AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction  (Read 19120 times)

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9576
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 06:43:52 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #150 on: November 17, 2020, 03:24:35 PM »

That is the one bright spot, as it eliminates two curb cuts (the exit from Riverwind's north valet, which has always been pretty dodgy, and one of the entrances/exits to Love's). If SH-9 were converted to freeway, you would have to figure out how to tie Adkins Hill Road into it, as well as run a ramp from I-35 NB to the new roundabout (I suppose you could realign Adkins Hill to tie into the new ramp they're adding).

There is still one curb cut that needs to be removed between there and the light at Bankers, and that's the entrance to Riverwind north valet. I suppose ODOT could just buy out access and Riverwind could use that money to connect the valet to the Bankers lot. Or they could just permanently close north valet; they often only have south valet open anyway. Then put in interchanges at Bankers and 24th St/Santa Fe, and run Texas-style frontage roads between the two, and now you're cooking...

One improvement that should be considered for the area is a pedestrian bridge between Riverwind and Love's, as there is a sort of strange amount of foot traffic between the two. I say strange because there's not a whole lot at Love's that you can't get at Riverwind that would make sense for someone on foot to be seeking out, but I guess there are people without rides that lose all their money at Riverwind and then chill out at Love's afterward. For whatever reason, there's been a decent number of accidents and near-misses, and it'd probably be in everyone's best interest for that bridge to be there (especially if the Chickasaws and Love's would be willing to contribute toward it).

Logged

Baloo Uriza

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1983
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Last Login: November 20, 2020, 08:54:41 PM
    • Mastodon
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #151 on: November 17, 2020, 03:29:50 PM »

$18 million for a new ramp into the Riverwind parking lot (the Chickasaws coughed up $1.6 million). Fun stuff.

And, you know, the land stolen from them.
Logged

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9576
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 06:43:52 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #152 on: November 17, 2020, 04:14:12 PM »

Having worked for the Chickasaw Nation Division of Commerce for 10 years (including 4 of those years at Riverwind), I can safely say it's still as much corporate welfare as if you ran a ramp straight into a Walmart parking lot. The only difference is what the profits are spent on.
Logged

SoonerCowboy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 18
  • Location: Choctaw, Oklahoma
  • Last Login: November 22, 2020, 10:22:52 PM
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #153 on: November 17, 2020, 06:33:19 PM »

Interesting. The ramp changes will theoretically make it easier to convert WB OK9 to a freeway in the future.

That would be awesome, if they could make that a freeway, to link up to the HE Bailey spur, and eventually OK9 to the east to link up to the Kickapoo turnpike.
Logged

Bobby5280

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2241
  • Location: Lawton, OK
  • Last Login: November 22, 2020, 09:17:44 PM
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #154 on: November 18, 2020, 08:23:41 PM »

The proposed improvements to the I-35/OK-9 interchange by Riverwind Casino look like a decent start. The relocation of the traffic signal with OK-9 and S Harvey Street/NW 12th Avenue would provide more room to build high speed, freeway-to-freeway ramps between I-35 and OK-9 to the West of I-35.

The problem for OK-9 remains that ROW is somewhat cramped going farther West of I-35 between the casino and other businesses on the North and South sides of the current 4-lane undivided highway. It would be a really super tight squeeze in a few spots to build a grade-level 4-lane freeway flanked by frontage roads. The current drainage ditches would have to be reconfigured, maybe even tunneled underneath the new road.

ODOT (or OTA) could take a different approach similar to the TX-146 project in Kemah, TX. Build an elevated 4-lane freeway (or toll road) structure above a reconfigured OK-9 surface boulevard. That concept would probably cost more money, but it would also ensure high speed connections between OK-9 and I-35 and do more to filter surface street access to the two super highways.

I really would like to see an all-limited-access connection between the H.E. Bailey Turnpike and I-35 South of Norman. A limited access connection from the H.E. Bailey Turnpike thru or around Norman and to the Kickapoo Turnpike would be even better.
Logged

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9576
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 06:43:52 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #155 on: November 18, 2020, 10:47:54 PM »

The proposed improvements to the I-35/OK-9 interchange by Riverwind Casino look like a decent start. The relocation of the traffic signal with OK-9 and S Harvey Street/NW 12th Avenue would provide more room to build high speed, freeway-to-freeway ramps between I-35 and OK-9 to the West of I-35.

The problem for OK-9 remains that ROW is somewhat cramped going farther West of I-35 between the casino and other businesses on the North and South sides of the current 4-lane undivided highway. It would be a really super tight squeeze in a few spots to build a grade-level 4-lane freeway flanked by frontage roads. The current drainage ditches would have to be reconfigured, maybe even tunneled underneath the new road.

According to the lot lines on the McClain County Assessor's website, the narrowest point of the ROW that is both undivided and developed is the part between Mason's Peanuts and the Chickasaw Employee Health Clinic, which is just about exactly 300 feet wide. The ROW tapers down to its narrowest point on the east side of 24th Street, but the land on either side is vacant, so it shouldn't be too hard to acquire some more in that area, and would be a good place to put an interchange with 24th Street. The ROW widens back out to about 325 feet on the west side of the intersection.

Quote
I really would like to see an all-limited-access connection between the H.E. Bailey Turnpike and I-35 South of Norman. A limited access connection from the H.E. Bailey Turnpike thru or around Norman and to the Kickapoo Turnpike would be even better.

Logged

Bobby5280

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2241
  • Location: Lawton, OK
  • Last Login: November 22, 2020, 09:17:44 PM
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #156 on: November 19, 2020, 12:19:54 AM »

Quote from: Scott5114
The ROW widens back out to about 325 feet on the west side of the intersection.

I think the tightest choke point along OK-9 is the part where First United Bank is on the North side of the road and McDonald's, Oklahoma Optical and the Shell station is on the South side. It's probably not all that geometrically reliable, but when I use the measuring tool in Google Earth Pro going from the fence line of a North property (like the bank) to the fence line of the South property (McDonald's) it comes out to about 280 feet in width. That's still technically enough space to build a 4-lane Interstate highway flanked by frontage roads. The only difficulty is accommodating extra room for slip ramps, particularly if they're braided ramps. And all the drainage ditch issues are included within that ROW. But I suppose if you build box culverts and other features in the right way below the highway that can be turned into a non-issue.

If I was one of the people in charge at Riverwind Casino I would be lobbying like holy hell to get OK-9 turned into a freeway between the end of the H.E. Bailey Turnpike Extension stub to US-62 and I-35. I would think the Riverwind Casino location would be only that much more valuable being at the junction of two super highways rather than just being at a regular exit off I-35. The same goes for the other businesses along OK-9 in that location. The freaking location would be even more valuable if the Kickapoo Turnpike was extended somehow down to I-35 in that area. If that happened I think commercial development would boom in that location.
Logged

Plutonic Panda

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1432
  • Location: Los Angeles
  • Last Login: Today at 12:51:41 PM
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #157 on: November 19, 2020, 12:40:43 AM »

There’s a rumor(unsubstantiated) of a Buc-ees going in at this location.
Logged

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9576
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 06:43:52 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #158 on: November 19, 2020, 03:27:39 AM »

Quote from: Scott5114
The ROW widens back out to about 325 feet on the west side of the intersection.

I think the tightest choke point along OK-9 is the part where First United Bank is on the North side of the road and McDonald's, Oklahoma Optical and the Shell station is on the South side. It's probably not all that geometrically reliable, but when I use the measuring tool in Google Earth Pro going from the fence line of a North property (like the bank) to the fence line of the South property (McDonald's) it comes out to about 280 feet in width.

The fence lines are not accurate to the property lines. The point you describe was where I got the 300' width. Based on your measurements the fencelines may be offset from the property lines by as much as 20'. Follow the link in my comment to the county assessor's website, which has a measurement tool you can use against the official property line data.

There’s a rumor(unsubstantiated) of a Buc-ees going in at this location.

Nothing in McClain County is owned by Buc-ees, according to the county assessor.
Logged

Bobby5280

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2241
  • Location: Lawton, OK
  • Last Login: November 22, 2020, 09:17:44 PM
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #159 on: November 19, 2020, 12:58:54 PM »

I really would like to see at least one Buc-ee's location built in the OKC area. I think the area around the OK-9/I-35 interchange is too cramped and access to I-35 too limited for a huge Buc-cee's store. The new one off I-10 in Southern Alabama has created a traffic nightmare there since there is only one way in and out. There are a few spots farther North along I-35 between Norman and Moore that would be more acceptable for a Buc-ee's location. I-40 on the Western side of OKC has some possibilities, although they would be better if they had continuous frontage roads.

It doesn't look like Buc-ee's has any plans to expand into Oklahoma anytime soon. For now the convenience super-store chain is concentrating its expansion plans on the Deep South. They just opened a new Buc-ee's location in Warner Robbins, GA. They have plans to build at least 2 or 3 more locations in Northern Georgia. They just announced plans to build a location just North of Florence, SC on I-95 at the SC-327 exit. A location near Daytona, FL is starting construction; a second Florida location is planned near St Augustine. Buc-ee's is also looking at the booming "Triangle" region in North Carolina.

Still, OKC and Tulsa are legit possible locations. Amarillo would be a great spot for a Buc-ee's store. There's all kinds of space where they could build one just West of the I-40/US-287 junction.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2020, 05:50:33 PM by Bobby5280 »
Logged

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9576
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 06:43:52 PM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #160 on: November 21, 2020, 03:12:32 AM »

From the one time I've been to a Buc-ee's, I feel like it'd be a great place to stop on the occasional roadtrip, but be way too big of a pain in the ass to be your daily fill-up-and-buy-a-Coke station.
Logged

CoreySamson

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 401
  • Buc-ee's Fanboy

  • Age: 17
  • Location: Greater Houston, TX
  • Last Login: November 22, 2020, 06:58:51 PM
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #161 on: November 21, 2020, 05:32:09 PM »

From the one time I've been to a Buc-ee's, I feel like it'd be a great place to stop on the occasional roadtrip, but be way too big of a pain in the ass to be your daily fill-up-and-buy-a-Coke station.

The smaller ones where I live surely are! There's one near me that has about 40-50 pumps which feels about the right size to me.
Logged
Houston-area teenage roadgeek.
Amateur guitarist and keyboardist.

Fix Baton Rouge's traffic!!!

Bobby5280

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2241
  • Location: Lawton, OK
  • Last Login: November 22, 2020, 09:17:44 PM
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #162 on: November 21, 2020, 06:07:10 PM »

The first Buc-ee's locations in the Houston area were pretty ordinary/normal in size. Then they just started getting bigger and bigger.

Quote from: Scott5114
From the one time I've been to a Buc-ee's, I feel like it'd be a great place to stop on the occasional roadtrip, but be way too big of a pain in the ass to be your daily fill-up-and-buy-a-Coke station.

Yeah, the giant-sized Buc-ee's stores do not function the same way as a neighborhood 7-Eleven where you just drive down the street to pick up a six-pack of Bud Light or something. Driving onto a Buc-ee's property has the same feel as going to a large Walmart or even a shopping mall. I think the executives for Buc-ee's understand this and choose their locations carefully so they do work as ideal stops on a road trip. The typical giant Buc-ee's store tends to be near major highway junctions on the outskirts of a major city or at a key road trip point, like the one off I-10 in Alabama. That's the I-10 exit to go down to Gulf Shores.

It's probably a good thing I don't have an opportunity to visit a Buc-ee's store on a frequent basis. I would be gaining a lot of weight eating a bunch of their beef jerky!

I got a good laugh visiting the Buc-ee's web site recently.  On the home page they had a big announcement about the Warner Robbins, GA store being open. They used the tag line: "Potty Like a Rock Star!" They do have very clean (and big) restrooms.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2020, 06:10:11 PM by Bobby5280 »
Logged

SoonerCowboy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 18
  • Location: Choctaw, Oklahoma
  • Last Login: November 22, 2020, 10:22:52 PM
Re: Oklahoma City Metro Highways | Small projects and construction
« Reply #163 on: November 21, 2020, 07:43:22 PM »

The first Buc-ee's locations in the Houston area were pretty ordinary/normal in size. Then they just started getting bigger and bigger.

Quote from: Scott5114
From the one time I've been to a Buc-ee's, I feel like it'd be a great place to stop on the occasional roadtrip, but be way too big of a pain in the ass to be your daily fill-up-and-buy-a-Coke station.

Yeah, the giant-sized Buc-ee's stores do not function the same way as a neighborhood 7-Eleven where you just drive down the street to pick up a six-pack of Bud Light or something. Driving onto a Buc-ee's property has the same feel as going to a large Walmart or even a shopping mall. I think the executives for Buc-ee's understand this and choose their locations carefully so they do work as ideal stops on a road trip. The typical giant Buc-ee's store tends to be near major highway junctions on the outskirts of a major city or at a key road trip point, like the one off I-10 in Alabama. That's the I-10 exit to go down to Gulf Shores.

It's probably a good thing I don't have an opportunity to visit a Buc-ee's store on a frequent basis. I would be gaining a lot of weight eating a bunch of their beef jerky!

I got a good laugh visiting the Buc-ee's web site recently.  On the home page they had a big announcement about the Warner Robbins, GA store being open. They used the tag line: "Potty Like a Rock Star!" They do have very clean (and big) restrooms.

I agree Bobby. Locally (OKC area), when filling up, I rarely go inside a convenience store, just fill up at the pump, and go. Different story when traveling though. Buc-ees' is a great stop for restroom, fuel and beef jerky LOL.
Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.