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Author Topic: Roads that trick your memory  (Read 9189 times)

exit322

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #25 on: July 09, 2013, 11:06:18 AM »

Sometimes the opposite is true:  I think to myself, Ooh, I'm almost there, and then I remember, Oh yeah, I forgot there's like a million more miles before XYZ.

When I was a kid going to my grandma's in Florida, I-75 was ALWAYS that.  We got off at Exit 61, which when you first enter the state...first exit's 87, so "that's not too bad."  No, just 165 miles of "not too bad."  Not a particularly exciting interstate either, so yeah...that trip did get a little better when the exit numbers changed, because at least the exit number dropped by 5-7-10 numbers every exit, instead of just 87, 86, 85, 84...
One time I drove down to Florida and they were in the middle of changing exit numbers on I-75. The Turnpike was Exit 65 at the time, and I remember falling asleep and waking up, seeing exits in the 380s (in reality, less than 60 miles from the Turnpike).

That would have been a screwy feeling.  I know when Georgia had just changed their numbers over, I had to do a quick doubletake when the first exit on I-95 was 109 and not 19.
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Henry

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #26 on: July 09, 2013, 11:22:23 AM »

In Chicago, I-90 and I-94 run north-south and I-55 runs east-west. I used to think that those routes should be signed with the directions they go in, until I learned that this was the opposite of the Interstate signing convention.
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paleocon121171

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #27 on: July 09, 2013, 01:52:01 PM »

What's really nice is on I-290 (The Eisenhower Expressway) especially heading back west toward Elk Grove Village, there are a couple of I-294 interchanges (as well as a couple alternate routes listed) in case you make a "mistake."
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hm insulators

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #28 on: July 09, 2013, 03:22:52 PM »

CA-18 was drastically different from how I remembered it. I remembered it being like CA-330, a generally narrow, two-lane highway that was considerably twisty and windy. Instead, I was on it a few months ago and segments of it are practically expressways, including a flyover ramp junction with CA-138. A very impressive road, to say the least.



That first ten miles or so of California 18 out of San Bernardino to the turnoff at 138 (including the bridge) was four-laned back in the 1960s sometime. (Would anyone know exactly what year; I've always been curious.) When I was in my pre-teen and teen years in the 1970s, my folks used to rent cabins up by Lake Arrowhead in the summer and later bought one of their own and it was definitely four-lane then. (The highway, not the cabin.) :-D

Beyond the Crestline turnoff, 18 is still the little cliff-hanging road it was since it was built.
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kphoger

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #29 on: July 09, 2013, 08:07:51 PM »

One time I drove [...] I remember falling asleep [...]
:banghead:

Hey man, highway hypnosis happens.  One time I drove from western Kansas to the Colorado Rocky Mountains.  I fell asleep seomwhere near Byers, and woke up in Denver when I started drifting toward a semi in the lane to the right of me.  :-o
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huskeroadgeek

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #30 on: July 10, 2013, 03:51:31 AM »

Sometimes the opposite is true:  I think to myself, Ooh, I'm almost there, and then I remember, Oh yeah, I forgot there's like a million more miles before XYZ.

When I was a kid going to my grandma's in Florida, I-75 was ALWAYS that.  We got off at Exit 61, which when you first enter the state...first exit's 87, so "that's not too bad."  No, just 165 miles of "not too bad."  Not a particularly exciting interstate either, so yeah...that trip did get a little better when the exit numbers changed, because at least the exit number dropped by 5-7-10 numbers every exit, instead of just 87, 86, 85, 84...
One time I drove down to Florida and they were in the middle of changing exit numbers on I-75. The Turnpike was Exit 65 at the time, and I remember falling asleep and waking up, seeing exits in the 380s (in reality, less than 60 miles from the Turnpike).

That would have been a screwy feeling.  I know when Georgia had just changed their numbers over, I had to do a quick doubletake when the first exit on I-95 was 109 and not 19.
I wonder how many people unfamiliar with sequential numbering have ever looked at a map and thought they knew about how many miles it was across a state with sequential numbering by looking at the first exit number. That happened to me the first time I was figuring up mileage for a trip across Georgia(prior to the change to mileage-based numbering). I thought it was only 142 miles across the state on I-75 based on the first exit number being 142. Fortunately, by the time I actually traveled through the state, I had figured out that they used sequential and not mileage based numbering.
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Henry

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #31 on: July 10, 2013, 11:33:07 AM »

Sometimes the opposite is true:  I think to myself, Ooh, I'm almost there, and then I remember, Oh yeah, I forgot there's like a million more miles before XYZ.

When I was a kid going to my grandma's in Florida, I-75 was ALWAYS that.  We got off at Exit 61, which when you first enter the state...first exit's 87, so "that's not too bad."  No, just 165 miles of "not too bad."  Not a particularly exciting interstate either, so yeah...that trip did get a little better when the exit numbers changed, because at least the exit number dropped by 5-7-10 numbers every exit, instead of just 87, 86, 85, 84...
One time I drove down to Florida and they were in the middle of changing exit numbers on I-75. The Turnpike was Exit 65 at the time, and I remember falling asleep and waking up, seeing exits in the 380s (in reality, less than 60 miles from the Turnpike).

That would have been a screwy feeling.  I know when Georgia had just changed their numbers over, I had to do a quick doubletake when the first exit on I-95 was 109 and not 19.
I wonder how many people unfamiliar with sequential numbering have ever looked at a map and thought they knew about how many miles it was across a state with sequential numbering by looking at the first exit number. That happened to me the first time I was figuring up mileage for a trip across Georgia(prior to the change to mileage-based numbering). I thought it was only 142 miles across the state on I-75 based on the first exit number being 142. Fortunately, by the time I actually traveled through the state, I had figured out that they used sequential and not mileage based numbering.
FWIW, I like mileage-based exits better...although sequential is fine for New England states, which are among the nation's smallest.
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huskeroadgeek

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #32 on: July 10, 2013, 04:18:43 PM »

Sometimes the opposite is true:  I think to myself, Ooh, I'm almost there, and then I remember, Oh yeah, I forgot there's like a million more miles before XYZ.

When I was a kid going to my grandma's in Florida, I-75 was ALWAYS that.  We got off at Exit 61, which when you first enter the state...first exit's 87, so "that's not too bad."  No, just 165 miles of "not too bad."  Not a particularly exciting interstate either, so yeah...that trip did get a little better when the exit numbers changed, because at least the exit number dropped by 5-7-10 numbers every exit, instead of just 87, 86, 85, 84...
One time I drove down to Florida and they were in the middle of changing exit numbers on I-75. The Turnpike was Exit 65 at the time, and I remember falling asleep and waking up, seeing exits in the 380s (in reality, less than 60 miles from the Turnpike).

That would have been a screwy feeling.  I know when Georgia had just changed their numbers over, I had to do a quick doubletake when the first exit on I-95 was 109 and not 19.
I wonder how many people unfamiliar with sequential numbering have ever looked at a map and thought they knew about how many miles it was across a state with sequential numbering by looking at the first exit number. That happened to me the first time I was figuring up mileage for a trip across Georgia(prior to the change to mileage-based numbering). I thought it was only 142 miles across the state on I-75 based on the first exit number being 142. Fortunately, by the time I actually traveled through the state, I had figured out that they used sequential and not mileage based numbering.
FWIW, I like mileage-based exits better...although sequential is fine for New England states, which are among the nation's smallest.
I definitely prefer mileage-based too and I also think sequential is fine for most of the states that use it-the one exception is New York, particularly on the Thruway. It's hard to have a concept of just how far it is between major cities because one can't make a quick look at a map to find out. I can imagine a trip across the state on the Thruway(particularly on the I-90 portion) has confused some people into being longer than they expect if they haven't actually added up the distance or aren't already familiar with it.
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Pete from Boston

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #33 on: July 13, 2013, 12:14:14 AM »

Some of my early memories of certain roads were based on a perception of direction that I didn't confirm with a map, and the misconception remained with me for a long time.

When the tolls came down from the Connecticut Turnpike when I was a kid, our regular route up into New England broadened to include not only 684-84 but 95-91-84 (and ultimately the Merritt).  I remember being convinced that north of New Haven, the segment of I-91 along the Quinnipiac River marshes turned due east until Exit 11 or so.  It took several years as a passenger through there to get re-oriented properly. 

Oddly, on one of my earliest childhood trips on the New Jersey Turnpike through the Meadowlands, I recall thinking the same thing -- that the road ran east-west through that stretch.  Something about me lost direction in marshes.

Other than that, everything just seems longer when you're younger, not driving, and/or new to a road.  I took a bus across Pennsylvania on 80 when I was 10 and it seemed interminable.  Now, many years later, it... ok, bad example.

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roadman65

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #34 on: July 13, 2013, 02:21:29 AM »

I could have swore that the Blakely Street exit off of I-81 in Scranton, PA was a cloverleaf when I was there before.  GSV and all Google images show it as a parclo.
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Sheryl Crowe

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #35 on: July 13, 2013, 02:26:19 PM »

Sometimes the opposite is true:  I think to myself, Ooh, I'm almost there, and then I remember, Oh yeah, I forgot there's like a million more miles before XYZ.

When I was a kid going to my grandma's in Florida, I-75 was ALWAYS that.  We got off at Exit 61, which when you first enter the state...first exit's 87, so "that's not too bad."  No, just 165 miles of "not too bad."  Not a particularly exciting interstate either, so yeah...that trip did get a little better when the exit numbers changed, because at least the exit number dropped by 5-7-10 numbers every exit, instead of just 87, 86, 85, 84...
One time I drove down to Florida and they were in the middle of changing exit numbers on I-75. The Turnpike was Exit 65 at the time, and I remember falling asleep and waking up, seeing exits in the 380s (in reality, less than 60 miles from the Turnpike).

That would have been a screwy feeling.  I know when Georgia had just changed their numbers over, I had to do a quick doubletake when the first exit on I-95 was 109 and not 19.
I wonder how many people unfamiliar with sequential numbering have ever looked at a map and thought they knew about how many miles it was across a state with sequential numbering by looking at the first exit number. That happened to me the first time I was figuring up mileage for a trip across Georgia(prior to the change to mileage-based numbering). I thought it was only 142 miles across the state on I-75 based on the first exit number being 142. Fortunately, by the time I actually traveled through the state, I had figured out that they used sequential and not mileage based numbering.
FWIW, I like mileage-based exits better...although sequential is fine for New England states, which are among the nation's smallest.
I definitely prefer mileage-based too and I also think sequential is fine for most of the states that use it-the one exception is New York, particularly on the Thruway. It's hard to have a concept of just how far it is between major cities because one can't make a quick look at a map to find out. I can imagine a trip across the state on the Thruway(particularly on the I-90 portion) has confused some people into being longer than they expect if they haven't actually added up the distance or aren't already familiar with it.
Many people around here have no idea that the numbers on the exit signs have any meaning whatsoever.  I've been teaching my son to calculate distances using mile-markers and exit signs since he could add and subtract.  My dad did the same thing to me. 

"All right, son, Atkins is the number 94 and we just passed the 115, so how far is it?" 

Good times.
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Interstatefan78

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #36 on: July 15, 2013, 10:53:06 AM »

I've driven on I-476 from Allentown to Philadelphia for the past eight years now and it's mostly a four lane toll road that needs of an urgent repair from Exit 56-20, but six lanes are in work from exit 20-31. Mostly farmland and only two service areas on I-476 both at Allentown and Hickory Run perhaps another service area North of Lansdale
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US81

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #37 on: July 28, 2013, 11:48:25 AM »

When I look at historical maps of roads I remember as a child, the map "in my head" had much bigger turns than on the map. A wide sweeping highway turn I remember as 90 degrees was not even 45, or an angled intersection I remember as 60 degrees may have been closer to 30.  Yet somehow it all coalesced in my mind as a coherent whole from which I could confidently navigate.
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vdeane

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Re: Roads that trick your memory
« Reply #38 on: July 28, 2013, 07:39:01 PM »

VT 15 does this to me as well.  I can't find the spot we stopped for lunch on a trip to Maine because the village layout I remember corresponds to no town on the road.  All I can say for sure is that it was somewhere between VT 104 and VT 100, and probably not the first town on that section (we stopped a town or two earlier to look at one of the cars after a rock messed up the gas gauge).
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