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Author Topic: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?  (Read 1441 times)

ET21

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #50 on: November 12, 2019, 09:32:44 AM »

Ohhhh how times have changed, two record snowfalls for Chicago to kickoff the season. Had our snowiest Halloween ever and currently going through the earliest occurrence of arctic temps
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paulthemapguy

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #51 on: November 12, 2019, 09:36:10 AM »

Do I need to change the title to get people to understand?

Probably, yeah. September is mostly summer, not fall.

Technically, September counts as "meteorological autumn," which begins September 1...and we are talking about weather heh

Anyway the high temperature here in Chicagoland is supposed to shatter the record lowest.  Previous lowest maximum for 11/12: 28F.  Today's forecast high: 21F.  This is absolutely insane.  There is no average high in Chicagoland below the 30s. So this could most accurately be described as January weather.

It's still construction season, too, so I was working outside yesterday in the falling snow.  We've had snow 10/30, 10/31, and 11/11.  Usually we don't get any measurable snow until around Thanksgiving.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2019, 09:40:36 AM by paulthemapguy »
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US 89

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #52 on: November 12, 2019, 10:29:24 AM »

Do I need to change the title to get people to understand?

Probably, yeah. September is mostly summer, not fall.

Technically, September counts as "meteorological autumn," which begins September 1...and we are talking about weather heh

I know I've posted about this on here before, but the meteorological definitions make more sense. The equinoxes and solstices are sort of arbitrary dates when it comes to weather, and they generally occur a month ahead of actual weather events. While the summer solstice is June 21, in most of the northern hemisphere the hottest month is July, and the weather in early June is far more summer-like than in mid-September. The issue is that astronomical summer is defined as a time of shortening day length between the solstice and equinox, which doesn't correlate with most people's view of summer as a time of the year with long, hot days.
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kphoger

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #53 on: November 12, 2019, 02:53:07 PM »




Do I need to change the title to get people to understand?

Probably, yeah. September is mostly summer, not fall.

Technically, September counts as "meteorological autumn," which begins September 1...and we are talking about weather heh

I know I've posted about this on here before, but the meteorological definitions make more sense. The equinoxes and solstices are sort of arbitrary dates when it comes to weather, and they generally occur a month ahead of actual weather events. While the summer solstice is June 21, in most of the northern hemisphere the hottest month is July, and the weather in early June is far more summer-like than in mid-September. The issue is that astronomical summer is defined as a time of shortening day length between the solstice and equinox, which doesn't correlate with most people's view of summer as a time of the year with long, hot days.

Bar bet:  The days get longer in the winter.

It's true!
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thspfc

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #54 on: November 12, 2019, 04:58:19 PM »

Changed title. I included November, since September and October snow is more or less impossible in some places.
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CNGL-Leudimin

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #55 on: November 12, 2019, 06:02:52 PM »

It's not rare for the mountains North of me to get snow as far low as 2000 ft in November. In fact they have had one such storm just a few days ago!
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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #56 on: November 12, 2019, 06:54:21 PM »

For the record, Seattle's September is more similar to August than October, at least most years. I know in most of the country, September is decidedly fall-feeling, but that isn't always the case here. I think this is also true for other parts of the Pacific Coast (Los Angeles in particular). This is why I thought it was weird that someone would include September in fall; A: it's mostly summer (just based on solstice dates), and B: in my experience, it's more similar to summer anyways.
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ce929wax

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #57 on: November 13, 2019, 12:13:32 AM »

^There is definitely a difference between August and September here in Michigan.  Usually, we have one last heat wave around Labor Day weekend, and then the air gets crisper.  We go from an average high of 78 degrees on September 1st to an average high of 67 on September 30th.  In Waxahachie, TX where I lived for 8 years, it goes from 92 on September 1st to 83 on September 30th.  I think there is a lot more difference between 78 and 67 than there is between 92 and 83.

Data according to accuweather.com
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KEVIN_224

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #58 on: November 13, 2019, 01:52:01 PM »

And Bradley International Airport (BDL) in Windsor Locks, CT (north of Hartford) goes from 70 on October 1st to 58 for Halloween. The low this morning for both Bradley and Hartford (HFD)? 17 degrees. Yup! :(
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kphoger

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #59 on: November 13, 2019, 02:20:51 PM »

I think there is a lot more difference between 78 and 67 than there is between 92 and 83.

You are correct.  There's a 22% bigger difference.

78 - 67 = 11
92 - 83 = 9

11 = 9 + 2

2 9 = 22.2222%
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US 89

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #60 on: November 13, 2019, 02:45:52 PM »



I haven't seen anybody use that character since I was in elementary school.
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CNGL-Leudimin

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #61 on: November 13, 2019, 03:06:57 PM »

It's not rare for the mountains North of me to get snow as far low as 2000 ft in November. In fact they have had one such storm just a few days ago!

Even better, the mountains have now so much snow, several ski resorts have scheduled the earliest season start since 2008.

Never heard that. Common parlance is "/".
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jeffandnicole

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #62 on: November 13, 2019, 03:45:06 PM »

^There is definitely a difference between August and September here in Michigan.  Usually, we have one last heat wave around Labor Day weekend, and then the air gets crisper.  We go from an average high of 78 degrees on September 1st to an average high of 67 on September 30th.  In Waxahachie, TX where I lived for 8 years, it goes from 92 on September 1st to 83 on September 30th.  I think there is a lot more difference between 78 and 67 than there is between 92 and 83.

Data according to accuweather.com

I think there is a lot more difference between 78 and 67 than there is between 92 and 83.

You are correct.  There's a 22% bigger difference.

78 - 67 = 11
92 - 83 = 9

11 = 9 + 2

2 9 = 22.2222%

Actually, it's incorrect. 

You're calculating this based on that the temperature bottom floor is 0.  For temperature readings, 0 means nothing other than it's damn cold outside. 32 is freezing. 

If you want to calculate the difference properly, you would need to use Absolute 0, which is -459.67 degrees F.

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kphoger

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #63 on: November 13, 2019, 03:58:49 PM »


^There is definitely a difference between August and September here in Michigan.  Usually, we have one last heat wave around Labor Day weekend, and then the air gets crisper.  We go from an average high of 78 degrees on September 1st to an average high of 67 on September 30th.  In Waxahachie, TX where I lived for 8 years, it goes from 92 on September 1st to 83 on September 30th.  I think there is a lot more difference between 78 and 67 than there is between 92 and 83.

Data according to accuweather.com


I think there is a lot more difference between 78 and 67 than there is between 92 and 83.

You are correct.  There's a 22% bigger difference.

78 - 67 = 11
92 - 83 = 9

11 = 9 + 2

2 9 = 22.2222%

Actually, it's incorrect. 

You're calculating this based on that the temperature bottom floor is 0.  For temperature readings, 0 means nothing other than it's damn cold outside. 32 is freezing. 

If you want to calculate the difference properly, you would need to use Absolute 0, which is -459.67 degrees F.

How am I assuming a floor of anything?  I'm simply saying that 11 is 22% bigger than 9.  I'm comparing the temperature differences, irrespective of the actual temperatures themselves.
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thspfc

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #64 on: November 13, 2019, 05:44:16 PM »

Classic example of AARoads users taking things way out of context. The point was, 92 degrees and 83 degrees are both hot and don't feel that different. 78 and 67 is a difference between hot and warm, or mild.
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ce929wax

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #65 on: November 13, 2019, 08:03:20 PM »

Classic example of AARoads users taking things way out of context. The point was, 92 degrees and 83 degrees are both hot and don't feel that different. 78 and 67 is a difference between hot and warm, or mild.

Yes, that was my point.
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Rothman

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #66 on: November 13, 2019, 11:13:05 PM »

92 and 83 feel different.
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ce929wax

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #67 on: November 14, 2019, 02:32:01 AM »

All right, for the anal-retentive among us, I never said that 92 and 83 didn't feel different, my point is that 92 and 83 feel less different than 78 and 67.  For instance, if you are in a room, 78 degrees is going to likely feel hot, whereas 67 degrees is going to likely feel cool to cold.  In the same room, 92 degrees and 83 degrees are still going to feel hot to most people, but 92 is going to feel hotter than 83.

Now, we may return to our regularly scheduled thread.
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Mark68

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Re: How rare are September, October, and November snowstorms?
« Reply #68 on: November 14, 2019, 10:48:16 AM »

We may get a minor snowfall as early as September. I believe the record earliest snowfall in Denver was September 3. Actually, when I first moved to Colorado (down in the Springs), there was measurable snowfall on September 13.

Generally, the first measurable snowfall occurs in early October. Been there, done that already this year. One of the biggest storms I've seen since moving here occurred on October 23-25, 1997. About 30" of snowfall (mostly on the 24th).
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