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Author Topic: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing  (Read 2159 times)

apeman33

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2019, 01:00:21 AM »

I don't know if it actually takes longer, but to me it feels like the U.S. 400 bypass of Dodge City takes more time than just simply going through Dodge on the former business route (Wyatt Earp Boulevard). I think it's because you have to stop and wait for oncoming traffic to pass before you can turn left to get on it when it splits from U.S. 50, then stop before it joins U.S. 56, stop again when it joins U.S. 283 and are likely to have to stop again at the traffic light before you can turn to Greensburg.

I'd rather take U.S. 50 to Road 113, then go south back to the traffic light at Wyatt Earp/U.S. 56-283. It feels like it takes less time.
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DJ Particle

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2019, 02:07:39 AM »

Sandwich Rd (US-6 Bypass) along the south side of the Cape Cod Canal.  2 lanes vs. 4.  That's all you need to know   :-D
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bing101

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #27 on: January 17, 2019, 08:21:57 AM »

In Metro Manila, EDSA was built as a bypass ring road for north-south traffic, yet from experience during most waking hours takes an hour longer to go through than simply heading straight through the City of Manila!  (This difference will be exacerbated even more when the Metro Manila Skyway extension opens next year)

I know in the Northern Half of Manila you have the South End of North Luzon Expressway getting jammed and you have the Manila Skyway construction zone in the area.  The results of how much EDSA traffic would be reduced is yet to be seen.
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Flint1979

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2019, 11:08:09 AM »

I don't know if it actually takes longer, but to me it feels like the U.S. 400 bypass of Dodge City takes more time than just simply going through Dodge on the former business route (Wyatt Earp Boulevard). I think it's because you have to stop and wait for oncoming traffic to pass before you can turn left to get on it when it splits from U.S. 50, then stop before it joins U.S. 56, stop again when it joins U.S. 283 and are likely to have to stop again at the traffic light before you can turn to Greensburg.

I'd rather take U.S. 50 to Road 113, then go south back to the traffic light at Wyatt Earp/U.S. 56-283. It feels like it takes less time.
To me it looks like it's about 4 miles shorter to go through town, doesn't look like a big town so you'd save maybe 2 minutes I would say. I think I'd use Trail Street, 14th Avenue and Wyatt Earp Boulevard.
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ftballfan

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #29 on: January 19, 2019, 07:30:01 PM »

In Metro Manila, EDSA was built as a bypass ring road for north-south traffic, yet from experience during most waking hours takes an hour longer to go through than simply heading straight through the City of Manila!  (This difference will be exacerbated even more when the Metro Manila Skyway extension opens next year)

I know in the Northern Half of Manila you have the South End of North Luzon Expressway getting jammed and you have the Manila Skyway construction zone in the area.  The results of how much EDSA traffic would be reduced is yet to be seen.
EDSA appears to be poorly built as well with limited access control (there appears to be side streets intersecting directly with EDSA!)
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sprjus4

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #30 on: January 19, 2019, 08:18:48 PM »

I don't know if it actually takes longer, but to me it feels like the U.S. 400 bypass of Dodge City takes more time than just simply going through Dodge on the former business route (Wyatt Earp Boulevard). I think it's because you have to stop and wait for oncoming traffic to pass before you can turn left to get on it when it splits from U.S. 50, then stop before it joins U.S. 56, stop again when it joins U.S. 283 and are likely to have to stop again at the traffic light before you can turn to Greensburg.

I'd rather take U.S. 50 to Road 113, then go south back to the traffic light at Wyatt Earp/U.S. 56-283. It feels like it takes less time.
It looks like (and I could be wrong) the U.S. 56 segment of the bypass was just U.S. 56 before, not a bypass. The little connector between U.S 56 and U.S. 400 / U.S. 50 looks like it was constructed to provide some sort of "relief route" to the town for long-distance truckers / traffic that doesn't feel like dealing with a town, slow speed limits, etc. The "bypass" is 65 MPH, where I imagine it's 25-35 MPH through the town. The little connector is a super-two freeway, whereas the rest of it (U.S. 56 / U.S. 400) is non-limited-access.
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wanderer2575

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #31 on: January 20, 2019, 10:20:46 AM »

I-475 through Flint and I-675 through Saginaw are about two miles longer than taking I-75 around both cities.

True, but in both cases I-75 actually is the bypass and the 3di is the route through the city.
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Flint1979

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #32 on: January 20, 2019, 12:39:57 PM »

I-475 through Flint and I-675 through Saginaw are about two miles longer than taking I-75 around both cities.

True, but in both cases I-75 actually is the bypass and the 3di is the route through the city.
I-675 was actually built to bypass the old Zilwaukee Bridge which was a drawbridge on I-75 and when it was in the up position backed traffic up so bad that I-675 had to be built.  It functions as a loop route into Saginaw and has been used for I-75 through traffic several times when the current Zilwaukee Bridge has been closed.

I-475 is basically an alternate route for I-75 through the Flint area. You'd miss the split with US-23 though for traffic trying to bypass Detroit if you were to use I-475 SB which just empties into SB I-75 traffic heading towards Detroit. I-75 really seems like the bypass route but it has more traffic and is shorter than the route it's bypassing in both cases. I-496 is the same way in Lansing.
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apeman33

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #33 on: January 21, 2019, 01:16:07 AM »

I don't know if it actually takes longer, but to me it feels like the U.S. 400 bypass of Dodge City takes more time than just simply going through Dodge on the former business route (Wyatt Earp Boulevard). I think it's because you have to stop and wait for oncoming traffic to pass before you can turn left to get on it when it splits from U.S. 50, then stop before it joins U.S. 56, stop again when it joins U.S. 283 and are likely to have to stop again at the traffic light before you can turn to Greensburg.

I'd rather take U.S. 50 to Road 113, then go south back to the traffic light at Wyatt Earp/U.S. 56-283. It feels like it takes less time.
It looks like (and I could be wrong) the U.S. 56 segment of the bypass was just U.S. 56 before, not a bypass. The little connector between U.S 56 and U.S. 400 / U.S. 50 looks like it was constructed to provide some sort of "relief route" to the town for long-distance truckers / traffic that doesn't feel like dealing with a town, slow speed limits, etc. The "bypass" is 65 MPH, where I imagine it's 25-35 MPH through the town. The little connector is a super-two freeway, whereas the rest of it (U.S. 56 / U.S. 400) is non-limited-access.

In a sense, it's three bypasses. The 400 connector is the newest. Just after 400 joins U.S. 56, the roads take an alignment that replaced the former U.S. 56 (now known as McArtor Road). Then the 56-283-400 loop around the southeast side replaced the routings of 56 and 283 that used to go up Second St. and join the former routing of U.S. 50 at Wyatt Earp Blvd.
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apeman33

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #34 on: January 21, 2019, 01:19:23 AM »

I don't know if it actually takes longer, but to me it feels like the U.S. 400 bypass of Dodge City takes more time than just simply going through Dodge on the former business route (Wyatt Earp Boulevard). I think it's because you have to stop and wait for oncoming traffic to pass before you can turn left to get on it when it splits from U.S. 50, then stop before it joins U.S. 56, stop again when it joins U.S. 283 and are likely to have to stop again at the traffic light before you can turn to Greensburg.

I'd rather take U.S. 50 to Road 113, then go south back to the traffic light at Wyatt Earp/U.S. 56-283. It feels like it takes less time.
To me it looks like it's about 4 miles shorter to go through town, doesn't look like a big town so you'd save maybe 2 minutes I would say. I think I'd use Trail Street, 14th Avenue and Wyatt Earp Boulevard.

Trail St. is a two-lane narrow residential road between Second and 14th. My preference was to turn north at Second, cross the tracks and turn west onto Wyatt Earp.

What I usually do is either take U.S. 50 to 113 Road and then down as I described above or just go through Dodge City on the former U.S. 50 alignment, then turn south on the east side of town to get back to U.S. 400. I prefer to take either route over the bypass.
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Flint1979

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #35 on: January 21, 2019, 12:10:12 PM »

I don't know if it actually takes longer, but to me it feels like the U.S. 400 bypass of Dodge City takes more time than just simply going through Dodge on the former business route (Wyatt Earp Boulevard). I think it's because you have to stop and wait for oncoming traffic to pass before you can turn left to get on it when it splits from U.S. 50, then stop before it joins U.S. 56, stop again when it joins U.S. 283 and are likely to have to stop again at the traffic light before you can turn to Greensburg.

I'd rather take U.S. 50 to Road 113, then go south back to the traffic light at Wyatt Earp/U.S. 56-283. It feels like it takes less time.
To me it looks like it's about 4 miles shorter to go through town, doesn't look like a big town so you'd save maybe 2 minutes I would say. I think I'd use Trail Street, 14th Avenue and Wyatt Earp Boulevard.

Trail St. is a two-lane narrow residential road between Second and 14th. My preference was to turn north at Second, cross the tracks and turn west onto Wyatt Earp.

What I usually do is either take U.S. 50 to 113 Road and then down as I described above or just go through Dodge City on the former U.S. 50 alignment, then turn south on the east side of town to get back to U.S. 400. I prefer to take either route over the bypass.
Really? I guess looking at it on GSV is a little different than actually being there. I see the houses but it doesn't look like too narrow of a street. I guess I'd jog off at 2nd Avenue too in that case. I've never been to that part of Kansas so I'm not real familiar with it.
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bemybear

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #36 on: August 22, 2019, 10:46:44 AM »

I think I-205 isn't really that great for bypassing Portland.  Unless it's rush hour headed southbound  in the morning or north in the evening, I-5 is much shorter and not necessarily much more congested.
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US 89

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #37 on: August 22, 2019, 11:20:24 AM »

US 17 through Myrtle Beach. I hate that road with a passion during summer tourist season, and I find it hard to believe it saves any time over the business route.
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roadman

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #38 on: August 22, 2019, 11:52:32 AM »

I-295 around Providence RI.  Unless there's a major problem between Attleboro and Warwick, you're better off sticking to I-95 - even during rush hour.
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milbfan

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Re: Bypasses that take longer than the routes that they are bypassing
« Reply #39 on: September 13, 2019, 11:05:40 PM »

I-64 v. I-264 in Louisville...12 mi v. 18-19 mi.
I-40 v. I-640 in Knoxville...feels longer; think it might be by a mile or two.
I-40 v. I-240 in Asheville...or maybe it only seems longer because it's a mess with all of the lane changes?
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