AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Baselines that are railroads for street grids  (Read 977 times)

roadman65

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10019
  • Location: Orlando, fl
  • Last Login: Today at 12:39:10 AM
Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« on: August 02, 2018, 06:05:57 PM »

In both Rahway and Linden in New Jersey they have a street grid though not in union with each other.  Meaning E-W prefixed streets in Rahway run the same direction as N-S prefixed streets in neighboring Linden.
However, both use the Amtrak NE- Corridor as the baseline for where E turns to W (in Rahway) and N turns to S (in Linden) instead of another street.

Are there any cities that use a railroad as the base line like both Rahway and Linden in Union County, NJ?
Logged
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

US 89

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2849
  • 189 to Evanston!

  • Location: Salt Lake City/Atlanta
  • Last Login: Today at 01:00:31 AM
    • Utah Highways
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2018, 07:09:42 PM »

In Albuquerque's quadrant system, the E/W divider is the BNSF railroad line (formerly ATSF) while Central Avenue/old US 66 is the N/S divider. I always found it odd that neither divider ran perfectly N/S or E/W.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2018, 09:02:34 AM by US 89 »
Logged

sparker

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 7038
  • Location: Bay Area, CA
  • Last Login: August 08, 2020, 05:19:49 PM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2018, 07:29:57 PM »

Many of the towns along CA 99 in the San Joaquin Valley utilize the UP (former SP) main line through town as the "zero" point for the streets perpendicular to the tracks.  Madera, Merced, and Modesto all use the tracks as that grid "starting point"; Madera considers those streets "east" and "west"; Merced "north" and "south", while Modesto bases only its downtown grid, essentially set at a 45 degree angle from a true N-S/E-W axis, to have its grid pattern start with the rail line.  Farther afield, the grid reverts to a normative N-S-E-W pattern to match the city's expansion into what was county territory laid out in a compass-correct grid pattern.
Logged

okc1

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 103
  • Last Login: August 08, 2020, 07:33:59 PM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2018, 07:10:37 AM »

Oklahoma City uses the BNSF mainline through downtown as the E-W reference. Where the railroad turns away from this reference, there is Santa Fe Ave.
Logged
Steve Reynolds
Midwest City OK
Native of Southern Erie Co, NY

Brandon

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10845
  • Mr. Accelerator is our friend; Mr. Brake is not.

  • Age: 43
  • Location: Joliet, IL
  • Last Login: August 08, 2020, 11:03:18 PM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2018, 09:35:19 AM »

This is extremely common in the Midwest if the PLSS grid isn't used.  Sometimes you get two grids for those towns, one based off the railroad (or former railroad), and one based off the PLSS outside of the downtown area.

Examples:
Plano, IL, BNSF line runs through middle of town.
Sycamore, IL, former rail line runs along north edge of town grid.
Manteno, IL, CN (former IC) line runs through middle of town.
Harvard, IL, UP line runs through middle of town.  Note the two grids.
Crystal Lake, IL, UP line runs through middle of town.  Note the multiple grids.
Clifton, IL, CN (former IC) line runs through middle of town.
Logged
"If you think this has a happy ending, you haven't been paying attention." - Ramsay Bolton

Illinois: America's own banana republic.

mgk920

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3770
  • Location: Appleton, WI USA
  • Last Login: August 08, 2020, 02:58:25 PM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2018, 10:57:40 AM »

Agreed, this is über-common in the high plains states where the railroads were laid first and then the small towns quickly followed.

Mike
Logged

jeffandnicole

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 11190
  • Age: 45
  • Location: South Jersey
  • Last Login: August 08, 2020, 11:49:19 PM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2018, 11:17:52 AM »

Agreed, this is über-common in the high plains states where the railroads were laid first and then the small towns quickly followed.

Mike

Same is true in many small NJ and PA towns, when rail lines were commuter lines into the cities.
Logged

txstateends

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1081
  • Location: north TX, not far from an interstate interchange and a US terminus
  • Last Login: June 05, 2019, 11:30:28 AM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2018, 02:38:35 PM »

In Amarillo, the BNSF (originally the Fort Worth and Denver) railroad is the zero-point for N-S addressing and E-W numbered streets.  Similarly, the east TX town of Jacksonville has the UP (previously the Missouri Pacific, originally the International & Great Northern) as their zero-point for N-S addressing (no numbered streets there, though).
Logged
\/ \/ click for a bigger image \/ \/

cjk374

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2153
  • The road less travelled is well worn under my feet

  • Age: 46
  • Location: Simsboro, LA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:03:38 AM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2018, 09:08:52 PM »

Ruston, LA uses the KCS mainline to divide north & south. US 167 north divides east from west.
Logged
Runnin' roads and polishin' rails.

Eth

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2791
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Georgia
  • Last Login: August 08, 2020, 10:16:21 PM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2018, 12:38:32 PM »

This is an almost trivial example, but: Decatur, GA has two streets with N/S prefixes, and for both of them the railroad running through downtown (SW-NE at about a 20-25 degree angle) is the inflection point. There is also one other street that exists as a "south" only; I think it may have formerly crossed the railroad, but no longer does and the disconnected northern portion was given a new name. Even for streets that exist only on one side of the railroad, addresses increase going away from the railroad.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2018, 12:42:30 PM by Eth »
Logged

bzakharin

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1569
  • Last Login: August 07, 2020, 07:59:54 PM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2018, 11:21:43 PM »

Haddonfield, NJ uses the PATCO/Atantic City line as East vs West prefixed roads
Logged

Road Hog

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 1249
  • Location: Collin County, TX
  • Last Login: Today at 01:19:50 AM
Re: Baselines that are railroads for street grids
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2018, 11:52:50 PM »

BNSF line in Celina, TX is the E-W zero line. Track is straight as an arrow but doesn’t run due N-S, though, so the old part of town has its grid off the cardinal points parallel and perpendicular to the tracks.
Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.