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Author Topic: I-280  (Read 445 times)

Max Rockatansky

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I-280
« on: March 08, 2019, 08:38:14 PM »

I didn't see a previous catch-all thread for I-280 so I'd figure I would create one.  Just published a blog on the shifting alignment history of the north terminus of I-280:

https://www.gribblenation.org/2019/03/the-strange-evolution-of-interstate-280.html

bing101

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Re: I-280
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2019, 11:36:07 PM »

I remember in Old Maps that I-280 was going to be on 19th Ave and I-80 was going to end on 19th ave too though.

Also where China Basin is Located that district prior to Oracle Park being in the area was then a wasteland for Loma Prieta rubble back in the 1990's prior to that area becoming the most gentrified and most expensive part of San Francisco though near the north end of I-280.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2019, 11:38:36 PM by bing101 »
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TheStranger

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Re: I-280
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2019, 12:01:40 AM »

The most intriguing parts of the 280 routings that came to mind:

1. the short freeway segment along Route 1 up to Font Boulevard, which includes the original 1950s bridges for Alemany Boulevard flyover and the overpass crossing Brotherhood Way

2. On the Southern Freeway portion, the segment from Route 82 east to US 101 was originally built as US 101 mainline (back when Bayshore Freeway south of the Alemany Maze interchange was Bypass US 101).

3. Another segment of limited-access carriageway that would have been incorporated into the original I-280 is the Presidio section of Route 1 from Lake Street to US 101.

I know sparker mentioned in another thread that during the freeway revolts, Sunset Boulevard was actually suggested as a potential alignment due to the wide right of way without any need for structure removal along the frontages. 

---

On the south (Santa Clara County/San Jose) end, I remember seeing one map on Eric Fischer's page with today's east-west segment of 85 incorporated into a freeway that is much of today's 280. 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/5510423863/in/album-72157622139053795/


In another planning map from Eric's pages:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/5510425589
101 following Santa Teresa south of the 85/101 junction after using Monterey Road south of the old 101/Bypass 101 Y junction is interesting, and a little more complicated than what ended up happening.

87 north of 101 is shown as planned here as well.

Otherwise it is very interesting to see the Milpitas bypass portion of 680 + the downtown San Jose section of 280 (planned pre-1965 as Route 17) already on a planning map.
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Chris Sampang

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Re: I-280
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2019, 11:19:08 AM »

My first time on I-280 would have been 1975.  It was such a modern looking freeway back then!  For "bad visuals" I saw a lot of tract housing but otherwise it was quite the route in those times.

Fast forward to 2013.  On the way back from the Southland, my friend and I took the Bayshore Freeway (US 101).  It was an enjoyable blast from the past with a stop to eat at a McDonald's that had a helicopter (non-functional) on display with the tiled floor reflecting an aviation theme.  Despite it being around 9 AM, traffic flowed just fine. 

Next to try for me: SR 82.  How much classic old school road architecture remains?  Did the new stuff overwhelm everything?  I am curious to see the original 101!

Rick
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US 101 is THE backbone of the Pacific coast from Bandon OR to Willets CA.  Industry, tourism and local traffic would be gone or severely crippled without it being in functioning condition in BOTH states.

Max Rockatansky

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Re: I-280
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2019, 12:24:39 PM »

My first time on I-280 would have been 1975.  It was such a modern looking freeway back then!  For "bad visuals" I saw a lot of tract housing but otherwise it was quite the route in those times.

Fast forward to 2013.  On the way back from the Southland, my friend and I took the Bayshore Freeway (US 101).  It was an enjoyable blast from the past with a stop to eat at a McDonald's that had a helicopter (non-functional) on display with the tiled floor reflecting an aviation theme.  Despite it being around 9 AM, traffic flowed just fine. 

Next to try for me: SR 82.  How much classic old school road architecture remains?  Did the new stuff overwhelm everything?  I am curious to see the original 101!

Rick

At some point I’ll get something going for all of I-280.  The freeway is actually susprisingly scenic between 84 and I-380 along the San Andreas Fault.  With 82 the further you get from San Francisco you get the more modern looking the scenery becomes.  There are a couple places where it resembles vintage US 101 but those aren’t the norm any longer. 

TheStranger

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Re: I-280
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2019, 12:45:13 PM »

My first time on I-280 would have been 1975.  It was such a modern looking freeway back then!  For "bad visuals" I saw a lot of tract housing but otherwise it was quite the route in those times.

Fast forward to 2013.  On the way back from the Southland, my friend and I took the Bayshore Freeway (US 101).  It was an enjoyable blast from the past with a stop to eat at a McDonald's that had a helicopter (non-functional) on display with the tiled floor reflecting an aviation theme.  Despite it being around 9 AM, traffic flowed just fine. 

Next to try for me: SR 82.  How much classic old school road architecture remains?  Did the new stuff overwhelm everything?  I am curious to see the original 101!

Rick

At some point I’ll get something going for all of I-280.  The freeway is actually susprisingly scenic between 84 and I-380 along the San Andreas Fault.  With 82 the further you get from San Francisco you get the more modern looking the scenery becomes.  There are a couple places where it resembles vintage US 101 but those aren’t the norm any longer. 

Along old US 101/current Route 82...

The section in Burlingame probably has the most 1950s vibe to it

There's a little bit of older businesses in the stretch from Belmont to Sunnyvale, but not consistently so.  Since ECR has been the Peninsula's main street for decades, redevelopment is constant along the road.

Having said that, in South San Francisco there is a section of old US 101 bypassed in the 1930s, Mission Road/Antoinette Lane (which are not continuous to each other anymore) that predates the 6 lane bypass arterial that would be US 101 until 1964 and Route 82 to the present day.
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Chris Sampang

sparker

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Re: I-280
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2019, 05:49:43 AM »

Ther, is one historic oddity regarding I-280:  the bridges over SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center), on Stanford University land, were constructed between 1965 and 1967, some 4 years before the remaining construction on that segment of freeway commenced -- but in conjunction with the western extension of the accelerator (a long continuous structure that extends under the freeway).  This advance construction was done as a joint project between the Division of Highways and Stanford in order to ensure that any vibrations emanating from the bridge structure would not affect SLAC operations and experiments.  The bridge bents on either side of the accelerator building are double-isolated, with vibration-absorbing pads between the bridge beams and the vertical bents -- and the bents themselves are sitting in a "sheath" of sand and clays to dissipate any remaining vibrations that might be transmitted to the ground; the entire bridge structure therefore "floats" above the surrounding ground rather than terminating there.  It is held in place by its own weight; connected to the remainder of the freeway by a series of short metal bars over which traffic passes (driving it, one feels a series of minor "bumps" at the connecting bars as well as a bit of a "dip" in the middle of the bridge itself -- a deliberately designed "sag" due to the irregular hillside that was carved out to accommodate the accelerator structure.  The unusual design of this road-to-structure isolation interface was a condition imposed by Stanford University as part of the agreement to route I-280 through the back of campus property; there are seismometers installed in the ground underneath and adjacent to the bridge to measure the continuous effectiveness of the isolation measures; when particularly precise SLAC experiments are undertaken, I-280 has on rare occasion been closed for the duration of such an experiment.  This is a one-of-a-kind accommodation by Caltrans and its predecessor agency made necessary by the nature of this particular atom-smashing device.     
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bing101

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Re: I-280
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2019, 12:43:34 PM »

I noticed that San Francisco was proposed to have a beltway though where I-780, I-680, I-280, CA-480, US-101 in Marin County and CA-37 were all proposed to be this Bay Area Beltway. What if that beltway was really completed how much traffic would have been relieved plus the Southern Crossing.


When I see these highways on a map it makes a circle around the bay though.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: I-280
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2019, 01:59:59 PM »

I noticed that San Francisco was proposed to have a beltway though where I-780, I-680, I-280, CA-480, US-101 in Marin County and CA-37 were all proposed to be this Bay Area Beltway. What if that beltway was really completed how much traffic would have been relieved plus the Southern Crossing.


When I see these highways on a map it makes a circle around the bay though.

They pretty much were meant to be a full beltway.  I-480 realistically never stood much of a chance to get to the Golden Gate Bridge given the terrain and urban growth.  I-280 on the original corridor would have been incredibly handy to have for connecting to the Golden Gate Bridge.

sparker

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Re: I-280
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2019, 12:46:44 AM »

^^^^^^^^
Since the S.F. economy has shifted over the last half-century from heavy industry as well as a primary P.O.E. -- most functions of which have migrated to the East Bay -- the necessity of southern freeway access to the Golden Gate Bridge has diminished considerably.  Commercial traffic to Marin County and points north along US 101 are readily accessed via I-580/Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, leaving the G.G. bridge to commuters and recreational traffic which, considering its physical limitations, is probably for the best.  As designed the original Interstate network in the city -- once away from the structures that served as "stub-ends" prior to the '89 earthquake -- would, even absent the '60's "freeway revolt", probably have consisted of a series of bored and cut-and-cover facilities (mainly due to S.F.'s history of politically connected NIMBY's), the property acquisition and construction costs of which would have dwarfed any other statewide highway projects.   Aside from the freeway facilities that currently exist, S.F. would in all likelihood been the poster child for an "out of sight/out of mind" freeway configuration.     
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GaryA

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Re: I-280
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2019, 12:02:24 PM »

I remember 280 as it was being built, since one of the first segments (west of 17) was near me.  The BGS at the then-east-end of the freeway did label what is now I-880 north as "I-280/I-680" since that was the originally proposed route (and the extension through downtown SJ hadn't been built).

We'd take family drives up 280 as it was being built, with some freeway segments being open and others not yet built.  One of the last segments to open was between Farm Hill and around 92, with Cañada Rd serving as the temporary route.
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bing101

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Re: I-280
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2019, 05:29:49 PM »

^^^^^^^^
Since the S.F. economy has shifted over the last half-century from heavy industry as well as a primary P.O.E. -- most functions of which have migrated to the East Bay -- the necessity of southern freeway access to the Golden Gate Bridge has diminished considerably.  Commercial traffic to Marin County and points north along US 101 are readily accessed via I-580/Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, leaving the G.G. bridge to commuters and recreational traffic which, considering its physical limitations, is probably for the best.  As designed the original Interstate network in the city -- once away from the structures that served as "stub-ends" prior to the '89 earthquake -- would, even absent the '60's "freeway revolt", probably have consisted of a series of bored and cut-and-cover facilities (mainly due to S.F.'s history of politically connected NIMBY's), the property acquisition and construction costs of which would have dwarfed any other statewide highway projects.   Aside from the freeway facilities that currently exist, S.F. would in all likelihood been the poster child for an "out of sight/out of mind" freeway configuration.   

Also as of 2019 Mission Bay and China Basin the areas where Chase Center(Golden State Warriors) and AT&T now Oracle Park is located is now the startup and VC hub of the city though.
Plus Caltrain, Bart, Muni and Ferries are mentioned as places where current San Francisco commuters demand transportation funds go to.
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bing101

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Re: I-280
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2019, 10:49:01 AM »

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