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Author Topic: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?  (Read 1303 times)

kphoger

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #50 on: February 19, 2019, 01:49:24 PM »

Panda Express is delicious and I'll fight anyone who says otherwise.  Sometimes I just don't give a fuck about authenticity.

Panda Express is bland and dried out.
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abefroman329

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #51 on: February 19, 2019, 01:51:28 PM »

Panda Express is delicious and I'll fight anyone who says otherwise.  Sometimes I just don't give a fuck about authenticity.

Panda Express is bland and dried out.
YOU'RE bland and dried out!
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jeffandnicole

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #52 on: February 19, 2019, 02:00:39 PM »

Panda Express is delicious and I'll fight anyone who says otherwise.  Sometimes I just don't give a fuck about authenticity.

Panda Express is bland and dried out.
YOU'RE bland and dried out!

I want to like Panda Express.  I really do.  But some of their newer restaurants seem to suffer with some quality issues.  Using a few examples in Delaware, one gave a burnt taste in its food, and this was a few times, several weeks apart.  Another seemed to really skimp on portion sizes.

I can't speak for other areas of the country because we normally don't go searching for Chinese food on trips, but in the South Jersey area, strip-mall Chinese food outlets are about as common as Pizzerias and Wawas.  Don't like one, there's 5 more in town to try.  Panda Express has finally opened a few stores scattered about, and I think they'll really need to try hard in this area to succeed.
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kphoger

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #53 on: February 19, 2019, 02:13:41 PM »

Re:  garlic

I cook with a lot of garlic because it's my favorite vegetable.   :awesomeface:

There's hardly ever a time I reach for the garlic and use fewer than three whole cloves.  For a dish that has "garlic" in the name, my wife and I might use up to ten cloves.  I hardly ever use it raw, however.  At the very least, I'll toast it in a dry skillet before peeling, which basically roasts it a bit in its own skin.  Once I had a Peruvian roommate who used to put raw garlic in the blender and drink it as a cure for the common cold;  I tried it and ended up on the kitchen floor in the fetal position.  I used to use even more, and I've noticed that I'm more likely to be bitten by mosquitoes now compared to then;  the scientists are agreed on the whole garlic-as-repellent thing, but I've personally noticed an effect.

If onions and garlic on your breath and in your pores turns women away, then those aren't the women for you!  My ex from years ago wouldn't kiss me if I had been eating raw onions;  my wife is a much better woman!



"Mexican" food in the US is all about tortillas, taco shells, refried beans, and compotes of meat and vegetables stewed or marinated in spicy sauces.  Actual food in Mexico--as in what is available when you go into a sit-down restaurant and order a meal--is not that different from "standard" fare in the US:  for example, you can order a steak with vegetables for dinner, or an omelette for breakfast, and the biggest difference is that both come with refried beans on the side.

Tortillas and refried beans:  that accounts for roughly 50% of what the people eat at home in the area of México I'm most familiar with—the remainder being eggs and a "special" dish here and there throughout the week.  The basic meal, which could be served two or three times a day with slight variations, consists of refried beans, scrambled eggs with something mixed in, salsa, and tortillas.  I believe rice is more common in the south than in the north, so that may end up replacing the eggs in other regions.  "Special" meals often end up being quite different from what we gringos think of as Mexican food—I've had spaghetti with poblano pepper sauce, fried fish, savory meat stew, and even hot dogs—but the staples tend be a lot closer to what we have here in the States.  Tacos, gorditas, tostadas:  these are all authentic Mexican dishes that combine the basics of tortillas, salsa, a tiny bit of meat, and some whatever-is-in-the-kitchen-at-the-time mixed in.

Regarding the "othering" effect, that's going to be an intrinsic effect of how we enjoy ethnic food. For instance, I'm going to be disappointed if I ask for Mexican food for dinner and am greeted with steak and vegetables and a side of refried beans. Sure, people from Mexico without a doubt eat steak, but it's not really a specialty of that place.

When I'm in México and offer to take people out to dinner, they ask me where.  When I answer that I'm taking them to a steakhouse, their eyes light up they get all excited.  Northern México loves steak, and restaurants that serve it are proud of it.  Some of the best steak I've ever had was in Coahuila.  The state of Chihuahua has historically been especially proud of its cattle and its beef.  Go to a backyard party in northern México, and chances are the people there will be grilling steaks and serving them with charred bulb onions and corn tortillas.  Basically, it is common, and it is a specialty.
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sparker

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #54 on: February 19, 2019, 05:21:23 PM »

Re:  garlic

I cook with a lot of garlic because it's my favorite vegetable.   :awesomeface:

There's hardly ever a time I reach for the garlic and use fewer than three whole cloves.  For a dish that has "garlic" in the name, my wife and I might use up to ten cloves.  I hardly ever use it raw, however.  At the very least, I'll toast it in a dry skillet before peeling, which basically roasts it a bit in its own skin.  Once I had a Peruvian roommate who used to put raw garlic in the blender and drink it as a cure for the common cold;  I tried it and ended up on the kitchen floor in the fetal position.  I used to use even more, and I've noticed that I'm more likely to be bitten by mosquitoes now compared to then;  the scientists are agreed on the whole garlic-as-repellent thing, but I've personally noticed an effect.

If onions and garlic on your breath and in your pores turns women away, then those aren't the women for you!  My ex from years ago wouldn't kiss me if I had been eating raw onions;  my wife is a much better woman!

The Chinese -- particularly those from the inland regions (Hunan, Szechuan, etc.) figured that one out long ago -- adding a roughly equal portion of fresh ginger to the garlic in dishes tends to somewhat neutralize -- or at least lessen -- the usual effects of garlic by itself.  I cook a lot of these dishes at home -- and many of them use a substantial amount of garlic -- but unless the dish has "......in garlic sauce" in the title, you can bet there's a similar amount of fresh ginger (definitely NOT the powdered stuff) called for in the dish, partially for the flavor but also to counteract "garlic effect".  Also, the combination creates a unique flavor profile -- if you've ever been to a authentic Szechuan or Hunan restaurant, you've undoubtedly tasted that combination! 
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MNHighwayMan

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #55 on: February 19, 2019, 08:26:25 PM »

Regarding the "othering" effect, that's going to be an intrinsic effect of how we enjoy ethnic food. For instance, I'm going to be disappointed if I ask for Mexican food for dinner and am greeted with steak and vegetables and a side of refried beans. Sure, people from Mexico without a doubt eat steak, but it's not really a specialty of that place.
When I'm in México and offer to take people out to dinner, they ask me where.  When I answer that I'm taking them to a steakhouse, their eyes light up they get all excited.  Northern México loves steak, and restaurants that serve it are proud of it.  Some of the best steak I've ever had was in Coahuila.  The state of Chihuahua has historically been especially proud of its cattle and its beef.  Go to a backyard party in northern México, and chances are the people there will be grilling steaks and serving them with charred bulb onions and corn tortillas.  Basically, it is common, and it is a specialty.

Perhaps I didn't pick the best example, but my point was that as an American, if I ask for Mexican food and get something substantially similar to something I can get at an average American restaurant, I'm going to be a little disappointed.
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Takumi

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #56 on: February 19, 2019, 10:43:39 PM »

I quite like garlic, but can’t stand onions.
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US71

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #57 on: February 19, 2019, 10:45:41 PM »

I quite like garlic, but can’t stand onions.

I like a little onion on my hamburger, but that's it.
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abefroman329

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #58 on: February 20, 2019, 09:32:39 AM »

I quite like garlic, but can’t stand onions.
I like cooked onions in many dishes, but I really only like raw onions on chili.  Raw onions don't sit especially well with me.
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hbelkins

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #59 on: February 20, 2019, 02:11:04 PM »

I'm somewhat allergic to onions. In most cases, they will give me a headache. An exception is anytime I eat White Castles.
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kevinb1994

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #60 on: February 20, 2019, 04:04:34 PM »

I'm somewhat allergic to onions. In most cases, they will give me a headache. An exception is anytime I eat White Castles.

Eating White Castles sounds like a royal pain!
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SectorZ

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #61 on: February 20, 2019, 09:25:23 PM »

I'm somewhat allergic to onions. In most cases, they will give me a headache. An exception is anytime I eat White Castles.

Only White Castles?
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US71

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #62 on: February 20, 2019, 10:29:41 PM »

I'm somewhat allergic to onions. In most cases, they will give me a headache. An exception is anytime I eat White Castles.

What about Krystals?
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abefroman329

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #63 on: February 21, 2019, 08:57:37 AM »

White Castle > Krystal.  Something about the Krystal bun being drier than the WC one just doesn't do it for me.
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hbelkins

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Re: Is veal parmigiana on its way out?
« Reply #64 on: February 21, 2019, 10:50:14 AM »

I'm somewhat allergic to onions. In most cases, they will give me a headache. An exception is anytime I eat White Castles.

What about Krystals?

The onions are different, and they bother me more than do the ones on White Castles.
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