Interstate 40 East - Flagstaff to Joseph City

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Interstate 40 east
Eastbound Interstate 40 approaching Exit 198, Butler Avenue, 3/4 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Butler Avenue (1/4 mile) and U.S. 89/Business Loop 40 at Country Club Road (3 1/4 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to U.S. 89/Business Loop 40 at Country Club Road (1 1/2 miles) and Walnut Canyon (5 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Eastbound Interstate 40 approaching Exit 201 for U.S. 89 to Page, 1 1/4 miles. In 1993, U.S. 89 was truncated to this interchange; all instances of the route south of Flagstaff were removed. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 201 serves both the east end of Business Loop I-40 (Country Club Drive) and U.S. 89. The actual interchange between the two roads and the Interstate was a 1968-vintage trumpet interchange that was reconstructed in 2006-07. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Eastbound Interstate 40 approaching Exit 201 for U.S. 89 to Page. U.S. 180 is unsigned here, but joins Interstate 40 at this interchange for a long overlap to Holbrook. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Eastbound Interstate 40 at Exit 201, Junction Westbound Business Loop I-40 into Flagstaff, Northbound U.S. 180 to the Grand Canyon, and Northbound U.S. 89 to Page and the Glen Canyon Dam. This interchange marks the southern terminus of U.S. 89. The business loop connects with Historic U.S. 66. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Immediately after exit 201, Interstate 40 sports U.S. 180 signage, which will remain until Holbrook. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 204, Walnut Canyon National Monument, 1/4 mile. Walnut Canyon is a small monument that preserves unique Sinagua cliff dwellings. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 204 departs here for Walnut Canyon National Monument. This exit marks the end of a continuous segment of U.S. 66 through Flagstaff. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 207, Cosnino Road, One mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 remains signed as the Purple Heart trail throughout Arizona. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 207, Cosnino Road, 1/4 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 207 departs here for Cosnino Road. The interchange design for Cosnino Road is fairly abrupt, with a harsh cloverleaf dictated by the proximity of the railroad, restricting certain trucks from using this interchange. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Reassurance marker for Interstate 40 and U.S. 180 east of Cosnino Road. Behind this sign is the now-closed Walnut Canyon Rest Area, which was closed in 1997. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Winona (3 miles), Winslow (46 miles) and Albuquerque (312 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 211, Winona. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 crosses Walnut Canyon here. The depth of the canyon is deceptive from the freeway, as it is up to 1000 feet deep in places. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Winona has a far greater reputation than the town size deserves because of the song "Get your Kicks on Route 66". The town is little more than a gas station and road junction. An old section of Route 66 (bypassed in 1947) can be picked up here and driven up to U.S. 89 north of Flagstaff. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 211 departs here for Winona. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 now leaves the pine trees of Flagstaff behind and starts descending slowly to the high grasslands of Northeast Arizona. At this point, we have dropped 1000 feet since Flagstaff, a mere 16 miles behind us. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Elk are prevalent across Northern Arizona, as seen by these dual warning signs. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 now leaves the Coconino National Forest. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 219, Twin Arrows, is the site of another former Route 66 trading post, long closed. All that remains are the decaying arrows, which have succumbed to the elements after years of decay. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 225, Buffalo Range Road, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 225 departs here to serve Buffalo Range Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Winslow (29 miles), Holbrook (60 miles) and Albuquerque (294 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 230, Two Guns. Two Guns has a bloody history, from the days when it was originally occupied by "Two Gun" Miller. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Just before reaching the Two Guns exit, Interstate 40 crosses Canyon Diablo. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 230 departs here for the site of Two Guns. The site was also home to an old trading post that has long since closed. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Meteor Crater Road (2 miles), Winslow (23 miles) and Albuquerque (289 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 233, Meteor Crater Road, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Use Exit 233 to reach Meteor Crater. The Crater is privately owned, but is open for public tours. NASA used the crater for Moon lander training during the Apollo program. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 233 departs here for Meteor Crater Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for the Meteor Crater Rest Area, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit here for the Meteor Crater Rest Area. Photo taken 06/28/08.
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Reassurance marker for Interstate 40 and U.S. 180. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Winslow (18 miles), Holbrook (50 miles), and Albuquerque (284 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 crosses the BNSF railroad tracks here. The windsock is mounted just before the overpass due to strong winds through the area. Photo taken 06/28/08.
The white dome of Meteor City Trading Post can be seen from the top of the railroad overpass. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 239, Meteor City Road, one mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 239, Meteor City Road, one mile. The white buildings in the background are for the trading post, which is not affiliated with Meteor Crater. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Meteor City road departs here at exit 239. A roadside curio shop is located here. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Arizona 99 (5 miles), Winslow (14 miles) and Albuquerque (280 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for Exit 245, Arizona 99 northbound to Leupp. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Arizona 99 was designated in 1970 between Leupp on the Navajo Reservation north of Interstate 40, and the Apache National Forest boundary southeast of Winslow. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Eastbound Interstate 40 at exit 245, Arizona 99 to Leupp. Arizona 99 southbound is silently multiplexed with Interstate 40 into Winslow. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 has now descended to 5000 feet in elevation, and will stay at approximately that elevation the rest of the way through Arizona. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Winslow (8 miles), Holbrook (40 miles) and Albuquerue (274 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 crosses Tucker Flat Wash here. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Winslow was established as a railway division stop along the AT&SF railroad. Today, the town is best known for "Standing in a Corner" park, from the Eagles song "Take It Easy". The next three exits are Hipkoe Drive, North Park Drive and Transcon Lane. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 enters the city of Winslow, as well as Navajo County, here. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 252, Former Business Loop 40 and Hipkoe Drive. While Business Loop 40 was still signed in 2008, the road was decommissioned in 2007 and turned over to the city of Winslow for maintenance. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Use exit 252 to reach Arizona 87 southbound, as well as Historic U.S. 66 (which is former Business Loop 40). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 252 marks the western edge of Former Business Loop 40, Winslow, and the beginning of Business Spur 40. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 252 marks the western edge of Business Loop 40, Winslow, and the beginning of Business Spur 40. Hipkoe Drive departs from Interstate 40 here. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 253, North Park Drive, 1 1/4 miles. Photo taken 06/28/08.
North Park Drive travels north-south through Winslow. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for North Park Drive, 1/2 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Now east of North Park Drive, we see this reassurance marker for Interstate 40 and U.S. 180. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 255, serving Former Business Loop 40 to Winslow and Transcon Lane. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Use exit 255 to reach Northland Pioneer College. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 255, Former Business Loop 40, 1/2 mile. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 255 departs from Interstate 40 to serve former Business Loop 40 and Transcon Lane here. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 257, Arizona 87 north to Second Mesa. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Use exit 257 to reach Homolovi Ruins State Park. The park protects an old Hopi pueblo, and opened in 1993. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Arizona 87 was extended north of Interstate 40 in 1968, incorporating former Arizona 65. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Arizona 87 north departs from Interstate 40 here, at exit 257. This marks the eastern end of another driveable section of old U.S. 66. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Joseph City (16 miles), Holbrook (27 miles) and Albuquerque (260 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Interstate 40 crosses Cottonwood Wash. In early days, there were many cottonwood trees along the wash that pioneers cut down and used, hence the name. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 264, Hibbard Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 264 departs here for Hibbard Road. Hibbard is a railroad siding named after the former head of the Santa Fe Railroad. Photo taken 06/28/08.
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Reassurance marker for Interstate 40 and U.S. 180. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Distance sign to Jackrabbit Road (5 miles), Holbrook (20 miles), and Albuquerque (254 miles). Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 269, Jackrabbit Road. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 269 departs here for Jackrabbit Road. Jackrabbit Road serves the Jackrabbit Trading Post and former US 66. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Advance signage for exit 274, the western end of Business Loop 40. Joseph City lies north of Interstate 40. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Business Loop 40 through Joseph City is another section of historic U.S. 66. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Joseph City was founded by Mormon pioneers in 1876, and named after the Mormon prophet Joseph Smith (who translated the Book of Mormon). The town was a farming center until the 1960s, when the nearby Cholla power plant opened, which dried up groundwater supplies used for farming. Photo taken 06/28/08.
Exit 274 departs here for the western end of Business Loop 40, and the west side of Joseph City. Photo taken 06/28/08.


 


Photo Credits:

06/28/08 by Kevin Trinkle

Page Updated 02-01-2009.