10:31:44 PM »

http://www.adweek.com/tvspy/nbc-boston-reveals-new-logo-on-anniversary/198466

WBTS-TV in Boston has been renamed NBC 10 Boston.

I was wondering why I never heard of this station before, and it turns out it's a low-power station. This has to be the only major market in America where a major network is on such a weak signal.

I'm surprised NBC allows this, quite frankly.

NBC/Comcast owns it.  That's why they allow it.  And with most people having cable/satellite (I believe Comcast owns the cable system there), they don't really have to care about their OTA signal. 

After all, they shut down their WNBC transmitter in NYC, and are merging with their Telemundo station WNJU, although they still have separate licenses.  WNBC had been in operation in one form or another since 1928.  Now they're just piggybacked.  Expect lots more of this in the coming years, due to repacking and the upcoming ATSC 3.0.
Logged
"Oh, so you hate your job? Well, why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called "EVERYBODY!" They meet at the bar." -- Drew Carey

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2733
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 12:25:32 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #73 on: January 13, 2018, 10:42:40 PM »

http://www.adweek.com/tvspy/fox-may-buy-10-sinclair-stations/198878

Here is an update in the Sinclair/Tribune deal now Fox is getting 10 divested Sinclair stations.

Quote
According to the Financial Times, the company is “finalising the purchase of about 10 US television stations from Sinclair Broadcast Group.”Sinclair, FT reports, is selling the stations as part of a divestment to win FCC approval of its $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media.The markets include Seattle, where Tribune owns Fox affiliate KCPQ and Sinclair owns ABC affiliate KOMO and Denver where Tribune currently owns the KDVR-KWGN duopoly. The Fox-Sinclair deal is contingent on the Sinclair-Tribune deal closing.Other markets that will see overlap, and may be included in the deal, include St. Louis (Tribune owns Fox affiliate KTVI, while Sinclair owns ABC affiliate KDNL); Salt Lake City (Tribune owns Fox affiliate KSTU, Sinclair owns CBS affiliate KUTV); Oklahoma City (Tribune owns Fox affiliate KOKH, and Sinclair owns NBC affiliate KFOR); also stations in Greensboro, Grand Rapids, Harrisburg, Richmond, and Des Moines may be in play.       
Logged

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2733
  • Last Login: August 16, 2019, 12:25:32 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #74 on: January 14, 2018, 08:53:38 PM »

http://www.kyoutv.com/home/2018/01/08/kyou-nbc-release/

Here is an announcement KYOU-TV will get an NBC affiliate

Quote
KYOU TO BRING LOCAL NBC AFFILIATE TO OTTUMWA-KIRKSVILLE AREA KYOU, Ottumwa-Kirksville’s long time FOX affiliate, will also launch an NBC affiliate in the market later this month. KYOU NBC will be seen over the air on 15.2 and on most local cable providers.“With major events like Super Bowl LII and The Winter Olympics right around the corner, we’re proud and excited to bring our viewers a local NBC affiliate,” stated KYOU Vice President and General Manager Michael Elrod.The new channel will broadcast in High Definition. In addition to top NBC prime and sports programming, the lineup will include new syndicated options for area viewers.“This new affiliation is another way we can serve and invest in the Ottumwa-Kirksville community,” said American Spirit Media owner Tom Henson.KYOU NBC will begin broadcasting the week of January 24th2018. KYOU’s FOX programming and local 9PM newscast will continue to air on 15.1.
Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.