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Author Topic: On house numbering  (Read 6328 times)

CNGL-Leudimin

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2016, 05:48:31 PM »

Being used to the numbering from the beginning of the street, I find the 'American' house numbering weird (as with many American things). It doesn't allow for the following to occur.
This leads to great fun if the road has many more houses on one side than the other (eg my road, where evens go up to 78 on the inside of a loop (with a big jump in numbers too) whereas the odds at that point are at 111 due to the outside not only having more houses along the edge, but spurs with several houses on, and then go up to 131). My grandparents' small cul-de-sac has 2, 4, 6 and 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 on the other side (should have gone with sequential numbers)

I know of one example in my hometown: There is a street where there are many houses in the odd side and a hospital in the even side in its first section, and as result number 6 is opposite number 63! Things even out at that point, and at the end of the street number 56 is opposite number 113.
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kphoger

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #26 on: December 23, 2016, 05:49:55 PM »

To answer the OP, I would number it like this:

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kphoger

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #27 on: December 23, 2016, 06:11:33 PM »

Some of the western suburbs of Chicago have an interesting system, where they base the address number on the zero-point of downtown Chicago.  So, for example, 26W402 would be a house 26 miles + 4 blocks west of Chicago's zero point.  Without shortening it, the number would be 21202 (20800 being the 26-mile point).  It also gets confusing in those areas, because they sometimes coexist along with suburb-specific numbering schemes (so, for example, 26W402 might be a block away from 722 or whatever).

However, this system only really exists in unincorporated DuPage and Kane Counties.  Unincorporated Cook and Will Counties use the more typical addresses based of State and Madison.

No, it exists in at least Warrenville proper, which is where I first encountered the system.  For example, the Warrenville post office is at 3S101 Rockwell Street, Walgreen's is at 28W104 Warrenville Road, etc.  However, it's by no means ubiquitous there.  Take two banks as an example, just one block apart and both in Warrenville proper:

Northstar Credit Union:  3S555 Winfield Road
Fifth Third Bank:  3601 Winfield Road

Confused yet?

This is also not unique to Warrenville.  The Winfield public library is at 0S291 Winfield Road, even though CDH a few blocks north (where my first child was born) is at 25 Winfield Road容ven though the bank across the street from the hospital is at 0N010 Winfield Road. 
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english si

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #28 on: December 24, 2016, 05:56:28 AM »

I'm really torn on this topic.

My most general answer is, anything except the English system of...
count up one side sequentially and then come back the other side sequentially (so, for instance ... 42 is opposite 1)
...which I'm really glad he mentioned, because it's just retarded.  If he hadn't mentioned it, I sure as heck was going to.
Is it that retarded? It depends on the road, surely. For roads that only have one entrance/exit, or spend most of their time going round a square (with no houses in the middle) it makes sense - especially the latter as what else would makes sense for that?
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20160805

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #29 on: December 24, 2016, 07:31:14 AM »

To answer the OP, I would number it like this:



That makes a lot of sense, and thank you for beautifying my interchanges  :biggrin: :nod:

Some of the western suburbs of Chicago have an interesting system, where they base the address number on the zero-point of downtown Chicago.  So, for example, 26W402 would be a house 26 miles + 4 blocks west of Chicago's zero point.  Without shortening it, the number would be 21202 (20800 being the 26-mile point).  It also gets confusing in those areas, because they sometimes coexist along with suburb-specific numbering schemes (so, for example, 26W402 might be a block away from 722 or whatever).

However, this system only really exists in unincorporated DuPage and Kane Counties.  Unincorporated Cook and Will Counties use the more typical addresses based of State and Madison.

No, it exists in at least Warrenville proper, which is where I first encountered the system.  For example, the Warrenville post office is at 3S101 Rockwell Street, Walgreen's is at 28W104 Warrenville Road, etc.  However, it's by no means ubiquitous there.  Take two banks as an example, just one block apart and both in Warrenville proper:

Northstar Credit Union:  3S555 Winfield Road
Fifth Third Bank:  3601 Winfield Road

Confused yet?

This is also not unique to Warrenville.  The Winfield public library is at 0S291 Winfield Road, even though CDH a few blocks north (where my first child was born) is at 25 Winfield Road容ven though the bank across the street from the hospital is at 0N010 Winfield Road. 

That makes no sense.  Why do certain buildings have one type of address and others have a different type of address?  That's just too confusing.
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kphoger

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #30 on: December 24, 2016, 11:01:53 AM »

Some of the western suburbs of Chicago have an interesting system, where they base the address number on the zero-point of downtown Chicago.  So, for example, 26W402 would be a house 26 miles + 4 blocks west of Chicago's zero point.  Without shortening it, the number would be 21202 (20800 being the 26-mile point).  It also gets confusing in those areas, because they sometimes coexist along with suburb-specific numbering schemes (so, for example, 26W402 might be a block away from 722 or whatever).

However, this system only really exists in unincorporated DuPage and Kane Counties.  Unincorporated Cook and Will Counties use the more typical addresses based of State and Madison.

No, it exists in at least Warrenville proper, which is where I first encountered the system.  For example, the Warrenville post office is at 3S101 Rockwell Street, Walgreen's is at 28W104 Warrenville Road, etc.  However, it's by no means ubiquitous there.  Take two banks as an example, just one block apart and both in Warrenville proper:

Northstar Credit Union:  3S555 Winfield Road
Fifth Third Bank:  3601 Winfield Road

Confused yet?

This is also not unique to Warrenville.  The Winfield public library is at 0S291 Winfield Road, even though CDH a few blocks north (where my first child was born) is at 25 Winfield Road容ven though the bank across the street from the hospital is at 0N010 Winfield Road. 

That makes no sense.  Why do certain buildings have one type of address and others have a different type of address?  That's just too confusing.

If it were ubiquitous, rather than coexisting with another numbering scheme, then I'm sure you could get used to it.  For example, the red highway on your drawing would be the 1S000 line, the next green avenue south of that would be the 2S000 line, and so on.  21E110 Poplar Street would be 6 miles east of 15E110 Poplar Street.  And, if we applied our 20-numbers-to-a-block system and assumed your 10-blocks-to-a-mile system, then 21E110 Poplar Street would be 5ス miles east of 15E010 Poplar Street, and numbers should rarely exceed ##X200.  But this is only reasonable with some semblance of a grid, and it should not coexist with another scheme.
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pianocello

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #31 on: December 24, 2016, 11:18:56 AM »

I would also avoid duplicating N/S addresses and E/W addresses.  In other words, only N and E addresses would use 1, 5, 9, 13, etc. and 2, 6, 10, 14, etc., while only S/W would use 3, 7, 11, 15, etc. and 4, 8, 12, 16, etc.  That way, if somebody knew an address but forgot the direction, you could figure out the correct direction based on the number.

Funny you should mention this. The City of Valparaiso does this, except the numbers x00-x49 are used north or east of the zero point (Lincolnway and Washington), while x50-x99 are south or west. For example, 302 Lincolnway is 3 blocks east of Washington, but 352 Lincolnway is 3 blocks west. It's pretty handy, as it eliminates the need for a directional prefix for streets.

It's an intuitive system, and it's not very confusing (in all honesty, most people don't even notice it), but Valparaiso is the only city I know of that uses it.
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20160805

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #32 on: December 25, 2016, 10:07:30 AM »

Some of the western suburbs of Chicago have an interesting system, where they base the address number on the zero-point of downtown Chicago.  So, for example, 26W402 would be a house 26 miles + 4 blocks west of Chicago's zero point.  Without shortening it, the number would be 21202 (20800 being the 26-mile point).  It also gets confusing in those areas, because they sometimes coexist along with suburb-specific numbering schemes (so, for example, 26W402 might be a block away from 722 or whatever).

However, this system only really exists in unincorporated DuPage and Kane Counties.  Unincorporated Cook and Will Counties use the more typical addresses based of State and Madison.

No, it exists in at least Warrenville proper, which is where I first encountered the system.  For example, the Warrenville post office is at 3S101 Rockwell Street, Walgreen's is at 28W104 Warrenville Road, etc.  However, it's by no means ubiquitous there.  Take two banks as an example, just one block apart and both in Warrenville proper:

Northstar Credit Union:  3S555 Winfield Road
Fifth Third Bank:  3601 Winfield Road

Confused yet?

This is also not unique to Warrenville.  The Winfield public library is at 0S291 Winfield Road, even though CDH a few blocks north (where my first child was born) is at 25 Winfield Road容ven though the bank across the street from the hospital is at 0N010 Winfield Road. 

That makes no sense.  Why do certain buildings have one type of address and others have a different type of address?  That's just too confusing.

If it were ubiquitous, rather than coexisting with another numbering scheme, then I'm sure you could get used to it.  For example, the red highway on your drawing would be the 1S000 line, the next green avenue south of that would be the 2S000 line, and so on.  21E110 Poplar Street would be 6 miles east of 15E110 Poplar Street.  And, if we applied our 20-numbers-to-a-block system and assumed your 10-blocks-to-a-mile system, then 21E110 Poplar Street would be 5ス miles east of 15E010 Poplar Street, and numbers should rarely exceed ##X200.  But this is only reasonable with some semblance of a grid, and it should not coexist with another scheme.

That system actually makes sense when explained like that.  But you're right: there shouldn't be two house numbering systems coexisting in the same area.  That just gets too confusing.

And was the 20 numbers per block part stolen from my OP?  ;-)
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Bickendan

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #33 on: December 26, 2016, 05:57:52 AM »

Some of the western suburbs of Chicago have an interesting system, where they base the address number on the zero-point of downtown Chicago.  So, for example, 26W402 would be a house 26 miles + 4 blocks west of Chicago's zero point.  Without shortening it, the number would be 21202 (20800 being the 26-mile point).  It also gets confusing in those areas, because they sometimes coexist along with suburb-specific numbering schemes (so, for example, 26W402 might be a block away from 722 or whatever).

However, this system only really exists in unincorporated DuPage and Kane Counties.  Unincorporated Cook and Will Counties use the more typical addresses based of State and Madison.

No, it exists in at least Warrenville proper, which is where I first encountered the system.  For example, the Warrenville post office is at 3S101 Rockwell Street, Walgreen's is at 28W104 Warrenville Road, etc.  However, it's by no means ubiquitous there.  Take two banks as an example, just one block apart and both in Warrenville proper:

Northstar Credit Union:  3S555 Winfield Road
Fifth Third Bank:  3601 Winfield Road

Confused yet?

This is also not unique to Warrenville.  The Winfield public library is at 0S291 Winfield Road, even though CDH a few blocks north (where my first child was born) is at 25 Winfield Road容ven though the bank across the street from the hospital is at 0N010 Winfield Road. 

That makes no sense.  Why do certain buildings have one type of address and others have a different type of address?  That's just too confusing.

If it were ubiquitous, rather than coexisting with another numbering scheme, then I'm sure you could get used to it.  For example, the red highway on your drawing would be the 1S000 line, the next green avenue south of that would be the 2S000 line, and so on.  21E110 Poplar Street would be 6 miles east of 15E110 Poplar Street.  And, if we applied our 20-numbers-to-a-block system and assumed your 10-blocks-to-a-mile system, then 21E110 Poplar Street would be 5ス miles east of 15E010 Poplar Street, and numbers should rarely exceed ##X200.  But this is only reasonable with some semblance of a grid, and it should not coexist with another scheme.

That system actually makes sense when explained like that.  But you're right: there shouldn't be two house numbering systems coexisting in the same area.  That just gets too confusing.

And was the 20 numbers per block part stolen from my OP?  ;-)
Report back once you've visited Prague. ;)
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kphoger

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #34 on: December 26, 2016, 12:34:13 PM »

I wasn't aware Prague had a grid system...
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Bickendan

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #35 on: December 27, 2016, 05:17:46 AM »

I wasn't aware Prague had a grid system...
I was referencing their dual address system -- an older one overlaid by a new one, so buildings have two address numbers. I'm not sure Prague's intending to phase out the old numbers.

Budapest, meanwhile, has grid systems.
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mrsman

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #36 on: July 04, 2017, 12:01:13 PM »

I would also avoid duplicating N/S addresses and E/W addresses.  In other words, only N and E addresses would use 1, 5, 9, 13, etc. and 2, 6, 10, 14, etc., while only S/W would use 3, 7, 11, 15, etc. and 4, 8, 12, 16, etc.  That way, if somebody knew an address but forgot the direction, you could figure out the correct direction based on the number.

Funny you should mention this. The City of Valparaiso does this, except the numbers x00-x49 are used north or east of the zero point (Lincolnway and Washington), while x50-x99 are south or west. For example, 302 Lincolnway is 3 blocks east of Washington, but 352 Lincolnway is 3 blocks west. It's pretty handy, as it eliminates the need for a directional prefix for streets.

It's an intuitive system, and it's not very confusing (in all honesty, most people don't even notice it), but Valparaiso is the only city I know of that uses it.

The only problem with that system is that it is different from the way that most people do addresses.  If I were looking for 352 Lincolnway, I would expect it to be relatively close to 302 Lincolnway, not 6 blocks away.
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pianocello

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #37 on: July 06, 2017, 11:41:07 AM »

Funny you should mention this. The City of Valparaiso does this, except the numbers x00-x49 are used north or east of the zero point (Lincolnway and Washington), while x50-x99 are south or west. For example, 302 Lincolnway is 3 blocks east of Washington, but 352 Lincolnway is 3 blocks west. It's pretty handy, as it eliminates the need for a directional prefix for streets.

It's an intuitive system, and it's not very confusing (in all honesty, most people don't even notice it), but Valparaiso is the only city I know of that uses it.

The only problem with that system is that it is different from the way that most people do addresses.  If I were looking for 352 Lincolnway, I would expect it to be relatively close to 302 Lincolnway, not 6 blocks away.

...which is probably why many businesses use the directional prefixes anyway.
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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #38 on: July 06, 2017, 12:01:25 PM »

Some of the western suburbs of Chicago have an interesting system, where they base the address number on the zero-point of downtown Chicago.  So, for example, 26W402 would be a house 26 miles + 4 blocks west of Chicago's zero point.  Without shortening it, the number would be 21202 (20800 being the 26-mile point).  It also gets confusing in those areas, because they sometimes coexist along with suburb-specific numbering schemes (so, for example, 26W402 might be a block away from 722 or whatever).

That sounds really weird, because 26W402 takes more characters to write than 21202.

I believe Indiana county routes are sometimes placed in a grid system with "100 North" running east-west, one mile north of the city center point. This is somewhat similar to the grid systems used in many Utah and southeast Idaho towns.
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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #39 on: July 06, 2017, 01:11:36 PM »

Some of the western suburbs of Chicago have an interesting system, where they base the address number on the zero-point of downtown Chicago.  So, for example, 26W402 would be a house 26 miles + 4 blocks west of Chicago's zero point.  Without shortening it, the number would be 21202 (20800 being the 26-mile point).  It also gets confusing in those areas, because they sometimes coexist along with suburb-specific numbering schemes (so, for example, 26W402 might be a block away from 722 or whatever).

That sounds really weird, because 26W402 takes more characters to write than 21202.

I believe Indiana county routes are sometimes placed in a grid system with "100 North" running east-west, one mile north of the city center point. This is somewhat similar to the grid systems used in many Utah and southeast Idaho towns.

Many, but not all Indiana counties use that system.  An address of 5000 N County Road 600 West would be a house that is 5 miles north of the N/A dividing line on a road that is 6 miles west of E/W dividing line.  An address of 6000 W County Road 500 North would be on the same corner as the previous house with its driveway on the other road.

Elkhart county uses a system where County Roads 2, 4, 6, etc. are E-W roads that are whole miles south of the northern county(state) line, and County Roads 1, 3, 5, etc. are N-S roads that are whole miles east of the western county line.  County roads on anything other than a whole number of miles south/east of the county line begin with a 1 and end with the last two digits of the nearest parallel 1 or 2-di county road.
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apeman33

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Re: On house numbering
« Reply #40 on: July 13, 2017, 02:10:21 AM »

My grandparents on my mother's side used to live in Mountain Home, Idaho, which has its streets named as though they're on a grid (E. 4th North, S. 3rd West, and the like). The thing is that some of the streets are aligned to the railroad tracks, which run NW to SE, but most are laid out true N-S, E-W. Because of this, there are some glitches as some of the streets don't straighten out. A lot of the "East" streets disappear between 3rd East and 10th East because 10th is true N-S and the others are angled. If you're on E. 6th South, you'll see 3rd East and 10th East in consecutive blocks. There are also only two streets between 2nd South and 4th North (Jackson St. and American Legion Blvd.) once you're past 10th East.

The first time I was in Mountain Home was when I was 18. I offered to deliver a bill to the cable company for my grandma and mixed up East 4th North with North 4th East. My grandparents lived on East 10th South.

But that experience with Mountain Home's grid and others like it got me into a phase for a few years where I was imagining what numbers the streets would be in other towns if they used a similar system.
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