AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Slang  (Read 1293 times)

US 89

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2317
  • 189 to Evanston!

  • Location: Salt Lake City/Atlanta
  • Last Login: Today at 02:03:24 AM
Re: Slang
« Reply #50 on: September 17, 2019, 10:03:14 PM »

“Uff da” is used in North Dakota as well, at least based on what a client from Fargo told me.

Yep.. at least in spirit! I've found the Dakotas linguistically and culturally to be very similar to Minnesota.

I mean, considering they are right next to it...
Logged
Interstate clinches: 14 82 86ID 215UT 225 345 444 575 985
US clinches: 91 491 550

Flickr
Imgur

Max Rockatansky

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9873
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Route 9, Sector 26
  • Last Login: Today at 12:33:26 AM
    • Gribblenation
Re: Slang
« Reply #51 on: September 18, 2019, 12:13:34 AM »

“Uff da” is used in North Dakota as well, at least based on what a client from Fargo told me.

Yep.. at least in spirit! I've found the Dakotas linguistically and culturally to be very similar to Minnesota.


I mean, considering they are right next to it...

My wife watched Fargo for the first time the other day.  I’ve been having the hardest time comparing what my cousins sound like, I finally had a real world analogy she got. 
« Last Edit: September 18, 2019, 09:14:01 AM by Max Rockatansky »
Logged

1995hoo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10502
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
  • Last Login: December 08, 2019, 10:06:18 PM
Re: Slang
« Reply #52 on: September 18, 2019, 07:53:55 AM »

“Uff da” is used in North Dakota as well, at least based on what a client from Fargo told me.

Yep.. at least in spirit! I've found the Dakotas linguistically and culturally to be very similar to Minnesota.

Except it was poster Bruce who mentioned “uff da” in the context of Seattle. I just didn’t quote his post because I didn’t feel like editing it down.
Logged
"You know, you never have a guaranteed spot until you have a spot guaranteed."
—Olaf Kolzig, as quoted in the Washington Times on March 28, 2003,
commenting on the Capitals clinching a playoff spot.

"That sounded stupid, didn't it?"—Kolzig, to the same reporter a few seconds later.

webny99

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3238
  • Roadgeek Forever.

  • Age: 20
  • Location: Rochester, NY
  • Last Login: December 08, 2019, 10:51:52 PM
Re: Slang
« Reply #53 on: September 18, 2019, 08:53:56 AM »

“Uff da” is used in North Dakota as well, at least based on what a client from Fargo told me.
Yep.. at least in spirit! I've found the Dakotas linguistically and culturally to be very similar to Minnesota.
I mean, considering they are right next to it...

New York is right next to Vermont, and in many ways they are as different as night and day.
Same with New York and Pennsylvania.


“Uff da” is used in North Dakota as well, at least based on what a client from Fargo told me.
Yep.. at least in spirit! I've found the Dakotas linguistically and culturally to be very similar to Minnesota.
Except it was poster Bruce who mentioned “uff da” in the context of Seattle. I just didn’t quote his post because I didn’t feel like editing it down.

Oops. I missed that, and just assumed Minnesota based on my priors (and the fact that a Minnesotan posted directly above you).
Bruce did note Scandinavian heritage as being the cause, though, so it would be applicable to all of the above, given the concentration of Scandinavian roots in the Upper Midwest.
Logged
Left Lane is For Passing, Not Camping!
Threads Started
Counties Clinched

roadman65

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9642
  • Location: Orlando, fl
  • Last Login: December 05, 2019, 11:10:39 AM
Re: Slang
« Reply #54 on: September 19, 2019, 10:23:41 AM »

Brooklyn is different from the rest of New York too in that respect.  Even the Puerto Ricans, as one old boss of mine was from Brooklyn but of Puerto Rican descent.  He told me that he once visited San Juan and spoke his native Spanish  while there and was found out by native Puerto Rico residents he was from Brooklyn as even in Spanish they have certain words that differ.

In fact I know another man who claims he is from Brooklyn but lacks the accent as well.  Also of Hispanic origin, but has a heavy Spanish accent that usually native Puerto Ricans or South Americans have when he speaks, but insists he is from Brooklyn.  I assume he is as phony as the career he wants many to think he had and that was an NYPD Officer.  The guy, when you meet him, is flaky to say the least and never stops talking and controls the conversation so you have to sit there and listen to him, especially when he talks about crap you care less about.  So the slang is important of people to know where they are from and makes us interesting.

Anyway, NY is made up of many slang in speech.
Logged
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.