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Author Topic: Foodie fun  (Read 1840 times)

davmillar

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2019, 07:25:18 PM »

Chicharrones from a bag, drizzled with hot sauce.  A yummy, typical Mexican snack food.
I can't get past the slimy, slippery texture. Fried pork rinds I can do no problem. But chicharron tacos... nope.
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inkyatari

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2019, 09:20:30 AM »

Hot sauce on snickers bars is one of my favorite things.
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tolbs17

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #27 on: September 10, 2019, 12:23:27 AM »

I enjoy this commercial... Who likes tacos?? I do! I wish I had 5 a day. It's like my third favorite food.


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ozarkman417

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #28 on: September 10, 2019, 09:05:37 PM »

I enjoy this commercial... Who likes tacos?? I do! I wish I had 5 a day. It's like my third favorite food.

I feel bad for the toilet at Taco Bell...
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MNHighwayMan

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2019, 08:41:44 AM »

I feel bad for the toilet at Taco Bell...

Why? Do you often try to shit out food at the same place where you bought it? Unless you're going to Taco Bell daily, and at the same time as a bowel movement, it isn't their toilets you have to be concerned about.
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csw

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #30 on: September 25, 2019, 10:27:05 PM »

Allegedly, döner kebabs can be found in Minneapolis...can one of the Minnesotans confirm? I've been wanting one since the day I left Germany...
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kphoger

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #31 on: September 26, 2019, 12:39:52 PM »

I recently started getting my feet wet with sardines (figuratively, not literally).
Anyone else on here eat sardines?  If so, I'm curious how you prepare them.
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hbelkins

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #32 on: September 26, 2019, 01:52:46 PM »

I love eating chicken with fries. My favorite! Either Jersey Chicken or KFC or even Popeyes. :)

Just wait until you dine at a Raising Cane's.  Succulent chicken tenders are their specialty and yes, they do have fries!

Rick

I have to look that up and see where it is. And I will give it a shot if it's near me!

Zaxby's is pretty much the same thing. Although I've gotten to where I prefer Cane's over Zaxby's.
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kphoger

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2020, 11:12:36 AM »

I recently started getting my feet wet with sardines (figuratively, not literally).
Anyone else on here eat sardines?  If so, I'm curious how you prepare them.

Update:

Until recently, I had been on the hunt for the smallest sardines available in stores.  This is because I was born after 1979, and turning to Google for answers is what we do, and a lot people online said the smaller sardines have the best flavor.  Well, I've only been able to find one type of two-layer sardines in town (fish small enough to be packed in the tin in two layers), but I've tried a few different kinds in addition.

Since posting in September, the most obvious use of sardines has been to make sardine salad out of it, similar to tuna salad, with mayo and mustard and diced pickles and stuff.  This is versatile for a snack (crackers or toast) but all the mayo probably negates the health benefits of eating oily fish.  What was a big winner with my younger two kids was to coat the fish in an egg wash with Frank's hot sauce mixed in, then bread them in seasoned flour, then pan-fry them and serve them as part of a pasta dish.  It was fantastic but, when my wife and eldest son arrived home, they said the house completely reeked of fish.  The biggest frustration with trying to use whole sardines has been that digging the little guys (which have been thoroughly cooked and soaking in oil) out the tin and then manipulating them in various ways—without breaking them—is an exercise in futility.

But I had a breakthrough on Tuesday evening after the kids went to bed.  I had an idea pop into my head, more or less completely formed, for something to try.  I had at some point bought a tin of Bela brand sardines in lemon-flavored olive oil, from Portugal, at the local Sprouts store.  These were definitely not the smallest sardines out there:  instead of, say, 20 fish per tin, there were only four.  To start, I sautéed some diced onion and bell pepper in a skillet, then added garlic, paprika, coriander, and salt.  When all of that was sautéed to my liking, I put in some red salsa and Frank's hot sauce.  Finally, I cut each sardine into three chunks, added them to the skillet, stirred everything around, and put it on a plate.

Served with some smoked Gouda cheese, it was a might fine nighttime snack.  The chunks of fish stayed pretty much intact, even after some stirring-around.  The only thing I missed was a squeeze of lemon, but we were out of that.  Served over a little bit of rice, the dish would be even better.

So now I'm no longer on the hunt for the smallest sardines.  Now I'm on the hunt for more Portuguese or Spanish sardines, and I no longer want to use the little ones for anything other than mashing them up into a salad.  I saw at Sprouts yesterday that they carry two other varieties of the same brand.  Next time I'm at Whole Foods, I'll have to review their selection as well.
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kevinb1994

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #34 on: May 07, 2020, 11:21:07 AM »

I recently started getting my feet wet with sardines (figuratively, not literally).
Anyone else on here eat sardines?  If so, I'm curious how you prepare them.

Update:

Until recently, I had been on the hunt for the smallest sardines available in stores.  This is because I was born after 1979, and turning to Google for answers is what we do, and a lot people online said the smaller sardines have the best flavor.  Well, I've only been able to find one type of two-layer sardines in town (fish small enough to be packed in the tin in two layers), but I've tried a few different kinds in addition.

Since posting in September, the most obvious use of sardines has been to make sardine salad out of it, similar to tuna salad, with mayo and mustard and diced pickles and stuff.  This is versatile for a snack (crackers or toast) but all the mayo probably negates the health benefits of eating oily fish.  What was a big winner with my younger two kids was to coat the fish in an egg wash with Frank's hot sauce mixed in, then bread them in seasoned flour, then pan-fry them and serve them as part of a pasta dish.  It was fantastic but, when my wife and eldest son arrived home, they said the house completely reeked of fish.  The biggest frustration with trying to use whole sardines has been that digging the little guys (which have been thoroughly cooked and soaking in oil) out the tin and then manipulating them in various ways—without breaking them—is an exercise in futility.

But I had a breakthrough on Tuesday evening after the kids went to bed.  I had an idea pop into my head, more or less completely formed, for something to try.  I had at some point bought a tin of Bela brand sardines in lemon-flavored olive oil, from Portugal, at the local Sprouts store.  These were definitely not the smallest sardines out there:  instead of, say, 20 fish per tin, there were only four.  To start, I sautéed some diced onion and bell pepper in a skillet, then added garlic, paprika, coriander, and salt.  When all of that was sautéed to my liking, I put in some red salsa and Frank's hot sauce.  Finally, I cut each sardine into three chunks, added them to the skillet, stirred everything around, and put it on a plate.

Served with some smoked Gouda cheese, it was a might fine nighttime snack.  The chunks of fish stayed pretty much intact, even after some stirring-around.  The only thing I missed was a squeeze of lemon, but we were out of that.  Served over a little bit of rice, the dish would be even better.

So now I'm no longer on the hunt for the smallest sardines.  Now I'm on the hunt for more Portuguese or Spanish sardines, and I no longer want to use the little ones for anything other than mashing them up into a salad.  I saw at Sprouts yesterday that they carry two other varieties of the same brand.  Next time I'm at Whole Foods, I'll have to review their selection as well.
I’m not the only one who enjoys some Gouda cheese then. I usually get the Babybel ones.
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kurumi

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #35 on: May 07, 2020, 11:00:10 PM »

Taiwanese stinky (fermented) tofu. The first time I encountered it, the table next to us had ordered it; the aroma (to my uncultured nose) was like a dog had climbed up on the table and left a gift. So naturally I thought, "Some day I'm going to try that."

One day, out with the extended family (about 8) I did, to their mild annoyance. The taste was... OK. There was more the feeling of being on a roller coaster and wanting the incline to take you up as fast as possible so the scary part would be over.

Now stinky tofu in Taiwan is apparently much better than anything you can get here in the US. So there's one more thing to try.
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sparker

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #36 on: May 08, 2020, 03:21:17 AM »

Always had a liking for kim chi -- Korean pickled cabbage; especially fond of the extra-hot variety (found in jars and bright red with chiles).  Quite odiferous when opened; usually keep it out in the auxiliary refrigerator in the garage (and tend to eat it out there right out of the jar as well).  My GF rolls here eyes about my choice of "oddball" foods, particularly when they tend to be a bit off the charts in regards to smell.  One of my favorite cheeses has always been Milwaukee Bier Kaese, a particularly "smelly" (quite possibly the source of the remark "who cut the cheese"!) rinded port salut variety.  Used to be able to get it in some supermarkets; but because it's made of unpasteurized milk, chains have stopped selling it -- but it's available from a couple of WI sources online.  That will invariably be for garage or back yard consumption! 

But my latest "craze" has been for Paqui chips, which come in two varieties -- a chili/lime version, very hot, with a mixture of cayenne and habanero powders with a nice dose of lime juice.  The other is their ghost pepper variety (it's ingredient #2 -- even ahead of salt!).  Hot doesn't begin to describe it; if you can get 3-4 down in a couple of minutes, you're doing well!  I usually have some sort of guac around to dip it in to make the heat tolerable.  But they do taste good!  And the company also has a chip made of the Carolina Reaper -- apparently one has to order it, and there's only one chip per tiny bag!  Since those are supposed to be 2.2 times as hot as a ghost pepper, Paqui is covering their ass -- you have to sign a waiver to get a bag/chip!  I'm curious -- but not in any particular hurry to try one out!  But I've got a couple of bags of ghost pepper chips and about a dozen bags of chili/lime in the pantry; those will do just fine!
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kphoger

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #37 on: May 08, 2020, 12:00:00 PM »

I’m not the only one who enjoys some Gouda cheese then. I usually get the Babybel ones.

Pro tip:   Aldi has great cheese.

Always had a liking for kim chi

Ick.  I've only had it once, as part of a fusion taco from a food truck.  I had high hopes in that type of dish, but it tasted like I was eating literal garbage on my taco.
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kurumi

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #38 on: May 08, 2020, 01:16:08 PM »

I don't know why kimchi, tsukemono, vietnamese picked veggies are great, but dill pickles ruin everything they touch.
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kphoger

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Re: Foodie fun
« Reply #39 on: May 08, 2020, 01:53:20 PM »

:fight:   Dill pickles are the only pickles!
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