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Author Topic: Favorite Accent  (Read 682 times)

cjk374

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Re: Favorite Accent
« Reply #25 on: June 02, 2019, 01:54:36 PM »

Somehow the cajun accent makes me feel right at home.  :bigass:
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kphoger

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Re: Favorite Accent
« Reply #26 on: June 03, 2019, 01:59:55 PM »

When I hear true Aussies talk it's enjoyable at first but enough for a headache after a while.

I remember once soaking in an outdoor hot tub at Bryce Canyon National Park, listening to a couple of foreign tourists and wondering what language they were speaking.  After trying to figure it out for about 15 minutes, I finally realized they were speaking English.  New Zealand.

Similarly, I once made it almost all the way from Harlem/Lake to downtown Chicago on the L before I realized the couple in front of me was speaking Spanish.  Asturias, Spain.
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webny99

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Re: Favorite Accent
« Reply #27 on: June 03, 2019, 09:06:20 PM »

When I hear true Aussies talk it's enjoyable at first but enough for a headache after a while.
I remember once soaking in an outdoor hot tub at Bryce Canyon National Park, listening to a couple of foreign tourists and wondering what language they were speaking.  After trying to figure it out for about 15 minutes, I finally realized they were speaking English.  New Zealand.

Oh, you mean Nuh Zulund?  :)

When I hear one of the Australasian accents I'm usually expecting it, but if you're not, it can really catch you off guard. When they're talking amongst themselves at full speed it might as well be a different language.
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ce929wax

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Re: Favorite Accent
« Reply #28 on: June 03, 2019, 11:45:04 PM »

I'm from Michigan and lived there until I was 11 and then moved to Southern California, where they asked me if I was from Texas a lot.  From there I went to New Mexico and they asked me if I was from Canada (ditto, Louisiana and Texas (for the first couple of years that I lived there anyway)  when I moved there).  After a couple of years in Texas, when I would come back to Michigan to visit they would comment that I sounded like a Texan.  My ex-girlfriend (no comment) made fun of me because I sounded like a "Yankee-Texan" (whatever the hell that means) and then when I moved to Tennessee I was told not to go to Grainger County, because they would shoot me if they heard my northern accent.  When I moved back to Michigan, my accent blended into a Texas-Tennessee-Michigan mashup that sounds like I am from Southern Indiana or Northern Kentucky. 

One of my uncles has lived in Michigan his entire life and has a southern accent.  One of my aunts has the same accent as Bobby's Mom in Bobby's World. 
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webny99

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Re: Favorite Accent
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2019, 12:57:21 PM »

One of my uncles has lived in Michigan his entire life and has a southern accent.
The Detroit, Cleveland, and to a lesser extent Chicago, accents are very southern-sounding.
In fact, I would say any accent originating in the Rust Belt region has (or can have) a Southern twist.


From there I went to New Mexico and they asked me if I was from Canada
Despite the following: (1) One of my parents being growing up a mile from the Canadian border and (2) traveling to Canada 20+ times per year my entire life, my accent could never be mistaken for Canadian (at least I don't think). I don't say "eye-ther", "aboot", "soh-ree" or "bee-n" (except when referring to the vegetable).
Accents in Minnesota and North Dakota, on the other hand, are much easier to mistake for Canadian, just from the general sound if not from specific words.
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