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Author Topic: How rare are fall snowstorms?  (Read 611 times)

Brandon

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2019, 06:10:08 PM »

I heard that Mackinac Island has had snow recorded in every month of the year.
I'm not calling you out, but that sounds fake. Snow in July just seems impossible at 45 degrees north and no altitude to speak of.

I don't think Mackinac Island has, but trace amounts can happen in the UP, particularly the Keweenaw, throughout June, July, and August.
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KEVIN_224

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2019, 08:20:30 PM »

There was one year recently where we in NJ had a giant snowstorm that cancelled Halloween, and an otherwise quiet winter.

Snowtober...Saturday, October 29, 2011. It helped set Connecticut's current record for power outages only two months after the record set by Hurricane Irene.

We had a snowstorm in mid-November 2018. No blizzards, thank goodness!
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D-Dey65

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #27 on: September 29, 2019, 11:31:39 AM »

A more typical timing of our first significant snow would be late November or early December.
Speaking of November snow in New York, back in November 2014 when that blizzard named "Knife" hit Buffalo and had no impact on the New York Tri-State Area whatsoever, I overheard a conversation between my aunt and uncle. She was worried I might get stuck in that storm on the way home, despite the fact that none of my trips to New York City or Long Island include anything upstate.

I think she might've confused Buffalo with Baltimore. That woman has no sense of direction.

 
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jeffandnicole

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #28 on: September 29, 2019, 01:33:14 PM »

...I think she might've confused Buffalo with Baltimore. That woman has no sense of direction.

Many people are often confused with directions and weather. Combine the two and it's an all-out confusion clusterfuck.

On travel websites, I so often see "It's raining today. Will that impact my trip next month?" Or, "The weather forecast looks bad next week; should I cancel the trip I saved up 2 years to go on?" In most cases, they're going to climates that typically get the weather they see, but somehow during the entire planning process they were never told or looked at what the typical weather would normally be.  And because weather forecasts are generalized, they act as if the entire week will be a washout if they see a 30% chance of showers.  When combined with roads, I've seen it worse. "I saw I-80 is closed in California because of snow. How does this impact my drive from NYC to Cleveland"?
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1995hoo

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #29 on: September 29, 2019, 02:42:47 PM »

Here in the DC area, I can only remember snow in October one time, and I certainly wouldn't call it a snowstorm—it was more of a minimal dusting of the sort that makes your lawn look like it was dusted with powdered sugar but doesn't stick to the streets and sidewalks. Don't remember what year it was other than that it was sometime after 2010. I'm sure I have pictures somewhere on my PC, though.

Snow in November here is not a regular occurrence but isn't so rare as to be bizarre. We've had snow for Veterans' Day a few times and it's been enough to make for a messy commute home.
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webny99

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #30 on: September 30, 2019, 12:13:53 PM »

Snow in September would be rare, although the Rochester area has recorded measurable snowfall in every month except July.

October is a bit of a wild card. There could be snow, especially as you get past Columbus Day and towards Halloween, but it wouldn't exactly be expected. You will almost certainly see a few snowfalls before Thanksgiving - or on Thanksgiving (IIRC, it has snowed 4 of the past 5 Thanksgivings) - but late November / early December is when the real dependable and accumulating snow starts coming.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #31 on: September 30, 2019, 12:25:03 PM »

Apparently the snow this past weekend was substantial enough that it closed Tioga Pass early.  CA 108 and CA 4 are presently closed although I'm not certain if it is for the winter at this point.

kphoger

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #32 on: September 30, 2019, 02:18:52 PM »

Common in Kansas.  Where I grew up in northwestern Kansas, it was rare for the first snow to happen after November.  The first snowstorm usually happened sometime around Halloween, as I recall.  Here in Wichita, however, it's common for the first snow to come in January, but it varies greatly from year to year here.
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ET21

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #33 on: September 30, 2019, 02:45:13 PM »

I've only had maybe a handfall of "snowfalls" (traces or brief dustings), though last year we had a decent blizzard the weekend of Thanksgiving. About 3 years ago we had flurries on Halloween
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D-Dey65

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #34 on: October 01, 2019, 11:02:25 PM »

In November 2017, there were two days I saw trace elements of snow in the New York Tri-State Area. One was at the parking lot of the Food Universe in Fresh Meadows on Hollis Court & Francis Lewis Boulevards and the westbound service road of I-495, and the other was at the Vince Lombardi Service Area on the New Jersey Turnpike as I was heading home.



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kphoger

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Re: How rare are fall snowstorms?
« Reply #35 on: October 02, 2019, 01:28:29 PM »

The reason western Kansas often has snowstorms in October or November that eastern Colorado and western Kansas are in the rain shadow of the Rocky Mountains.  Typically, storms dump their load before they're done making it east across the mountains, so those plains to the east don't receive much rain or snow.  However, if a storm is mighty enough to actually make it past the Front Range, then it's also mighty enough to dump a whole bunch of snow.
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