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Author Topic: Oldest bridge on your state highway system  (Read 6886 times)

Duke87

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #50 on: October 14, 2017, 11:40:02 AM »

At what point, though, does it stop being a bridge and start being a culvert?

The distinguishing factor is how it's built. If you drop a pipe (it can be a rectangular pipe) in the water, fill in around it with dirt, and then build a road on top of it, that is a culvert. If you build a structure spanning over the water without dropping anything other than vertical supports in it, that is a bridge.

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #51 on: October 15, 2017, 07:11:47 PM »

The distinguishing factor is how it's built. If you drop a pipe (it can be a rectangular pipe) in the water, fill in around it with dirt, and then build a road on top of it, that is a culvert. If you build a structure spanning over the water without dropping anything other than vertical supports in it, that is a bridge.

But what does it count if the vertical supports are later filled-in-around with dirt, a pipe laid in place?
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Big John

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #52 on: October 15, 2017, 09:22:09 PM »

The distinguishing factor is how it's built. If you drop a pipe (it can be a rectangular pipe) in the water, fill in around it with dirt, and then build a road on top of it, that is a culvert. If you build a structure spanning over the water without dropping anything other than vertical supports in it, that is a bridge.

But what does it count if the vertical supports are later filled-in-around with dirt, a pipe laid in place?
still not a culvert as there is no bottom piece of the structure.
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US 89

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #53 on: October 18, 2017, 06:52:24 PM »

The distinguishing factor is how it's built. If you drop a pipe (it can be a rectangular pipe) in the water, fill in around it with dirt, and then build a road on top of it, that is a culvert. If you build a structure spanning over the water without dropping anything other than vertical supports in it, that is a bridge.

But what does it count if the vertical supports are later filled-in-around with dirt, a pipe laid in place?
still not a culvert as there is no bottom piece of the structure.

Back in the day, it probably was a real bridge. Now it looks a lot like a culvert, especially when you look at it just upstream where the creek crosses Center Street.
Also, the Larson Video and parking lot to the west were built right on top of the creek. You can see the path of the creek on satellite view. If it isn't a culvert, then this "bridge" would be 300 feet wide with a video store partly on it. That just seems weird to me.
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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #54 on: October 18, 2017, 08:10:04 PM »

For Alabama, this 1913 CSX bridge in Ardmore spans AL 53 and restricts it to one lane:
http://bridgehunter.com/al/limestone/bh50057/


Matthews Bridge in Jacksonville. 1953 it was opened, as many others have perished over time with roadway widenings and such.
The Main St Bridge (US 1/90) in downtown Jax was built in 1946

Miami River Bridge on Flagler Street (SR 968):
http://bridgehunter.com/fl/miami-dade/870660/

East Las Olas Bridge on SR 842 dates from 1930 (rebuilt in 1960):
http://bridgehunter.com/fl/broward/865729/

Peace River Bridge on US 98 / SR 700 near Fort Meade dates to 1931:
http://bridgehunter.com/fl/polk/peace-river/

« Last Edit: October 18, 2017, 08:30:11 PM by formulanone »
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #55 on: October 27, 2017, 05:53:48 PM »

The 1906 North Fork Road Bridge in Friant was part of CA 41 for one year after the original Lanes Bridge collapsed in 1940:

0 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

Not that makes it part of the highway system or anything, I just thought it was cool because said bridge is literally in ruins below the Friant Dam after being washed out in 1951.

Beltway

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #56 on: October 29, 2017, 12:34:41 AM »

I can't think of many older bridges still on the highway system in Virginia right off hand, I'm still doing some digging. For now I will say the US 360 Mayo Bridge in Richmond (1913)
Virginia has the oldest bridge of any state by far.  US 11 uses the natural bridge.

Covington - Humpback Bridge - Virginia's oldest covered bridge - was built in 1857 and spans 100 feet over Dunlap Creek. It is 4-feet taller at its center, which gives the appearance of its humpback.

https://www.virginia.org/Listings/OutdoorsAndSports/HumpbackBridge/
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Richard3

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #57 on: December 19, 2017, 03:54:32 PM »

I didn't see anything from province of Quebec, so I take a guess.

It's probably not the oldest bridge of the highway system here, but the Victoria Bridge is definitely one of the oldest bridges in the province. Its construction began in 1854, as a railway tubular bridge.  The first train crosses it on Dec. 12th, 1859.  With its 1800 metres (5905,5 feet, or 1,12 miles), it was the longest railway bridge of the World at this time.

In 1897, the structure was completely changed, from its tubular one to a metal truss one, without interrupting traffic; they install the trusses around the tube, then removed it.  They also add a second rail lane, plus a streetcar lane to the bridge.  To complete it all, they changed the name into the "Victoria Jubilee Bridge".

It's in 1927 that the Victoria Bridge becomes a road bridge, with the addition of a first road lane.

In 1956, the streetcar lane was replaced by another road lane, allowing circulation in both directions at the same time.

Nowadays, Victoria Bridge is part of Quebec highway 112, with its two lanes for cars (trucks and other big vehicles prohibited), one in each direction, except for rush hour; the two lanes are going thru Montreal in the morning, and thru the South-Shore in the afternoon.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2018, 11:58:14 PM by Richard3 »
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ColossalBlocks

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #58 on: December 19, 2017, 09:16:35 PM »

More than likely the MO-19 bridge in Thayer, MO.

https://goo.gl/maps/wMDb3LTkgZL2
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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #59 on: December 20, 2017, 03:19:20 AM »

Possibly oldest in Oregon but definitely in Portland: Hawthorne Bridge: 1910.
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Richard3

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #60 on: December 20, 2017, 05:22:51 PM »

On a local scale, the Cartier-Ross Bridge, in Maskinongé, QC was completed in December 1903.  At this time, it was simply called "Pont de Maskinongé" (Maskinongé Bridge), as it was built in the middle of the village of Maskinongé, on what was at the time the Quebec highway 2, also called "Chemin du Roy" (King's Road).  The structure was built of iron, with a wooden deck.

In July 1927, the bridge was replaced with a brand new one in the village, in order to allow heavier and bigger cars and trucks to cross the Maskinongé River.  With a similar structure as the former one (but larger and higher), the new bridge was built with a concrete deck, and the former bridge was moved 6 miles downstream on the same river, and rebuilt with an extension on the western side of the river (right, on the picture).  The new bridge was named Galipeault Bridge, to celebrate the fact that the provincial transportation minister of the time, Antonin Galipeault, born in Maskinongé, gave a lot of subsidies to conclude the project. The former bridge was renamed Cartier-Ross Bridge, as of the name of the two land owners, Ovide Cartier and Régis Ross, who each gave a parcel for the construction of the bridge, that still connects the two sides of the river nowadays.

This picture was taken in April 2008, along the spring flooding, and the last vertical leg of the bridge was broken.  It was since repaired, and is still solid today.



A zoom in of the broken leg.
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Nanis

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #61 on: December 20, 2017, 05:52:33 PM »

The bridge that Frankford avenue (US 13/PA 13) uses to cross the Pennypack is really old.
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kphoger

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #62 on: December 21, 2017, 02:14:19 PM »

The bridge that Frankford avenue (US 13/PA 13) uses to cross the Pennypack is really old.

Where is that, exactly?
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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #63 on: December 21, 2017, 04:45:27 PM »

Sounds like this one.
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kphoger

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #64 on: December 21, 2017, 04:55:35 PM »

The bridge that Frankford avenue (US 13/PA 13) uses to cross the Pennypack is really old.

Where is that, exactly?

Sounds like this one.


Ah, so it's this one that was mentioned back on page 1:

Here it is
I guess US 13 in Northeast Pennsylvania drives on the oldest road bridge in the USA.

Public Domain,  Coemgenus (Wikimedia Commons)
Heh.  You meant Philadelphia, silly man.

Wikipedia says 1697.
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kkt

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #65 on: December 21, 2017, 05:24:27 PM »

Not finding a convenient single list, but for Washington and Oregon perhaps the Interstate Bridge northbound half, built in 1917.


I found an earlier bridge for Washington.  The Murray Morgan Bridge, AKA City Waterway Bridge, in Tacoma, was built in 1913.  It was part of WA 509 for a long time, however WA 509 was rerouted around this bridge and the bridge now belongs to the City of Tacoma.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murray_Morgan_Bridge
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GenExpwy

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #66 on: December 21, 2017, 10:06:53 PM »

Ah, so it's this one that was mentioned back on page 1:

Here it is
I guess US 13 in Northeast Pennsylvania drives on the oldest road bridge in the USA.

Public Domain,  Coemgenus (Wikimedia Commons)
Heh.  You meant Philadelphia, silly man.

Wikipedia says 1697.

The Wikipedia article says:
Quote
The bridge was widened in 1893 to accommodate streetcars, which commenced service in 1895, and again in 1950 to better accommodate automobile traffic.
Is that why the inside of the arch (visible in the photo) is part stone and part concrete? Would the stone-lined part be the 1697 section, and the concrete-lined part is the newer section?
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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #67 on: January 08, 2018, 09:13:14 AM »

After some looking around, I've determined the Lee Creek Bridge near Natural Dam is likely the oldest in Arkansas. It was built in 1934 along what was then TEMP US 59/AR 45. At least it will be until the end of the month when it's demolished.
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Beltway

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Re: Oldest bridge on your state highway system
« Reply #68 on: January 08, 2018, 09:30:17 AM »

Ah, so it's this one that was mentioned back on page 1:
Here it is
I guess US 13 in Northeast Pennsylvania drives on the oldest road bridge in the USA.
[img width=800 height=596]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Frankford-
Heh.  You meant Philadelphia, silly man.
Wikipedia says 1697.
The Wikipedia article says:
Quote
The bridge was widened in 1893 to accommodate streetcars, which commenced service in 1895, and again in 1950 to better accommodate automobile traffic.
Is that why the inside of the arch (visible in the photo) is part stone and part concrete? Would the stone-lined part be the 1697 section, and the concrete-lined part is the newer section?

So a major part of the bridge was built in 1893 and in 1950.  How much change and addition to a bridge can occur and the age of the older part still be relevant?
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