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Author Topic: Strange habits you have  (Read 39264 times)

MNHighwayMan

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #175 on: October 30, 2017, 06:01:26 PM »

Another word would be "asocial."

But: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/antisocial

Quote
1. Unwilling or unable to cooperate and associate normally with other people

Which has no connotations of being hostile.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2017, 06:04:02 PM by MNHighwayMan »
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formulanone

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #176 on: October 30, 2017, 06:19:08 PM »

He's (still is?...not sure) homeschooled; that's a major chunk of social skills, verbal/visual cues, and social graces missing from one's life. Family can be very forgiving towards, accustomed to, or unaware of social miscues and behaviors, so not "getting things" also isn't terribly surprising.

Sorry to jump in here, but my wife home-schools our children, and some of my best friends were home-schooled.  You seem to be assuming that home-schooled children don't interact with anyone but their families, and that's simply not true in my experience.  Between non-school sports, church activities, family friends and extended family members, and citywide home-school associations—home-schooled children are likely to have quite a bit more interaction with "the outside world" than you might imagine.

I didn’t say it’s not bad for some, but we have a few neighbors on our block which also homeschool, and they’re some of the most bitter folks we’ve lived near and seem to have raised some disrespectful children to boot. Perhaps they privately feel a bit aggrieved when my wife told them she’s a public school teacher. We try to be friendly, but get a lot of clannish attitudes from most members of the families (so have other neighbors’ experiences), but not everyone is the same. There’s probably other reasons...but it’s hard to get to know anti-social people that don’t give the standard wave hello/bye in return, or usually ignore a "hello" or "hi" greeting to re-break the ice after the first 10 days we'd met.

That’s not to say public and private schools are havens for everyone, either. Not everyone is going to cure cancer nor develop intellectual pursuits. Not everyone is for the occasionally rigid ideals and typically weak behavioral standards public schools use towards kids; they're only disciplined within the behavioral extremes, so it leaves a lot to be desired for handling troublemakers. But my experiences seem to be that a lot of folks whine about workloads and leave an extremely long leash on their kids in return.

Socially, it really depends on what kinds of experiences they get from other home-schooled children. If they're only with their parents much of the time, then they don't really get the same involvement (for better, worse, and indifferent) with kids their own ages. But if they are actively working, playing, learning, helping, et al with other kids their age, then it can be a wonderful thing. But I don't see that from my sample size. I've met some other home-school parents that seem to be a few pickles shy of a barrel, although patience and persistence are probably the most needed commodities for educating anyone.

So, no...I don’t have the same ideals about homeschooling. For all I know, maybe they parents in question are not even educating them, which puts a pretty big hole in my argument. And frankly, if the neighbors don't operate a paper mill in the backyard, engage in germ warfare, or try to burn our house down...they're free to live their own lives without any of our intrusion (except if we accidentally throw the Frisbee over the fence again).
« Last Edit: October 30, 2017, 08:59:36 PM by formulanone »
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jakeroot

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #177 on: October 30, 2017, 08:31:13 PM »

He's (still is?...not sure) homeschooled; that's a major chunk of social skills, verbal/visual cues, and social graces missing from one's life. Family can be very forgiving towards, accustomed to, or unaware of social miscues and behaviors, so not "getting things" also isn't terribly surprising.

Sorry to jump in here, but my wife home-schools our children, and some of my best friends were home-schooled.  You seem to be assuming that home-schooled children don't interact with anyone but their families, and that's simply not true in my experience.  Between non-school sports, church activities, family friends and extended family members, and citywide home-school associations—home-schooled children are likely to have quite a bit more interaction with "the outside world" than you might imagine.

Assuming that publicly- and privately-schooled children participate just as equally in extra-curricular activities, home-schooled children are still at a disadvantage, because they cannot make friends in the classroom. I participated in zero extra-curricular activities (minus Boy Scouts, but I never made friend's with anyone), and relied solely on my interactions in class and lunch to make friends. And that worked well; I made many long-lasting friendships with dozens of people that I continue to interact with today. Without school, I wouldn't have many friends outside of work.
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Rothman

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #178 on: October 30, 2017, 09:07:04 PM »

Homeschooling is a tremendous risk.  In my experience, I have seen failures run the gamut from smart kids that are quite intellectually capable and have some level of social skills, but ultimately do not "play nice with others" for various reasons and therefore risk being ostracized in a traditional workplace (i.e., the kid performs well academically all the way through college only to not be able to integrate with others in the subtle manner an office or other workplace demands), all the way down to the worst:  The so-called "unschooling" trend which I have seen totally ruin a couple of kids.  By the time they were teenagers, they knew shockingly and disturbingly little because the idea was that their own innate curiosity would guide them (parents were self-learners and brilliant nerds...they were unable to deal with kids that they felt did not share that characteristic).

Essentially, parents who homeschool trade the kid having to learn and cope with the diverse and more uncontrolled social environment of school for total control over curriculum.  Kudos to those that pull it off, but I have doubts about the overall success rate given my observations.
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Roadgeekteen

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #179 on: October 30, 2017, 09:40:25 PM »

I sometimes think that I would like homeschooling (especially in the morning) but I would miss a lot about school, including my only time to interact with peers my age.
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kphoger

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #180 on: October 31, 2017, 10:26:50 AM »

For what it's worth, the two biggest advantages we've seen in home-schooling are as follows:

(1) Teaching style, schedule, and even curriculum can be selected and tweaked to serve each individual child's personality and learning style.  Our two older sons are school aged at this time, and they have quite different intellects and ways of thinking.  We waited about half a year longer to start our second son than we did to start our first son, because we knew he simply wasn't ready before that.  When we did start, he thrived right off the bat.  He is more imaginative but less analytical than our oldest son, so that helps choose what sorts of assignments will best engage him.  One of the boys isn't very alert yet first thing in the morning, so we make sure the more challenging subjects are taught later in the day.  Et cetera.  This kind of thing does take some trial and error, but you learn what makes your own kids tick pretty quickly.

(2) Review actually happens.  In public (or private) school, the exam is generally the end of the learning.  You find out your score, if you're lucky you find out which ones you missed, but almost never do you find out why you got them wrong—let alone go back over the material again until you actually do get it.  This realization was mind-altering for us.  Our goal is for our children to learn—not just to measure how well they've learned and move on to something else.  So, if one of them is struggling with a topic, we slow the pace down.  This year, in fact, we did several topics all over again from the previous year, just because we knew the information needed to be cemented in their minds better, before starting the new material.  If that means we need to cut into vacation time or go longer into the summer, then so be it.
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kphoger

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #181 on: October 31, 2017, 03:15:28 PM »

I have perhaps an unhealthy obsession with Microsoft Excel.  Not sure if that can qualify as a habit or not.

For example, I prepare road trip directions in Excel.  I tried my hand at reworking the NYC subway map using Excel, which quickly got out of hand but I still think is doable.  I recently sketched the floor plan for the Tabernacle as outlined in the book of Exodus, to scale, with one cell representing a square cubit (then realized I should have made one cell represent a square half-cubit).  At work, I live inside Excel, using fun things like conditional formulas and formatting every day.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #182 on: October 31, 2017, 03:31:27 PM »

I have perhaps an unhealthy obsession with Microsoft Excel.  Not sure if that can qualify as a habit or not.

For example, I prepare road trip directions in Excel.  I tried my hand at reworking the NYC subway map using Excel, which quickly got out of hand but I still think is doable.  I recently sketched the floor plan for the Tabernacle as outlined in the book of Exodus, to scale, with one cell representing a square cubit (then realized I should have made one cell represent a square half-cubit).  At work, I live inside Excel, using fun things like conditional formulas and formatting every day.

When I reconstructed my kitchen and utility room area, I used Excel.  I resized the cells to represent 1 square inch each.  I went thru about 50 designs before I found one that I liked and that would work.

I've also had my entire house layout in Excel, which I used to mark the various switches and outlets, and what circuit breaker each one goes to.  Due to the above renovations, I also got a new circuit breaker box, so I have to do that exercise again sometime.
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1995hoo

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #183 on: March 09, 2019, 08:39:15 PM »

Mega threadbump here because of something I saw today.

A toothpaste tube roller? Never heard of any such thing! I just did a Google search to see what one looks like. Strikes me as a waste of money.

We had something like that.  I think it came from a dollar store.  At least I hope it did.  Yes, it is a waste of money.  And I don't even know why we had it because toothpaste squirting isn't an issue in my house.

There are actual rollers you can buy, as well as slit feeders which are run up the tube from behind to push unused toothpaste to the front.  My father has tried both over the years.  In theory the cost is amortized over time in reduced waste of toothpaste, but the counter edge is a more cost-efficient solution.  And none of these solutions by themselves will get out the last bit of toothpaste that sits within the tube collar.  There is usually at least five days' worth of toothbrushings in there (if you use a motorized toothbrush) and the only way I know of to get it out is to fold the back of the toothpaste tube and use it as a pusher.  This improves finger strength too.

....

We were at Bed Bath & Beyond today to get towels and electric toothbrush heads (hey, the ubiquitous 20% off coupons are HUGE as to the latter). I saw this and immediately remembered this thread, although I had to search the forum to find it.

I hope this doesn’t bring back traumatic memories for anyone. (I didn’t buy one.)

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Roadgeekteen

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #184 on: March 09, 2019, 09:29:26 PM »

Needing to touch every part of door handles, and always like slam the door shut. I do not get it.
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formulanone

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #185 on: March 10, 2019, 11:08:30 AM »

Mega threadbump here because of something I saw today.

A toothpaste tube roller? Never heard of any such thing! I just did a Google search to see what one looks like. Strikes me as a waste of money.

We had something like that.  I think it came from a dollar store.  At least I hope it did.  Yes, it is a waste of money.  And I don't even know why we had it because toothpaste squirting isn't an issue in my house.

There are actual rollers you can buy, as well as slit feeders which are run up the tube from behind to push unused toothpaste to the front.

We were at Bed Bath & Beyond today to get towels and electric toothbrush heads (hey, the ubiquitous 20% off coupons are HUGE as to the latter). I saw this and immediately remembered this thread, although I had to search the forum to find it.

I hope this doesn’t bring back traumatic memories for anyone. (I didn’t buy one.)



I see these in use at some auto repair shops where some types of sealant cost the dealer $50-100 for a single 6-8 ounce tube.

hbelkins

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Re: Strange habits you have
« Reply #186 on: March 10, 2019, 02:06:29 PM »

Mega threadbump here because of something I saw today.

A toothpaste tube roller? Never heard of any such thing! I just did a Google search to see what one looks like. Strikes me as a waste of money.

We had something like that.  I think it came from a dollar store.  At least I hope it did.  Yes, it is a waste of money.  And I don't even know why we had it because toothpaste squirting isn't an issue in my house.

There are actual rollers you can buy, as well as slit feeders which are run up the tube from behind to push unused toothpaste to the front.  My father has tried both over the years.  In theory the cost is amortized over time in reduced waste of toothpaste, but the counter edge is a more cost-efficient solution.  And none of these solutions by themselves will get out the last bit of toothpaste that sits within the tube collar.  There is usually at least five days' worth of toothbrushings in there (if you use a motorized toothbrush) and the only way I know of to get it out is to fold the back of the toothpaste tube and use it as a pusher.  This improves finger strength too.

....

We were at Bed Bath & Beyond today to get towels and electric toothbrush heads (hey, the ubiquitous 20% off coupons are HUGE as to the latter). I saw this and immediately remembered this thread, although I had to search the forum to find it.

I hope this doesn’t bring back traumatic memories for anyone. (I didn’t buy one.)



My dad used one in his later years. He had trouble squeezing the tube, and this helped him get toothpaste out.
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