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Author Topic: Utah  (Read 3964 times)

epzik8

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Re: Utah
« Reply #50 on: May 17, 2018, 10:35:51 AM »

Why are streets in the Salt Lake City area called things like 500 West?
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Kniwt

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Re: Utah
« Reply #51 on: May 17, 2018, 11:32:26 AM »

Why are streets in the Salt Lake City area called things like 500 West?

The history: https://history.lds.org/article/museum-treasures-meridian-marker?lang=eng
An explainer: http://www.exploreutah.com/GettingAround/Navigating_Utahs_Streets.shtml

That said, in the parts of Utah where it's not flat, the grid system sometimes breaks down in those communities that use it. Outside Hurricane, for example, I recently encountered the intersection of "1500 West" and "1600 West."
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i-215

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Re: Utah
« Reply #52 on: May 17, 2018, 05:02:43 PM »

Why are streets in the Salt Lake City area called things like 500 West?

Those other articles will go into more depth.  It's basically our version of "5th Avenue" or "W 5th Street."  Instead, we use house addresses for the street numbers.  It's weird at first, but once you get used to it, it works very well.

Back before GPS, in Salt Lake County, nobody ever bought Thomas Guides.  The grid told you exactly where you needed to go.
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nexus73

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Re: Utah
« Reply #53 on: May 18, 2018, 11:11:46 AM »

I liked Utah's Cartesian coordinate system.  Also take note that when going away from the 0,0 point that the even numbered addresses will be on the right hand side.

SLC was laid out as an urban farm district originally, thus the big blocks and wide streets able to handle turning a team of oxen on.  The exception is the Avenues district, which is a traditional residential neighborhood. 

Rick
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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #54 on: May 18, 2018, 06:36:37 PM »

The Temple streets are also common sources of confusion. Many people think South Temple should run south from the temple, when it's actually the E/W street on the south side of the temple (as well as the zero axis for N/S streets).

The coordinate system is nice, especially in Salt Lake County, where all the cities use one unified numbering system based on the Salt Lake Temple. Originally Midvale and Sandy had their own systems, but they have since joined the Salt Lake City system. However, outside of Salt Lake County, many cities that have grown into each other still use their own grid origin. In Davis County, some smaller cities will share a grid with a larger city (for example, Clearfield's grid origin is also used by Syracuse, Clinton, Sunset, and West Point). But this doesn't happen in Utah County, where there are almost 20 separate grids in use despite the different cities growing together into one suburbia.

Most cities with a grid system have a Main Street and a Center Street that serve as the grid axes, but Main Street can be either the N/S axis or the E/W axis depending on the city. In most cities along the Wasatch Front, the Main Street is a N/S road, but the Main Streets in Lehi and American Fork run E/W.

Another thing to beware of is that blocks are different sizes in different cities. In downtown Salt Lake City, anywhere east of the Jordan River and north of 45th South, a mile is 6 2/3 blocks, so 20 blocks = 3 miles. But in Orem, for example, 8 blocks is a mile.

Also take note that when going away from the 0,0 point that the even numbered addresses will be on the right hand side.

That's true for most grids, but not all of them. IIRC, in Logan when going away from 0,0 even numbers are on the left.
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nexus73

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Re: Utah
« Reply #55 on: May 18, 2018, 07:52:48 PM »

The Temple streets are also common sources of confusion. Many people think South Temple should run south from the temple, when it's actually the E/W street on the south side of the temple (as well as the zero axis for N/S streets).

The coordinate system is nice, especially in Salt Lake County, where all the cities use one unified numbering system based on the Salt Lake Temple. Originally Midvale and Sandy had their own systems, but they have since joined the Salt Lake City system. However, outside of Salt Lake County, many cities that have grown into each other still use their own grid origin. In Davis County, some smaller cities will share a grid with a larger city (for example, Clearfield's grid origin is also used by Syracuse, Clinton, Sunset, and West Point). But this doesn't happen in Utah County, where there are almost 20 separate grids in use despite the different cities growing together into one suburbia.

Most cities with a grid system have a Main Street and a Center Street that serve as the grid axes, but Main Street can be either the N/S axis or the E/W axis depending on the city. In most cities along the Wasatch Front, the Main Street is a N/S road, but the Main Streets in Lehi and American Fork run E/W.

Another thing to beware of is that blocks are different sizes in different cities. In downtown Salt Lake City, anywhere east of the Jordan River and north of 45th South, a mile is 6 2/3 blocks, so 20 blocks = 3 miles. But in Orem, for example, 8 blocks is a mile.

Also take note that when going away from the 0,0 point that the even numbered addresses will be on the right hand side.

That's true for most grids, but not all of them. IIRC, in Logan when going away from 0,0 even numbers are on the left.


Never did make it to Logan.  I wonder why they are different?  Maybe being north of SLC is the reason.

In Provo, 0,0 is where Center (E/W) meets University Avenue (N/S).  Orem has the usual Center/Main combination.

Rick

« Last Edit: May 19, 2018, 12:48:57 PM by nexus73 »
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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #56 on: May 19, 2018, 01:05:48 AM »

Also take note that when going away from the 0,0 point that the even numbered addresses will be on the right hand side.
That's true for most grids, but not all of them. IIRC, in Logan when going away from 0,0 even numbers are on the left.
Never did make it to Logan.  I wonder why they are different?  Maybe being north of SLC is the reason.

Based on this full listing of all address grids in Utah, it appears to be strictly a Cache County thing. In Cache County, even addresses are always on the south and east sides, and odd addresses on the north and west sides. So if you’re going east or north, the numbering does follow the pattern in the rest of the state, but going south or west breaks the pattern.
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