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Author Topic: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?  (Read 27494 times)

Flint1979

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #100 on: January 05, 2018, 02:31:16 PM »

Get rid of the Gratiot Connector part of the interchange all together and re-street the area and then develop it, connect downtown to Eastern Market. Then realign the curve for traffic staying on I-75, then ramp I-75 NB traffic like it is now to I-375 SB so I-75 NB traffic has access to the southbound portion of the boulevard. The freeway stops being a freeway at Gratiot and through traffic continues on the service drives as the boulevard. Both service drives can be extended to three lanes and through routed instead of like the NB service drive ending at Antietam. The traffic signals on Gratiot work at the same time and allow traffic to clear the intersection before turning red.

I simply wish that I-75 didn't exist between I-94 and I-96 and the Lodge didn't exist south of I-94. Lots of wasted land just to move traffic through and it broke up vibrant neighborhoods. I-75 should multiplex with I-94 between I-96 and itself then turn south onto current I-96 and have I-96 terminate at I-94 instead of it's current terminus makes much more sense than the current setup. I flatout can't stand the I-75 stretch between milemarkers 48-51.
How much extra traffic would that dump onto I-94 and I-96?
From I-75 quite a bit I-94 is about to be widened through there anyway and should really be ten lanes. I-96 would be fine.

From the Lodge probably about the same as it is now since most of that traffic is coming and going from downtown.

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The Ghostbuster

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #101 on: January 16, 2018, 06:16:08 PM »

Does anyone know whether the local residents support or oppose turning Interstate 375 into a boulevard?
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Flint1979

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #102 on: January 16, 2018, 06:24:22 PM »

Does anyone know whether the local residents support or oppose turning Interstate 375 into a boulevard?
I'm pretty sure local residents don't care one way or the other. This freeway is downtown, not really in a residential neighborhood.
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silverback1065

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #103 on: January 16, 2018, 06:56:53 PM »

if anything, they'd be for it.  unless these freeway removal people are just a vocal minority
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Flint1979

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #104 on: January 16, 2018, 10:03:24 PM »

if anything, they'd be for it.  unless these freeway removal people are just a vocal minority
I'm pretty sure most people in Detroit are for it.
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wanderer2575

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #105 on: May 19, 2018, 08:46:29 PM »

I know this thread has been dormant for some months, but I just came across some information on the MDOT website.  Looks like all the proposals have been narrowed down to two preferred alternatives.  Both call for what is now I-375 to be rebuilt as a surface boulevard south of Gratiot Avenue.  The difference between the two alternatives is configuration and alignment of the new boulevard.

Both alternatives call for reconstructing the I-75/I-375 interchange to make I-75 the through movement, eliminating the Gratiot Connector, and eliminating the left-hand Madison Avenue exit and entrance ramps in favor of a new combined Gratiot/Madison interchange.  Interestingly, the proposed redesigned interchange has the new northbound boulevard making a left-hand merge onto northbound I-75.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_I-375_Practical_Alternatives_608079_7.pdf
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Flint1979

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #106 on: May 19, 2018, 09:50:24 PM »

I know this thread has been dormant for some months, but I just came across some information on the MDOT website.  Looks like all the proposals have been narrowed down to two preferred alternatives.  Both call for what is now I-375 to be rebuilt as a surface boulevard south of Gratiot Avenue.  The difference between the two alternatives is configuration and alignment of the new boulevard.

Both alternatives call for reconstructing the I-75/I-375 interchange to make I-75 the through movement, eliminating the Gratiot Connector, and eliminating the left-hand Madison Avenue exit and entrance ramps in favor of a new combined Gratiot/Madison interchange.  Interestingly, the proposed redesigned interchange has the new northbound boulevard making a left-hand merge onto northbound I-75.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_I-375_Practical_Alternatives_608079_7.pdf
I wonder what the freeway name is going to be since currently it switches from the Fisher to the Chrysler. I think this is the best one I've seen yet and hope this is the one they go with.
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billtm

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #107 on: May 20, 2018, 02:30:51 PM »

I know this thread has been dormant for some months, but I just came across some information on the MDOT website.  Looks like all the proposals have been narrowed down to two preferred alternatives.  Both call for what is now I-375 to be rebuilt as a surface boulevard south of Gratiot Avenue.  The difference between the two alternatives is configuration and alignment of the new boulevard.

Both alternatives call for reconstructing the I-75/I-375 interchange to make I-75 the through movement, eliminating the Gratiot Connector, and eliminating the left-hand Madison Avenue exit and entrance ramps in favor of a new combined Gratiot/Madison interchange.  Interestingly, the proposed redesigned interchange has the new northbound boulevard making a left-hand merge onto northbound I-75.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_I-375_Practical_Alternatives_608079_7.pdf
I wonder what the freeway name is going to be since currently it switches from the Fisher to the Chrysler. I think this is the best one I've seen yet and hope this is the one they go with.

I agree these look like much needed improvements to downtown Detroit, but I have a couple questions about the design alternatives that struck me as a little odd.
1. Why is there a stoplight in between Lafayette St. and Larned St.?
2. In alternative 4, why didn't they make the new local road/service drive extend further northward to make it a continuation of the new I-75 exit ramp to Madison St./Gratoit Av. (which is how they did it in alternative 5, but with the entrance ramp)?
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Flint1979

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #108 on: May 20, 2018, 03:09:33 PM »

I know this thread has been dormant for some months, but I just came across some information on the MDOT website.  Looks like all the proposals have been narrowed down to two preferred alternatives.  Both call for what is now I-375 to be rebuilt as a surface boulevard south of Gratiot Avenue.  The difference between the two alternatives is configuration and alignment of the new boulevard.

Both alternatives call for reconstructing the I-75/I-375 interchange to make I-75 the through movement, eliminating the Gratiot Connector, and eliminating the left-hand Madison Avenue exit and entrance ramps in favor of a new combined Gratiot/Madison interchange.  Interestingly, the proposed redesigned interchange has the new northbound boulevard making a left-hand merge onto northbound I-75.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_I-375_Practical_Alternatives_608079_7.pdf
I wonder what the freeway name is going to be since currently it switches from the Fisher to the Chrysler. I think this is the best one I've seen yet and hope this is the one they go with.

I agree these look like much needed improvements to downtown Detroit, but I have a couple questions about the design alternatives that struck me as a little odd.
1. Why is there a stoplight in between Lafayette St. and Larned St.?
2. In alternative 4, why didn't they make the new local road/service drive extend further northward to make it a continuation of the new I-75 exit ramp to Madison St./Gratoit Av. (which is how they did it in alternative 5, but with the entrance ramp)?
1. My best guess is that this will function like a Michigan Left Turn and that one as well as the one north of Lafayette are for the turn arounds. In Alternate 5 only the one you mentioned would function like this since the one north of Lafayette would be for Monroe Street.
2. I'm not sure I understand what you mean with this one.
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silverback1065

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #109 on: May 20, 2018, 03:48:10 PM »

i think it's too wide, and the median to too big.  what's the point of the 2 way side road anyway?
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billtm

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #110 on: May 20, 2018, 04:33:35 PM »

i think it's too wide, and the median to too big.  what's the point of the 2 way side road anyway?

The two way side road is there in alternative 4 in order to reduce boulevard access points and probably for local access if they put buildings in between the main boulevard and the service drive.
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billtm

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #111 on: May 20, 2018, 04:42:43 PM »

I know this thread has been dormant for some months, but I just came across some information on the MDOT website.  Looks like all the proposals have been narrowed down to two preferred alternatives.  Both call for what is now I-375 to be rebuilt as a surface boulevard south of Gratiot Avenue.  The difference between the two alternatives is configuration and alignment of the new boulevard.

Both alternatives call for reconstructing the I-75/I-375 interchange to make I-75 the through movement, eliminating the Gratiot Connector, and eliminating the left-hand Madison Avenue exit and entrance ramps in favor of a new combined Gratiot/Madison interchange.  Interestingly, the proposed redesigned interchange has the new northbound boulevard making a left-hand merge onto northbound I-75.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_I-375_Practical_Alternatives_608079_7.pdf
I wonder what the freeway name is going to be since currently it switches from the Fisher to the Chrysler. I think this is the best one I've seen yet and hope this is the one they go with.

I agree these look like much needed improvements to downtown Detroit, but I have a couple questions about the design alternatives that struck me as a little odd.
1. Why is there a stoplight in between Lafayette St. and Larned St.?
2. In alternative 4, why didn't they make the new local road/service drive extend further northward to make it a continuation of the new I-75 exit ramp to Madison St./Gratoit Av. (which is how they did it in alternative 5, but with the entrance ramp)?
1. My best guess is that this will function like a Michigan Left Turn and that one as well as the one north of Lafayette are for the turn arounds. In Alternate 5 only the one you mentioned would function like this since the one north of Lafayette would be for Monroe Street.
2. I'm not sure I understand what you mean with this one.

To (hopefully) clarify my second question, in alternative 5 the service drive extends all the way up to the Gratoit Avenue interchange, but in alternative 4 the service drive terminates at Monroe Street and instead there is an entrance ramp from Gratoit Avenue to the boulevard. Why not just have the two way service road go up to Gratoit? I feel like a two-way street would be better than a one-way ramp.
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Flint1979

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #112 on: May 20, 2018, 05:10:25 PM »

I know this thread has been dormant for some months, but I just came across some information on the MDOT website.  Looks like all the proposals have been narrowed down to two preferred alternatives.  Both call for what is now I-375 to be rebuilt as a surface boulevard south of Gratiot Avenue.  The difference between the two alternatives is configuration and alignment of the new boulevard.

Both alternatives call for reconstructing the I-75/I-375 interchange to make I-75 the through movement, eliminating the Gratiot Connector, and eliminating the left-hand Madison Avenue exit and entrance ramps in favor of a new combined Gratiot/Madison interchange.  Interestingly, the proposed redesigned interchange has the new northbound boulevard making a left-hand merge onto northbound I-75.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_I-375_Practical_Alternatives_608079_7.pdf
I wonder what the freeway name is going to be since currently it switches from the Fisher to the Chrysler. I think this is the best one I've seen yet and hope this is the one they go with.

I agree these look like much needed improvements to downtown Detroit, but I have a couple questions about the design alternatives that struck me as a little odd.
1. Why is there a stoplight in between Lafayette St. and Larned St.?
2. In alternative 4, why didn't they make the new local road/service drive extend further northward to make it a continuation of the new I-75 exit ramp to Madison St./Gratoit Av. (which is how they did it in alternative 5, but with the entrance ramp)?
1. My best guess is that this will function like a Michigan Left Turn and that one as well as the one north of Lafayette are for the turn arounds. In Alternate 5 only the one you mentioned would function like this since the one north of Lafayette would be for Monroe Street.
2. I'm not sure I understand what you mean with this one.

To (hopefully) clarify my second question, in alternative 5 the service drive extends all the way up to the Gratoit Avenue interchange, but in alternative 4 the service drive terminates at Monroe Street and instead there is an entrance ramp from Gratoit Avenue to the boulevard. Why not just have the two way service road go up to Gratoit? I feel like a two-way street would be better than a one-way ramp.
Ok I see what you mean and I'm not sure why they'd do that I guess this is why we should hope for Alternate 5. I don't see why they don't just have two one way streets instead of the boulevard and two way street and develop the land in the middle.
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wanderer2575

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #113 on: May 20, 2018, 10:04:01 PM »

I know this thread has been dormant for some months, but I just came across some information on the MDOT website.  Looks like all the proposals have been narrowed down to two preferred alternatives.  Both call for what is now I-375 to be rebuilt as a surface boulevard south of Gratiot Avenue.  The difference between the two alternatives is configuration and alignment of the new boulevard.

Both alternatives call for reconstructing the I-75/I-375 interchange to make I-75 the through movement, eliminating the Gratiot Connector, and eliminating the left-hand Madison Avenue exit and entrance ramps in favor of a new combined Gratiot/Madison interchange.  Interestingly, the proposed redesigned interchange has the new northbound boulevard making a left-hand merge onto northbound I-75.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_I-375_Practical_Alternatives_608079_7.pdf
I wonder what the freeway name is going to be since currently it switches from the Fisher to the Chrysler. I think this is the best one I've seen yet and hope this is the one they go with.

I agree these look like much needed improvements to downtown Detroit, but I have a couple questions about the design alternatives that struck me as a little odd.
1. Why is there a stoplight in between Lafayette St. and Larned St.?
2. In alternative 4, why didn't they make the new local road/service drive extend further northward to make it a continuation of the new I-75 exit ramp to Madison St./Gratoit Av. (which is how they did it in alternative 5, but with the entrance ramp)?
1. My best guess is that this will function like a Michigan Left Turn and that one as well as the one north of Lafayette are for the turn arounds. In Alternate 5 only the one you mentioned would function like this since the one north of Lafayette would be for Monroe Street.
2. I'm not sure I understand what you mean with this one.

To (hopefully) clarify my second question, in alternative 5 the service drive extends all the way up to the Gratoit Avenue interchange, but in alternative 4 the service drive terminates at Monroe Street and instead there is an entrance ramp from Gratoit Avenue to the boulevard. Why not just have the two way service road go up to Gratoit? I feel like a two-way street would be better than a one-way ramp.
Ok I see what you mean and I'm not sure why they'd do that I guess this is why we should hope for Alternate 5. I don't see why they don't just have two one way streets instead of the boulevard and two way street and develop the land in the middle.

Two one-way streets with a depressed greenway (e.g. space for a bike path) or space for other use in the middle was Alternate 6, which for whatever reason was eliminated.

I'd guess at least part of the reason for not extending the secondary two-way road on the west side of the boulevard up to Gratiot Avenue (Alternate 4) is that all northbound traffic on that road would need to turn left or right onto Gratiot.  Continuing straight north through the intersection would directly put motorists the wrong way onto either direction of I-75.  Given the number of wrong-way freeway driving incidents we've had around here lately, plus the number of visitors unfamiliar with the area (e.g. going to the casino or attending stadium events), a design easily allowing that error probably would be a Bad Thing.  This isn't an issue if the secondary road is on the east side of the boulevard (Alternate 5), as any northbound traffic continuing past Gratiot will correctly merge into either direction of I-75.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2018, 11:41:46 PM by wanderer2575 »
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billtm

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #114 on: May 21, 2018, 09:44:39 AM »

I know this thread has been dormant for some months, but I just came across some information on the MDOT website.  Looks like all the proposals have been narrowed down to two preferred alternatives.  Both call for what is now I-375 to be rebuilt as a surface boulevard south of Gratiot Avenue.  The difference between the two alternatives is configuration and alignment of the new boulevard.

Both alternatives call for reconstructing the I-75/I-375 interchange to make I-75 the through movement, eliminating the Gratiot Connector, and eliminating the left-hand Madison Avenue exit and entrance ramps in favor of a new combined Gratiot/Madison interchange.  Interestingly, the proposed redesigned interchange has the new northbound boulevard making a left-hand merge onto northbound I-75.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_I-375_Practical_Alternatives_608079_7.pdf
I wonder what the freeway name is going to be since currently it switches from the Fisher to the Chrysler. I think this is the best one I've seen yet and hope this is the one they go with.

I agree these look like much needed improvements to downtown Detroit, but I have a couple questions about the design alternatives that struck me as a little odd.
1. Why is there a stoplight in between Lafayette St. and Larned St.?
2. In alternative 4, why didn't they make the new local road/service drive extend further northward to make it a continuation of the new I-75 exit ramp to Madison St./Gratoit Av. (which is how they did it in alternative 5, but with the entrance ramp)?
1. My best guess is that this will function like a Michigan Left Turn and that one as well as the one north of Lafayette are for the turn arounds. In Alternate 5 only the one you mentioned would function like this since the one north of Lafayette would be for Monroe Street.
2. I'm not sure I understand what you mean with this one.

To (hopefully) clarify my second question, in alternative 5 the service drive extends all the way up to the Gratoit Avenue interchange, but in alternative 4 the service drive terminates at Monroe Street and instead there is an entrance ramp from Gratoit Avenue to the boulevard. Why not just have the two way service road go up to Gratoit? I feel like a two-way street would be better than a one-way ramp.
Ok I see what you mean and I'm not sure why they'd do that I guess this is why we should hope for Alternate 5. I don't see why they don't just have two one way streets instead of the boulevard and two way street and develop the land in the middle.

Two one-way streets with a depressed greenway (e.g. space for a bike path) or space for other use in the middle was Alternate 6, which for whatever reason was eliminated.

I'd guess at least part of the reason for not extending the secondary two-way road on the west side of the boulevard up to Gratiot Avenue (Alternate 4) is that all northbound traffic on that road would need to turn left or right onto Gratiot.  Continuing straight north through the intersection would directly put motorists the wrong way onto either direction of I-75.  Given the number of wrong-way freeway driving incidents we've had around here lately, plus the number of visitors unfamiliar with the area (e.g. going to the casino or attending stadium events), a design easily allowing that error probably would be a Bad Thing.  This isn't an issue if the secondary road is on the east side of the boulevard (Alternate 5), as any northbound traffic continuing past Gratiot will correctly merge into either direction of I-75.

I didn't think about that. That makes a lot more sense now!
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The Ghostbuster

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #115 on: May 24, 2018, 03:38:09 PM »

Which is worse for a downtown area? A four-lane freeway? Or an eight-lane boulevard? I would definitely say the latter. Crossing that boulevard looks like it would be a pain.
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Flint1979

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #116 on: May 24, 2018, 03:40:30 PM »

Which is worse for a downtown area? A four-lane freeway? Or an eight-lane boulevard? I would definitely say the latter. Crossing that boulevard looks like it would be a pain.
Look how much space that four lane freeway takes up though. You could develop an entire block of buildings between two one way streets right there. I personally don't think the freeways were meant for the inner cities and Detroit seems to have overdone the freeway system now.
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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #117 on: May 24, 2018, 05:10:12 PM »

At least with an 8-lane boulevard, you can have buildings right up to the street.  Can't exactly do that with a freeway.

And let's face it.  Detroit's a city.  It should have buildings.
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Brandon

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #118 on: May 24, 2018, 05:17:16 PM »

At least with an 8-lane boulevard, you can have buildings right up to the street.  Can't exactly do that with a freeway.

And let's face it.  Detroit's a city.  It should have buildings.

One can bury a freeway in a tunnel (cut and cover).  Can't do that with a wide boulevard.
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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #119 on: May 24, 2018, 06:35:36 PM »

They can, yes...but only at significant expense.
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silverback1065

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #120 on: May 24, 2018, 07:21:27 PM »

i'm just saying it's too wide. 
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Flint1979

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #121 on: May 25, 2018, 02:27:50 AM »

I hate how freeway's breakup the fabric of connecting neighborhoods in a city. I can imagine around 1950 the area north of where old Tiger Stadium stood was a vibrant neighborhood then I-75 was put in and broke up Corktown from North Corktown. Now North Corktown has a lot of abandonment and vacant lots with nothing on them.

I like how Detroit's freeways for the most part direct you towards downtown but I don't like the overuse of the freeways within the city limits. I-94 should be capped between 2nd or Cass and Brush or Beaubien and I-75 should be capped between Grand River and  Brush and I didn't leave another option for this one because it's ridiculous that the freeways carve up the city of Detroit. You can cap I-75 from Outer Drive (exit 42) to 8 Mile (exit 59) and I'm good with that too. They should do something to make the Lodge a boulevard too and attach the entire west side of Detroit to downtown, make it a boulevard from Grand Blvd. to Fort and while they are at it they can extend the cap on I-75 to the new Lodge Blvd.
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wanderer2575

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Re: Detroit - Potential I-375 road diet?
« Reply #122 on: August 02, 2020, 01:45:34 PM »

Reviving the thread for this new news:

I-375 redesign funding redirected while project study continues

https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2020/07/29/mdot-375-funding-project/5532790002/

Quote
Darcie Moran, Detroit Free Press

The funding allotted for the rebuilding of Interstate 375 was moved to aid other projects while study of the effort continues, says Michigan Department of Transportation Director Paul C. Ajegba.

Crain’s Detroit Business first reported Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s administration pulling the $180 million in MDOT’s five-year project plan, leaving $6 million still slated for project planning.

In January, Whitmer announced her latest plan to “fix the damn roads” — a $3.5-billion road bonding plan — and the State Transportation Commission, made up of governor appointees, removed the I-375 project from its 5-year approved project list.

Discussions on turning the milelong strip back into a surface street have spanned much of the last decade.  It’s been long recognized as a remnant of the 1960s, when Black Detroit neighborhoods were destroyed for freeways to the suburbs; the Black Bottom neighborhood was destroyed for the creation of I-75 and I-375.

The history is not forgotten, but the process of reviewing possible plans for the road isn’t over and needs to play out, Ajegba said.  Meanwhile, other roads need attention.

“It doesn't make sense to be holding $180 million aside for something we don't know what we're going to do (with) when we have roads that are falling apart,” he said.

It’s also premature to say the expressway will definitely be ripped out as an environmental study is still underway and an OK from the Federal Highway Administration is still needed, he said.

The environmental study has continued for several years and proposals have included making the road a surface-level street with landscaped medians, bicycle lanes and new lighting.

With crumbling roads and Whitmer’s attempts to fix them, the money was primarily redirected for other metro Detroit projects, Ajegba said.

Officials are committed to Detroit and spending significant money there, he said, pointing especially to the I-94 corridor, a nearly $2-billion investment.

“375 will eventually take care of itself but we are using that money wisely to do some big projects in the city, and that's a good thing,” he said.  “We're reinvesting it back in the city."

But the city of Detroit is hoping for a continued discussion while the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, or SEMCOG, weighs the next step — removing the I-375 project from its 2020-23 Transportation Improvement Program.

SEMCOG’s executive committee last week tabled an amendment to the program plan, used to get federal funding, which included pushing the project to 2027.

A Detroit representative on the transportation coordinating council had previously recommended approval of the amendment, minus the I-375 project deletion.

Detroit Chief Operating Officer Hakim Berry said officials are hoping to sit down to get more information on the choices and reasons at hand.

He noted the years of work that have gone into the project.

“There’s been a lot of energy, a lot of meetings and a lot of planning to make this happen,” he said.  “375 is historically a thorn for many of the Detroiters here.”
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