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Author Topic: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another  (Read 828 times)

Elm

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2019, 01:27:10 PM »

In Loveland, Colorado, avenues run north-south, and streets run east-west, with some other guidelines based on length and curves:

Quote
For purposes of naming streets, the following definitions shall be used:
  • Through streets less than four hundred feet in length shall be designated as “Places.” Cul-de-sac streets shall be designated as “Courts.”
  • Streets four hundred feet in length or longer, running north and south, shall be designated as “Avenues.” Streets four hundred feet in length or longer, running east and west, shall be designated as “Streets.”
  • Curving streets shall be designated as “Drives” and may be of any length.
  • A looped street may have only one name if it intersects the same street to form two tee-intersections. Looped streets shall be designated as “Circles.” (Ord. 4059 § 2, 1995; prior code § 20.26(e))

(from 12.08.040 in the city code's Title 12; later sections also go into naming themes by area)
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stevashe

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2019, 03:10:33 PM »

In Seattle, avenues are north-south and streets are east-west. Usually  the exceptions are given a separate suffix, like Way (for grid breakers), or Boulevard.

This actually extends to all of the King County grid as well, which (mostly) lines up with Seattle's grid. Most of the cities that have their own grid also use Avenues N/S and Streets E/W, exceptions being Kirkland which has them swapped, and Auburn, which uses lettered streets for N/S roads instead. Also, all east-west roads have their directionals before the name (i.e. NE 85th St) and all north-south roads have the directional placed after the name (i.e. 148th Ave NE) so you still can determine whether a road runs N/S or E/W even if it isn't a Street or Avenue designation.

The pattern also extends to Snohomish County (where the grid is based on Everett's), but the directional is always a suffix. Pierce County generally follows the same rule, but Tacoma's grid has lettered streets that run north-south.

Actually Clark County (Vancouver, WA area) has this as well, but they do the opposite of Snohomish County and always put the directional as a prefix.
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rlb2024

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2019, 03:41:38 PM »

In Memphis streets run N-S and avenues run E-W.  And street addresses have nothing to do with blocks — they are distance from the dividing lines between north and south or east and west.  The house numbers on the block I grew up started at 570 and ended at 652, and the difference between house numbers was either 4, 6, or 8 depending on the width of the lot the house sat on.
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Revive 755

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #28 on: November 02, 2019, 10:32:06 PM »

Coralville, IA:  Streets run E-W, Avenues run N-S
Cedar Rapids, IA:  Streets run N-S, Avenues run either E-W or SW-NE depending upon the part of town
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DJ Particle

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #29 on: November 05, 2019, 05:59:28 AM »

Minneapolis follows this for the most part.  S and SE have mostly Streets E-W and Avenues N-S.  NE is the reverse.  And in N Minneapolis, just about *everything* is an Avenue.
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marleythedog

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #30 on: November 09, 2019, 06:50:02 PM »

The core grid of Sidney, Ohio has avenues N-S (including Main Ave instead of Main St) and streets E-W. It doesn't extend to the 20th century suburban-style development, however.
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KeithE4Phx

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #31 on: November 09, 2019, 09:30:21 PM »

Gary, Indiana and most of Lake County follow a reverse pattern to Chicago. Avenues run east-west and streets run north-south.

The north/south streets in Gary and Merrillville (same street grid) are not numbered, though.  The east/west avenues are.

And that only applies to Gary and Merrillville.  Hammond's and Whiting's (also same grid) numbered streets are the same as in Chicago, but addresses lop off the leading "1."  For example, 7500 Calumet Ave. is at the corner of 175th St. and Calumet.  There are no "West" streets; the "0 point" is the state line, and address numbers increase to the east.
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jakeroot

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #32 on: November 10, 2019, 04:43:10 AM »

Tacoma is a bit weird. Everything is a street, except important roads (6th Ave, Pacific Ave, Sprague Ave, Puyallup Ave, Tacoma Ave, Fawcett Ave, Yakima Ave, etc).

In the north end, the grid literally gets squished to the point where 6th Ave, which is parallel/in-between S 7th St and N 7th St, becomes the dividing line between the north and south edges of the city. The only sections of the city with house numbers between 1 and 599 are in a triangle between Division Ave and 6th Ave (with Division coming straight out of 6th Ave, about 20 blocks from the edge of the city. It's really quite weird, and it needs to be seen on a map to make any sense.

I think this style would work poorly if more numbered streets were used. But, north-south streets are all named or have letters, so it's fine in practice.
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stridentweasel

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Re: Cities where Avenues run one way and streets run another
« Reply #33 on: November 10, 2019, 04:07:55 PM »

It's kind of fun trying to explain the Kansas City metro area's street grid and naming/numbering conventions:

In the center city--Kansas City, MO--numbered streets run east-west.  Named roads with varying suffixes run north-south.  The numbers start on the north side of downtown, and going south, they increment every 1/16 mile until somewhere in the 20s, at which point they increment every 1/8 mile.  Going north, they seem to increment at 1/8-mile intervals, but I don't even know where the numbered streets start on the northern side, because the grid is interrupted by North Kansas City, which is a separate city and has numbered avenues that run east-west.  The Kansas City, MO grid system using numbered streets at 1/8-mile increments extends over Jackson, Platte, Clay, and Cass Counties in Missouri, and into Johnson and Miami Counties in Kansas.  I'm not sure if it extends beyond any of those counties.  And a numbered road that is aligned between two numbered streets is called a Terrace.  Then there's Kansas City, Kansas, where numbered streets run north-south, starting on the east side of downtown KCK, and they also increment at 1/8-mile intervals.  However, there are numbered avenues in the southeastern portion of KCK, in order to extend KCMO's street numbers into KCK.  This gets confusing at the Wyandotte-Johnson county line, where Wyandotte County names it County Line Road, but Johnson County names it 47th Street.  Frankly, I think it would be better for Johnson County to just adopt the avenue suffix for that street if it wants to use the number.  And I say this because the convergence of the two grid systems results in an intersection of two different 47th Streets (Kansas City, Kansas's 47th Street turns into Antioch Road south of the county line).  The Kansas City, KS grid system extends across Wyandotte and Leavenworth Counties in Kansas.

Simple, right?  Now let me explain Wichita's grid system (and maybe some of the people here who are more familiar with Wichita could explain the historical reasoning behind this)!  At first glance, in the more central parts of the city, it seems very similar to the grid system Kansas City, MO uses south of downtown.  Numbered streets run east-west, and they increment at 1/8 mile intervals, going both north and south of Douglas Avenue.  Named roads of varying suffixes run north-south.  Going north, Douglas Avenue is the 0 point of the street numbering (although Central Avenue appears to be the 5 point, and is there even a 4th Street?), but going south, Douglas Avenue appears to be the 3 point (and I had to look closely at a map to notice this), but the east-west numbered streets don't start in the southern direction until well south of Douglas Avenue, anyway; named streets are used instead.  And similar to Kansas City, MO, Wichita has named roads with varying suffixes running north-south, until you get somewhere east of Greenwich Road and about a mile west of Maize Road!  On the outer edges of the city, you have numbered streets running in both directions.  They are differentiated with a directional suffix indicating their geographical relationship to the center of the city.  For example, on the eastern side of Wichita, there is an intersection between 13th Street North and 127th Street East, and on the western side, there is an intersection between 13th Street North and 119th Street West.  However, the north-south numbered streets increment in 1/16-mile intervals instead of 1/8.  In fact, this is identical to the way grid-based address numbers increment in Johnson County, with the exception of part of Olathe.

And then there's Topeka, where numbered streets run east-west, except for major east-west roadways, which are called avenues.  And, again, north-south roads are named with varying suffixes.

So, as much as some of us would probably like a nice, clean grid system where streets run in one direction, and avenues run in the other, metro Kansas City, Wichita, and Topeka all decided against that at some point in history.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 11:26:02 PM by stridentweasel »
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