Interstate 40 East - Joseph City to New Mexico

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Interstate 40 East
Advance signage for exit 277, Business Loop 40 serving Joseph City. Photo taken 06/28/08.
The east end of the Business Loop is served at Exit 277. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 277 departs here for Joseph City, as Business Loop 40 and former US 66. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Reassurance marker for Interstate 40 Eastbound and U.S. 180 east of Joseph City. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Holbrook (8 miles), Gallup (103 miles) and Albuquerque (242 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 280, Hunt Road and Geronimo Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 280 serves the Geronimo Trading Post, one of the many trading posts along former US 66. The buildings of the trading post can be seen in the background. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 280 departs here for Geronimo Road and Hunt Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
This guide sign advises travellers to Petrified Forest National Park to use Exit 285, U.S. 180 to reach the park. Interstate 40 will also pass through the park ahead. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 283, Perkins Valley Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 283 also serves Golf Course Road, which is used to reach the Hidden Cove Golf Coure (owned by the city of Holbrook). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 283, Perkins Valley Road, 1/2 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Perkins Valley Road departs here, as exit 283. This exit marks the western city limits of Holbrook. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for the three exits of Holbrook. Holbrook was named after H.R. Holbrook, the first engineer on the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, and is the county seat of Navajo County. Photo taken 06/28/08.
This busy guide sign offers advance signage for exit 285, Business Loop 40, U.S. 180, and Arizona 77 to Show Low and Petrified Forest National Park, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 285 also serves a portion of old U.S. 66 through Holbrook. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Arizona 77 travels south to Show Low, eventually ending up in Tucson. U.S. 180 travels east to Springerville and Alpine before entering New Mexico. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 285 departs here for Business Loop 40, Arizona 77 and U.S. 180, as well as downtown Holbrook. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 289, East Navajo Blvd and Business Loop 40. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 289 serves the newer chain motels and restaurants located on the east end of Holbrook. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 289, East Navajo Blvd departs here for the town of Holbrook. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 292 departs here to serve Arizona 77 to Keams Canyon. Arizona 77 was extended north of Interstate 40 in 1963. North of Interstate 40, Arizona 77 enters the Navajo Indian Nation and is no longer a state highway. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 294, Sun Valley Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 294 serves Sun Valley Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Petrified Forest National Park (16 miles), Gallup (85 miles) and Albuquerque (224 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 300, serving Goodwater. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 300 departs here for Goodwater. The former trading post here closed in 2000, leaving the exit with no services. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 crosses Little Lithodendren Wash. We have just passed several rock formations to the north side of the freeway. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Petrified Forest National Park (10 miles), Gallup (80 miles) and Albuquerque (219 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 303, Adamana Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Since there is a Little Lithodendren Wash, it follows that there is a Big Lithodendren Wash. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Adamana Road departs here. Adamana Road serves the old railroad station of Adamana, created in 1890 to serve Petrified Forest National Monument, as well as Stewart's Petrified Wood, one of the many curio shops along old Route 66. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Petrified Forest National Park (7 miles), Gallup (77 miles) and Albuquerque (215 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 enters Apache County here. Apache County is the most northeast of all Arizona counties, with St. Johns as the County Seat. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 311, Petrified Forest National Park, 2 miles. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 311 only serves the park, travelling north through the park to reach the Painted Desert before crossing Interstate 40 and heading south to U.S. 180. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Trucks are not permitted on Exit 311 and the Petrified Forest road. We are now in the park, which is bisected by the Interstate. This section of Interstate 40 was one of the first two sections to open, in 1961 (between exits 303 and 320). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 311 departs here for Petrified Forest National Park. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 crosses the Dead River, which joins the Rio Puerco to eventually drain into the Little Colorado River. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 320 departs here for Pinta Road. The remaining 39 miles of Interstate 40 are sparsely populated. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to US 191 North (12 miles), US 191 south (18 miles) and Albuquerque (198 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 crosses Crazy Creek here. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 325 serves Navajo. While there is not much at Navajo, there is immense history, for in 1863, this is where the first territorial government of Arizona was formally inagurated - when this was called Navajo Springs (shortened to reduce typing on the telegraph!). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to US 191 North (6 miles), US 191 south (12 miles) and Albuquerque (193 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 330, McCarrell Road, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
McCarrell Road departs here as exit 330. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to US 191 North (3 miles), US 191 south (9 miles) and Albuquerque (189 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 333, U.S. 191 northbound to Ganado and the Navajo Nation. Photo taken 06/28/08.
U.S. 191 northbound was signed as Arizona 63 from 1971 to 1982, before being re-signed as U.S. 191. This section of U.S. 191 was never signed as U.S. 666. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Use U.S. 191 northbound to reach Chambers, and the Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site. Photo taken 06/28/08.
U.S. 191 northbound departs here for Ganado. U.S. 191 also travels north to Canyon De Chelly National Monument. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 East U.S. 191 South
Reassurance marker for Interstate 40 and U.S. 191. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to U.S. 191 southbound (5 miles), Gallup (47 miles) and Albuquerque (187 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 339 serving Sanders. Exit 339 is also U.S. 191 southbound. Photo taken 06/28/08.
U.S. 191 travels south from Exit 339 to St. Johns and Springerville, and then onto the infamous Coronado Trail. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 East
Interstate 40 enters the Navajo Nation here, after paralelling the southern boundary since Winona. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 341, Ortega Road, 3/4 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 341 departs here for Ortega Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 346, Pine Springs Road, 3/4 mile. Interstate 40 is now descending into the Rio Puerco Valley. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 346 departs here for Pine Springs Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 348 serving Houck, 3/4 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Use exit 348 to reach St. Anslem Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Houck is named after a former sheepherder who ran a trading post at this site between 1877-1885. Exit 348 departs here for Houck. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Just past exit 348 is a long-closed rest area. We now see advance signage for exit 351, Allentown Road, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 351 departs here for Allentown. Allantown (as it was called) is named after a former railroad construction worker. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Indian Route 12 (5 miles), Gallup (29 miles) and Albuquerque (167 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 354, Hawthorne Road, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Hawthorne Road departs here, as exit 354. Most exits along this section of Interstate 40 serve small settlements. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 357, Indian Route 12 to Window Rock, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
The bluffs and mesas of far eastern Arizona make this section of Interstate 40 quite scenic. Advance signage for exit 357, Indian Route 12, 1/2 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Indian Route 12 travels north to Window Rock, which is the governmental center of the Navajo Nation. Photo taken 06/28/08.
The 300 foot tall sandstone bluffs along Interstate 40 are quite dramatic, and memorable along this section of Interstate 40. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 359, Grants Road, 3/4 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Use exit 359 to reach Historic U.S. 66, which paralells Interstate 40 between exits 357 and 359 through Lupton. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 359 departs here as Grants Road. This is the last exit inside Arizona. Photo taken 06/28/08.
After 359 miles, Interstate 40 exits Arizona and enters New Mexico. Gallup is a few short miles away, followed by Albuquerque. Photo taken 06/28/08.



Photo Credits:

06/28/08 by Kevin Trinkle

Page Updated 02-05-2009.