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Author Topic: Very unusual street suffixes  (Read 15969 times)

US 89

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #75 on: February 20, 2021, 01:18:56 AM »

for official stupid reasons renamed "Freedom Freeway" at some point.

Did they designate an Expressdom Expressway somewhere else at the same time? Or a Parkdom Parkway? So many missed opportunities.

empirestate

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #76 on: February 20, 2021, 11:42:29 AM »

Hard to believe no one has mentioned Salisbury Crag in Worcester, MA.

Nash's Nook in Columbia, TN
Silverado Pass in Spring Hill, TN
Neeley's Bend in Spring Hill, TN

Cases like these make me wonder if there's a distinction to be made between [Name + Suffix] constructions, and those where it's simply a two-word phrase for some geographic feature, which for "literary" reasons is also applied to the road itself.

In other words, a crag and a bend are both physiographic features, not types of roads—but both could logically have roads running through them. So in the case of Salisbury Crag and Silverado Pass, do "crag" and "pass" actually function as the road descriptor suffix? Or is there an unwritten descriptor, as: {the road through} Silverado Pass, where "road" is the descriptor, not "pass"?

(Am I greatly over-thinking this? Of course! You could also say that somebody who climbs Mt. Everest is getting way too much exercise.) :-P

For that matter, have we looked at the relatively unusual cases where the road descriptor is a prefix rather than a suffix? For example, here's the intersection of Trail of the Maples and " " " Hemlocks:
https://goo.gl/maps/XoxxZhgitWFDcPWa9 (the map view erroneously omits the "the")
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citrus

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #77 on: February 20, 2021, 12:04:14 PM »

No Name Uno, in Gilroy, CA https://goo.gl/maps/m5r77CsEfLfighN89
It's a frontage road, but it's relatively well-known because there's a major hospital on it!
Some history here: https://gilroydispatch.com/former-worker-says-he-coined-no-name-uno/
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kphoger

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #78 on: February 20, 2021, 10:04:12 PM »

Blacktop

'Blacktop' is a common generic in southern Illinois—both as part of the official road name and as common parlance for "____ Road".

So, for example, near Zeigler is a road officially called Creek Nation Blacktop.  Or there's Eddyville Blacktop (Eddyville Blk).

But the road between Corinth and Johnston City is commonly called 'Corinth Blacktop' in Johnston City, and it's commonly called 'Johnston City Blacktop' in Corinth.  Herrin Road west of Herrin is commonly called 'Herrin Blacktop' in Johnston City;  east of Herrin is commonly called 'Colp Blacktop' in Herrin.  You get the idea.

This sometimes makes for confusion.  For example, I once witnessed an accident on what's officially called 'Corinth Road' on the outskirts of Johnston City.  I called 9-1-1 and reported the location as 'Johnston City Blacktop', because that's what I had heard most people refer to it as.  The dispatcher on the other end replied with 'Which one?'  To which I replied 'the one that heads west out of town toward Corinth'.
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Avalanchez71

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #79 on: February 22, 2021, 09:44:01 AM »

Hard to believe no one has mentioned Salisbury Crag in Worcester, MA.

Nash's Nook in Columbia, TN
Silverado Pass in Spring Hill, TN
Neeley's Bend in Spring Hill, TN

Pass is definelty a suffix and there are other examples in the Nashville metropolitan area of "Pass".

Cases like these make me wonder if there's a distinction to be made between [Name + Suffix] constructions, and those where it's simply a two-word phrase for some geographic feature, which for "literary" reasons is also applied to the road itself.

In other words, a crag and a bend are both physiographic features, not types of roads—but both could logically have roads running through them. So in the case of Salisbury Crag and Silverado Pass, do "crag" and "pass" actually function as the road descriptor suffix? Or is there an unwritten descriptor, as: {the road through} Silverado Pass, where "road" is the descriptor, not "pass"?

(Am I greatly over-thinking this? Of course! You could also say that somebody who climbs Mt. Everest is getting way too much exercise.) :-P

For that matter, have we looked at the relatively unusual cases where the road descriptor is a prefix rather than a suffix? For example, here's the intersection of Trail of the Maples and " " " Hemlocks:
https://goo.gl/maps/XoxxZhgitWFDcPWa9 (the map view erroneously omits the "the")
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empirestate

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #80 on: February 23, 2021, 12:49:42 AM »

Pass is definelty a suffix and there are other examples in the Nashville metropolitan area of "Pass".

Is it used to denote a sort of road-like feature? (It certainly could be.) Or is it always evoking a mountain pass?

Anyway, even without "Pass" as an example, the question certainly remains. Now I'm trying to think of a case where a road is named as a geographic feature, or something else, without using an obvious two-word, specific-generic construction. Closest I can think of is Bowery.
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Avalanchez71

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #81 on: February 23, 2021, 07:38:52 AM »

Pass is definelty a suffix and there are other examples in the Nashville metropolitan area of "Pass".

Is it used to denote a sort of road-like feature? (It certainly could be.) Or is it always evoking a mountain pass?

Anyway, even without "Pass" as an example, the question certainly remains. Now I'm trying to think of a case where a road is named as a geographic feature, or something else, without using an obvious two-word, specific-generic construction. Closest I can think of is Bowery.

I don't really think so.  I think it is a suffix.  However, in Spring Hill I also see Springs, Glen, Grove, Knoll, Walk and Ridge used as a suffix.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Spring+Hill,+TN/@35.7252561,-86.9321936,16.88z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x8863785e49af2da3:0x1bc893243d09b485!8m2!3d35.751179!4d-86.9300023
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Avalanchez71

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #82 on: February 23, 2021, 07:40:09 AM »

Owensboro, KY uses "Walk" as a suffix.

I think Walk is used in the Hampton Roads, VA area frequently.  I know there are a couple in the Nashville, TN region.
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ahj2000

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #83 on: February 23, 2021, 09:07:29 AM »

In the Hickory-Conover area in NC, there’s many streets that take on multiple suffixes. You could have a 10th Avenue Way or a 4th Street Place Drive.
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frankenroad

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #84 on: February 23, 2021, 02:26:40 PM »

Columbia, MD, has a host of wacky street names, including many that end in "Garth", "Row", and "Ride".

A complete list can be found here.  https://geographic.org/streetview/usa/md/howard/columbia.html

The history behind street naming in Columbia can be found at https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1995-01-10-1995010059-story.html
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kphoger

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #85 on: February 23, 2021, 02:35:26 PM »

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andrepoiy

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #86 on: February 26, 2021, 08:05:05 PM »

There are also roads that lack suffixes... I was looking at Google Maps and came across some new suburban neighbourhoods in Irvine CA with street names that are just named stuff like "Toretta" and "Della".
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kphoger

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #87 on: February 26, 2021, 08:43:14 PM »

There are also roads that lack suffixes... I was looking at Google Maps and came across some new suburban neighbourhoods in Irvine CA with street names that are just named stuff like "Toretta" and "Della".

I grew up in a town like that.  My address was 806 S 1st.  And I have a childhood memory of my mom ordering something over the phone...

— What's your address?
— 806 S 1st.
— 1st what?
— Just 1st.
— I mean, is it 1st Street, 1st Avenue, 1st what?
— No, it's just 1st.
— Well, I have to put something into the computer.  It's a required field.
— Then just put whatever you want, then.
— Is it Street or Avenue or...?
— No.
— OK, how about 1st Street, then?
— Whatever you think.

 :banghead:
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Avalanchez71

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #88 on: March 01, 2021, 08:16:30 AM »

There are also roads that lack suffixes... I was looking at Google Maps and came across some new suburban neighbourhoods in Irvine CA with street names that are just named stuff like "Toretta" and "Della".

I grew up in a town like that.  My address was 806 S 1st.  And I have a childhood memory of my mom ordering something over the phone...

— What's your address?
— 806 S 1st.
— 1st what?
— Just 1st.
— I mean, is it 1st Street, 1st Avenue, 1st what?
— No, it's just 1st.
— Well, I have to put something into the computer.  It's a required field.
— Then just put whatever you want, then.
— Is it Street or Avenue or...?
— No.
— OK, how about 1st Street, then?
— Whatever you think.

 :banghead:

That was long before the USPS online database of addresses.
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kphoger

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Re: Very unusual street suffixes
« Reply #89 on: March 01, 2021, 11:30:28 AM »

Late 90s.
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