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Author Topic: 2018 metropolitan population estimates  (Read 911 times)

bandit957

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2019, 09:53:27 AM »

I dread the day when Cincinnati and Dayton close any rural gaps in between and are considered one giant urbanized area. This would be very misleading. We don't have any real economic or social connection to Dayton here. It's also a symptom that the area really has become overdeveloped. But media talking heads are already bragging that this is coming soon.

If all the gaps are closed from Boston to DC, it would be considered one humongous area, which is also misleading.
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Rothman

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #26 on: June 23, 2019, 10:08:32 AM »

Boston to DC has been called the Megalopolis for decades -- there was even a National Geographic article and map to that effect back when I was a kid (early 1990s).  Driving down I-95, it is hard to argue otherwise.
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Flint1979

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #27 on: June 23, 2019, 10:09:39 AM »

I dread the day when Cincinnati and Dayton close any rural gaps in between and are considered one giant urbanized area. This would be very misleading. We don't have any real economic or social connection to Dayton here. It's also a symptom that the area really has become overdeveloped. But media talking heads are already bragging that this is coming soon.

If all the gaps are closed from Boston to DC, it would be considered one humongous area, which is also misleading.
It almost seems like it could happen regarding Cincinnati and Dayton. The distance along I-75 between I-275 and I-675 is only about 27 miles.
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golden eagle

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2019, 08:14:13 PM »

I dread the day when Cincinnati and Dayton close any rural gaps in between and are considered one giant urbanized area. This would be very misleading. We don't have any real economic or social connection to Dayton here. It's also a symptom that the area really has become overdeveloped. But media talking heads are already bragging that this is coming soon.

If all the gaps are closed from Boston to DC, it would be considered one humongous area, which is also misleading.

There was some talk a while back about combining Cincinnati and Dayton into one Nielsen radio market, which makes absolutely no sense to me. That makes as much sense as combining DC and Baltimore into one metro. While were at it, Detroit-Toledo-Flint metro, anybody?
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bandit957

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2019, 08:29:13 PM »

There was some talk a while back about combining Cincinnati and Dayton into one Nielsen radio market, which makes absolutely no sense to me.

It would make no sense. At all. I used to be able to pick up a couple Dayton stations quite well, but that can't be done now. The dial is too crowded, and radio receivers just aren't as good now.
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bing101

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2019, 09:57:36 PM »


Some of these need to be revised IMO out west given several metro areas have grown together.  San Francisco/Oakland/San Jose ought to be a single metro area along with Los Angeles/Riverside/San Bernardino.  There is literally no break in the urban sprawl in those particular areas of California.


I would actually say San Francisco/Oakland/San Jose/Sacramento/Stockton/Salinas/Modesto/Fresno could easily be one. Another could be Los Angeles/Riverside/San Bernardino/Anaheim/Santa Barbara/Bakersfield/San Diego/Tijuana/El Centro/Mexicali would be another.

You could probably add Denver/Boulder/Fort Collins/Greeley/Cheyenne/Colorado Springs/Pueblo/Canon City as another.




This map might fit your description though.

Aside from Tracy there is too much separating San Joaquin Valley from being part of the Bay Area or Sacramento.  All the communities have a huge geographic barrier from the Bay Area via the Diablo Range.  The farms separate the communities even further into isolated pockets usually alongside CA 99. 

Regarding Phoenix, Flagstaff and Tucson there is way too much mountain, reservation and desert in the way to consider those one metro area.


Austin and San Antonio should be in the running for being 1 megaopolis 
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Revive 755

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2019, 10:00:06 PM »

Orlando is going to break the top 20 very soon, it will pass StL and Baltimore. Cleveland is going to fall multiple spots, to Indianapolis, San Jose, and Nashville. Milwaukee and Providence are going to lose ground to Jacksonville, OKC, and Raleigh. And whats the deal with Decatur and Danville IL both losing people at a very quick rate?

Danville and Decatur lost a lot of industry.  Besides having the other problems of Illinois (which might explain a lot of areas from Illinois losing population on the list), they don't have a major university, are not located at a major crossroad, or have much else going for them.
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bing101

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #32 on: June 25, 2019, 09:50:58 AM »


Some of these need to be revised IMO out west given several metro areas have grown together.  San Francisco/Oakland/San Jose ought to be a single metro area along with Los Angeles/Riverside/San Bernardino.  There is literally no break in the urban sprawl in those particular areas of California.

Here is a better one we need to start making a list of suburbs and exurbs that has to serve more than one census defined area. I know in past threads we talked about Temecula being the commuter city for both San Diego and Los Angeles though.  Solano County is the other where we mentioned this area having to house both Sacramento and Bay area commuters at the same time. This is how we are going to find were the megaopolis are forming.
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bandit957

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #33 on: June 25, 2019, 09:57:34 AM »

Here is a better one we need to start making a list of suburbs and exurbs that has to serve more than one census defined area. I know in past threads we talked about Temecula being the commuter city for both San Diego and Los Angeles though.  Solano County is the other where we mentioned this area having to house both Sacramento and Bay area commuters at the same time. This is how we are going to find were the megaopolis are forming. [/size]

The area around Middletown and Springboro may be tied to Dayton, though it's in Butler and Warren counties, which overall are tied to Cincinnati. Some counties might have a handful of households that are tied to an area different from the rest of the county. You could break this down to the level of a city block if data was available.
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Beltway

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #34 on: June 25, 2019, 11:38:10 PM »

Boston to DC has been called the Megalopolis for decades -- there was even a National Geographic article and map to that effect back when I was a kid (early 1990s).  Driving down I-95, it is hard to argue otherwise.

Back in the 1960s a book was written, _Megalopolis unbound;: The supercity and the transportation of tomorrow_, by Claiborne Pell.  About the Northeast, improvements to rail travel.
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bing101

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #35 on: June 26, 2019, 12:16:00 AM »

Here is a better one we need to start making a list of suburbs and exurbs that has to serve more than one census defined area. I know in past threads we talked about Temecula being the commuter city for both San Diego and Los Angeles though.  Solano County is the other where we mentioned this area having to house both Sacramento and Bay area commuters at the same time. This is how we are going to find were the megaopolis are forming.

The area around Middletown and Springboro may be tied to Dayton, though it's in Butler and Warren counties, which overall are tied to Cincinnati. Some counties might have a handful of households that are tied to an area different from the rest of the county. You could break this down to the level of a city block if data was available.

Central New Jersey would have to be another candidate for suburbs/exurbs where they would serve NYC and Philadelphia Commuters.
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ipeters61

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #36 on: June 26, 2019, 08:12:52 AM »

Here is a better one we need to start making a list of suburbs and exurbs that has to serve more than one census defined area. I know in past threads we talked about Temecula being the commuter city for both San Diego and Los Angeles though.  Solano County is the other where we mentioned this area having to house both Sacramento and Bay area commuters at the same time. This is how we are going to find were the megaopolis are forming.

The area around Middletown and Springboro may be tied to Dayton, though it's in Butler and Warren counties, which overall are tied to Cincinnati. Some counties might have a handful of households that are tied to an area different from the rest of the county. You could break this down to the level of a city block if data was available.

Central New Jersey would have to be another candidate for suburbs/exurbs where they would serve NYC and Philadelphia Commuters.
There are rumors that Milford DE is going to be our next "boom town."  I even heard rumors that people would start commuting to Philadelphia from there.  I think that's a huge stretch, considering I live 20 miles north of Milford and I already live 82 miles from Philly.  I will say that I do know of a (very) small minority of people who do commute to DC from here, though (91 miles from Dover).
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golden eagle

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #37 on: June 28, 2019, 08:46:00 PM »


Some of these need to be revised IMO out west given several metro areas have grown together.  San Francisco/Oakland/San Jose ought to be a single metro area along with Los Angeles/Riverside/San Bernardino.  There is literally no break in the urban sprawl in those particular areas of California.


I would actually say San Francisco/Oakland/San Jose/Sacramento/Stockton/Salinas/Modesto/Fresno could easily be one. Another could be Los Angeles/Riverside/San Bernardino/Anaheim/Santa Barbara/Bakersfield/San Diego/Tijuana/El Centro/Mexicali would be another.

You could probably add Denver/Boulder/Fort Collins/Greeley/Cheyenne/Colorado Springs/Pueblo/Canon City as another.




This map might fit your description though.

Aside from Tracy there is too much separating San Joaquin Valley from being part of the Bay Area or Sacramento.  All the communities have a huge geographic barrier from the Bay Area via the Diablo Range.  The farms separate the communities even further into isolated pockets usually alongside CA 99. 

Regarding Phoenix, Flagstaff and Tucson there is way too much mountain, reservation and desert in the way to consider those one metro area.


Austin and San Antonio should be in the running for being 1 megaopolis

Austin and San Antonio together would form a giant urban area, but both areas are part of the emerging Texas Triangle forming along I-35 from San Antonio to DFW, 45 from Dallas to Houston, and 10 from Houston to San Antonio. The I-35 portion is the most pronounced part. Im not sure if I-45 and I-10 will build up enough in the foreseeable future to complete the triangle.
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US 89

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Re: 2018 metropolitan population estimates
« Reply #38 on: June 29, 2019, 12:46:08 AM »

Looking at the Great Lakes region, there’s too much rural space between Kankakee and Champaign-Urbana for C-U to be part of the megalopolis. I can’t see the Front Range region stretching all the way to Albuquerque. Isn’t there a lot of mountains between Albuquerque and Pueblo?

There's a whole lot of nothing between Albuquerque and Pueblo, with exception for a few smaller towns. And yes, there are definitely mountains, including the 7800 foot Raton Pass which I'm pretty sure is the highest point on I-25.

I'm not a fan of that map either, since I think they try too hard stretching the regions especially in the west. I really don't see how you can identify the Wasatch Front in Utah with the Front Range as a megaregion. Nor can I see Boise being considered part of the Pacific Northwest, or Vegas lumped in with SoCal. There's just too much open space, desert, or mountains between all those areas.
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