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Author Topic: Where will be the newest major city?  (Read 5305 times)

silverback1065

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #50 on: November 28, 2018, 09:39:24 AM »

was there in September, place was boring af.  phoenix is worse though.
Hm.  I'd actually disagree there.  Phoenix is a "new" city and I've enjoyed my visits there.

to me phoenix was the city you fly into to and immediately leave to experience the actually cool parts of the state.  Camelback mountain was the only thing interesting in that city. 
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abefroman329

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #51 on: November 28, 2018, 09:52:53 AM »

To this day; however, Utah still has some interesting liquor laws, and is the only place caffeine free cola outsells regular cola.
That would explain why I had so much trouble finding caffeine-free soda for sale in convenience stores.
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Rothman

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #52 on: November 28, 2018, 01:11:28 PM »

To this day; however, Utah still has some interesting liquor laws, and is the only place caffeine free cola outsells regular cola.
That would explain why I had so much trouble finding caffeine-free soda for sale in convenience stores.
Might be changing now that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has clarified that caffeinated sodas are not against the Word of Wisdom (dietary doctrine).  Grew up not drinking them myself and still do not out of habit.
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abefroman329

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #53 on: November 28, 2018, 01:20:00 PM »

To this day; however, Utah still has some interesting liquor laws, and is the only place caffeine free cola outsells regular cola.
That would explain why I had so much trouble finding caffeine-free soda for sale in convenience stores.
Might be changing now that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has clarified that caffeinated sodas are not against the Word of Wisdom (dietary doctrine).  Grew up not drinking them myself and still do not out of habit.
Given how cheery they tend to be, I think it'd be interested to see a caffeinated Mormon.
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Rothman

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #54 on: November 28, 2018, 01:24:10 PM »

Drank two tablespoons of Mountain Dew on a late night drive down to Tennessee for the eclipse and that's all I needed to be safe.

As my father says, keep your exposure low and you keep the required dose low. :D
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kphoger

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #55 on: November 28, 2018, 01:27:19 PM »

Drank two tablespoons of Mountain Dew on a late night drive down to Tennessee for the eclipse and that's all I needed to be safe.

As my father says, keep your exposure low and you keep the required dose low. :D

I find the cold and the tingle of a soda to be nearly as invigorating as the caffeine itself.
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SP Cook

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #56 on: November 28, 2018, 02:30:54 PM »


That used to be a strange quirk in Utah.  You had to belong to a "club" in order to get an alcoholic drink.  It turned into a bit of a joke, even in the early 70s (when my parents were out there for a couple of years).  The club was free and the cards were handed out in the restaurant when you ordered the drink.


Technically, that is still the law in WV.   The state Constitution still forbids "consumption in a saloon or other public place". 

They worked around it it two ways.  Back in the 30s they declared beer to be "non-intoxicating beer" and thus bars could sell beer.  Still today, if you look at the license of a beer only place it authorized the sale of "non-intoxicating beer".  (And yes somebody did try to beat a DUI by pointing out that the state itself called the stuff "non-intoxicating".  He lost.)

As to hard liquor, until the early 60s, the only places with hard liquor drinks were real clubs, like the Shrine, Moose, KofC and like that.  The voters kept rejecting a repeal admendment, so they just decided to ignore that and anybody who wanted to start a bar could just form a "club" that charged $1 to join, with $1 discount on your first drink. 

Until the mid-80s or so, the state cops would raise revenue by going into bars and asking everybody for their membership cards, and ticket the owners.  Owners also had to keep a ledger where every "member" signed, which the cops would inspect.  Traveling people would make a joke out of how many membership cards they had.  I had a professor who had nearly a 1000.  Eventually one of the governors, think it was Moore, but I forget, said this was counterproductive and told the cops to stand down, and the actual card and such went away, but it is still actually a "club" to this day.
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abefroman329

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #57 on: November 28, 2018, 03:02:45 PM »

I still think the dumbest state-specific law regarding serving alcohol is SC's that requires serving liquor in bars by the airline bottle, meaning that, if you want a drink or a shooter made with more than one kind of alcohol, they have to make a giant drink using airline bottles (you can have them split the finished product multiple ways, though).

Supposedly VA has a law against making drinks that mix beer and hard liquor, but I think that particular bartender didn't feel like making Irish car bombs (it can be a pain in the ass to get shot glasses out of the bottoms of Guiness glasses, from what I hear).
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kevinb1994

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #58 on: November 29, 2018, 12:11:44 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.
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MantyMadTown

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #59 on: November 29, 2018, 03:01:17 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I think there should be a giant transit network serving the Triangle, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem. I'm guessing that whole area's gonna be a giant conurbation at one point.
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kevinb1994

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #60 on: November 29, 2018, 03:10:00 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I think there should be a giant transit network serving the Triangle, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem. I'm guessing that whole area's gonna be a giant conurbation at one point.

Yeah and don’t forget High Point which is the third major city of the Piedmont Triad.
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CNGL-Leudimin

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #61 on: November 29, 2018, 03:27:20 AM »

I believe it will be at the bottom of the ocean, far away from land :sombrero:.
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MantyMadTown

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #62 on: November 29, 2018, 04:05:41 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I think there should be a giant transit network serving the Triangle, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem. I'm guessing that whole area's gonna be a giant conurbation at one point.

Yeah and don’t forget High Point which is the third major city of the Piedmont Triad.

Well I see that Amtrak's Carolinian and Piedmont connect Raleigh with Cary, Durham, Burlington, Greensboro, and High Point, with a bus connection between High Point and Winston-Salem. But I'm wondering if we can build rail lines there besides just Amtrak.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #63 on: November 29, 2018, 06:06:35 AM »

I still think the dumbest state-specific law regarding serving alcohol is SC's that requires serving liquor in bars by the airline bottle, meaning that, if you want a drink or a shooter made with more than one kind of alcohol, they have to make a giant drink using airline bottles (you can have them split the finished product multiple ways, though).

I thought that law was modified long ago to allow regular liquor bottles and pours in bars.

Quote
Supposedly VA has a law against making drinks that mix beer and hard liquor, but I think that particular bartender didn't feel like making Irish car bombs (it can be a pain in the ass to get shot glasses out of the bottoms of Guiness glasses, from what I hear).

Done all the time, at bars everywhere.  Usually they'll use a regular pint glass, or just a plastic cup, rather than the traditional Guinness glass.
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The Nature Boy

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #64 on: November 29, 2018, 09:18:18 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I keep feeling like Alamance County is going to be prime for some explosive growth over the 20 years. It's the buffer zone between Raleigh/Durham and the Triad and one could feasibly commute to either Raleigh or Greensboro from there.

was there in September, place was boring af.  phoenix is worse though.
Hm.  I'd actually disagree there.  Phoenix is a "new" city and I've enjoyed my visits there.

Maybe I'm just boring but I find most "new" cities insufferably boring, if only because they seem mass produced. A lot of the fun of east coast and older rust belt cities is that you can see the organic growth of the city in its footprint. Boston, New York, and DC have a lot of older buildings that blend in with the new construction and you can really get a sense of history from being there. Most Sunbelt cities feel like someone just mass produced them in a factory and just plopped them down on the plot of land that they occupy. The fact that a place like Phoenix tries to subvert its natural environment and pump in water from the Colorado River so they can have greenery is an example of this, in my mind.
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silverback1065

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #65 on: November 29, 2018, 09:22:24 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I keep feeling like Alamance County is going to be prime for some explosive growth over the 20 years. It's the buffer zone between Raleigh/Durham and the Triad and one could feasibly commute to either Raleigh or Greensboro from there.

was there in September, place was boring af.  phoenix is worse though.
Hm.  I'd actually disagree there.  Phoenix is a "new" city and I've enjoyed my visits there.

Maybe I'm just boring but I find most "new" cities insufferably boring, if only because they seem mass produced. A lot of the fun of east coast and older rust belt cities is that you can see the organic growth of the city in its footprint. Boston, New York, and DC have a lot of older buildings that blend in with the new construction and you can really get a sense of history from being there. Most Sunbelt cities feel like someone just mass produced them in a factory and just plopped them down on the plot of land that they occupy. The fact that a place like Phoenix tries to subvert its natural environment and pump in water from the Colorado River so they can have greenery is an example of this, in my mind.

no architecture to speak of in downtowns of "new" cities, blocks are way too big, nothing to do in the downtown.  booooring!
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The Nature Boy

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #66 on: November 29, 2018, 09:27:04 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I keep feeling like Alamance County is going to be prime for some explosive growth over the 20 years. It's the buffer zone between Raleigh/Durham and the Triad and one could feasibly commute to either Raleigh or Greensboro from there.

was there in September, place was boring af.  phoenix is worse though.
Hm.  I'd actually disagree there.  Phoenix is a "new" city and I've enjoyed my visits there.

Maybe I'm just boring but I find most "new" cities insufferably boring, if only because they seem mass produced. A lot of the fun of east coast and older rust belt cities is that you can see the organic growth of the city in its footprint. Boston, New York, and DC have a lot of older buildings that blend in with the new construction and you can really get a sense of history from being there. Most Sunbelt cities feel like someone just mass produced them in a factory and just plopped them down on the plot of land that they occupy. The fact that a place like Phoenix tries to subvert its natural environment and pump in water from the Colorado River so they can have greenery is an example of this, in my mind.

no architecture to speak of in downtowns of "new" cities, blocks are way too big, nothing to do in the downtown.  booooring!

That's another thing, older cities are much more walkable because they were constructed and laid out before the automobile. A good city needs a good downtown and we moved away from that in the mid-20th century in favor of sprawling cities, which was a mistake.
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abefroman329

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #67 on: November 29, 2018, 09:35:04 AM »

I thought that law was modified long ago to allow regular liquor bottles and pours in bars.
You are correct, the law was modified in 2006.  I have not been in a bar in SC since 2002.
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silverback1065

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #68 on: November 29, 2018, 09:39:10 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I keep feeling like Alamance County is going to be prime for some explosive growth over the 20 years. It's the buffer zone between Raleigh/Durham and the Triad and one could feasibly commute to either Raleigh or Greensboro from there.

was there in September, place was boring af.  phoenix is worse though.
Hm.  I'd actually disagree there.  Phoenix is a "new" city and I've enjoyed my visits there.

Maybe I'm just boring but I find most "new" cities insufferably boring, if only because they seem mass produced. A lot of the fun of east coast and older rust belt cities is that you can see the organic growth of the city in its footprint. Boston, New York, and DC have a lot of older buildings that blend in with the new construction and you can really get a sense of history from being there. Most Sunbelt cities feel like someone just mass produced them in a factory and just plopped them down on the plot of land that they occupy. The fact that a place like Phoenix tries to subvert its natural environment and pump in water from the Colorado River so they can have greenery is an example of this, in my mind.

no architecture to speak of in downtowns of "new" cities, blocks are way too big, nothing to do in the downtown.  booooring!

That's another thing, older cities are much more walkable because they were constructed and laid out before the automobile. A good city needs a good downtown and we moved away from that in the mid-20th century in favor of sprawling cities, which was a mistake.

We need to get away from squiggly roads that go nowhere.  bring back the grid and reform zoning. 
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The Nature Boy

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #69 on: November 29, 2018, 09:42:40 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I keep feeling like Alamance County is going to be prime for some explosive growth over the 20 years. It's the buffer zone between Raleigh/Durham and the Triad and one could feasibly commute to either Raleigh or Greensboro from there.

was there in September, place was boring af.  phoenix is worse though.
Hm.  I'd actually disagree there.  Phoenix is a "new" city and I've enjoyed my visits there.

Maybe I'm just boring but I find most "new" cities insufferably boring, if only because they seem mass produced. A lot of the fun of east coast and older rust belt cities is that you can see the organic growth of the city in its footprint. Boston, New York, and DC have a lot of older buildings that blend in with the new construction and you can really get a sense of history from being there. Most Sunbelt cities feel like someone just mass produced them in a factory and just plopped them down on the plot of land that they occupy. The fact that a place like Phoenix tries to subvert its natural environment and pump in water from the Colorado River so they can have greenery is an example of this, in my mind.

no architecture to speak of in downtowns of "new" cities, blocks are way too big, nothing to do in the downtown.  booooring!

That's another thing, older cities are much more walkable because they were constructed and laid out before the automobile. A good city needs a good downtown and we moved away from that in the mid-20th century in favor of sprawling cities, which was a mistake.

We need to get away from squiggly roads that go nowhere.  bring back the grid and reform zoning.

Or in Houston's case, implement zoning.
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silverback1065

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #70 on: November 29, 2018, 09:45:55 AM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I keep feeling like Alamance County is going to be prime for some explosive growth over the 20 years. It's the buffer zone between Raleigh/Durham and the Triad and one could feasibly commute to either Raleigh or Greensboro from there.

was there in September, place was boring af.  phoenix is worse though.
Hm.  I'd actually disagree there.  Phoenix is a "new" city and I've enjoyed my visits there.

Maybe I'm just boring but I find most "new" cities insufferably boring, if only because they seem mass produced. A lot of the fun of east coast and older rust belt cities is that you can see the organic growth of the city in its footprint. Boston, New York, and DC have a lot of older buildings that blend in with the new construction and you can really get a sense of history from being there. Most Sunbelt cities feel like someone just mass produced them in a factory and just plopped them down on the plot of land that they occupy. The fact that a place like Phoenix tries to subvert its natural environment and pump in water from the Colorado River so they can have greenery is an example of this, in my mind.

no architecture to speak of in downtowns of "new" cities, blocks are way too big, nothing to do in the downtown.  booooring!

That's another thing, older cities are much more walkable because they were constructed and laid out before the automobile. A good city needs a good downtown and we moved away from that in the mid-20th century in favor of sprawling cities, which was a mistake.

We need to get away from squiggly roads that go nowhere.  bring back the grid and reform zoning.

Or in Houston's case, implement zoning.

texas may set the record for most beltways around a metro area in a few years. 
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Beltway

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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #71 on: November 29, 2018, 12:23:45 PM »

Or in Houston's case, implement zoning.
texas may set the record for most beltways around a metro area in a few years.

Houston already has a complete inner loop freeway and two complete beltway freeways.

I can't think of any city with more than that.
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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #72 on: November 29, 2018, 12:38:58 PM »

Wilmington, De. It is being reinvented & new companies are moving in.


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Yeah, look at the growth in southern New Castle county.  There was discussion about Middletown over in the DE US 301 Toll thread.  I just passed through there last week and was really surprised.
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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #73 on: November 29, 2018, 02:38:18 PM »

I’d say that, due to being a top 20 finalist for Amazon’s HQ2 in addition to being a former contender for Apple’s HQ2, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aka the Research Triangle or simply The Triangle, is poised to become the next major combined statistical area.

I think there should be a giant transit network serving the Triangle, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem. I'm guessing that whole area's gonna be a giant conurbation at one point.

Yeah and don’t forget High Point which is the third major city of the Piedmont Triad.

Well I see that Amtrak's Carolinian and Piedmont connect Raleigh with Cary, Durham, Burlington, Greensboro, and High Point, with a bus connection between High Point and Winston-Salem. But I'm wondering if we can build rail lines there besides just Amtrak.

https://web.archive.org/web/20150402181705/http://ourtransitfuture.com/projects/durham-wake/

https://web.archive.org/web/20070529123915/http://www.partnc.org/5-rail.htm

https://www.ncdot.gov/divisions/rail/Pages/future-service.aspx
« Last Edit: November 29, 2018, 02:49:14 PM by kevinb1994 »
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Re: Where will be the newest major city?
« Reply #74 on: November 29, 2018, 07:49:22 PM »

Sioux Falls SD has seen major growth over the years. Now it's population is pushing 200,000 nearly double from 1990. I don't get what the attraction is that so many people are moving there. Boring terrain cold weather the big attractions South Dakota has like Mt Rushmore and Deadwood ect are way on the other side of the state.
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