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Author Topic: Speed Limits That Are Too High  (Read 3545 times)

michravera

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Re: Speed Limits That Are Too High
« Reply #100 on: July 16, 2020, 06:24:07 PM »

I think having less tolerance for speeding (and, by extension, driving closer to the limit) the higher it is, is completely backwards.

Driving 45 in a 25 mph zone is very significant.
Driving 100 in an 80 mph zone is not that significant.

It should be done on a proportional basis, whether it's 10, or 15, or 20%. Using 10% as an example:
25 mph: tolerance of 2-3 mph over
45 mph: tolerance of 4-5 mph over
65 mph: tolerance of 6-7 mph over
85 mph: tolerance of 8-9 mph over

Right now, most of you are describing a bell curve: Stick close to the limits when they're low (25) or high (75+), but in the middle of that range, anything goes. Doesn't that mean that the speed limits in that middle range need to be increased, so we can at least be consistent?
What do people get pulled over for going on the 80-85 roads out west?

My experience in Texas and Arizona (and California and Nevada) is that very little speed enforcement is done on properly posted roads. There's just no point in it. Reasonable people behave reasonably. What happens in California, for instance between Utica Ave and Twisselmann Rd  on I-5, where the limit is posted at the state maximum and there are no exits for over 30 km, is that CHP grabs the drivers for 100+ and don't really bother the 85/70 cars and the 70/55 trucks.
In California 100+ is a REAL ticket. You can lose your license and pay over $1000 in fines and taxes. 85/70, if you plead guilty on the second appearance when the cop shows up, gets you a fine of around $50. Now, the amount on the ticket will read a lot higher than that, but that's not the real fine, if you take it to court.
I never saw anyone pulled over for speeding on a freeway my entire time in Texas.
In Nevada, NHP often run speed enforcement on NB I-15 between Primm and Vegas (Posted 70MPH), but people blow by and aren't usually bothered. Once again, it seems that they target the 100+ drivers.
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bemybear

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Re: Speed Limits That Are Too High
« Reply #101 on: July 16, 2020, 07:16:57 PM »

WV and KY have a bunch of narrow, 2-lane curvy and hilly roads that are signed at 55 MPH - too high.  It's darn near impossible to get to 55 MPH even if one wants too on some of those roads.

Anyway, there are literally dozens of these, but the most memorable to me are:

(1) US-250 (WV) from Fairmount to Hundred.
(2) WV-7 from Hundred to New Martinsville.
(3) WV-82 from Birch River to Cowen.
(4) US-460 (KY) from Paris to Mount Sterling.

I expected this thread to have lots of people suggesting that a speed limit is too high or low for a road but didn't expect to see different ideas of what a speed limit is for. I grew up in Oregon and lived in CA/TN/IL/AK/NJ/NY and have been to every state but HI.  And it's my belief and general experience that a speed limit defines (or should define) the fastest the DOT thinks it would be sensible to go on the least demanding stretches of the road bearing that limit.  So a boring ass straight road with few driveways and at least a modest shoulder is probably posted too low at 55.  But unless it's tail of the dragon curvy for EVERY single mile, even a very curvy road littered with a million advisory speeds would probably be posted as speed Limit 55.  As others have mentioned, Massachusetts is one state that changes speed limits sometimes 3 or 4 times in a mile seemingly for the benefit of law enforcement.  but in most of the US, thankfully, there are thousands of miles of roads with many curves that are posted at speeds no normal person in a normal car could  or should maintain.  That's the point of advisory signs.

The best showpiece for what I think is the wisdom and beauty of this approach is US-101 from Mendocino County to the OR border.  Good stretches of it are 4 lanes and posted for 65.  Almost none of it is flat, much of it is curvy and hilly at the same time and even some of THAT is 65 MPH and a lot of vehicles would be challenged to maintain 65 safely but the road is wide enough, lightly traveled enough and with sufficient visibility (on a clear day) that having a little more than normal speed differential seems acceptable between the people having fun in their sprightly cars and the very common motorhomes and some semi-trucks that also use that road.  The worst example of the opposite is MA-2 which, while lovely, has so many rapidly changing speed limits coming into and out of each corner as to be somewhere between laughable and insulting.
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debragga

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Re: Speed Limits That Are Too High
« Reply #102 on: July 17, 2020, 04:09:06 PM »

I think having less tolerance for speeding (and, by extension, driving closer to the limit) the higher it is, is completely backwards.

Driving 45 in a 25 mph zone is very significant.
Driving 100 in an 80 mph zone is not that significant.

It should be done on a proportional basis, whether it's 10, or 15, or 20%. Using 10% as an example:
25 mph: tolerance of 2-3 mph over
45 mph: tolerance of 4-5 mph over
65 mph: tolerance of 6-7 mph over
85 mph: tolerance of 8-9 mph over

Right now, most of you are describing a bell curve: Stick close to the limits when they're low (25) or high (75+), but in the middle of that range, anything goes. Doesn't that mean that the speed limits in that middle range need to be increased, so we can at least be consistent?
What do people get pulled over for going on the 80-85 roads out west?

My experience in Texas and Arizona (and California and Nevada) is that very little speed enforcement is done on properly posted roads. There's just no point in it. Reasonable people behave reasonably. What happens in California, for instance between Utica Ave and Twisselmann Rd  on I-5, where the limit is posted at the state maximum and there are no exits for over 30 km, is that CHP grabs the drivers for 100+ and don't really bother the 85/70 cars and the 70/55 trucks.
In California 100+ is a REAL ticket. You can lose your license and pay over $1000 in fines and taxes. 85/70, if you plead guilty on the second appearance when the cop shows up, gets you a fine of around $50. Now, the amount on the ticket will read a lot higher than that, but that's not the real fine, if you take it to court.
I never saw anyone pulled over for speeding on a freeway my entire time in Texas.
In Nevada, NHP often run speed enforcement on NB I-15 between Primm and Vegas (Posted 70MPH), but people blow by and aren't usually bothered. Once again, it seems that they target the 100+ drivers.

I'm a pretty frequent traveler of I-20 between Terrell TX and Monroe LA, with a good bit of experience between Fort Worth and Dallas as well. In Texas the only place you need to be wary is Waskom (right next to the state line), and patrolling between there and DFW is VERY rare. In Louisiana, on the other hand, you could easily see 10-15 cop cars (mostly state troopers and some sheriff's deputies) in the ~100 miles between Bossier City and Monroe.
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