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Author Topic: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes  (Read 4067 times)

adventurernumber1

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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #175 on: January 11, 2019, 07:05:37 PM »

For a tiny state, Arkansas gets a lot of interstate traffic. Wouldn't break my heart if every interstate had 6 lanes, especially I-40 between Little Rock and Memphis.

I agree. If I recall correctly, all of both I-30 and I-40 in Arkansas have incredibly high levels of truck traffic. Nowhere is this more evident than on Interstate 40 between Little Rock and Memphis, which, IIRC, is a stretch of interstate that has one of the highest levels of truck traffic in the entire country.

Interstate 30 in Arkansas (and Texas) also has very high volumes of truck traffic - and combined with regular traffic, I could see how it could possibly indeed be warranted to widen much of Interstate 30 from DFW to Little Rock - perhaps mostly in Arkansas, as the traffic calls for, as has been noted.


it would likely be one of the longest stretches of six laned interstate in the country.

and it could definitely be one of the longest stretches of interstate in the country with a sustained minimum of six lanes.
I-75 maintains at least 6 lanes between Chattanooga, TN and Naples, FL, a distance of 735 miles (with a couple of half-mile 4-lane sections at major junctions, but 6-lanes everywhere else). A six-lane I-35 between San Antonio and Oklahoma City would only be 500 miles.

It would definitely still be largely beat by the stretch of I-75 that you mention - and it would not even come remotely close to I-95 if it is fully widened by South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia - but I just meant that if that theoretical I-35 widening was fully completed, it would still probably make it into the Top 5 (or so) longest stretches of interstate in the country with a sustained minimum of six lanes.

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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #176 on: January 11, 2019, 07:13:39 PM »

It would definitely still be largely beat by the stretch of I-75 that you mention - and it would not even come remotely close to I-95 if it is fully widened by South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia - but I just meant that if that theoretical I-35 widening was fully completed, it would still probably make it into the Top 5 (or so) longest stretches of interstate in the country with a sustained minimum of six lanes.
Oh okay. Yeah, a I-95 widening through SC, NC, and VA would result in about 1,160 miles of 6+ lane interstate continuous.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #177 on: January 12, 2019, 12:03:27 AM »

I personally think that I-75 should be at least six lanes from the northern terminus of US-127 to Miami. It's busy enough to warrant at least six lanes and should be at least ten lanes in Detroit, Cincinnati and Atlanta. There are also some chokes on I-75 that need to be fixed in both Detroit and Cincinnati. I think eight lanes through Florida would be fine as well. I've traveled I-75 plenty of times and can honestly say that it's a very heavily traveled highway.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #178 on: January 12, 2019, 11:53:23 AM »

I personally think that I-75 should be at least six lanes from the northern terminus of US-127 to Miami. It's busy enough to warrant at least six lanes and should be at least ten lanes in Detroit, Cincinnati and Atlanta. There are also some chokes on I-75 that need to be fixed in both Detroit and Cincinnati. I think eight lanes through Florida would be fine as well. I've traveled I-75 plenty of times and can honestly say that it's a very heavily traveled highway.

I'd love to see Ohio 6 lane the remaining 4 lane portion from Findlay to Troy, but it doesn't seem to be in the works. The recent project to rebuild 75 around Lima would have been an excellent opportunity to widen that section of it, but it was deemed that the traffic counts didn't warrant the extra expense, and they didn't even build the brand new bridges wide enough to facilitate any future 6 laning.


 
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #179 on: January 12, 2019, 06:39:50 PM »

So about how many miles are we up to, perhaps 12,000 out of the 48,000 miles of Interstate highway, that need to be widened to 6 lanes?

25% seems a bit high.

We will get a final mileage count at some point, but my guess is closer to ~7,000.

(Replying a week late because it took me that long to get the dataset winnowed down to a size that won't crash ArcMap...)

Using the 2017 FHWA Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) dataset.  This is from data that the state DOTs (or equivalents) have submitted to FHWA...part of the recent "ARNOLD" requirements for all state DOTs to submit their road networks to FHWA in a GIS Linear Reference System format.

The dataset includes recent Interstate additions such as I-2 and I-14 in Texas and also includes the limited-access segments of Alaska's "Interstates".  It does not include the latest additions such as I-69 north of Bloomington, IN or the completion of I-269 in Mississippi.

Out of approximately 48,158 miles of Interstate highway...:

11,887 miles (just under 25%) are listed as already being 6 or more lanes.

3,487 miles (7.2%) are listed as 8 or more lanes.

7,446 miles (15.5%) meet the OP's criteria of being in rural areas (also to include urbanized areas less than 50,000 population), currently 4 lanes, and at least 30,000 AADT.

2,751 miles (5.7%) that are in rural areas and currently 4 lanes, but have a more restrictive (yet better-than-normal-scenaro) volume of 41,000 AADT or higher.  41,000 AADT is the LOS C/D threshold for a rural roadway with the following characteristics:

- Free flow speed of 75 MPH
- Interchange spacing of 2+ miles
- 25% trucks
- K-Factor of 10%
- Directional split of 65%
- Peak Hour Factor of 0.9

Most rural Interstates have a lower truck percentage, a lower directional split, and a higher peak hour factor, all of which would result in a higher LOS threshold than 41K.

Even with the "more restrictive" AADT level, several notable candidates stand out:

- I-5 from Eugene to Salem, OR
- I-10 from Lafayette to Baton Rouge, LA
- I-15 from Barstow, CA to the Nevada line
- I-26 from I-95 to Columbia, SC
- I-71 from Cincinnati to Columbus, OH
- I-77 from Columbia to Rock Hill, SC
- I-81 from Wythville to Strasburg, VA
- I-85 from outside Atlanta, GA into South Carolina
- I-90 from Buffalo, NY to I-490 (towards Rochester)
- I-95 from Savannah, GA to I-26 (noted a number of times upthread)
- Most of I-95 through North Carolina (exceptions south of Lumbarton, bypassing Fayetteville, and Kenley-Wilson)


Lastly, there are about 230 miles that are in rural areas, currently 4 lanes, but have a volume of 62,360 AADT or higher.  This volume level meets the LOS C/D threshold I described above for needing 8 lanes, though the actual LOS threshold for these road segments would need to be determined at a local level.
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Flint1979

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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #180 on: January 12, 2019, 06:45:41 PM »

I personally think that I-75 should be at least six lanes from the northern terminus of US-127 to Miami. It's busy enough to warrant at least six lanes and should be at least ten lanes in Detroit, Cincinnati and Atlanta. There are also some chokes on I-75 that need to be fixed in both Detroit and Cincinnati. I think eight lanes through Florida would be fine as well. I've traveled I-75 plenty of times and can honestly say that it's a very heavily traveled highway.

I'd love to see Ohio 6 lane the remaining 4 lane portion from Findlay to Troy, but it doesn't seem to be in the works. The recent project to rebuild 75 around Lima would have been an excellent opportunity to widen that section of it, but it was deemed that the traffic counts didn't warrant the extra expense, and they didn't even build the brand new bridges wide enough to facilitate any future 6 laning.
They must of widened the part between Perrysburg and Findlay then, last time I was through there I wasn't paying attention to the number of lanes. By the time you get to Troy you're pretty much hitting all of Dayton's traffic after that point going south or before it going north. I just wish they could widened the approach on the Cincinnati side to the Brent Spence Bridge, actually the Covington side should be widened too. Hopefully a second span gets built soon there.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #181 on: January 12, 2019, 07:17:11 PM »

2,751 miles (5.7%) that are in rural areas and currently 4 lanes, but have a more restrictive (yet better-than-normal-scenaro) volume of 41,000 AADT or higher.  41,000 AADT is the LOS C/D threshold for a rural roadway with the following characteristics:
- Free flow speed of 75 MPH
- Interchange spacing of 2+ miles
- 25% trucks
- K-Factor of 10%
- Directional split of 65%
- Peak Hour Factor of 0.9

That would mean a hundred or hundreds of miles of bumper to bumper traffic moving at high speeds, a very unpleasant experience over that distance, and it would take very little to "bring it to its knees" at that volume.

Those are 24/7/365 averages, and as I have said before what are the weekend volumes for the highest volume 20 weekends of the year, on a particular highway that is being evaluated.
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adventurernumber1

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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #182 on: January 12, 2019, 07:37:09 PM »

So about how many miles are we up to, perhaps 12,000 out of the 48,000 miles of Interstate highway, that need to be widened to 6 lanes?

25% seems a bit high.

We will get a final mileage count at some point, but my guess is closer to ~7,000.

(Replying a week late because it took me that long to get the dataset winnowed down to a size that won't crash ArcMap...)

Using the 2017 FHWA Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) dataset.  This is from data that the state DOTs (or equivalents) have submitted to FHWA...part of the recent "ARNOLD" requirements for all state DOTs to submit their road networks to FHWA in a GIS Linear Reference System format.

The dataset includes recent Interstate additions such as I-2 and I-14 in Texas and also includes the limited-access segments of Alaska's "Interstates".  It does not include the latest additions such as I-69 north of Bloomington, IN or the completion of I-269 in Mississippi.

Out of approximately 48,158 miles of Interstate highway...:

11,887 miles (just under 25%) are listed as already being 6 or more lanes.

3,487 miles (7.2%) are listed as 8 or more lanes.

7,446 miles (15.5%) meet the OP's criteria of being in rural areas (also to include urbanized areas less than 50,000 population), currently 4 lanes, and at least 30,000 AADT.

2,751 miles (5.7%) that are in rural areas and currently 4 lanes, but have a more restrictive (yet better-than-normal-scenaro) volume of 41,000 AADT or higher.  41,000 AADT is the LOS C/D threshold for a rural roadway with the following characteristics:

- Free flow speed of 75 MPH
- Interchange spacing of 2+ miles
- 25% trucks
- K-Factor of 10%
- Directional split of 65%
- Peak Hour Factor of 0.9

Most rural Interstates have a lower truck percentage, a lower directional split, and a higher peak hour factor, all of which would result in a higher LOS threshold than 41K.

Even with the "more restrictive" AADT level, several notable candidates stand out:

- I-5 from Eugene to Salem, OR
- I-10 from Lafayette to Baton Rouge, LA
- I-15 from Barstow, CA to the Nevada line
- I-26 from I-95 to Columbia, SC
- I-71 from Cincinnati to Columbus, OH
- I-77 from Columbia to Rock Hill, SC
- I-81 from Wythville to Strasburg, VA
- I-85 from outside Atlanta, GA into South Carolina
- I-90 from Buffalo, NY to I-490 (towards Rochester)
- I-95 from Savannah, GA to I-26 (noted a number of times upthread)
- Most of I-95 through North Carolina (exceptions south of Lumbarton, bypassing Fayetteville, and Kenley-Wilson)


Lastly, there are about 230 miles that are in rural areas, currently 4 lanes, but have a volume of 62,360 AADT or higher.  This volume level meets the LOS C/D threshold I described above for needing 8 lanes, though the actual LOS threshold for these road segments would need to be determined at a local level.

Thank you very much for posting that. That was very interesting and insightful.  :nod:


It appears that I-15 from Barstow, California to Nevada must indeed have a good bit of traffic. Perhaps Interstate 15 being a minimum of six lanes from the SoCal Megalopolis to Las Vegas could be in order.

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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #183 on: January 12, 2019, 07:48:20 PM »

2,751 miles (5.7%) that are in rural areas and currently 4 lanes, but have a more restrictive (yet better-than-normal-scenaro) volume of 41,000 AADT or higher.  41,000 AADT is the LOS C/D threshold for a rural roadway with the following characteristics:
- Free flow speed of 75 MPH
- Interchange spacing of 2+ miles
- 25% trucks
- K-Factor of 10%
- Directional split of 65%
- Peak Hour Factor of 0.9

That would mean a hundred or hundreds of miles of bumper to bumper traffic moving at high speeds, a very unpleasant experience over that distance, and it would take very little to "bring it to its knees" at that volume.

You're aware that FHWA considers LOS C acceptable in rural areas, right?

And there's still some wiggle room in a traffic stream at LOS D.  Not much, but there's still room.  What you described is the LOS D/E threshold.

Quote
Those are 24/7/365 averages, and as I have said before what are the weekend volumes for the highest volume 20 weekends of the year, on a particular highway that is being evaluated.

Well get me some weekend volume data then.  I'm going off the data that is available....
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #184 on: January 12, 2019, 08:57:42 PM »

That would mean a hundred or hundreds of miles of bumper to bumper traffic moving at high speeds, a very unpleasant experience over that distance, and it would take very little to "bring it to its knees" at that volume.
You're aware that FHWA considers LOS C acceptable in rural areas, right?
And there's still some wiggle room in a traffic stream at LOS D.  Not much, but there's still room.  What you described is the LOS D/E threshold.
Quote
Those are 24/7/365 averages, and as I have said before what are the weekend volumes for the highest volume 20 weekends of the year, on a particular highway that is being evaluated.
Well get me some weekend volume data then.  I'm going off the data that is available....

It is unfortunate that weekend volume data is not available, because it would help outline the problems on some of our favorite Interstate highways, such as I-81 TN-Harrisburg and I-95 SC/NC.

The PA Turnpike is doing 6-lane total rebuilds on some sections in the mid-20s and some in the low-30s, probably going to 6 lanes because of weekend problems.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 08:59:58 PM by Beltway »
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #185 on: January 12, 2019, 10:52:00 PM »

So about how many miles are we up to, perhaps 12,000 out of the 48,000 miles of Interstate highway, that need to be widened to 6 lanes?

25% seems a bit high.

We will get a final mileage count at some point, but my guess is closer to ~7,000.


(Replying a week late because it took me that long to get the dataset winnowed down to a size that won't crash ArcMap...)

Using the 2017 FHWA Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) dataset.  This is from data that the state DOTs (or equivalents) have submitted to FHWA...part of the recent "ARNOLD" requirements for all state DOTs to submit their road networks to FHWA in a GIS Linear Reference System format.

The dataset includes recent Interstate additions such as I-2 and I-14 in Texas and also includes the limited-access segments of Alaska's "Interstates".  It does not include the latest additions such as I-69 north of Bloomington, IN or the completion of I-269 in Mississippi.

Out of approximately 48,158 miles of Interstate highway...:

11,887 miles (just under 25%) are listed as already being 6 or more lanes.

3,487 miles (7.2%) are listed as 8 or more lanes.

7,446 miles (15.5%) meet the OP's criteria of being in rural areas (also to include urbanized areas less than 50,000 population), currently 4 lanes, and at least 30,000 AADT.

2,751 miles (5.7%) that are in rural areas and currently 4 lanes, but have a more restrictive (yet better-than-normal-scenaro) volume of 41,000 AADT or higher.  41,000 AADT is the LOS C/D threshold for a rural roadway with the following characteristics:

- Free flow speed of 75 MPH
- Interchange spacing of 2+ miles
- 25% trucks
- K-Factor of 10%
- Directional split of 65%
- Peak Hour Factor of 0.9

Most rural Interstates have a lower truck percentage, a lower directional split, and a higher peak hour factor, all of which would result in a higher LOS threshold than 41K.

Even with the "more restrictive" AADT level, several notable candidates stand out:

- I-5 from Eugene to Salem, OR
- I-10 from Lafayette to Baton Rouge, LA
- I-15 from Barstow, CA to the Nevada line
- I-26 from I-95 to Columbia, SC
- I-71 from Cincinnati to Columbus, OH
- I-77 from Columbia to Rock Hill, SC
- I-81 from Wythville to Strasburg, VA
- I-85 from outside Atlanta, GA into South Carolina
- I-90 from Buffalo, NY to I-490 (towards Rochester)
- I-95 from Savannah, GA to I-26 (noted a number of times upthread)
- Most of I-95 through North Carolina (exceptions south of Lumbarton, bypassing Fayetteville, and Kenley-Wilson)


Lastly, there are about 230 miles that are in rural areas, currently 4 lanes, but have a volume of 62,360 AADT or higher.  This volume level meets the LOS C/D threshold I described above for needing 8 lanes, though the actual LOS threshold for these road segments would need to be determined at a local level.

I've also seen with a 10% truck traffic, its 72,000 C/D level for 4 lanes, and 108,000 for 6 lanes.

If we are talking about 8 laning, then I-5 from Salem to Wilsonville is around 95,000 AADT, well above that threshold for 8 laning, in fact it could be at the threshold for 10 laning.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 11:28:14 PM by Hurricane Rex »
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #186 on: January 13, 2019, 09:57:43 AM »

Quote from: Beltway
It is unfortunate that weekend volume data is not available, because it would help outline the problems on some of our favorite Interstate highways, such as I-81 TN-Harrisburg and I-95 SC/NC.

Agree it's unfortunate we don't have more detailed weekend data.  That would help settle the disagreement.  But I was able to find a proxy for I-95 weekend volumes, using VDOT's average weekend daily traffic.  It's the best we've got from the available data.

Quote from: Hurricane Rex
I've also seen with a 10% truck traffic, its 72,000 C/D level for 4 lanes, and 108,000 for 6 lanes.

It's also going to depend on the other factors I described above.  Keeping all other above-mentioned variables constant but dropping the truck percentage to 10%, the LOS C/D threshold for 4 lanes is much lower...just under 44,000 vpd.  And around 66,800 for 6 lanes.

(EDIT)

Quote
If we are talking about 8 laning, then I-5 from Salem to Wilsonville is around 95,000 AADT, well above that threshold for 8 laning, in fact it could be at the threshold for 10 laning.

So I took a look at this segment, finding what data I could from ODOT.  2017 volumes from the north side of Salem to the south side of Wilsonville range from 93K-100K.  Let's go with 96K for the mean (the average is slightly below 96K).  Regarding a point Beltway made about weekend volumes, the ATR on the south side of Wilsonville shows that weekend volumes are actually lower than weekday volumes several months of the year, and not much higher than weekday volumes during the remaining months.  The ATR also recorded the 30th Highest Hour percentage (8.2%), which we can use in lieu of specific weekday or weekend volumes.  Truck percentage ranges from 13.9% to 17.5%.  We'll use an even 16% as the mean.

Unfortunately, I couldn't find directional split or peak hour factor data for this segment, so I'm going to default to the same values I used upthread (65% split and 0.9 PHF).

Calculating this out, I come up with LOS D, though it wouldn't take a whole lot of traffic for it to go to LOS E.  By FHWA's rural LOS criteria, most of it would warrant 8 lanes (which would result in an LOS C even with higher volumes).  10 would be overkill.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 10:26:13 AM by froggie »
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #187 on: January 13, 2019, 10:54:19 AM »

They must of widened the part between Perrysburg and Findlay then, last time I was through there I wasn't paying attention to the number of lanes.

Yep, they just spent the last 3 or so years widening it from Perrysburg to the north side of Findlay. Widening through Findlay itself to just past the OH 15/US 68 exit is currently underway, which includes rebuilding the OH 15/US 68 interchange (which now has a new flyover open to replace the old loop ramp)

Quote
I just wish they could widened the approach on the Cincinnati side to the Brent Spence Bridge, actually the Covington side should be widened too. Hopefully a second span gets built soon there.

They have the plans drawn up for redoing that entire stretch on both sides and adding a second span...but the issue is funding it, since Kentucky is opposed to using tolls. 
« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 10:57:57 AM by Buck87 »
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #188 on: January 13, 2019, 11:26:21 AM »

^ I don't see why, since Kentucky approved bridge tolls down in Louisville.  Unless they're just being obstinate...
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #189 on: January 13, 2019, 11:36:40 AM »

^ I don't see why, since Kentucky approved bridge tolls down in Louisville.  Unless they're just being obstinate...

just spitballing here, but...

In Louisville the commutters most affected by the tolls are on the non Kentucky side of the river.
In Cincinnati it would be the Kentucky side that gets the shaft.   
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #190 on: January 13, 2019, 01:52:25 PM »

They must of widened the part between Perrysburg and Findlay then, last time I was through there I wasn't paying attention to the number of lanes.

Yep, they just spent the last 3 or so years widening it from Perrysburg to the north side of Findlay. Widening through Findlay itself to just past the OH 15/US 68 exit is currently underway, which includes rebuilding the OH 15/US 68 interchange (which now has a new flyover open to replace the old loop ramp)

Quote
I just wish they could widened the approach on the Cincinnati side to the Brent Spence Bridge, actually the Covington side should be widened too. Hopefully a second span gets built soon there.

They have the plans drawn up for redoing that entire stretch on both sides and adding a second span...but the issue is funding it, since Kentucky is opposed to using tolls.
I noticed the construction at the US-68/OH-15 exit. It'd be nice if they could widen it all the way to Troy.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #191 on: January 13, 2019, 02:27:54 PM »

Quote from: Beltway
It is unfortunate that weekend volume data is not available, because it would help outline the problems on some of our favorite Interstate highways, such as I-81 TN-Harrisburg and I-95 SC/NC.
Agree it's unfortunate we don't have more detailed weekend data.  That would help settle the disagreement.  But I was able to find a proxy for I-95 weekend volumes, using VDOT's average weekend daily traffic.  It's the best we've got from the available data.

Those are averaged figures, which aren't even really applicable for one Interstate highway corridor.  What would be needed are segment by segment (say 10 miles perhaps) weekend volumes for the particular Interstate highway that is under consideration for expansion.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #192 on: January 13, 2019, 03:27:04 PM »




Quote from: Hurricane Rex
I've also seen with a 10% truck traffic, its 72,000 C/D level for 4 lanes, and 108,000 for 6 lanes.

It's also going to depend on the other factors I described above.  Keeping all other above-mentioned variables constant but dropping the truck percentage to 10%, the LOS C/D threshold for 4 lanes is much lower...just under 44,000 vpd.  And around 66,800 for 6 lanes.

(EDIT)

Quote
If we are talking about 8 laning, then I-5 from Salem to Wilsonville is around 95,000 AADT, well above that threshold for 8 laning, in fact it could be at the threshold for 10 laning.

So I took a look at this segment, finding what data I could from ODOT.  2017 volumes from the north side of Salem to the south side of Wilsonville range from 93K-100K.  Let's go with 96K for the mean (the average is slightly below 96K).  Regarding a point Beltway made about weekend volumes, the ATR on the south side of Wilsonville shows that weekend volumes are actually lower than weekday volumes several months of the year, and not much higher than weekday volumes during the remaining months.  The ATR also recorded the 30th Highest Hour percentage (8.2%), which we can use in lieu of specific weekday or weekend volumes.  Truck percentage ranges from 13.9% to 17.5%.  We'll use an even 16% as the mean.

Unfortunately, I couldn't find directional split or peak hour factor data for this segment, so I'm going to default to the same values I used upthread (65% split and 0.9 PHF).

Calculating this out, I come up with LOS D, though it wouldn't take a whole lot of traffic for it to go to LOS E.  By FHWA's rural LOS criteria, most of it would warrant 8 lanes (which would result in an LOS C even with higher volumes).  10 would be overkill.

According to an ODOT project evaluation for the Boone Bridge, that section of road was LOS C (albeit barely IMO, and I think they stretched the definition.

LG-TP260

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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #193 on: January 13, 2019, 03:49:33 PM »

So about how many miles are we up to, perhaps 12,000 out of the 48,000 miles of Interstate highway, that need to be widened to 6 lanes?
25% seems a bit high.
We will get a final mileage count at some point, but my guess is closer to ~7,000.

(Replying a week late because it took me that long to get the dataset winnowed down to a size that won't crash ArcMap...)
...
7,446 miles (15.5%) meet the OP's criteria of being in rural areas (also to include urbanized areas less than 50,000 population), currently 4 lanes, and at least 30,000 AADT.
...
- I-90 from Buffalo, NY to I-490 (towards Rochester)

Thanks for the reply... awesome info!  :thumbsup:

Glad to see my guesstimate was pretty darn close, and especially glad to see the Thruway Rochester-Buffalo made the list!
Most of the segments you listed didn't come as a huge surprise, although there were at least a few that hadn't been mentioned yet, like I-71 from Columbus to Cincinnati.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #194 on: January 13, 2019, 06:24:33 PM »

After looking at the traffic counts along the 90 mile stretch of US-23 between the Ohio state line and Flint I'd say the cutoff line should be Milan, north of that six lanes and in the Ann Arbor area between the western M-14 split and US-12 eight lanes.

There are 90,000 vehicles a day that use the stretch between the western M-14 split and I-94 and it boggles the mind on why MDOT has not widened this stretch of highway. It's six lanes only in the stretch with the M-14 multiplex.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #195 on: January 13, 2019, 06:37:15 PM »

Quote from: Beltway
It is unfortunate that weekend volume data is not available, because it would help outline the problems on some of our favorite Interstate highways, such as I-81 TN-Harrisburg and I-95 SC/NC.
Agree it's unfortunate we don't have more detailed weekend data.  That would help settle the disagreement.  But I was able to find a proxy for I-95 weekend volumes, using VDOT's average weekend daily traffic.  It's the best we've got from the available data.

Those are averaged figures, which aren't even really applicable for one Interstate highway corridor.  What would be needed are segment by segment (say 10 miles perhaps) weekend volumes for the particular Interstate highway that is under consideration for expansion.

The way VDOT publishes its traffic volumes, you can actually calculate segment-by-segment average weekend volumes (VDOT defining the weekend as Fri-Sun).  That's what I had done for my I-95 analysis.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #196 on: January 13, 2019, 06:42:27 PM »

Quote from: Beltway
It is unfortunate that weekend volume data is not available, because it would help outline the problems on some of our favorite Interstate highways, such as I-81 TN-Harrisburg and I-95 SC/NC.
Agree it's unfortunate we don't have more detailed weekend data.  That would help settle the disagreement.  But I was able to find a proxy for I-95 weekend volumes, using VDOT's average weekend daily traffic.  It's the best we've got from the available data.
Those are averaged figures, which aren't even really applicable for one Interstate highway corridor.  What would be needed are segment by segment (say 10 miles perhaps) weekend volumes for the particular Interstate highway that is under consideration for expansion.
The way VDOT publishes its traffic volumes, you can actually calculate segment-by-segment average weekend volumes (VDOT defining the weekend as Fri-Sun).  That's what I had done for my I-95 analysis.

I forgot to include my qualifier, "the highest 20 weekends in the year plus holidays".  That would take specific traffic engineering analysis on each segment.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #197 on: January 13, 2019, 10:34:47 PM »

For I-75 in Michigan keep in mind that a lot of people have vacation homes on the lakes in the northern part of the state that live in the Detroit area and I-75 connects the two so you're going to have a lot of weekend traffic in the summer, especially on the Holiday weekends. US-127 and US-131 both have the same issue with Lansing/Jackson and Grand Rapids/Kalamazoo respectfully.

I-94 between US-127 and US-23 should be six lanes already, then again from I-69 to Mattawan.
I-94 should also be at least eight lanes between US-12 in Ypsilanti and M-19 near New Haven, a pretty hefty distance of 61 miles where I-94 sees over 100,000 VPD in many areas of this stretch including a long stretch from Haggerty Road to Roseville. The entire Edsel Ford Freeway is as outdated as it gets for an Interstate highway.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #198 on: January 14, 2019, 09:36:04 AM »

I wonder if it would be possible to get an estimated mileage by state?

So far, it would seem that Virginia and Pennsylvania have the most miles of six-laning in order, with New York, South Carolina, and Indiana not far behind.
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Re: Rural Freeways That Need Six Lanes
« Reply #199 on: January 14, 2019, 09:57:33 AM »

I wonder if it would be possible to get an estimated mileage by state?
So far, it would seem that Virginia and Pennsylvania have the most miles of six-laning in order, with New York, South Carolina, and Indiana not far behind.

Has anyone yet said much about California?  Just between I-5, I-15 and I-80 there is at least 600 miles that likely need 6-laning, and that would make them #1.
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