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Author Topic: Regional television markets  (Read 20513 times)

cjk374

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #25 on: November 23, 2017, 11:28:38 AM »

We were blessed to get TV stations from 2 cities...Monroe & Shreveport. If the weather was bad & messing with the reception in one direction, we just went outside & turned the antenna in the other direction. The only exception was ABC. Monroe had no ABC affiliate until the mid 90s (I think). And of course if the president addressed the nation, your only escape was PBS.
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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #26 on: November 23, 2017, 12:20:35 PM »

IIRC there is a Nevada county which is part of the market... of Denver!
What? Which one? I thought that all would be in Las Vegas or SLC markets if out of state.

I'm pretty sure either Eureka or Lander county (maybe both) have been in the Denver market before.

I know the Denver market extended into South Dakota at some point.

Now I check, Wikipedia now lists Eureka county as part of Reno media market, it used to list it as part of Denver's!

Back when I proposed redrawing US State lines to match something else, I considered using media markets to do so, but I dismissed it because it would result in several states with less than 100,000 inhabitantes, the smallest one with just 14,000! (Which would be the Glendive MT "state") In the end I used NWS Weather Forecast Offices to do that.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 02:00:04 PM by CNGL-Leudimin »
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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #27 on: November 23, 2017, 01:55:18 PM »

It goes back to even before the days of sat TV.  Denver stations existed first and were microwaved into many other places.  Later in the BUD (big ugly dish) era, among the options to get network stations was a package called "Netlink Denver 5" which was the Denver local stations. 

As to reforming TV markets, WV's micro markets are fast approaching the critical level where they should die.  First, for complex historical-political reasons none of transmitters are in the same towns, and this combined with the terrain, mean that essentially everyone has to have cable or a dish.  The edges of the state are covered by other states (Washington and Pittsburgh mostly).  The only real and legitimate market is, of course, Huntington-Charleston, with enough people to allow for serious news coverage and such.  That leaves:

- Parkersburg.  Historically just one station (NBC), everyone get provider TV and the H-C or Columbus stations anyway.  Shut it down and make H-C (the 2 WV counties) and Columbus (the one OH one) a little bigger.

- Bluefield-Beckley-Oak Hill.  Historically just two stations (NBC and ABC) which were so far apart no place could get both OTA.  CBS, and later Fox, was brought in by cable from H-C, Roanoke, or even Bristol.   (Now has a CBS with .2 Fox at a yet third independent location).  Population bleed has reduced what was always a small market to near nothing.  News coverage is pure amateur hour.  Kids just out of school and sales guy with no talent, using 30 year old SD equipment.  Shut it down and make H-C larger.

- Wheeling.  Historically just 2 stations (NBC and CBS) with ABC from Pittsburgh.  Just a few miles from Pittsburgh, the area got its own TV stations when the Rust Belt was not yet rusting.  Population bleed means no money for anything.  News operations are worse than Bluefield's.   Serves no purpose.  Shut it down and get Pittsburgh stations, which everybody does anyway.

- Clarksburg.  Also always missing ABC, which comes from Pittsburgh, along with all the other Pittsburgh stations.  Worse market in the state.  No money for anything.  In fact so amateurish that several counties have been "captured" by Nielsen's methods by Pittsburgh.  Shut it down and let Pittsburgh and H-C get larger.

In doing so the result is the two panhandles and the northern edge of the state served by the cities that are part of (DC or Pittsburgh) and the rest of the state being one market (similar to New Mexico or Utah) which would be 12 places larger in the list of markets, with the economy to support a serious effort at news and other local programming.


The Coachella Valley CA has channel 50 - subchannels .2 is WPMY (My Net) Pittsburgh (serves West Virginia), .3 WPMI (NBC) Mobile, AL (Gulf coast including Miss. & Fla.), .4 KDMD (CBS) Alaska (not sure it's from Anchorage or Juneau) and .5 KEZI (ABC) Eugene OR (Pacific time schedule). The seasonal resident population forms a large portion of the TV market demographic, as well these areas are known for large low-income migrant worker populations come to the resort economy in the winter season. Appalachia, the "Delta" or "cotton belt", Alaska and "Pooregon" - that makes sense. However, the majority of resort work is from Mexico and Central America like Guatemala and El Salvador, as well Puerto Rico (an US territory) and even the Philippines - they immigrate to Guam, Saipan and esp Hawaii. KVMD channels 23 and 31 (based in 29 Palms and Victorville) have 2 Tagalog or Filipino languages subchannels - the Philippines also have Cebuano, Ilocano, Mindanao and Visayano. Channel 50 itself (29 in 29 Palms) is our local My Net. station, KPSE owned by KMIR (NBC), and KMIR is now on cable in 29 Palms, because they used to not be over-air there. 
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 01:58:26 PM by Desert Man »
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23skidoo

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #28 on: November 24, 2017, 12:02:15 PM »

It goes back to even before the days of sat TV.  Denver stations existed first and were microwaved into many other places.  Later in the BUD (big ugly dish) era, among the options to get network stations was a package called "Netlink Denver 5" which was the Denver local stations. 

As to reforming TV markets, WV's micro markets are fast approaching the critical level where they should die.  First, for complex historical-political reasons none of transmitters are in the same towns, and this combined with the terrain, mean that essentially everyone has to have cable or a dish.  The edges of the state are covered by other states (Washington and Pittsburgh mostly).  The only real and legitimate market is, of course, Huntington-Charleston, with enough people to allow for serious news coverage and such.  That leaves:

- Parkersburg.  Historically just one station (NBC), everyone get provider TV and the H-C or Columbus stations anyway.  Shut it down and make H-C (the 2 WV counties) and Columbus (the one OH one) a little bigger.

- Bluefield-Beckley-Oak Hill.  Historically just two stations (NBC and ABC) which were so far apart no place could get both OTA.  CBS, and later Fox, was brought in by cable from H-C, Roanoke, or even Bristol.   (Now has a CBS with .2 Fox at a yet third independent location).  Population bleed has reduced what was always a small market to near nothing.  News coverage is pure amateur hour.  Kids just out of school and sales guy with no talent, using 30 year old SD equipment.  Shut it down and make H-C larger.

- Wheeling.  Historically just 2 stations (NBC and CBS) with ABC from Pittsburgh.  Just a few miles from Pittsburgh, the area got its own TV stations when the Rust Belt was not yet rusting.  Population bleed means no money for anything.  News operations are worse than Bluefield's.   Serves no purpose.  Shut it down and get Pittsburgh stations, which everybody does anyway.

- Clarksburg.  Also always missing ABC, which comes from Pittsburgh, along with all the other Pittsburgh stations.  Worse market in the state.  No money for anything.  In fact so amateurish that several counties have been "captured" by Nielsen's methods by Pittsburgh.  Shut it down and let Pittsburgh and H-C get larger.

In doing so the result is the two panhandles and the northern edge of the state served by the cities that are part of (DC or Pittsburgh) and the rest of the state being one market (similar to New Mexico or Utah) which would be 12 places larger in the list of markets, with the economy to support a serious effort at news and other local programming.

I like this idea. I have similar ideas for the designated market areas in Michigan (my home state) and Ohio:

Move Detroitís transmitters in Southfield further east to cover Port Huron (as mentioned by 7/8 above, it does not currently have coverage). There are some areas around Warren that might work.  This means that signals are weaker in western Livingston and Washtenaw counties, but they are close enough to Lansing to receive over-the-air signals, even if they are still part of Detroitís DMA. I'd move Monroe County to the Toledo DMA.

For the Grand Rapids DMA, Iíd move Calhoun and Branch Counties to the Lansing DMA. Battle Creek is currently part of the Grand Rapids DMA, but itís closer to Lansing so I think it belongs there. While weíre at it, give St. Joseph county to South Bendís DMA, which is much closer to that city than to Grand Rapids. Iíd move all of the Grand Rapids DMA transmitters to Jamestown, MI (midway between Muskegon and Kalamazoo, and within 15 mi of Grand Rapids). This basically trades coverage of Battle Creek for coverage of Muskegon, which currently only receives WZZM 13 over the air. By making the Grand Rapids DMA smaller, you only need one ABC affiliate (as mentioned by ftballfan above, there are two).

I donít have any major changes to the Lansing and Flint/Tri-Cities DMAs or their transmitters.

Lastly, Iíd combine the Traverse City/Cadillac, Marquette, and Alpena markets. The Alpena market is the third smallest in the nation, and I donít know why it has its own market. The UP and all of northern lower can share one medium-sized market. Put a set of full-power transmitters near Cadillac, with translators in Alpena, Marquette and the Soo.

Hereís a map of the new media markets (for reference, a map of current media markets nationwide can be found here):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_television_markets



For Ohio, Iíd make even more radical changes:

Eliminate the Lima, Youngstown, Wheeling (see SP Cook's post) and Zanesville markets. Theyíre too small to stand on their own. Merge Lima into Fort Wayne DMA (to ensure Lima has over-the-air coverage, move the transmitters for Fort Wayne to the state line near the town of Monroeville). Merge Youngstown into Cleveland (by moving Clevelandís transmitters to Solon). Youngstownís population has basically declined to the point where itís just another suburb of Cleveland anyways. Lastly, merge Zanesville with the Parkersburg and Athens DMA.

Iíd move Toledoís transmitters south of where they are now. At the moment, theyíre located too close to the Michigan border, which is already covered by Detroit's stations. Iíd say move the transmitters down to Bowling Green to cover the area south of Findlay.

For Dayton, move the transmitters to the northwest of the city, away from Cincinnati. For Cincinnati, move the transmitters to Kentucky, away from Dayton. For Columbus, move the transmitters to Westerville (a northeastern suburb) so that the signals can reach Mansfield.

Hereís a map:


I have ideas for other states, too...



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bing101

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2017, 09:42:36 AM »

Interestingly the major Ota tv stations owners as of 2017 are Sinclair, Nexstar, Grey, Raycom, Scripps, Hearst and Tegna.

I don't think a new gerrymandering of the DMA maps are going to happen.
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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2017, 11:58:45 AM »

I don't think a new gerrymandering of the DMA maps are going to happen.

I don't see any possible benefit that could be gained by gerrymandering TV media markets.
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jp the roadgeek

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2017, 12:15:16 PM »

There are 2 oddities that I find in the Northeast.  The first is Windham County, VT being in the Boston DMA.  It would seem more logical for it to be in the Springfield, MA market, seeing that Brattleboro is only 60 miles from Springfield and over 100 miles from Boston, plus it borders Franklin County, MA, which is part of that market.  The other is Berkshire County, MA and Bennington County, VT being part of the Albany, NY market.  They belong in the Springfield and Burlington, VT markets, respectively.  Both are counties that are in a market that all but these 2 counties get NYC regional sports networks, while the rest of the Albany market cannot get Boston regional sports networks.  Plus, most Berkshire County cable systems get Springfield stations anyway.  Here, redrawing the lines may make sense.
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SectorZ

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #32 on: November 26, 2017, 07:30:22 PM »

There are 2 oddities that I find in the Northeast.  The first is Windham County, VT being in the Boston DMA.  It would seem more logical for it to be in the Springfield, MA market, seeing that Brattleboro is only 60 miles from Springfield and over 100 miles from Boston, plus it borders Franklin County, MA, which is part of that market.  The other is Berkshire County, MA and Bennington County, VT being part of the Albany, NY market.  They belong in the Springfield and Burlington, VT markets, respectively.  Both are counties that are in a market that all but these 2 counties get NYC regional sports networks, while the rest of the Albany market cannot get Boston regional sports networks.  Plus, most Berkshire County cable systems get Springfield stations anyway.  Here, redrawing the lines may make sense.

It's why counties should be split if possible (like the National Weather Service does for forecast areas). People in Berkshire Cty can live, on a line, 20 miles from downtown Springfield living near Hampden Cty or 25 miles from downtown Albany living near the NY border. The county should be split in half, diagonally, from southwest to northeast, with the obvious halves going where they belong. Windham Cty VT should clearly be somewhere different than Boston. I've always appreciated that Boston 25 has embraced it in weather reports and points out weather for Keene and Brattleboro. The others ignore everything that far out.
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bing101

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #33 on: November 27, 2017, 09:27:02 AM »

I'm surprised that New Jersey don't have counties that are split by two TV and Radio markets in the central part of NJ though. Its given how Philadelphia and New York are essentially covering those areas though.
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jp the roadgeek

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #34 on: November 27, 2017, 10:31:13 AM »

There are 2 oddities that I find in the Northeast.  The first is Windham County, VT being in the Boston DMA.  It would seem more logical for it to be in the Springfield, MA market, seeing that Brattleboro is only 60 miles from Springfield and over 100 miles from Boston, plus it borders Franklin County, MA, which is part of that market.  The other is Berkshire County, MA and Bennington County, VT being part of the Albany, NY market.  They belong in the Springfield and Burlington, VT markets, respectively.  Both are counties that are in a market that all but these 2 counties get NYC regional sports networks, while the rest of the Albany market cannot get Boston regional sports networks.  Plus, most Berkshire County cable systems get Springfield stations anyway.  Here, redrawing the lines may make sense.

It's why counties should be split if possible (like the National Weather Service does for forecast areas). People in Berkshire Cty can live, on a line, 20 miles from downtown Springfield living near Hampden Cty or 25 miles from downtown Albany living near the NY border. The county should be split in half, diagonally, from southwest to northeast, with the obvious halves going where they belong. Windham Cty VT should clearly be somewhere different than Boston. I've always appreciated that Boston 25 has embraced it in weather reports and points out weather for Keene and Brattleboro. The others ignore everything that far out.

You've got a point with Berkshire County.  Blandford is 20 minutes from Springfield, and over an hour from Albany.  OTOH, Williamstown is a straight shot on route 2 to the Capital District, but 80 miles from Springfield.  It's like another couple of anomalies.  You can get from Enfield, CT to Downtown Springfield in 7 minutes, but Enfield is part of the Hartford/New Haven DMA; WGGB's studios are about 15 miles from Enfield, but default ABC affiliate WTNH's are an hour away in New Haven.  Suffield is 7 miles from WWLP's transmitter across the MA border in neighboring Feeding Hills, but WVIT is the default NBC affiliate, and their transmitter is 40 minutes away in West Hartford.  And Hartford County needs to be divided by the NWS.  I can never understand why they have to issue a Winter Storm Warning for the entire county when towns on the MA border like Granby or Hartland are forecast to get a foot of snow, while towns like New Britain and Southington 40 miles away in the same county get all rain.  It's even crazier when Hartford County gets one and New Haven County doesn't; it could be all rain in Southington, but go up 600 feet to Wolcott in New Haven County, and it's snowing to beat the band. 
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The Nature Boy

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #35 on: November 27, 2017, 08:29:13 PM »

There are 2 oddities that I find in the Northeast.  The first is Windham County, VT being in the Boston DMA.  It would seem more logical for it to be in the Springfield, MA market, seeing that Brattleboro is only 60 miles from Springfield and over 100 miles from Boston, plus it borders Franklin County, MA, which is part of that market.  The other is Berkshire County, MA and Bennington County, VT being part of the Albany, NY market.  They belong in the Springfield and Burlington, VT markets, respectively.  Both are counties that are in a market that all but these 2 counties get NYC regional sports networks, while the rest of the Albany market cannot get Boston regional sports networks.  Plus, most Berkshire County cable systems get Springfield stations anyway.  Here, redrawing the lines may make sense.

I always found it weird that Coos County, NH was in the Portland, ME media market. This is a county that definitely should be split since the western half of Coos would fit better in the Burlington, VT market.

Windham County, VT and Cheshire County, NH are tricky since they're both actually closer to Boston than either Albany or Burlington. I don't know how to resolve that. Create a media market anchored in Concord, NH?
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jp the roadgeek

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #36 on: November 29, 2017, 01:32:39 PM »

Just thought of one more: Fishers Island, NY.  Itís considered part of the NYC DMA and gets the full set of NYC affiliates and NYC sports networks, but it sits 2 miles off shore of Groton, CT (Hartford/New Haven DMA), and as the crow flies, itís closest affiliates would be Providence; itís only 6 miles from Westerly, RI.  Itís closer to Gillette Stadium than MetLife, and about equidistant from Fenway, Yankee Stadium and Citi Field, but has no Boston sports viewing options.
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The Nature Boy

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #37 on: November 30, 2017, 08:28:13 PM »

Just thought of one more: Fishers Island, NY.  Itís considered part of the NYC DMA and gets the full set of NYC affiliates and NYC sports networks, but it sits 2 miles off shore of Groton, CT (Hartford/New Haven DMA), and as the crow flies, itís closest affiliates would be Providence; itís only 6 miles from Westerly, RI.  Itís closer to Gillette Stadium than MetLife, and about equidistant from Fenway, Yankee Stadium and Citi Field, but has no Boston sports viewing options.

NY and CT should really just transfer ownership of Fishers Island to Connecticut. It's apart of CT in everyday but legally.
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7/8

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2017, 07:15:38 AM »

Just thought of one more: Fishers Island, NY.  Itís considered part of the NYC DMA and gets the full set of NYC affiliates and NYC sports networks, but it sits 2 miles off shore of Groton, CT (Hartford/New Haven DMA), and as the crow flies, itís closest affiliates would be Providence; itís only 6 miles from Westerly, RI.  Itís closer to Gillette Stadium than MetLife, and about equidistant from Fenway, Yankee Stadium and Citi Field, but has no Boston sports viewing options.

NY and CT should really just transfer ownership of Fishers Island to Connecticut. It's apart of CT in everyday but legally.

I decided to read the Wikipedia article on Fishers Island and I found this:

Quote
The island was the subject of a border dispute between New York and Connecticut. The states of New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island meet in the waters east of Fishers Island. Before the British took possession of New York City from the Dutch in 1664, all of Suffolk County was claimed by Connecticut, with British settlers there accepting its jurisdiction. A 1664 land patent given to the Duke of York included all islands in Long Island Sound, apparently thus granting Fishers Island also to the Province of New York. The Duke of York held a grudge against Connecticut, as the New Haven settlers had hidden three of the judges who sentenced his father King Charles I to death in 1649. Settlers throughout Suffolk County pressed to stay part of Connecticut, but Governor Sir Edmund Andros threatened to eliminate their rights to land if they did not yield, which they did by 1676.[6] A joint commission from Connecticut and New York in 1879 reiterated that New York has legal title to Fishers Island.

It's interesting because I always thought Suffolk County looked like New England with historical houses on the waterfront. Culturally though, I can't say since I unfortunately haven't been there.
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jp the roadgeek

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #39 on: December 01, 2017, 02:05:27 PM »

If you get out on the forks of Long Island, youíll think youíre more in coastal New England.  The architecture and atmosphere of Greenport is not much unlike that of Watch Hill, RI. or Old Saybrook, CT (itís only about 15 miles across the sound from Old Saybrook).  But get into Riverhead or especially a place like Patchouge, and the NYC cultural influence kicks back in.
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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #40 on: December 02, 2017, 04:05:52 PM »

Splitting counties should have been done more often (by zip code or township boundaries) in MI.

Southern Monroe County (roughly south of the Raisin River) should be Toledo market
Northern Oceana County (Pentwater/Hart/Walkerville) and northern Newaygo County (Bitely/Brohman/possibly White Cloud) should be Traverse City-Cadillac market (and probably would have been if not for ABC 29&8 (formerly) being a joke of a TV station; CBS and NBC for most of Oceana and Newaygo County has historically come from TC and Cadillac)
Eastern Ionia County (Portland/Pewamo), SW Shiawassee County (Perry/Morrice), and far western Livingston County (Fowlerville) should all be Lansing market; their high schools all play in Lansing-based leagues and all areas are in the Lansing sphere of influence for commuting
Far northeast Montcalm County (Vestaburg) should be Flint-Saginaw market
The Alpena market would have taken in a couple more counties (likely Montmorency, Oscoda, and Presque Isle) if there was more than one station
Northern Menominee County (basically everything from Stephenson on north) should be Marquette market, especially now that MQT has a full set of network affiliates
A side note about the Marquette market: The stations cover some news from the easternmost three counties of the UP despite none of the stations having cable or OTA penetration there
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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #41 on: December 02, 2017, 05:13:07 PM »

There's already a movement to create Peconic County, NY from the forks of Long Island

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peconic_County%2C_New_York

There was also a proposed Adirondack County in NY, which would include portions of Essex and Franklin Counties:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peconic_County%2C_New_York



Only that it would be for cosmetic purposes, Worcester County, MA could also stand to be split up.  It is for NWS purposes, and like Berkshire County, it stretches from border to border north to south.  Perhaps a Quabbin County that could include the towns around Quabbin Reservoir, as well as the Fitchburg/Leominster area.
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Desert Man

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #42 on: December 03, 2017, 10:29:28 AM »

KCRA 3 (NBC) Sacramento - the state capital has over-air transmitters across the northern half of CA, with one in Chico (the Redding market, yet Chico is almost the same size as Redding) and Ukiah in Mendocino county (closer to the San Francisco Bay area). KCRA 3's transmissions can reach Merced, 90 miles to the south (part of the Fresno market). Both Fresno and Chico-Redding have their own local NBC affiliates, so does KNTV 11 San Francisco-San Jose, which replaced KRON 4 in the 2000s. Nearby Salinas-Monterey market has KSBW 8 which co-owns KSBY 6 in San Luis Obispo-Santa Barbara market. And Tulare county near Delano can receive some Bakersfield market stations.
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Sctvhound

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #43 on: December 04, 2017, 03:42:33 PM »

SC is a smaller state, but we have multiple TV markets. Charleston and Columbia are the only two markets with only SC counties included. Florence/Myrtle Beach, Greenville/Spartanburg, and Charlotte all have NC counties included, while Savannah and Augusta have GA counties included.

Florence/MB is a weird market. CBS (WBTW) has been there since the 50s, and is the heritage station in the market. Until the 80s, Myrtle Beach was treated as just another town. ABC (WPDE) was added in 1980. Prior to that, most people got ABC from Charleston, Wilmington or Raleigh. The entire market got a Fox affiliate in 1997 (WFXB). Prior to that, Myrtle Beach and Lumberton shared Wilmingtonís Fox affiliate (WSFX).

Florence had their own Fox low power station. NBC was not added until 2008. Prior to that, WIS Columbia, WECT Wilmington, and Charleston (either WCBD or WCIV) were available, depending on where you lived.

Georgetown County, a big part of the Grand Strand, that goes within 15 miles of Myrtle Beach, is in the Charleston market. The CBS, WBTW, was dropped from local cable a few months ago, and only CBS from Charleston remains. ABC and NBC from Myrtle Beach are still available.
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nyratk1

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #44 on: December 04, 2017, 03:49:05 PM »

If you get out on the forks of Long Island, youíll think youíre more in coastal New England.  The architecture and atmosphere of Greenport is not much unlike that of Watch Hill, RI. or Old Saybrook, CT (itís only about 15 miles across the sound from Old Saybrook).  But get into Riverhead or especially a place like Patchouge, and the NYC cultural influence kicks back in.

That reminds me that we used to get WSBK-38 here as a part of our cable system up until the mid 90s. Do remember watching a few Red Sox games.
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Desert Man

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #45 on: December 04, 2017, 04:57:33 PM »

Southern UT (St. George) has translators of Salt Lake City and Las Vegas NV market stations, as well some Phoenix AZ TV.  They get CBS, FOX and My Network from north (Salt Lake), CW and NBC from west (Vegas), and over-air ABC from south (Phoenix). Since they are in UT, 3 PBS from Provo (Brigham Young University's KBYU), Ogden and Salt Lake city. I suppose they get ABC from Salt Lake and Las Vegas each, and CBS KPHO 5, co-owner of independent KTVK 3 (former ABC affiliate) from Phoenix.
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jp the roadgeek

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #46 on: December 04, 2017, 05:25:05 PM »

If you get out on the forks of Long Island, youíll think youíre more in coastal New England.  The architecture and atmosphere of Greenport is not much unlike that of Watch Hill, RI. or Old Saybrook, CT (itís only about 15 miles across the sound from Old Saybrook).  But get into Riverhead or especially a place like Patchouge, and the NYC cultural influence kicks back in.

That reminds me that we used to get WSBK-38 here as a part of our cable system up until the mid 90s. Do remember watching a few Red Sox games.

We got WSBK on my cable system in CT until 1995, right around the time that TV-38 went UPN and lost Red Sox rites and gave up the Bruins road games package to NESN.  When my family first got cable, I got all Hartford affiliates, all Springfield affiliates (still get PBS from Springfield), all NYC affiliates, and WSBK (before cable was available on my street, WLVI was also available from Boston).  When our system first expanded beyond 36 channels, we lost Springfield NBC and WABC, then little by little, lost other affiliates after the old company merged with Cox. We got NYC channels because my system is based in New Haven County, but Cox wanted to streamline it with its other 2 systems in Hartford County, so they were phased out.  First Springfield ABC went away, followed by WSBK, then WCBS, WNYW, and WWOR (I had the local feed; it went away when the EMI feed, which the other 2 systems had, ended).  We still had WNBC on 9/11, but lost it soon thereafter.  WPIX was the last holdover, which we lost about 7 years ago.  Having the NYC affiliates was nice because you'd often get an extra NFL game on Sunday when the NYC affiliate showed a different game than the Hartford affiliate.     
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Desert Man

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #47 on: December 04, 2017, 08:27:40 PM »

KSL 5 (NBC) was a former CBS affiliate for Utah, based in Salt Lake City, and it's owned by Bonneville Media, which is a subsidiary of Bonneville Int'l Corp - owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Mormon majority UT. It can be viewed throughout UT and 4 neighboring states on cable, satellite and over-air transmissions. It owns radio stations KSL 1160 AM and 102.7 FM.
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bing101

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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #48 on: December 09, 2017, 08:46:33 PM »

https://www.fybush.com/sites/2005/site-051111.html

Here is one interesting fact though KOVR was originally going to be a Bay Area TV station. But due to affiliation deals but ABC wanted the station away from Bay Area territory though. After Channel 13 left Mount Diablo to Walnut Grove to get the ABC affiliation deal for Sacramento and Stockton.
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Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #49 on: December 12, 2017, 01:16:08 PM »

The Tulsa TV market's stations which extends beyond the KS state line (Coffeyville) and Tahlequah between Muskogee OK and Fort Smith AR. NBC on 2 (and 8 - subchannel?) but on channels 4 in Coffeyville KS, Independence KS and Tahlequah; CBS on 6 and 10 (transmitter?); ABC on 8 (it had univision programming before it had its own affiliate on 25); the CW on 19 based in Muskogee (in 1999, Tulsa was the only metro area without a WB affiliate - WGN America 9 was its source for WB, now the CW), FOX on 23 (KOKI - substation of KOKH Oklahoma City); and My Net on 41 (KMYT, formerly KTFO - it means forty one or FO(X), had a radio station KCFO). PBS on 3 (Eufaula), 11 (Tulsa) and 13 (Oklahoma City), plus Rogers State College TV on 35 from Claremore. The TBN station on channel 17 from Bartlesville is on cable 7 or 10, and ION channels 33 and 44 from Muskogee on cable 3 or 4. KOCO 5 (ABC) OKC on cable 12 to some in Tulsa; by Kansas state line, they get NBC 3 from Wichita; by Missouri state line, FOX on 7 from Joplin; and by Arkansas state line, CBS/My Net 5 from Fort Smith-Fayetteville.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 01:28:27 PM by Desert Man »
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