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Author Topic: Teach your friends how to use a roundabout  (Read 1586 times)

ScottRAB

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Re: Teach your friends how to use a roundabout
« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2018, 07:59:55 PM »


Not through the center island, but through enter/exit arms. Please see the one in video for an example of this dangerous design.
I walk through such a setup about once a month and drive same spot few times a week; and it is really very uncomfortable experience. Jaywalking 200 feet away is a MUCH safer way of doing it, weather permitting. Drivers in a circle don't really see pedestrian (and pedestrian don't see blinkers) until it is too late.
[/quote]

   All modern roundabouts have median islands separating incoming and outgoing auto traffic.  Pedestrians don't have to find a gap in two directions of traffic, just one.  This is safer for pedestrians, especially for younger or older ones, because they only need to concentrate on one direction of traffic at a time.  This is what is meant by two-phase. Cross the first half, pause if you need to, then cross the second half.  With the lower design speed of 15-20 mph, roundabout medians become very safe places to cross.  Itís estimated that median refuges for pedestrians reduce crashes by 25% or better.

On multi-lane crossings pedestrian beacons or signals are often added if the auto (or pedestrian) traffic is too numerous.  The signals can also be two phase, requiring the pedestrian to push a second button when they get to the median.  The median can also have a Z path to reorient the pedestrian to view oncoming traffic.  Also, the signals usually rest in off, so they are only activated if a pedestrian needs the help crossing. This way only motorists that need to stop are delayed.

Pedestrians using roundabouts:
WashDOT:
In Fort Worth, TX:
FDOT:
Lake County video:
Clearwater, FL, check at 1 minute:
Springfield, OR:
Kitchener, ON:
Funny:
Michigan State:
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kalvado

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Re: Teach your friends how to use a roundabout
« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2018, 09:53:53 PM »


Not through the center island, but through enter/exit arms. Please see the one in video for an example of this dangerous design.
I walk through such a setup about once a month and drive same spot few times a week; and it is really very uncomfortable experience. Jaywalking 200 feet away is a MUCH safer way of doing it, weather permitting. Drivers in a circle don't really see pedestrian (and pedestrian don't see blinkers) until it is too late.


   All modern roundabouts have median islands separating incoming and outgoing auto traffic.  Pedestrians don't have to find a gap in two directions of traffic, just one.  This is safer for pedestrians, especially for younger or older ones, because they only need to concentrate on one direction of traffic at a time.  This is what is meant by two-phase. Cross the first half, pause if you need to, then cross the second half.  With the lower design speed of 15-20 mph, roundabout medians become very safe places to cross.  Itís estimated that median refuges for pedestrians reduce crashes by 25% or better.

On multi-lane crossings pedestrian beacons or signals are often added if the auto (or pedestrian) traffic is too numerous.  The signals can also be two phase, requiring the pedestrian to push a second button when they get to the median.  The median can also have a Z path to reorient the pedestrian to view oncoming traffic.  Also, the signals usually rest in off, so they are only activated if a pedestrian needs the help crossing. This way only motorists that need to stop are delayed.

Pedestrians using roundabouts:
WashDOT:
In Fort Worth, TX:
FDOT:
Lake County video:
Clearwater, FL, check at 1 minute:
Springfield, OR:
Kitchener, ON:
Funny:
Michigan State:

Thank you, sir, but you didn't really had to bother registering to copy paste this propaganda. But not to be too harsh.... When did you try such a walk yourself last time?
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kphoger

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Re: Teach your friends how to use a roundabout
« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2018, 01:48:01 PM »

Many people confuse other and older styles of circular intersections with modern roundabouts. High speed, east coast rotaries, large multi-lane traffic circles (Arc DíTriomphe, Dupont Circle), and small neighborhood traffic circles are not modern roundabouts.
The Brits even call a merry-go-round a kidís roundabout.

Fully aware already.  But considering that modern roundabouts, by definition, don't have a pedestrian route running through the middleóit was obviously necessary to expand the definition a bit to include circular intersections that are somewhat but not exactly like a modern roundabout.
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Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

SSR_317

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Re: Teach your friends how to use a roundabout
« Reply #28 on: October 02, 2018, 04:40:44 PM »

Rather than trying to explain roundabouts to someone, just send them to the Roundabout Capital of the Universe (Carmel, IN) and have them drive around town for a week. They'll learn in a hurry (if they don't get hospitalized for vertigo first).  :)
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