News:

The AARoads Wiki is live! Come check it out!

Main Menu

NYC Roads

Started by Mergingtraffic, September 02, 2015, 03:30:46 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

RobbieL2415

Quote from: Rothman on April 19, 2024, 09:14:45 AM
Quote from: crispy93 on April 19, 2024, 08:55:26 AMLooks like NYC will soon be able to lower its default speed limit (again) to 20 mph this time: https://archive.is/v6Gax

Meh.  25 mph was a good one.  If enforcement isn't cutting it now, it certainly won't at 20.
Is there even an objective, factual basis for this?


Rothman

Quote from: RobbieL2415 on April 19, 2024, 01:09:31 PM
Quote from: Rothman on April 19, 2024, 09:14:45 AM
Quote from: crispy93 on April 19, 2024, 08:55:26 AMLooks like NYC will soon be able to lower its default speed limit (again) to 20 mph this time: https://archive.is/v6Gax

Meh.  25 mph was a good one.  If enforcement isn't cutting it now, it certainly won't at 20.
Is there even an objective, factual basis for this?

For lowering the speed limit?

Let's just say requests for speed limit reductions on State-owned roads come in regularly to NYSDOT and are regularly rejected for not being warranted...

Whether the City has an engineering-based check on people who just think lower speed limits are a panacea...I don't know...
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

D-Dey65

Quote from: Rothman on April 19, 2024, 09:14:45 AM
Quote from: crispy93 on April 19, 2024, 08:55:26 AMLooks like NYC will soon be able to lower its default speed limit (again) to 20 mph this time: https://archive.is/v6Gax

Meh.  25 mph was a good one.  If enforcement isn't cutting it now, it certainly won't at 20.
I guess the people calling for this are forgetting that we have cars so we can go faster than horses and buggies. That and not having to leave horse or other animal shit on the streets. Are they seriously trying to bring us back to 19th Century speed limits?

 


Rothman

Quote from: D-Dey65 on April 19, 2024, 09:16:30 PM
Quote from: Rothman on April 19, 2024, 09:14:45 AM
Quote from: crispy93 on April 19, 2024, 08:55:26 AMLooks like NYC will soon be able to lower its default speed limit (again) to 20 mph this time: https://archive.is/v6Gax

Meh.  25 mph was a good one.  If enforcement isn't cutting it now, it certainly won't at 20.
I guess the people calling for this are forgetting that we have cars so we can go faster than horses and buggies. That and not having to leave horse or other animal shit on the streets. Are they seriously trying to bring us back to 19th Century speed limits?

 



I don't know.  I know some people floor it and then smash their brakes when lights turn on Manhattan -- and then subsequently must get brake work done every six months -- but, 25 mph is a good NY speed limit in my experience.  Sure, you can hit 35 or so, but any faster than that, you become one of those bad drivers that never misses a turn, which ticks everyone off, locals and whoever else alike.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

vdeane

Quote from: D-Dey65 on April 19, 2024, 09:16:30 PMI guess the people calling for this are forgetting that we have cars so we can go faster than horses and buggies. That and not having to leave horse or other animal shit on the streets. Are they seriously trying to bring us back to 19th Century speed limits?
It's not so much as they forgot as they view the proliferation of cars as a mistake which they seek to undo.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

NoGoodNamesAvailable

NYC has speed cameras that go off when you go 10 mph over, now they can get money from people doing 30.

crispy93

Here's some dashcam pics of the new lane configuration on the Major Deegan northbound at the Cross-Bronx. They re-allocated one of the lanes from the service road to be an exit lane for the CBX: https://imgur.com/a/tXxnIJR
Not every speed limit in NY needs to be 30

The Ghostbuster

Given how constrained the city's road system is, its a wonder anyone can get anywhere in the city by car. As much as mass transit is promoted, it can't provide doorstep-to-destination transport 24/7 without waiting, transfers, or plenty of walking to and from the stops. That is why most people utilize cars and shun mass transit; they want to be able to travel on their own schedule, not when someone else dictates.

Rothman

Quote from: The Ghostbuster on April 29, 2024, 02:54:12 PMGiven how constrained the city's road system is, its a wonder anyone can get anywhere in the city by car. As much as mass transit is promoted, it can't provide doorstep-to-destination transport 24/7 without waiting, transfers, or plenty of walking to and from the stops. That is why most people utilize cars and shun mass transit; they want to be able to travel on their own schedule, not when someone else dictates.

I think the majority in NYC utilizes public transit, not the minority.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

storm2k

Quote from: Rothman on April 29, 2024, 07:19:32 PM
Quote from: The Ghostbuster on April 29, 2024, 02:54:12 PMGiven how constrained the city's road system is, its a wonder anyone can get anywhere in the city by car. As much as mass transit is promoted, it can't provide doorstep-to-destination transport 24/7 without waiting, transfers, or plenty of walking to and from the stops. That is why most people utilize cars and shun mass transit; they want to be able to travel on their own schedule, not when someone else dictates.

I think the majority in NYC utilizes public transit, not the minority.

Since when do people let something like facts get in the way of a good narrative?

TheDon102

Something I dont see talked about here is how NYCDOT has been on a mission removing car lanes from the avenues and the major east-west thoroughfares in Manhattan. They have created a lot of congestion themselves (yes congestion existed before NYCDOT reimagined NYC Streets but it has gotten worse). The remedy to this artificially inflated congestion is to punish drivers by charging them a +$15 toll to enter Manhattan's CBD. In addition trucks will pay much larger tolls thereby increasing prices on food and other commodities. Obviously most NYC residents use public transit, however NYC residents rely on trucks to deliver food to various local businesses.

Rothman

Quote from: TheDon102 on May 03, 2024, 10:26:32 PMSomething I dont see talked about here is how NYCDOT has been on a mission removing car lanes from the avenues and the major east-west thoroughfares in Manhattan. They have created a lot of congestion themselves (yes congestion existed before NYCDOT reimagined NYC Streets but it has gotten worse). The remedy to this artificially inflated congestion is to punish drivers by charging them a +$15 toll to enter Manhattan's CBD. In addition trucks will pay much larger tolls thereby increasing prices on food and other commodities. Obviously most NYC residents use public transit, however NYC residents rely on trucks to deliver food to various local businesses.

I just drove around Manhattan without much issue a few weeks ago.  I find your description to be an exaggeration.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Plutonic Panda

Quote from: Rothman on May 03, 2024, 11:19:56 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 03, 2024, 10:26:32 PMSomething I dont see talked about here is how NYCDOT has been on a mission removing car lanes from the avenues and the major east-west thoroughfares in Manhattan. They have created a lot of congestion themselves (yes congestion existed before NYCDOT reimagined NYC Streets but it has gotten worse). The remedy to this artificially inflated congestion is to punish drivers by charging them a +$15 toll to enter Manhattan's CBD. In addition trucks will pay much larger tolls thereby increasing prices on food and other commodities. Obviously most NYC residents use public transit, however NYC residents rely on trucks to deliver food to various local businesses.

I just drove around Manhattan without much issue a few weeks ago.  I find your description to be an exaggeration.
I'm shocked that you would have this opinion.

TheDon102

Quote from: Rothman on May 03, 2024, 11:19:56 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 03, 2024, 10:26:32 PMSomething I dont see talked about here is how NYCDOT has been on a mission removing car lanes from the avenues and the major east-west thoroughfares in Manhattan. They have created a lot of congestion themselves (yes congestion existed before NYCDOT reimagined NYC Streets but it has gotten worse). The remedy to this artificially inflated congestion is to punish drivers by charging them a +$15 toll to enter Manhattan's CBD. In addition trucks will pay much larger tolls thereby increasing prices on food and other commodities. Obviously most NYC residents use public transit, however NYC residents rely on trucks to deliver food to various local businesses.

I just drove around Manhattan without much issue a few weeks ago.  I find your description to be an exaggeration.

8th avenue going from 5 through lanes to 2 lanes, car ban on 14th street for most hours of the day, taking a lane from seemingly all of the NYCDOT owned east river crossings, 3rd avenue going from 5 through lanes to 3, 2nd avenue going from 4 through lanes to 2 (from 23rd street to houston), 9th avenue going from 5 lanes to 3 lanes.   

Rothman

Quote from: TheDon102 on May 04, 2024, 09:50:05 AM
Quote from: Rothman on May 03, 2024, 11:19:56 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 03, 2024, 10:26:32 PMSomething I dont see talked about here is how NYCDOT has been on a mission removing car lanes from the avenues and the major east-west thoroughfares in Manhattan. They have created a lot of congestion themselves (yes congestion existed before NYCDOT reimagined NYC Streets but it has gotten worse). The remedy to this artificially inflated congestion is to punish drivers by charging them a +$15 toll to enter Manhattan's CBD. In addition trucks will pay much larger tolls thereby increasing prices on food and other commodities. Obviously most NYC residents use public transit, however NYC residents rely on trucks to deliver food to various local businesses.

I just drove around Manhattan without much issue a few weeks ago.  I find your description to be an exaggeration.

8th avenue going from 5 through lanes to 2 lanes, car ban on 14th street for most hours of the day, taking a lane from seemingly all of the NYCDOT owned east river crossings, 3rd avenue going from 5 through lanes to 3, 2nd avenue going from 4 through lanes to 2 (from 23rd street to houston), 9th avenue going from 5 lanes to 3 lanes.   

I'm not seeing the issue.  Like I said, the system seems to be handling it.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

SignBridge

Mr. Rothman, what time of day did you drive in Manhattan? Maybe 7am on a Sunday morning?

Rothman

Quote from: SignBridge on May 04, 2024, 08:14:29 PMMr. Rothman, what time of day did you drive in Manhattan? Maybe 7am on a Sunday morning?

Wasn't my first rodeo driving in Manhattan.  I'm down there quite frequently.  So, various times, various days.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

TheDon102

Quote from: Rothman on May 04, 2024, 06:45:30 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 04, 2024, 09:50:05 AM
Quote from: Rothman on May 03, 2024, 11:19:56 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 03, 2024, 10:26:32 PMSomething I dont see talked about here is how NYCDOT has been on a mission removing car lanes from the avenues and the major east-west thoroughfares in Manhattan. They have created a lot of congestion themselves (yes congestion existed before NYCDOT reimagined NYC Streets but it has gotten worse). The remedy to this artificially inflated congestion is to punish drivers by charging them a +$15 toll to enter Manhattan's CBD. In addition trucks will pay much larger tolls thereby increasing prices on food and other commodities. Obviously most NYC residents use public transit, however NYC residents rely on trucks to deliver food to various local businesses.

I just drove around Manhattan without much issue a few weeks ago.  I find your description to be an exaggeration.

8th avenue going from 5 through lanes to 2 lanes, car ban on 14th street for most hours of the day, taking a lane from seemingly all of the NYCDOT owned east river crossings, 3rd avenue going from 5 through lanes to 3, 2nd avenue going from 4 through lanes to 2 (from 23rd street to houston), 9th avenue going from 5 lanes to 3 lanes. 

I'm not seeing the issue.  Like I said, the system seems to be handling it.

The rationale for congestion pricing from the MTA is that congestion in the Manhattan CBD is so bad that we need to charge people a fee in order to discourage people from driving. So it doesn't seem like the system is handling it.

Rothman

Quote from: TheDon102 on May 04, 2024, 11:48:40 PM
Quote from: Rothman on May 04, 2024, 06:45:30 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 04, 2024, 09:50:05 AM
Quote from: Rothman on May 03, 2024, 11:19:56 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 03, 2024, 10:26:32 PMSomething I dont see talked about here is how NYCDOT has been on a mission removing car lanes from the avenues and the major east-west thoroughfares in Manhattan. They have created a lot of congestion themselves (yes congestion existed before NYCDOT reimagined NYC Streets but it has gotten worse). The remedy to this artificially inflated congestion is to punish drivers by charging them a +$15 toll to enter Manhattan's CBD. In addition trucks will pay much larger tolls thereby increasing prices on food and other commodities. Obviously most NYC residents use public transit, however NYC residents rely on trucks to deliver food to various local businesses.

I just drove around Manhattan without much issue a few weeks ago.  I find your description to be an exaggeration.

8th avenue going from 5 through lanes to 2 lanes, car ban on 14th street for most hours of the day, taking a lane from seemingly all of the NYCDOT owned east river crossings, 3rd avenue going from 5 through lanes to 3, 2nd avenue going from 4 through lanes to 2 (from 23rd street to houston), 9th avenue going from 5 lanes to 3 lanes. 

I'm not seeing the issue.  Like I said, the system seems to be handling it.

The rationale for congestion pricing from the MTA is that congestion in the Manhattan CBD is so bad that we need to charge people a fee in order to discourage people from driving. So it doesn't seem like the system is handling it.

I thought we were saying that the goal of raising revenue for MTA was blatant in the planning docs, rather than congestion mitigation.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

LilianaUwU

Quote from: Rothman on May 05, 2024, 12:10:09 AM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 04, 2024, 11:48:40 PM
Quote from: Rothman on May 04, 2024, 06:45:30 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 04, 2024, 09:50:05 AM
Quote from: Rothman on May 03, 2024, 11:19:56 PM
Quote from: TheDon102 on May 03, 2024, 10:26:32 PMSomething I dont see talked about here is how NYCDOT has been on a mission removing car lanes from the avenues and the major east-west thoroughfares in Manhattan. They have created a lot of congestion themselves (yes congestion existed before NYCDOT reimagined NYC Streets but it has gotten worse). The remedy to this artificially inflated congestion is to punish drivers by charging them a +$15 toll to enter Manhattan's CBD. In addition trucks will pay much larger tolls thereby increasing prices on food and other commodities. Obviously most NYC residents use public transit, however NYC residents rely on trucks to deliver food to various local businesses.

I just drove around Manhattan without much issue a few weeks ago.  I find your description to be an exaggeration.

8th avenue going from 5 through lanes to 2 lanes, car ban on 14th street for most hours of the day, taking a lane from seemingly all of the NYCDOT owned east river crossings, 3rd avenue going from 5 through lanes to 3, 2nd avenue going from 4 through lanes to 2 (from 23rd street to houston), 9th avenue going from 5 lanes to 3 lanes. 

I'm not seeing the issue.  Like I said, the system seems to be handling it.

The rationale for congestion pricing from the MTA is that congestion in the Manhattan CBD is so bad that we need to charge people a fee in order to discourage people from driving. So it doesn't seem like the system is handling it.

I thought we were saying that the goal of raising revenue for MTA was blatant in the planning docs, rather than congestion mitigation.

It is obvious it's a cash grab from the MTA, whether there's actually unbearable congestion or not.
"Volcano with no fire... Not volcano... Just mountain."
—Mr. Thwomp

My pronouns are she/her. Also, I'm an admin on the AARoads Wiki.

vdeane

Plus it's not just congestion in Manhattan... a decent amount of congestion on the BQE is the result of people shunpiking the tunnels, so there's hope that this will put a stop to that and provide some relief there.  Then again, you also have to add in the traffic from people no longer shunpiking the MTA crossings between LI and NJ.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

The Ghostbuster

If all of the New York Bridges and Tunnels were tolled, the only way to shunpike would be to take transit. If the upcoming congestion pricing plan is considered successful, it may spread to other parts of New York City, although I'm sure plenty here would not want that to happen.

vdeane

Quote from: The Ghostbuster on May 05, 2024, 11:59:51 AMIf all of the New York Bridges and Tunnels were tolled, the only way to shunpike would be to take transit. If the upcoming congestion pricing plan is considered successful, it may spread to other parts of New York City, although I'm sure plenty here would not want that to happen.
You'd need separate zones otherwise you might defeat the point.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

mrsman

Quote from: NoGoodNamesAvailable on April 20, 2024, 10:56:09 AMNYC has speed cameras that go off when you go 10 mph over, now they can get money from people doing 30.

Which as many remember was the citywide speed limit not too long ago, and tends to be the speed set for the green wave on many of the one-way avenues in Manhattan.

And this certainly dovetails with the rest of the thread.  Congestion pricing will mean that fewer cars will be driving on city streets, so it will be even harder to maintain such a low speed limit.  And more and more streets will be subjected to road diets, usually in the form of taking a lane for bike lanes.  So now even the currently wider thoroughfares can be subjected to 20 MPH.

This is ridiculous!

20 MPH is fine for many of the narrow streets that are one-way and are difficult to negotiate because of double parking.  Roadways with at least two full lanes of traffic (whether one-way or two-way) should be at 25 MPH as the basic standard.  And roadways with at least two lanes of traffic in the direction of travel should be at least 30 MPH.

1995hoo

I might have hit 60 mph on Sixth Avenue once extremely late at night many years ago just trying to keep up with the cabbies.
"You know, you never have a guaranteed spot until you have a spot guaranteed."
—Olaf Kolzig, as quoted in the Washington Times on March 28, 2003,
commenting on the Capitals clinching a playoff spot.

"That sounded stupid, didn't it?"
—Kolzig, to the same reporter a few seconds later.



Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.