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Author Topic: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?  (Read 1127 times)

SectorZ

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2019, 03:20:40 PM »

I recall that seat belts haven't been installed in school buses because it's actually safer without them.  Every seat is padding and, in the case of a rollover or whatever, that would be a lot of seat belts that might need to be cut.

Which is one of the biggest bunches of baloney I've seen.  There's a video of a bus going out of control due to an incapacitated driver out there, and due to the lack of seat belts, one of the kids hits the ceiling of the bus.

One kid gets hurt so start doubling everyone's back-road commute times because the bus driver has to ensure every kid is belted in before pulling off? Got a fire in the bus (much more likely than a rollover) you think all those kids are going to not freak out and get those belts off in time? When you solve those two things, I'll be on board.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2019, 03:45:28 PM »

I recall that seat belts haven't been installed in school buses because it's actually safer without them.  Every seat is padding and, in the case of a rollover or whatever, that would be a lot of seat belts that might need to be cut.

Which is one of the biggest bunches of baloney I've seen.  There's a video of a bus going out of control due to an incapacitated driver out there, and due to the lack of seat belts, one of the kids hits the ceiling of the bus.

It's actually not baloney.  School Buses are the safest vehicle to be in for kids, even without seatbelts. (Source: https://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/Documents/2018bussir-abstract.pdf )  The high, soft seatbacks reduce whiplash and reduce the overall movement back and forth that can happen to kids...they're basically crashing into an airbag in front of them. 

Sure, you found a video of a school bus in an accident, and ONE kid in that school bus that flipped way up in the air.  What about the others on board - they didn't flip up, and they weren't wearing seatbelts either.

New Jersey started requiring shoulder harnesses after a fatal accident on I-80 when a school bus crossed 3 lanes to make an illegal U-turn, and got hit by a truck.  That prompted the call for better seatbelts, although by all accounts the 2 people killed (an adult and a child) were wearing seatbelts.  43 others survived.  What the accident should've called for is better screening of school bus drivers, which based on my travels hasn't happened as of yet.

And while every parent wants to think their kid is an angel and puts their belt on when they sit down on a school but, the reality is that's far from the truth.  Better seatbelts are only as good as the kid that actually wears them.
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wxfree

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2019, 04:04:27 PM »

Nevada has a similar law:

Quote from: Nevada Revised Statutes
NRS 484B.360  Maximum speed of school bus.  A school bus shall not exceed:
1.  A speed of 55 miles per hour when transporting pupils to and from school; or
2.  The speed limit posted by a public authority for the portion of highway being traversed when transporting pupils to and from any activity which is properly a part of a school program.

So now maybe a better question: Why do school buses have different lawful maximum speeds when transporting kids to/from school versus to/from school activities? Transporting to/from school activities isn't inherently safer in any way, other than it's possible there will be fewer kids on the bus.

I would guess that it's because of the assumption that going to school isn't as far as going somewhere else.  Also, you don't make regular stops on the way to somewhere else, so the extra speed is more advantageous.

That's somewhat similar to Texas, which allows school activity buses to travel at the speed limit, but to me it seems like that's because it's a different design, like a regular passenger bus.  School buses are limited to 50 or 60 even when going somewhere else.
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US 81

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #28 on: July 29, 2019, 04:29:16 PM »

When worn correctly, seat belts and car seats save lives; however, seat belts can cause serious injury if they are not worn correctly.  Lap belts that ride up onto the abdomen (instead on sitting across the bones of the pelvis) cause abdominal organ ruptures with hemorrhage and/or lumbar spine injuries that may cause paraplegia. Shoulder harnesses that run across the neck can cause airway injuries or cervical spine injuries, either of which can be fatal. It's hard to have seat belts that easily adjust from kindergarten size to high school size and most kids would not reliably adjust the belts to fit themselves correctly. Therefore, instead of seat belts many decision-makers advocate the high seat-back with padding isolation. It inhibits - but does not entirely prevent - some heavy adult-sized kid from becoming a human missile that kills or injures other kids.

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tolbs17

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #29 on: July 29, 2019, 05:09:45 PM »

I recall that seat belts haven't been installed in school buses because it's actually safer without them.  Every seat is padding and, in the case of a rollover or whatever, that would be a lot of seat belts that might need to be cut.

If a bus ever catches on fire then yeah I'd say no seat belts. It's probably a reason why 44 states don't require them.
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1995hoo

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2019, 05:11:45 PM »

When I was a kid, a few school buses had seatbelts for a while. Instead of wearing them, we hit each other with them.
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tolbs17

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2019, 05:13:30 PM »

When I was a kid, a few school buses had seatbelts for a while. Instead of wearing them, we hit each other with them.

That's another reason why they shouldn't have seatbelts on a bus. Or, the person should just be banned from the bus altogether.
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rarnold

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #32 on: July 29, 2019, 05:19:23 PM »

As a person who has ridden on school buses most of my life, the 40 MPH sped limit is preposterous. Yes, speed increase can lead to more accidents and more severe accidents, but if the other vehicles on the road are traveling at the posted speed limit and a bus is cruising at 40 MPH, it is also dangerous. People will pass the vehicle, and not always at safe times. In North Carolina, where the highest posted speed is 70, the bus is traveling at least 30 MPH slower than other traffic.

Allow the driver to drive at the posted speed or a lower speed if more comfortable. If the driver speeds, find a new driver or the kids can get to the bus stop 5 minutes later.
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tolbs17

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #33 on: July 29, 2019, 05:24:14 PM »

As a person who has ridden on school buses most of my life, the 40 MPH sped limit is preposterous. Yes, speed increase can lead to more accidents and more severe accidents, but if the other vehicles on the road are traveling at the posted speed limit and a bus is cruising at 40 MPH, it is also dangerous. People will pass the vehicle, and not always at safe times. In North Carolina, where the highest posted speed is 70, the bus is traveling at least 30 MPH slower than other traffic.

Allow the driver to drive at the posted speed or a lower speed if more comfortable. If the driver speeds, find a new driver or the kids can get to the bus stop 5 minutes later.

You'll have people on a two-lane highway trying to get around the school bus. It happens constantly and there was almost a near collision when they were rushing to get around the bus.
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index

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #34 on: July 29, 2019, 05:41:20 PM »

I recall that seat belts haven't been installed in school buses because it's actually safer without them.  Every seat is padding and, in the case of a rollover or whatever, that would be a lot of seat belts that might need to be cut.

Which is one of the biggest bunches of baloney I've seen.  There's a video of a bus going out of control due to an incapacitated driver out there, and due to the lack of seat belts, one of the kids hits the ceiling of the bus.

One kid gets hurt so start doubling everyone's back-road commute times because the bus driver has to ensure every kid is belted in before pulling off? Got a fire in the bus (much more likely than a rollover) you think all those kids are going to not freak out and get those belts off in time? When you solve those two things, I'll be on board.
Plus, the kids school buses carrying vary wildly. It's common practice in my district to sit as many as four to a seat with younger kids in elementary schools. (yes, four, I myself was stuck on an overcrowded bus for ages where I had to sit in the aisle. not fun) You also have all the same reasons city buses don't have seat belts added on to that.

Even in middle school, when we were obviously a lot larger than elementary schoolers, we were often forced to sit three per seat, which meant the poor soul that sat on the outer edge was half hanging out in the aisle...Which some of the bus supervisors thought was funny. That was annoying at best. Seat belts wouldn't work for that.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2019, 05:46:39 PM by index »
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tolbs17

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #35 on: July 29, 2019, 10:01:01 PM »

It's mostly elementary schoolers, and middle schoolers. Some high schoolers will do it also, but pretty much about 75% of the seniors have cars or their parents pick them up. So I would exclude half of high school.

Do you think special ed buses are the same thing? If they are handicapped then that means I'm pretty sure it's a bus for special needs. It's a lot more quieter and the ride is more soothing. However, it can be annoying at some times if you hear a low-functioning person go "la, la, la!".
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sprjus4

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #36 on: July 29, 2019, 10:21:50 PM »

Even in middle school, when we were obviously a lot larger than elementary schoolers, we were often forced to sit three per seat, which meant the poor soul that sat on the outer edge was half hanging out in the aisle...Which some of the bus supervisors thought was funny. That was annoying at best. Seat belts wouldn't work for that.
I've had some bus drivers where they aren't even paying attention, and I'll just sit on the floor, especially in the back of the bus. It's better than being half in the seat, half over air. I can't count the amount of times I've had to sit 3 to a seat, never 4 to a seat though.
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tolbs17

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #37 on: July 31, 2019, 12:10:14 AM »

This is a perfect example why seat belts shouldn't be allowed on school buses!!! If this happens, then you will probably be dead!!! I want those kids to be safe. I rather prefer accidents over fires like this.

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tolbs17

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Re: In North Carolina, why do school buses drive 45 mph?
« Reply #38 on: October 02, 2019, 05:03:36 PM »

Also, forgot to say that they are banned from expressways if they are carrying kids on there too.

Quote
bans them from expressways if they're carrying students.

Source:
https://www.wral.com/school-bus-speed-limit-weighed/12243462/
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