AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Grade separation  (Read 4300 times)

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 7812
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: October 19, 2018, 04:52:28 PM
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2017, 03:00:51 PM »

Thanks I'll soon learn how to use Quotes correctly  :pan: .

Also Do you see the area that OLDBP Travels, ( https://www.google.com/maps/dir/39.6064817,-75.8331299/39.6654423,-75.6597519/@39.638255,-75.7473838,13z/data=!4m2!4m1!3e0 ) Its a good distance, This road has many businesses and homes. It Connects 3 different Cities and had substantial traffic on it. So Yes I believe this should be DE-281 Because its a major route.

Yes, I know how to use a map.  But your link only proves my point:  For the path you intended to show me, Google Maps suggests I should not, in fact, use the Pike.



Lots of roads have homes, businesses, and traffic.  But that doesn't mean they function as an important link in the state transportation scheme.  Here is an example in the Kansas City area that I think is comparable to yours.  It's a major road in a built-up area, has a lot of businesses on it, and has high traffic volume.  On the Missouri side of the line, it's a state highway.  But there's no good reason that 135th Street should be a state highway, because hardly anyone but locals find it useful.  Anybody going between two of the towns it might supposedly link would use a different route instead—a route that's actually on the state highway network.  The one major difference that your local example throws into the mix is tolls being on the "better" route.
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

Tonytone

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 225
  • Age: 20
  • Location: Delaware
  • Last Login: Today at 11:18:24 PM
    • LawnCare Website
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2017, 03:05:57 PM »

Thanks I'll soon learn how to use Quotes correctly  :pan: .

Also Do you see the area that OLDBP Travels, ( https://www.google.com/maps/dir/39.6064817,-75.8331299/39.6654423,-75.6597519/@39.638255,-75.7473838,13z/data=!4m2!4m1!3e0 ) Its a good distance, This road has many businesses and homes. It Connects 3 different Cities and had substantial traffic on it. So Yes I believe this should be DE-281 Because its a major route.

Yes, I know how to use a map.  But your link only proves my point:  For the path you intended to show me, Google Maps suggests I should not, in fact, use the Pike.



Lots of roads have homes, businesses, and traffic.  But that doesn't mean they function as an important link in the state transportation scheme.  Here is an example in the Kansas City area that I think is comparable to yours.  It's a major road in a built-up area, has a lot of businesses on it, and has high traffic volume.  On the Missouri side of the line, it's a state highway.  But there's no good reason that 135th Street should be a state highway, because hardly anyone but locals find it useful.  Anybody going between two of the towns it might supposedly link would use a different route instead—a route that's actually on the state highway network.  The one major difference that your local example throws into the mix is tolls being on the "better" route.

Good point but let me show you this( https://www.google.com/maps/dir/39.6654423,-75.6110001/39.6931866,-75.6687641/@39.6786871,-75.638503,14z/data=!4m2!4m1!3e0 ). Now this road is shorter then OLDBP, But it passes The ILG, this is a SR tho R-58. And the traffic on this road is about the same or higher then OLD BP.
Logged
Working on Civil Engineer Degree/Creator of Valuez Lawn-Care

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 7812
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: October 19, 2018, 04:52:28 PM
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2017, 03:12:14 PM »

Yes, Delaware does seem to have a LOT of state highways.  More than 60, in fact, and you're just scraping the surface with these examples.
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

Tonytone

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 225
  • Age: 20
  • Location: Delaware
  • Last Login: Today at 11:18:24 PM
    • LawnCare Website
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2017, 03:32:02 PM »

Yes, Delaware does seem to have a LOT of state highways.  More than 60, in fact, and you're just scraping the surface with these examples.
Lets get back to the main topic. How long do you think this will take to actually be constructed. I feel as if Grade Separations should just be done Especially when the area already has grading and simply needs a bridge and on ramps.

Here's the information about the 13/14 split interchange: Interchanges/Grade Separations
    Project   Description   Capital Costs1
7   Route 40/Route 13 interchange   Grade separation of the intersection of Route 40 and Route 13, depending on the recommendations of the Route 13 Corridor Study. Concepts considered by the Steering Committee including taking Route 13 over Route 40.   $6.96
8   Route 40 overpass of Norfolk Southern railroad tracks   Grade separation, raising Route 40 over the Norfolk Southern tracks.   $15.57
Subtotal   $22.53

Now here's the link to the offical page http://www.deldot.gov/information/projects/rt40/pages/20_phase_3.shtml.
Logged
Working on Civil Engineer Degree/Creator of Valuez Lawn-Care

jeffandnicole

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 9110
  • Age: 43
  • Location: South Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 11:22:53 PM
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2017, 03:46:33 PM »

Thanks I'll soon learn how to use Quotes correctly  :pan: .

Also Do you see the area that OLDBP Travels, ( https://www.google.com/maps/dir/39.6064817,-75.8331299/39.6654423,-75.6597519/@39.638255,-75.7473838,13z/data=!4m2!4m1!3e0 ) Its a good distance, This road has many businesses and homes. It Connects 3 different Cities and had substantial traffic on it. So Yes I believe this should be DE-281 Because its a major route.

Yes, I know how to use a map.  But your link only proves my point:  For the path you intended to show me, Google Maps suggests I should not, in fact, use the Pike.



Lots of roads have homes, businesses, and traffic.  But that doesn't mean they function as an important link in the state transportation scheme.  Here is an example in the Kansas City area that I think is comparable to yours.  It's a major road in a built-up area, has a lot of businesses on it, and has high traffic volume.  On the Missouri side of the line, it's a state highway.  But there's no good reason that 135th Street should be a state highway, because hardly anyone but locals find it useful.  Anybody going between two of the towns it might supposedly link would use a different route instead—a route that's actually on the state highway network.  The one major difference that your local example throws into the mix is tolls being on the "better" route.

No one should ever use those directions, because it involves a needless $4 toll crossing from Delaware into Maryland.  And that's sorta the catch22 with these directions.  The fastest route isn't the cheapest route.  The shortest route is often filled with vehicles.  You could take the 20 minute option shown...but that exit can be quite congested at rush hour. 

Old Baltimore Pike needs widening, but there's a large NIMBYism level with it.

Logged

Tonytone

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 225
  • Age: 20
  • Location: Delaware
  • Last Login: Today at 11:18:24 PM
    • LawnCare Website
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2017, 03:51:46 PM »

Thanks I'll soon learn how to use Quotes correctly  :pan: .

Also Do you see the area that OLDBP Travels, ( https://www.google.com/maps/dir/39.6064817,-75.8331299/39.6654423,-75.6597519/@39.638255,-75.7473838,13z/data=!4m2!4m1!3e0 ) Its a good distance, This road has many businesses and homes. It Connects 3 different Cities and had substantial traffic on it. So Yes I believe this should be DE-281 Because its a major route.

Yes, I know how to use a map.  But your link only proves my point:  For the path you intended to show me, Google Maps suggests I should not, in fact, use the Pike.



Lots of roads have homes, businesses, and traffic.  But that doesn't mean they function as an important link in the state transportation scheme.  Here is an example in the Kansas City area that I think is comparable to yours.  It's a major road in a built-up area, has a lot of businesses on it, and has high traffic volume.  On the Missouri side of the line, it's a state highway.  But there's no good reason that 135th Street should be a state highway, because hardly anyone but locals find it useful.  Anybody going between two of the towns it might supposedly link would use a different route instead—a route that's actually on the state highway network.  The one major difference that your local example throws into the mix is tolls being on the "better" route.

No one should ever use those directions, because it involves a needless $4 toll crossing from Delaware into Maryland.  And that's sorta the catch22 with these directions.  The fastest route isn't the cheapest route.  The shortest route is often filled with vehicles.  You could take the 20 minute option shown...but that exit can be quite congested at rush hour. 

Old Baltimore Pike needs widening, but there's a large NIMBYism level with it.

Jeff I believe OLDBP has enough room to be repaved and re-striped to a 4 lane road with shoulders and new sidewalks. 
also here are some links for projects on OLDBP
 http://www.deldot.gov/information/projects/Salem_Church_OBP/
http://www.deldot.gov/information/projects/273_OBPtoEagleRunRd/index.shtml
http://www.deldot.gov/information/projects/SR72_OldBaltimore_Pike/

Yes spending $4 to go to S college ave is only for "THROUGH TRAFFIC" Local traffic knows the roads, but I can agree and say I would rather take the toll then to take Welsh Tract road on a rainy day. the back roads are free and dangerous while the highway is Money and safe.
Logged
Working on Civil Engineer Degree/Creator of Valuez Lawn-Care

kkt

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4507
  • Location: Seattle, Washington
  • Last Login: October 19, 2018, 07:09:20 PM
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #31 on: May 11, 2017, 03:54:46 PM »

Does it really take 5-7 years to get everything done, i feel like traffic will be worse @273, @896 @harmony road/I-95 because the traffic is already ridiculous. They need to change the way processing construction & ROW goes because all the projects are to slow. Im happy they are finally fixing roads & stuff but just 2-3 years ago nothing was happening. I think the biggest project was the winding of SR1 from U.S40 to SR 273

No, usually it takes 20-40 years to get anything done.
Logged

US71

  • Road Scholar , Master of Snark
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 7721
  • Sign Inspector

  • Age: 58
  • Location: On the road again
  • Last Login: Today at 09:21:16 PM
    • The Road Less Taken
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2017, 04:33:24 PM »

Does it really take 5-7 years to get everything done, i feel like traffic will be worse @273, @896 @harmony road/I-95 because the traffic is already ridiculous. They need to change the way processing construction & ROW goes because all the projects are to slow. Im happy they are finally fixing roads & stuff but just 2-3 years ago nothing was happening. I think the biggest project was the winding of SR1 from U.S40 to SR 273

No, usually it takes 20-40 years to get anything done.


Took close to 40 years to build I-540 (now I-49) north of Alma, AR
Logged
a man hears what he wants to hear
And disregards the rest -- Simon & Garfunkel

cpzilliacus

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10143
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Maryland
  • Last Login: October 18, 2018, 11:44:04 PM
Re: Grade separation
« Reply #33 on: May 11, 2017, 07:31:56 PM »

Took close to 40 years to build I-540 (now I-49) north of Alma, AR

Maryland's Route 200 (ICC) was (in varied forms) on planning maps since the 1950's.  Let's say 1960 for the purpose of discussion.

The first DEIS was completed and released for comment after several years of study in 1983, 23 years later.  It went nowhere.

The second DEIS was completed and released in 1997, 37 years later.  Then-Gov. Parris N. Glendening (D) "cancelled" the project a year or two later.

The third DEIS was initiated after Glendening left office in 2002.  FEIS and ROD were signed in 2006, then there was a year until the promised lawsuit were litigated and resolved (everything was dismissed by the court), and construction got going in 2007, with most of the project completed in 2011 (though the final part was not finished and opened to traffic until 2014).  The first part of the road opened in 2010, about 50 years after it was first discussed.
Logged
Opinions expressed here on AAROADS are strictly personal and mine alone, and do not reflect policies or positions of MWCOG, NCRTPB or their member federal, state, county and municipal governments or any other agency.

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.