AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Which states use what electronic toll technology.  (Read 20850 times)

Mdcastle

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 617
  • Last Login: Today at 10:21:28 AM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #50 on: September 30, 2015, 08:55:51 AM »

What technology does eastern Canada (Confederation Bridge / Halifax Bridges / Quebec bridges, etc) use?
Logged

1995hoo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12071
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
  • Last Login: Today at 12:41:42 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #51 on: September 30, 2015, 09:55:12 AM »


While there aren't 'hundreds' (probably several dozen), there's still the issue to trying to connect them all.  And considering the entire Northeast is already connected, it's really a matter of connecting those further away from that area - Florida, Texas, California, etc. 

The biggest hurdle isn't connecting everyone; it's the fees involved to do so.  Why would California want to connect to EZ Pass, when the fees probably will cost more than the revenue brought in with tag usage from other regions.

Also, as has been noted elsewhere, there's the issue of some agencies' refusal to eliminate the old gate arms in the converted toll-machine lanes. Incompatible transponders won't trigger the thing that raises the arm.
Logged
"You know, you never have a guaranteed spot until you have a spot guaranteed."
—Olaf Kolzig, as quoted in the Washington Times on March 28, 2003,
commenting on the Capitals clinching a playoff spot.

"That sounded stupid, didn't it?"—Kolzig, to the same reporter a few seconds later.

cl94

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6073
  • Trust me, I'm a transportation engineer

  • Age: 26
  • Location: Albany, New York
  • Last Login: Today at 12:57:03 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #52 on: September 30, 2015, 10:03:52 AM »

There's another toll plaza in Ontario that accepts E-ZPass. Lewiston-Queenston Bridge. All 4 bridges between New York and Southern Ontario accept it. Given the amount of regional traffic, I'm surprised the IAG hasn't tried to work something out with 407 ETR to make the transponders compatible. I know I would be more inclined to use 407 if my E-ZPass worked on it.
Logged
Please note: All posts represent my personal opinions and do not represent those of my employer or any of its partner agencies.

Travel Mapping (updated weekly)

PHLBOS

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 7227
  • Age: 55
  • Location: Greater Philly, PA
  • Last Login: January 23, 2021, 01:38:31 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #53 on: September 30, 2015, 10:24:41 AM »

An ATM card is also a debit card. Once upon a time you were able to use a particular bank's ATM card only at that bank's ATMs; later certain ATM networks developed (you can sometimes see these logos on the back of your card, such as "Honor" or "Cirrus") to allow you to use your ATM card at other banks in the same network. The idea of the VISA or MasterCard-branded "check card" came later and allowed you to use your ATM card at stores, gas stations, etc.
Not necessarily.  Although rare, bare-bones ATM cards with no MasterCard/VISA logos on them still exist and are just ATM cards as opposed to debit or check cards.  I happen to have one in my wallet and still use it to this day.

Some bridges crossing the Hudson in NYC are supposed to get AET (or it may be the new TZ Bridge).
The new AET gantry framework for the new TZ Bridge (along I-87 South/287 East on the Nyack side of the Hudson) is already erected.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2015, 10:31:12 AM by PHLBOS »
Logged
GPS does NOT equal GOD

cl94

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6073
  • Trust me, I'm a transportation engineer

  • Age: 26
  • Location: Albany, New York
  • Last Login: Today at 12:57:03 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #54 on: September 30, 2015, 12:36:09 PM »

Some bridges crossing the Hudson in NYC are supposed to get AET (or it may be the new TZ Bridge).
The new AET gantry framework for the new TZ Bridge (along I-87 South/287 East on the Nyack side of the Hudson) is already erected.

It's up and will be activated within the next 6 months or so. The permanent gantry will be where the current toll booths are.
Logged
Please note: All posts represent my personal opinions and do not represent those of my employer or any of its partner agencies.

Travel Mapping (updated weekly)

hbelkins

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 15164
  • It is well, it is well, with my soul.

  • Age: 59
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Last Login: January 25, 2021, 12:27:28 PM
    • Millennium Highway
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #55 on: September 30, 2015, 02:11:20 PM »

Also, as has been noted elsewhere, there's the issue of some agencies' refusal to eliminate the old gate arms in the converted toll-machine lanes. Incompatible transponders won't trigger the thing that raises the arm.

AFAIK, that wasn't an issue with the CBBT. It uses E-ZPass and has gate arms.
Logged

cl94

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6073
  • Trust me, I'm a transportation engineer

  • Age: 26
  • Location: Albany, New York
  • Last Login: Today at 12:57:03 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #56 on: September 30, 2015, 02:17:18 PM »

Also, as has been noted elsewhere, there's the issue of some agencies' refusal to eliminate the old gate arms in the converted toll-machine lanes. Incompatible transponders won't trigger the thing that raises the arm.

AFAIK, that wasn't an issue with the CBBT. It uses E-ZPass and has gate arms.

As do the TBTA crossings in New York, the Peace Bridge, and the Niagara Falls bridge.

Issue here is that technologies are incompatible so the passes won't be read and the gate won't raise, but it wouldn't cost a heck of a lot to just add an another chip or two to new transponders so everything is technologically compatible. The chips aren't that expensive and it would save agencies money in the long run because they would have to pay fewer toll takers.
Logged
Please note: All posts represent my personal opinions and do not represent those of my employer or any of its partner agencies.

Travel Mapping (updated weekly)

Mapmikey

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3076
  • Co-curator with Froggie of www.vahighways.com

  • Age: 51
  • Last Login: Today at 12:35:39 PM
    • Co-curator Virginia Highways Project
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #57 on: September 30, 2015, 02:22:53 PM »

There's another toll plaza in Ontario that accepts E-ZPass. Lewiston-Queenston Bridge. All 4 bridges between New York and Southern Ontario accept it. Given the amount of regional traffic, I'm surprised the IAG hasn't tried to work something out with 407 ETR to make the transponders compatible. I know I would be more inclined to use 407 if my E-ZPass worked on it.

ETR 407 would collect more $ this way.  I drove a chunk of it in June and never received a bill for it as I guess they can't/don't query Virginia registrations...

Mike
Logged

PHLBOS

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 7227
  • Age: 55
  • Location: Greater Philly, PA
  • Last Login: January 23, 2021, 01:38:31 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #58 on: September 30, 2015, 02:39:04 PM »

Also, as has been noted elsewhere, there's the issue of some agencies' refusal to eliminate the old gate arms in the converted toll-machine lanes. Incompatible transponders won't trigger the thing that raises the arm.

AFAIK, that wasn't an issue with the CBBT. It uses E-ZPass and has gate arms.

As do the TBTA crossings in New York, the Peace Bridge, and the Niagara Falls bridge.
Same with the DRPA bridges (Commodore Barry, Walt Whitman, Ben Franklin & Betsy Ross Bridges).
Logged
GPS does NOT equal GOD

cl94

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6073
  • Trust me, I'm a transportation engineer

  • Age: 26
  • Location: Albany, New York
  • Last Login: Today at 12:57:03 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #59 on: September 30, 2015, 02:42:03 PM »

There's another toll plaza in Ontario that accepts E-ZPass. Lewiston-Queenston Bridge. All 4 bridges between New York and Southern Ontario accept it. Given the amount of regional traffic, I'm surprised the IAG hasn't tried to work something out with 407 ETR to make the transponders compatible. I know I would be more inclined to use 407 if my E-ZPass worked on it.

ETR 407 would collect more $ this way.  I drove a chunk of it in June and never received a bill for it as I guess they can't/don't query Virginia registrations...

Mike

I'd use it, but I don't like the $7.20-8.50 surcharge per trip for not having a transponder, plus another $4 or so for an "account maintenance fee". Granted, rates are excessive, but I'd pay the premium to avoid congested areas if I know there's an issue. With as many New York and Pennsylvania plates I see up there, you'd think that it would be in their best interest.
Logged
Please note: All posts represent my personal opinions and do not represent those of my employer or any of its partner agencies.

Travel Mapping (updated weekly)

doorknob60

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 836
  • Age: 27
  • Location: Boise, ID
  • Last Login: January 19, 2021, 05:03:31 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #60 on: October 01, 2015, 03:49:11 PM »

The only electronic tolling in Oregon I'm aware of is BreezeBy for the Hood River Bridge. It's not even fully in Oregon. It doesn't help that the only other toll road (partially) in the state is the even less used Bridge of the Gods, which has no electronic tolling.

Kacie Jane

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1680
  • Age: 35
  • Location: Kent, WA
  • Last Login: February 01, 2020, 10:04:51 PM
Re: Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #61 on: October 01, 2015, 05:30:53 PM »

Also, as has been noted elsewhere, there's the issue of some agencies' refusal to eliminate the old gate arms in the converted toll-machine lanes. Incompatible transponders won't trigger the thing that raises the arm.

AFAIK, that wasn't an issue with the CBBT. It uses E-ZPass and has gate arms.

As do the TBTA crossings in New York, the Peace Bridge, and the Niagara Falls bridge.
Same with the DRPA bridges (Commodore Barry, Walt Whitman, Ben Franklin & Betsy Ross Bridges).

The argument isn't that electronic tolling can't work with gate arms.  It's that incompatible technologies can't.

Without gate arms, in theory, an E-ZPass highway can "accept" SunPass or Good to Go or whatever else just by using toll by plate as a back up, and cross-referencing plates with other tolling system accounts.  With gate arms, that's not an option, since the gate arm won't raise if the booth doesn't read a transponder.
Logged

1995hoo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12071
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
  • Last Login: Today at 12:41:42 PM
Which states use what electronic toll technology.
« Reply #62 on: October 02, 2015, 03:35:45 AM »

Thanks. That was exactly what I was getting at, and I experienced the issue first-hand in Miami a few years back when the Rickenbacker Causeway didn't accept SunPass but the only sign advising of that was a piece of 8.5-by-11-inch paper too small to see until it was too late.

Electronic tolling obviously does work with gate arms. The multitude of New York City toll facilities that continue to use the arms underscores that.
Logged
"You know, you never have a guaranteed spot until you have a spot guaranteed."
—Olaf Kolzig, as quoted in the Washington Times on March 28, 2003,
commenting on the Capitals clinching a playoff spot.

"That sounded stupid, didn't it?"—Kolzig, to the same reporter a few seconds later.

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.