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Author Topic: US holidays by tiers  (Read 2448 times)

abefroman329

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2019, 12:33:04 PM »

In WV the state takes the federal holidays, plus "West Virginia Day", which is June 20, which means it always falls on the same day of the week as the 4th of July.
Nearly every state has a random holiday like this.  Illinois has Casimir Pulaski Day, DC has Emancipation Day, Massachusetts has Patriots Day.  Some Southern states celebrate Robert E. Lee's birthday.
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kevinb1994

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2019, 02:19:42 PM »

In WV the state takes the federal holidays, plus "West Virginia Day", which is June 20, which means it always falls on the same day of the week as the 4th of July.
Nearly every state has a random holiday like this.  Illinois has Casimir Pulaski Day, DC has Emancipation Day, Massachusetts has Patriots Day.  Some Southern states celebrate Robert E. Lee's birthday.

Our adopted home state of Florida (which we moved to from New Jersey in late-September 2017) is one of those Southern states that does NOT celebrate Robert E. Lee’s birthday—instead celebrating Jeff(erson) Davis’ birthday. Coincidentally we have come to live in Winn-Dixie’s home territory of Jacksonville, Florida (which it has been since November 1944, a grand total of almost 75 years—although it was once known as Winn & Lovett from November 1944 to 1955, when it merged with the Dixie Home Super Markets chain and took on the well-known Winn-Dixie name), which has been home to the Davis family (originally from Texas) that started what has become known as Winn-Dixie (they acquired a boatload of land around where we live in the Southside of Jacksonville, FL from the Skinner family of dairy, real estate, and turpentine fame, who still own and operate a considerable amount of land in and around the same general area as the Davis family) for the same amount of years as the supermarket chain itself.
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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2019, 02:55:26 PM »

We always had school on Veterans’ Day, but most of us figured the day after Thanksgiving was a fair trade. We did get Columbus Day. The day we got that most people don’t was Inauguration Day every four years. Led to a really short week when it fell in the same week as what was then called Lee-Jackson-King Day. (Lee-Jackson Day is still a state holiday, but it’s now the Friday before King Day. Schools are open. Courts and government offices are closed.)
Some schools don't have black friday off? That would make traveling a bitch.

I said we got the day after Thanksgiving instead of Veterans’ Day and most of us were reasonably happy with that trade. We also had two teacher workdays earlier in November. By the time I was in third grade, those always coincided with Election Day so they could use the cafeterias as polling places. I recall one year we had school on Election Day and they wanted us to eat in silence due to adults coming in to vote. That didn’t work so well and it was part of what led to the teacher workday schedule being adjusted.
Given that most schools get BOTH Black Friday and Veterans Day off, I'm not sure that was really a "trade".  Most schools where I grew up also got the day before Thanksgiving off too, though my school district didn't for a long time because we got the Jewish holidays off.  I think they eventually traded December 23 for the day before Thanksgiving or something.
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1995hoo

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2019, 03:23:53 PM »

We always had school on Veterans’ Day, but most of us figured the day after Thanksgiving was a fair trade. We did get Columbus Day. The day we got that most people don’t was Inauguration Day every four years. Led to a really short week when it fell in the same week as what was then called Lee-Jackson-King Day. (Lee-Jackson Day is still a state holiday, but it’s now the Friday before King Day. Schools are open. Courts and government offices are closed.)
Some schools don't have black friday off? That would make traveling a bitch.

I said we got the day after Thanksgiving instead of Veterans’ Day and most of us were reasonably happy with that trade. We also had two teacher workdays earlier in November. By the time I was in third grade, those always coincided with Election Day so they could use the cafeterias as polling places. I recall one year we had school on Election Day and they wanted us to eat in silence due to adults coming in to vote. That didn’t work so well and it was part of what led to the teacher workday schedule being adjusted.
Given that most schools get BOTH Black Friday and Veterans Day off, I'm not sure that was really a "trade".  Most schools where I grew up also got the day before Thanksgiving off too, though my school district didn't for a long time because we got the Jewish holidays off.  I think they eventually traded December 23 for the day before Thanksgiving or something.

“Most” get both? Not around here they don’t. At least in my lifetime, none of the school systems here ever gave Veterans’ Day as a holiday. Our relatives in Florida don’t get it either.
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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #29 on: January 22, 2019, 04:26:11 PM »

Nobody celebrates National Aluminum Siding Week anymore.

I mean to. But who has the time?

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2019, 09:18:45 AM »

The bank I do business with is open on MLK Jr. Day, but is closed on Veterans Day. Growing up, I never had MLK, Columbus, or Veterans Day off (Presidents' Day varied; some years we'd have it off but others we'd have school).

At my last full time job (non-government, but our main client was the Department of Defense), we just had the federal holidays off, which meant days like Black Friday and Christmas Eve (when it fell on a workday) were work days (Christmas Eve was a Sunday the year I worked there). At a previous office job, we had the following days off:
New Years' Day
Memorial Day
Independence Day
Labor Day
Thanksgiving
Black Friday
Christmas Eve (Christmas fell on a Thursday one of the years I was there, so that year Christmas Eve was a workday and this holiday was moved to the 26th)
Christmas Day

IMHO, the Veterans Day holiday should be moved to Election Day in even-numbered years (or the elections moved to Veterans Day).

Brandon, I take it you're a Lions fan. Forward down the field!
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abefroman329

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2019, 09:28:01 AM »

MLK Day still isn't a holiday in some states, and in others, it's shared with Robert E. Lee's birthday.

The worst was the decade I worked for law firms, since just because it was a firm holiday didn't mean I didn't have to come in and work.  Same for weekends.  And snow/inclement weather days.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2019, 09:30:41 AM »

For most of the NJ State Worker Unions, Lincoln's Birthday was removed as a state holiday a number of years ago.  In November, we take off Election Day, but have to work on Black Friday.  Many people seem to support switching Election Day with Black Friday, but the Union Leaders don't want to change that for whatever reason.

For decades, the Governor granted state workers a paid holiday on Black Friday anyway, but that ended with the Corzine administration a number of years ago.

On another somewhat related subject - I noticed a few Facebook friends this year complaining that their kids had to go back to school January 2nd.  They asked why do they have to go back the day after a holiday? (And after they already had 1 1/2 weeks off).  Why not January 3rd?  Or why not January 7th (the following Monday)?  I was in awe that some of these parents didn't seem to think that, well, everyone else works come January 2nd, so that would present some issues with kids staying home.  Not to mention pushing the school year further into the summer. And I'm sure these same parents are complaining come June that it's so hot out and why does the school year end so late. 
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Roadgeekteen

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #33 on: January 23, 2019, 09:42:40 AM »

MLK Day still isn't a holiday in some states, and in others, it's shared with Robert E. Lee's birthday.

The worst was the decade I worked for law firms, since just because it was a firm holiday didn't mean I didn't have to come in and work.  Same for weekends.  And snow/inclement weather days.
What the heck is a shared MLK day/Robert E Lee day called? "Seeing both sides day?"
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abefroman329

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #34 on: January 23, 2019, 10:56:08 AM »

MLK Day still isn't a holiday in some states, and in others, it's shared with Robert E. Lee's birthday.

The worst was the decade I worked for law firms, since just because it was a firm holiday didn't mean I didn't have to come in and work.  Same for weekends.  And snow/inclement weather days.
What the heck is a shared MLK day/Robert E Lee day called? "Seeing both sides day?"
In Arkansas it was literally "MLK Day/Lee Day."

I think that giving neither MLK nor Robert E. Lee a holiday is better than trying to split the baby.
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oscar

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2019, 11:19:41 AM »

In Arkansas it was literally "MLK Day/Lee Day."

I think that giving neither MLK nor Robert E. Lee a holiday is better than trying to split the baby.

That's where Virginia wound up. A black Democratic governor successfully pushed for addition of an MLK holiday, combined with the existing Lee/Jackson holiday so state workers wouldn't get more time off. One of his white Republican successors concluded that the combined holiday didn't work, and got the Lee/Jackson holiday moved back to the Friday preceding the MLK holiday, even though that meant a four-day weekend for state workers.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 12:00:59 PM by oscar »
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abefroman329

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2019, 11:26:28 AM »

In Arkansas it was literally "MLK Day/Lee Day."

I think that giving neither MLK nor Robert E. Lee a holiday is better than trying to split the baby.

That's where Virginia wound up. A black Democratic governor successfully pushed for addition of an MLK holiday, combined with the existing Lee/Jackson holiday so state workers wouldn't get more time off. One of his white Republican successors concluded that the combined holiday didn't work, add got the Lee/Jackson holiday moved back to the Friday preceding the MLK holiday, even though that meant a four-day weekend for state workers.
It looks like Arkansas moved "Lee Day" to the second Saturday in October (which appears to coincide with Columbus Day).  Also, what is known as Washington’s Birthday at the federal level (Jesus fucking Christ is this forum ever pedantic) is "George Washington's Birthday and Daisy Gatson Bates Day," the latter being an Arkansan civil rights activist.  Which appears to be even more baby-splitting: Omit any mention of Lincoln, but replace him with a civil rights activist.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 02:49:05 PM by abefroman329 »
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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2019, 11:59:17 AM »

In Arkansas it was literally "MLK Day/Lee Day."

I think that giving neither MLK nor Robert E. Lee a holiday is better than trying to split the baby.

That's where Virginia wound up. A black Democratic governor successfully pushed for addition of an MLK holiday, combined with the existing Lee/Jackson holiday so state workers wouldn't get more time off. One of his white Republican successors concluded that the combined holiday didn't work, add got the Lee/Jackson holiday moved back to the Friday preceding the MLK holiday, even though that meant a four-day weekend for state workers.
It looks like Arkansas moved "Lee Day" to the second Saturday in October (which appears to coincide with Columbus Day).  Also, what is known as President's Day at the federal level is "George Washington's Birthday and Daisy Gatson Bates Day," the latter being an Arkansan civil rights activist.  Which appears to be even more baby-splitting: Omit any mention of Lincoln, but replace him with a civil rights activist.
Maybe they think of Lincoln as too "foreign"
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Brandon

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2019, 12:04:51 PM »

In Arkansas it was literally "MLK Day/Lee Day."

I think that giving neither MLK nor Robert E. Lee a holiday is better than trying to split the baby.

That's where Virginia wound up. A black Democratic governor successfully pushed for addition of an MLK holiday, combined with the existing Lee/Jackson holiday so state workers wouldn't get more time off. One of his white Republican successors concluded that the combined holiday didn't work, add got the Lee/Jackson holiday moved back to the Friday preceding the MLK holiday, even though that meant a four-day weekend for state workers.
It looks like Arkansas moved "Lee Day" to the second Saturday in October (which appears to coincide with Columbus Day).  Also, what is known as President's Day at the federal level is "George Washington's Birthday and Daisy Gatson Bates Day," the latter being an Arkansan civil rights activist.  Which appears to be even more baby-splitting: Omit any mention of Lincoln, but replace him with a civil rights activist.
Maybe they think of Lincoln as too "foreign"

154 years on, and there's still some butthurt down there.
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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2019, 02:17:29 PM »

In Arkansas it was literally "MLK Day/Lee Day."

I think that giving neither MLK nor Robert E. Lee a holiday is better than trying to split the baby.

That's where Virginia wound up. A black Democratic governor successfully pushed for addition of an MLK holiday, combined with the existing Lee/Jackson holiday so state workers wouldn't get more time off. One of his white Republican successors concluded that the combined holiday didn't work, add got the Lee/Jackson holiday moved back to the Friday preceding the MLK holiday, even though that meant a four-day weekend for state workers.
It looks like Arkansas moved "Lee Day" to the second Saturday in October (which appears to coincide with Columbus Day).  Also, what is known as President's Day at the federal level is "George Washington's Birthday and Daisy Gatson Bates Day," the latter being an Arkansan civil rights activist.  Which appears to be even more baby-splitting: Omit any mention of Lincoln, but replace him with a civil rights activist.
Maybe they think of Lincoln as too "foreign"

154 years on, and there's still some butthurt down there.

That’s what she said.  :bigass:
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SP Cook

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #40 on: January 23, 2019, 02:38:04 PM »

BTW, it is a myth that the federal name of the February holiday is "President's Day".  The law was changed in 1968, coming into effect in 1971, and both Johnson and Nixon used the term "President's Day", but the Uniform Monday Holiday Act calls it "George Washington's Birthday".  Lincoln's Birthday was never a federal holiday.

The name of the holiday is Presidents' (plural possessive) Day in NM, ND, OK, PA, PR, SD, TX, VT, and WA; President's (singular possessive) in AK, ID, MD, MA, NE, NH, TN WV and WY; Presidents (plural, not possive) Day in NV, NJ, and OR; Washington's Birthday and President's Day in ME; Lincoln/Washington/Presidents' Day in AZ; George Washington Day in VA; Washington's Birthday in IL, IA, MI, LA, and NY; Lincoln's and Washington's Birthday in MT; Washington-Lincoln Day in CO and OH; Washington and Lincoln Day in MN; George Washington/Thomas Jefferson Birthday in AL; and, as noted above, George Washington's Birthday and Daisy Gatson Bates Day in AR.  In California it is "The third Monday in February".  CA lists some holidays by name, including ones you might think not like Columbus Day, but just gives a date for others.  Weird.

Veterans Day was included in the Monday deal from 1971 to 77, when it was put back an 11/11 at the request of the VFW.  With WWI now over 100 years and all of its veterans now dead and the day thus used to honor veterans of later conflicts for whom 11/11 has no meaning, I would not mind moving it back to a Monday. 

OT Politics.  Back in the day, democrats would celebrate Jefferson-Jackson Day with a fundraiser dinner.  Usually near the time of the Battle of New Orleans, but they would fudge to get a speaker.  Around here they started calling it "Roosevelt-Kennedy Day" a couple years ago.  The Republican equivalent used to be "Lincoln Day" which was usually near Lincoln's Birthday, but likewise fudge-able.  Now the local GOP is calling it Lincoln-Reagan Day.  Reagan was also born in February.

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #41 on: January 23, 2019, 07:08:56 PM »

OT Politics.  Back in the day, democrats would celebrate Jefferson-Jackson Day with a fundraiser dinner.  Usually near the time of the Battle of New Orleans, but they would fudge to get a speaker.  Around here they started calling it "Roosevelt-Kennedy Day" a couple years ago.  The Republican equivalent used to be "Lincoln Day" which was usually near Lincoln's Birthday, but likewise fudge-able.  Now the local GOP is calling it Lincoln-Reagan Day.  Reagan was also born in February.

It used to be Lincoln Day here, too, but has increasingly become Lincoln-Reagan Day. I don't think it has as much to do with both being born in February as it does with highlighting Regan's importance to the modern-day GOP.
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hbelkins

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #42 on: January 23, 2019, 07:12:50 PM »

The bank I do business with is open on MLK Jr. Day

Interesting. I have long heard that the reason banks take federal holidays off is because if they are open on a federal holiday, and get robbed, FDIC will not cover losses. Before my local bank started absorbing other banks and becoming more of a regional bank, it epitomized the exact opposite of what's commonly called bankers' hours. They opened early, stayed open late, and took only a minimum of holidays when banks in other places were closed. Yet it's always closed for MLK Day since it became a federal holiday, and we don't have a significant black population in this community or among the customer base.
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bulldog1979

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #43 on: January 24, 2019, 03:15:52 AM »

My current employer has seven paid holidays:

New Year's Day
MLK Day
Memorial Day
Independence Day
Labor Day
Thanksgiving Day
Christmas Day.

It was nice a few years ago when the holiday for Christmas, New Year's and MLK Day hit in three consecutive biweekly pay checks. Now Christmas and New Year's fall in the same pay period. As a hotel that is open 24/7/365, someone is always working, holiday or not. Our part-time employees get paid time and a half if they work the day of a holiday, and full-timers get an extra day's pay on that check for the day, regardless if they worked the actual day or not. Depending on the schedule, they can earn up to 48 hours of pay at straight time in a holiday week if they work 40 hours. Salaried managers get to take an extra day off within two weeks of either side of the actual holiday.
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abefroman329

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #44 on: January 24, 2019, 08:13:07 AM »

It’s not really an “extra” paycheck if you’re salaried. You get 26 paychecks a year if you’re paid biweekly vs. 24 if you’re paid semi-monthly, but you get paid the same amount of money for the year.
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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #45 on: January 24, 2019, 08:36:19 AM »

The bank I do business with is open on MLK Jr. Day

Interesting. I have long heard that the reason banks take federal holidays off is because if they are open on a federal holiday, and get robbed, FDIC will not cover losses.

That wouldn't even make sense.  FDIC covers each holdings one has in each account category to $250,000.  FDIC insurance has nothing to do with the money in the till or the vault.

There's no law or rule that banks must be closed on federal holidays.  Many do because the Federal Reserve is closed, but even then that's more of an excuse than a rule.  The Federal Reserve is also closed on Saturdays, when most banks are open, and on Sunday, when some banks are open.

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #46 on: January 24, 2019, 09:12:50 AM »

Correct.  The FDIC is a government run pool insurance against bank failures, which in simple terms means a bank having loaned too much to deadbeats that won't pay it back to cover the deposits.  It really does not have anything to do with the actual physical cash in the vault, which, if insured at all, would be covered by private casualty insurance. 

Probably most banks do not bother, because, in modern times, the amount of actual cash on hand is really not that much at all.  It is 99% 1s and 0s in a computer file.  Your local Wal-Mart has WAY more cash on hand than your local bank.

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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #47 on: January 25, 2019, 11:25:21 PM »

Also, the USPS now delivers Amazon packages and Express Mail on most federal holidays (with Priority Mail in some areas), exceptions normally being New Years Day, Fourth of July, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.
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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #48 on: January 27, 2019, 03:36:08 PM »

It’s not really an “extra” paycheck if you’re salaried. You get 26 paychecks a year if you’re paid biweekly vs. 24 if you’re paid semi-monthly, but you get paid the same amount of money for the year.

No, but where I've worked on salary, I've gotten to take one extra day off for the holiday without using personal or vacation time. Instead of working 10 days per pay period to earn my salary, I only need to work 9 (or with the Christmas/New Year's combo in the same period, only 8) to earn that pay.
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Re: US holidays by tiers
« Reply #49 on: January 28, 2019, 08:19:00 PM »

Mardi Gras is tier 1 holiday in Louisiana. For the other 49 states, it's a tier 6.
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