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Author Topic: Utah  (Read 55822 times)

Plutonic Panda

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Re: Utah
« Reply #200 on: April 12, 2021, 06:07:05 PM »

The Spectrum of St. George reports that the controversial "Northern Corridor" project near St. George has been given the federal OK to proceed.
https://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2021/01/14/northern-corridor-gets-approved-environmental-groups-pledge-fight/4160228001/

Quote
Washington County and the Utah Department of Transportation were given the OK from the Trump administration on Thursday to punch a four-lane highway through part of the Red Cliffs National Conservation Area.

Dubbed the Northern Corridor, the highway would connect Interstate 15 in the east with Red Cliffs Drive in the west, helping solve a growing traffic problem, according to county officials.

Friday's decision marks the culmination of a controversial year-and-a-half federal review of the highway's environmental implications on one of Washington County's most protected pieces of land, and the highly sensitive species — like the Mojave desert tortoise — given sanctuary there.

The decision, made public Thursday by the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was praised by county officials who've attempted to build the highway for the past decade but drew ire from the environmental groups who've already pledged to continue fighting it.


(As usual, the satellite imagery for the area is very outdated. The road is already complete and open east of the red locator, connecting to I-15 Exit 13.)

Any possibility this approval will be recinded by the new administration.
God I hope not.
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Rover_0

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Re: Utah
« Reply #201 on: April 15, 2021, 03:16:39 PM »

The Spectrum of St. George reports that the controversial "Northern Corridor" project near St. George has been given the federal OK to proceed.
https://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2021/01/14/northern-corridor-gets-approved-environmental-groups-pledge-fight/4160228001/

Quote
Washington County and the Utah Department of Transportation were given the OK from the Trump administration on Thursday to punch a four-lane highway through part of the Red Cliffs National Conservation Area.

Dubbed the Northern Corridor, the highway would connect Interstate 15 in the east with Red Cliffs Drive in the west, helping solve a growing traffic problem, according to county officials.

Friday's decision marks the culmination of a controversial year-and-a-half federal review of the highway's environmental implications on one of Washington County's most protected pieces of land, and the highly sensitive species — like the Mojave desert tortoise — given sanctuary there.

The decision, made public Thursday by the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was praised by county officials who've attempted to build the highway for the past decade but drew ire from the environmental groups who've already pledged to continue fighting it.


(As usual, the satellite imagery for the area is very outdated. The road is already complete and open east of the red locator, connecting to I-15 Exit 13.)

Any possibility this approval will be recinded by the new administration.
God I hope not.

Agreed. I feel that a lot of the projects in that area have done well to be more environmentally friendly.

Anyways, I can’t seem to find anything definitive about it, but given that UDOT seems to have a pretty big part in the planning of the Northern Corridor, it seems that UDOT will have maintenance over the road—ergo, it will be a state route. IIRC, I think it will connect to Red Hills Parkway just before RHP meets SR-18 (Bluff Street). With RHP and SR-8 (Sunset Blvd) being not too far apart, I can’t help but wonder if we get an SR-8 extension out of this.

(Correct me if I’ve missed anything.)
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The Ghostbuster

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Re: Utah
« Reply #202 on: April 15, 2021, 08:53:36 PM »

If the Northern Corridor is constructed, it will be an extension of the existing Washington Parkway, right? That would make a nice bypass of St. George, Middleton and Washington. I assume the road would be four lanes with at-grade intersections, correct?
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Kniwt

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Re: Utah
« Reply #203 on: April 17, 2021, 12:01:09 PM »

If the Northern Corridor is constructed, it will be an extension of the existing Washington Parkway, right? That would make a nice bypass of St. George, Middleton and Washington. I assume the road would be four lanes with at-grade intersections, correct?

The recently completed road north of I-15 to Green Spring Drive is signed as Washington Parkway, but most of it is only two lanes (yes, with at-grade intersections at Washington Main Street and Fairway Drive before heading into the more residential area) and usually quite empty. Here's a random shot:

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The Ghostbuster

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Re: Utah
« Reply #204 on: April 17, 2021, 02:04:04 PM »

How much traffic uses the road on a daily basis, since it looks very empty? I would assume Washington Parkway is quite underutilized; maybe more traffic would come to the corridor if more development was built alongside it.
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Re: Utah
« Reply #205 on: April 18, 2021, 12:49:10 AM »

How much traffic uses the road on a daily basis, since it looks very empty? I would assume Washington Parkway is quite underutilized; maybe more traffic would come to the corridor if more development was built alongside it.

I mean it doesn't really go anywhere right now... all it does right now is connect a couple subdivisions, so I wouldn't expect too much traffic on it.

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Re: Utah
« Reply #206 on: April 18, 2021, 03:46:52 PM »

Each spring, UDOT usually posts a "top 10 projects" list of some sort describing the year's biggest highway construction projects. This year they didn't put it in a top-10 format, but they did make a similar post describing the year's biggest planned projects.

Major central Wasatch Front projects include:

Quote
Bangerter Three Interchanges – Salt Lake County, $221 million: UDOT is building new freeway-style interchanges on Bangerter Highway at 6200 South, 10400 South and 12600 South. This is a continuation of UDOT’s multi-year effort to upgrade Bangerter Highway in order to meet the traffic demands of western Salt Lake County. Construction began in May 2020 and most of the project is expected to be completed by December.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect the east/west closure of 12600 South at Bangerter Highway to remain in place until August, with reduced speeds along the detour routes. 6200 South remains closed to east/west travel across Bangerter Highway for cyclists and pedestrians through July. Drivers should also plan for an east/west closure of 10400 South at Bangerter Highway from May to November.

Quote
I-80 & I-215 Renewed; Salt Lake East – Salt Lake County, $146.5 million: UDOT is repaving I-80 between 1300 East and 2300 East, and the I-215 east belt between 3300 South and 4500 South. A new lane will also be added to eastbound I-80 between 1300 East and 2300 East, and the 1300 East, 1700 East and 2000 East bridges along I-80 will be demolished and reconstructed. Construction for the project will begin as early as this May and will continue through 2022.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect lane restrictions on I-80 and I-215 overnight and on weekends, as well as at least two overnight closures of I-80 during bridge work.

Northern Wasatch Front projects:

Quote
I-15 Davis-Weber Express Lanes – Davis and Weber Counties, $163 million: UDOT is widening I-15 to extend the Express Lanes from Layton Parkway to Riverdale Road. The project is also building new, widened bridges at Church Street and 200 South and repaving and widening bridges at five additional locations. Additionally, crews are extending the on-ramp from Layton Parkway to Hill Field Road, installing new ramp meters at high-traffic on-ramps and replacing concrete panels between Hill Field Road and I-84. Construction began in summer 2018 and will continue through fall.
Expected impacts: The project will maintain three lanes of traffic on I-15 during daytime hours, Monday through Saturday, but drivers should expect overnight and weekend lane closures as well as lane splits, shoulder work and other changing traffic conditions.

Quote
S.R. 53; 24th Street Viaduct Rehab – Weber County, $7.2 million: Crews will extend the life of the 24th Street viaduct by repaving from A Ave. to Lincoln Ave over the Union Pacific railroad yard into downtown Ogden. This project will also enhance pedestrian access by converting stairs to an ADA-compliant ramp and improve drainage on the viaduct. Construction began earlier this month and is scheduled to be complete in early September.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect the viaduct to be reduced to a single eastbound one-way lane with pedestrian and bicycle access restricted. They should also plan for seven overnight closures of the viaduct, as well as one weekend closure.

Southern Wasatch Front projects:

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I-15; Northbound I-15 Bridge Ride Fix in American Fork – Utah County, $4.1 million: Workers will repair three bridges along northbound I-15 between the 500 East and Main Street interchanges in American Fork to even out the bumps. Construction will begin this summer.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect lane restrictions and moderate travel delays.

Quote
2100 North Lehi (S.R. 194; I-15 to S.R. 68) – Utah County, $3.4 million: UDOT will repave 2100 North (S.R. 194) in Lehi from Redwood Road (S.R. 68) to Thanksgiving Way to extend the life of the road and provide a smoother ride for drivers. Construction is expected to begin this month and end by June.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect lane restrictions in alternating directions.

Quote
S.R. 92 Alpine Loop (American Fork Canyon Seasonal Gate to U.S. 189 in Provo Canyon) – Utah County, $1 million: Crews will resurface the Alpine Loop (S.R. 92) from the Pine Hollow Trailhead to U.S. 189 in Provo Canyon to extend the life of the road. Construction is scheduled to begin in early May and expected to be complete in July.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect one-way traffic with flagging during work hours along S.R. 92 from Mount Timpanogos Campground to U.S. 189 in Provo Canyon throughout construction. Additionally, the road from Pine Hollow Trailhead to Timpooneke Campground will be closed from early May to late May, and the road from Timpooneke Campground to the Mount Timpanogos Campground will be closed from early May to late July.

Elsewhere in northern and northeast Utah:

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S.R. 248; S.R. 224 to U.S. 40 – Summit County, $3.1 million: UDOT will extend the life of the pavement and provide a smoother driving surface along S.R. 248 by repaving the highway from S.R. 224 to the U.S. 40 interchange. This project is also upgrading a series of pedestrian ramps and restriping the corridor to add a westbound shoulder-running bus lane for about 2 miles from U.S. 40 to Comstock Drive. Construction is expected to start in June and continue through fall.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect daytime lane closures and possible flagging throughout construction.

Quote
U.S. 40; Starvation Reservoir Bridge Preservation – Duchesne County, $4.2 million: UDOT will extend the life of the road and provide a smoother driving surface along the Starvation Bridge on U.S. 40 in Duchesne County. Crews will repave the concrete surface of the bridge and the bridge barriers and will apply a polymer seal to help the bridge surface resist wear. Construction began earlier this month and will continue through late October.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect one-way traffic and heavy delays throughout the project.

Southern and eastern Utah:

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U.S. 191; 400 North to Colorado River bridge – Grand County, $31.1 million: Workers are widening U.S. 191 in north Moab to four travel lanes, along with a center turn lane for most of the project length. Additionally, a new storm drain system is being installed to help manage seasonal run-off that occasionally pushes debris onto the highway. Construction began last year and is expected to be complete this June.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect U.S. 191 to be reduced to one lane in each direction for the duration of the project.

Quote
I-15 over East Nichols Canyon Rd – Iron County, $10.5 million: UDOT will replace two I-15 bridges in Cedar City to keep the interstate in good condition and maintain this key statewide transportation corridor. Construction is expected to start later this year and is expected to end in 2022.
Expected impacts: Drivers can expect I-15 lanes to be temporarily shifted to the median during the project.

I was somewhat surprised that the West Davis Corridor, Tooele Midvalley Highway, and Southern Parkway projects weren't included here, but I guess construction on those won't really have a whole lot of impact on existing roads.

Kniwt

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Re: Utah
« Reply #207 on: April 29, 2021, 02:10:42 PM »

St. George News reports today that the final 8 miles of UT 7, from Sand Hollow Road to UT 9, will open May 20.

https://www.stgeorgeutah.com/news/archive/2021/04/29/mgk-officials-announce-completion-and-opening-date-of-final-segment-of-southern-parkway/
Quote
Work on the estimated $75.5 million, 8-mile stretch of road officially designated as state Route 7 began in March 2020 and is set to wrap up with a ribbon cutting on May 19, with the road opening up for public use the next day.

“It’ll be opened up all the way,” Kevin Kitchen, a spokesman for the Utah Department of Transportation, told St. George News. “It’ll be awesome.”

Lingering work on the Southern Parkway’s final section includes paving, some electrical work and the painting of some new structures built as a part of the project, Kitchen said.

The final segment of the Southern Parkway runs from the intersection with Sand Hollow Road/4300 West and around, heading north on the eastern side of the Sand Hollow Reservoir until connecting with state Route 9 in the area of 2700 West.

As a part of the project, four new overpasses have been built at the intersections of Sand Hollow Road, 1100 West and 3000 South and SR-9.
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andy3175

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Re: Utah
« Reply #208 on: May 14, 2021, 10:46:01 AM »

Plans call for a possible new road to connect to Navajo Mountain in Utah. The link has a map showing the location of the community and its lack of connection to the state highway grid.

https://www.sltrib.com/news/2021/05/09/why-navajo-mountain-one/

Quote
The small southern Utah town of Navajo Mountain, one of the most isolated communities in the Lower 48, may soon find a new connection to the state’s highway system if a $110 million project moves forward. ...

A draft proposal, prepared by Jones and DeMille Engineering, anticipates three phases for the project: a $49 million dirt road connection between Navajo Mountain and Oljato; a $30.2 million dirt spur heading north across the San Juan River to connect to Highway 276 east of Halls Crossing; and, lastly, the paving of both new roads.

The initial phase would shave about 55 miles off the current three-hour, one-way journey from Navajo Mountain to Blanding, likely reducing driving times by 40 minutes.

The connection to Highway 276 would reduce the trip by 13 additional miles, but it would require the construction of a $10.5 million bridge near Clay Hills Crossing on the San Juan River as well as several smaller bridges.



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Kniwt

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Re: Utah
« Reply #209 on: May 18, 2021, 07:08:44 PM »

Fox 13 in SLC reports today on the ongoing effort to find a stripe paint that works in Utah's myriad climates.
https://www.fox13now.com/news/local-news/utah-scientists-work-to-find-better-way-to-illuminate-road-lines

Quote
The scientists spread regular glow-in-the-dark paint in a line next to similar paint that included reflective glass beads. While water can often impact the visibility of all paints, the version with the glass beads is designed to block out the water, but not the light.

Early in the test, the paint glowed brightly. But when the light dimmed, the line did not shine as bright. The paint did pass the durability test, with no sign of deterioration.

"I feel like we're just turning the corner," said Taylor Sparks, the University of Utah's Associate Chair of Material Science Engineering and the older brother of Dave Sparks, the star of the popular "Diesel Brothers" television series.

Meanwhile, UDOT has tried different ways to make lane lines more visible, including reflective tape. However, the state's weather conditions pose a problem with that solution.

"We have experimented with other things, like markers implanted in the roadway, but with the amount of plowing we do in the State of Utah, they can be problematic," said Robert Miles, UDOTs Director of Traffic and Safety.

UDOT also uses its own version of a paint with glass beads to reflect headlights, but it too has issues with water, which dissipates the light.
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Rothman

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Re: Utah
« Reply #210 on: May 18, 2021, 09:56:44 PM »

Heh.  "Myriad climates."  The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints took plans for a large church (stake center) from Utah and built it outside of Springfield, MA.

They forgot about humidity.  Some of the stucco decorations on the outside peeled off the summer after it was constructed.

They also somehow forgot about...winter.  Pipes broke due to lack of sufficient insulation.

Some myriad they got out there. :D
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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #211 on: May 19, 2021, 12:20:10 AM »

Sounds like an issue more of construction than inherent design. Winter temperatures in Springfield are only a few degrees colder than they are in Salt Lake City - the warmest place in the Wasatch Front. Logan is colder.

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Re: Utah
« Reply #212 on: May 19, 2021, 06:41:26 AM »

Sounds like an issue more of construction than inherent design. Winter temperatures in Springfield are only a few degrees colder than they are in Salt Lake City - the warmest place in the Wasatch Front. Logan is colder.
My father was a local leader involved with the project. Both issues were identified as design issues rather than construction, my oversimplification for humor's sake notwithstanding. :D
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Kniwt

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Re: Utah
« Reply #213 on: May 19, 2021, 01:07:47 PM »

Some photos from this morning's grand opening of the final section of UT 7 from Sand Hollow Road to SR 9. A couple of, um, interesting signs.

Speed limit is only 60mph through the entire new section.
The second carriageway is fully graded but not paved.
Exit 19 has ramps in the eastbound direction only. There is no Exit 19 westbound.













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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #214 on: May 19, 2021, 07:39:12 PM »

Is exit 19 some sort of access to the state park? I wasn't aware of any planned interchanges between Sand Hollow Rd and 3000 South. Amazing how little coverage UDOT has given to this project - if this were in northern Utah, it almost certainly would have its own website with more details. Instead all I could find was the generic project page.

Also, did you happen to see whether the SR 9 interchange where SR 7 now ends is numbered?

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Re: Utah
« Reply #215 on: May 19, 2021, 07:55:58 PM »

The end at SR 9 has no exit number, and not even any BGSs, just that tiny JCT sign and the LGS in the background for "<-- TO I-15 / Hurricane -->".

(At the other end, the junction with I-15 has no exit number or advance BGSs either.)

Because I had bike brain, I didn't get any pics of the Exit 19 advance BGSs, which are just for a numbered street. I'm not sure why Exit 19 exists, since there's no pavement -- and not even gravel -- beyond the interchange. My best guess is that it provides a place for vehicles towing ATVs/UTVs to enter the areas beyond the state park. For that matter, the eastbound offramp appears to begin around MP 20.1, so even the exit number is a bit odd.
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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #216 on: May 19, 2021, 08:03:51 PM »

The end at SR 9 has no exit number, and not even any BGSs, just that tiny JCT sign and the LGS in the background for "<-- TO I-15 / Hurricane -->".

I meant from SR 9, but I imagine you didn't see that.

As for exit 19, I wonder if it's intended to be a second entrance to Sand Hollow State Park at some point in the future. I know tourism in that area has increased significantly in recent years and there are some OHV/campground areas on that side of the lake.

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Re: Utah
« Reply #217 on: May 19, 2021, 11:03:39 PM »

So here's a map of the extension (thanks Duke87 for digging this up from the depths of the interwebs):



Seems to me that exit 19 should have been numbered 20, given it is basically equidistant from 18 and 22, but who am I to argue.

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Re: Utah
« Reply #218 on: May 20, 2021, 06:21:53 AM »

Seems to me that exit 19 should have been numbered 20, given it is basically equidistant from 18 and 22, but who am I to argue.

In fact, here's an older picture of MP 20 before the signs and stripes went up, looking eastbound. The overpass in the background is, um, Exit 19. You can see the offramp just beginning at the curve sign.

(And there's nowhere that UDOT could theoretically be planning for an actual "Exit 20" in the future. Past the exit is a steady 5% grade hugging the side of the hill, and there couldn't possibly be an exit there ... well, until another developer decides to drop another 3,000 homes in the middle of nowhere, which is happening at Exit 15 now. :/ )

« Last Edit: May 20, 2021, 06:25:35 AM by Kniwt »
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Re: Utah
« Reply #219 on: May 23, 2021, 11:43:20 AM »

The end at SR 9 has no exit number, and not even any BGSs, just that tiny JCT sign and the LGS in the background for "<-- TO I-15 / Hurricane -->".
I meant from SR 9, but I imagine you didn't see that.

There are new BGSs along SR 9. Here are a couple of them heading westbound. Apologies for the crappy 5:30am photos. (There's also a new "END" SR 7 sign just north of the interchange, where the road continues as a new access road into a trailer park, but no corresponding "begin" in the opposite direction.)



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US 89

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Re: Utah
« Reply #220 on: May 23, 2021, 01:21:24 PM »

I wonder what the logic behind not numbering the exits is. UDOT did the same thing on the new signage for the Coral Canyon interchange at the west end of 9. Seems like they'd want a head start on numbering given current plans to upgrade 9 to a freeway for most of the way from 15 to Hurricane. (For comparison, exits 404 and 405 on US 89 in Davis County were numbered when they were built 20ish years ago, well in advance of the current project to extend a continuous freeway into the area.)

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Re: Utah
« Reply #221 on: June 06, 2021, 05:08:06 PM »

The Spectrum of St. George reports that the controversial "Northern Corridor" project near St. George has been given the federal OK to proceed.
https://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2021/01/14/northern-corridor-gets-approved-environmental-groups-pledge-fight/4160228001/

Quote
Washington County and the Utah Department of Transportation were given the OK from the Trump administration on Thursday to punch a four-lane highway through part of the Red Cliffs National Conservation Area.

Dubbed the Northern Corridor, the highway would connect Interstate 15 in the east with Red Cliffs Drive in the west, helping solve a growing traffic problem, according to county officials.

Friday's decision marks the culmination of a controversial year-and-a-half federal review of the highway's environmental implications on one of Washington County's most protected pieces of land, and the highly sensitive species — like the Mojave desert tortoise — given sanctuary there.

The decision, made public Thursday by the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was praised by county officials who've attempted to build the highway for the past decade but drew ire from the environmental groups who've already pledged to continue fighting it.


(As usual, the satellite imagery for the area is very outdated. The road is already complete and open east of the red locator, connecting to I-15 Exit 13.)

Any possibility this approval will be recinded by the new administration.
God I hope not.

Agreed. I feel that a lot of the projects in that area have done well to be more environmentally friendly.

Anyways, I can’t seem to find anything definitive about it, but given that UDOT seems to have a pretty big part in the planning of the Northern Corridor, it seems that UDOT will have maintenance over the road—ergo, it will be a state route. IIRC, I think it will connect to Red Hills Parkway just before RHP meets SR-18 (Bluff Street). With RHP and SR-8 (Sunset Blvd) being not too far apart, I can’t help but wonder if we get an SR-8 extension out of this.

(Correct me if I’ve missed anything.)
A lawsuit was issued by Conserve Southwest Utah to halt the Northern Corridor project in the St. George area.

Press release: https://biologicaldiversity.org/w/news/press-releases/lawsuit-targets-utah-highway-through-protected-conservation-lands-threatened-tortoise-habitat-2021-06-04/

Quote
Conservation groups sued federal officials Thursday to stop construction of the Northern Corridor Highway, a controversial four-lane highway through the protected Red Cliffs National Conservation Area in southwest Utah.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., against the Interior Department and the Bureau of Land Management, says the Trump administration violated five environmental protection laws when it approved the highway in January.

“The decision by the previous administration is a clear violation of the National Conservation Area’s congressionally mandated purpose and ignores more effective and environmentally sensitive transportation alternatives,” said Tom Butine, board president of Conserve Southwest Utah, the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit. “Local and federal stakeholders designated what is now the Red Cliffs National Conservation Area 25 years ago as a permanently protected wildlife reserve in exchange for allowing development on 300,000 acres of land outside the protected area. It makes no sense to pursue this route when a better way exists to both move traffic and protect Red Cliffs. If a highway is allowed through this protected land, it means nothing can be protected.”

The Trump administration’s January 2021 decision, supporting a request from Washington County and Utah’s congressional delegation, permitted construction of a four-lane highway through Red Cliffs National Conservation Area.


The St. George news has more at https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.stgeorgeutah.com/news/archive/2021/06/04/apc-us-sued-over-approval-of-northern-corridor-highway-in-desert-tortoise-habitat/&ved=2ahUKEwiwpdKP84PxAhVHJDQIHVl4BW0QvOMEegQICxAB&usg=AOvVaw2RAaFzx8aHU-O7wlNlMBPS&cshid=1623013637239

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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Utah
« Reply #222 on: June 06, 2021, 06:41:22 PM »

We as a country need to go back and rethink the environmental laws we have on the books. I understand the need for protecting our environment and as someone who spends much of their time outdoors and in our parks I appreciate conservation efforts.

That said we shouldn’t have projects left and right delayed or canceled due to unreasonable environmental restrictions.
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Rothman

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Re: Utah
« Reply #223 on: June 06, 2021, 11:13:00 PM »

We as a country need to go back and rethink the environmental laws we have on the books. I understand the need for protecting our environment and as someone who spends much of their time outdoors and in our parks I appreciate conservation efforts.

That said we shouldn’t have projects left and right delayed or canceled due to unreasonable environmental restrictions.
I'd imagine 90% of the projects out there are not delayed by environmental work, if not more.  Most federal-aid projects are categorical exclusions to NEPA.
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Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Plutonic Panda

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Re: Utah
« Reply #224 on: June 07, 2021, 05:04:34 AM »

We as a country need to go back and rethink the environmental laws we have on the books. I understand the need for protecting our environment and as someone who spends much of their time outdoors and in our parks I appreciate conservation efforts.

That said we shouldn’t have projects left and right delayed or canceled due to unreasonable environmental restrictions.
I'd imagine 90% of the projects out there are not delayed by environmental work, if not more.  Most federal-aid projects are categorical exclusions to NEPA.
Interesting given the fact that it takes years and years longer to get a project going today than it used to before environmental laws were on the books.
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